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Insulin Pen Price

Pens Versus Vials For Insulin Delivery: A Cost Comparison

Pens Versus Vials For Insulin Delivery: A Cost Comparison

San Francisco—Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the leading cause of kidney failure, nontrauma-related amputation of lower limbs, and new cases of blindness in the United States; it is also one of the most common causes of heart disease, stroke, and death. Type 2 DM (T2DM) is the most common form of the disease, affecting up to 7.9% of the US population. Estimated associated healthcare costs are $159.5 billion each year. Treatment guidelines emphasize the correct type of insulin at the correct time; according to researchers, the method used to deliver the insulin may also have an impact on patient outcomes. Previous studies have shown that patients prefer using an insulin pen rather than the traditional syringe and vial. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ RELATED CONTENT Over-the-Counter Insulin Available for Patients with Diabetes Who Cannot Afford Prescription U.S. FDA approves Medtronic's 'artificial pancreas' for diabetes ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Researchers recently conducted a retrospective analysis to compare total direct healthcare charges and diabetes-related total direct healthcare charges among adults with T2DM who initiate therapy with mealtime insulin disposable pens or vials. They reported results of the analysis at a poster session at the AMCP meeting. The poster was titled The Association Between Use of Mealtime Insulin Pens versus Vials and Healthcare Charges in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. The analysis compared the insurance claims of a nationwide sample of adults who initiated mealtime analog insulin therapy with a prefilled pen or conventional syringe and vial to assess the impact of th Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: Types, Benefits, And How To Use Them

Insulin Pens: Types, Benefits, And How To Use Them

Insulin pens are used by people with diabetes to inject insulin. The pens include an insulin cartridge, a dial to measure dosage, and a disposable needle. Insulin pens are growing in popularity. They allow insulin to be delivered in a more simple, accurate, and convenient way than the vial and syringe method. Contents of this article: Types of insulin pen There are several different brands and models of insulin pen available. Most fall into two distinct categories: disposable and reusable. A disposable pen: this contains a prefilled insulin cartridge. Once used, the entire pen unit is thrown away. A reusable pen: this contains a replaceable insulin cartridge. Once empty, the cartridge is discarded and a new one put in. A new disposable needle must be used every time insulin is injected. With proper care, reusable insulin pens can last for several years. Choosing an insulin pen The brand, model, and category of pen used will depend on several factors. It is important to discuss this with a doctor before purchase. Some general factors about the pen to consider include: type and brand of insulin available size of the insulin dose it can hold increments by which the dose of insulin can be adjusted material and durability (if reusable) how it indicates remaining insulin levels ability to correct dose levels that are put in wrong size of the numbers on the dose dial level of dexterity required to use the pen Benefits Research has highlighted the benefits of using insulin pens, particularly prefilled disposable pens. People with diabetes are happier using insulin pens than the vial and syringe technique, according to some studies. One reason for this is that insulin pens have many features that make them safe and convenient. For example, greater dose accuracy and autoshield ne Continue reading >>

Get To Know The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

Get To Know The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Novo Knocks It Out Of The Park With New

Novo Knocks It Out Of The Park With New "echo" Smart Insulin Pen

Three bites into my enchilada my mother asks me, "Did you take your insulin?" My first response is to glare at her. I'm 50 years old fer' God's sake. I don't need to be reminded to take my insulin. My second response is to realize that I'm not sure whether or not I did take my insulin. After all, five to six shots a day, 365 days a year, adds up to something well over 2,000 shots annually. They blend together, one pretty much like the last, and each pretty much like the next. In the past, I'd wrack my brain to remember. But until my blood sugar either shot up or stayed where it belonged, there was no way to know for sure whether or not I'd forgotten my insulin. Now, thanks to a sleek new sleek royal-red insulin pen that hit the market in January, with a swift flick of my thumb have the answer: I took 2.5 units of Novolog minutes ago. It's not an app. It's not a pump. It's a super-pen from Novo Nordisk called the NovoPen Echo, one of which I've been test-driving lately. It's the world's first half-unit dosing pen with a memory. Echo is not unique in delivering half-unit drips of insulin; Lilly makes a half-unit re-fillable pen called the HumaPen Luxura HD, and Novo themselves have made the NovoPen Junior, another half-unit re-fillable pen, for years. A pen with a memory is not a new idea either. Lilly at one time offered the HumaPen Memoir that stored dosing info. But combining half-unit with memory is something entirely new. The Echo is billed as a tool for kids, but there are plenty of adult type 1s like me who take fast-acting insulin from a pen. Why wouldn't we want to be more accurate about it too? {Note: Echo is only new to the USA, it's been use in the rest of the civilized world since 2010.} Quick additional background: Refillable pens have been around since 1985 Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: Improving Adherence And Reducing Costs

Insulin Pens: Improving Adherence And Reducing Costs

The advantages offered by insulin pens may help improve patient adherence. Currently 8.3% of the United States adult population, or 25.8 million people, have diabetes. Of these cases, more than 90% are cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and at least 1 million are estimated to be cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Although a variety of oral medications are available for patients with diabetes, insulins remain an important component of treatment.1,2 Insulins are the standard therapy in patients with T1DM and are ultimately used in patients with T2DM who do not respond adequately to other treatment modalities. Although in some settings insulins may be administered intravenously (eg, with an insulin pump), the vast majority of insulin administrations are subcutaneous injections.1,2 Available Forms and Administration In the United States, 2 types of insulins are available: recombinant human insulins and insulin analogs. Recombinant human insulin is available from 2 manufacturers (Humulin by Eli Lilly and Novolin by Novo Nordisk); each of these is available in a regular form and in a longer-acting neutral protamine hagedorn (NPH) form. Unlike recombinant human insulins, insulin analogs are structurally modified forms of insulin that are designed to either lower blood sugar rapidly or maintain low blood sugar levels over time. These insulin analogs may be classified as rapid-acting and long-acting insulins. Rapid-acting insulins include insulin lispro, insulin aspart, and insulin glulisine, and long-acting insulins include insulin glargine and insulin detemir. Premixed formulations of insulin are also available.1,2 Regardless of the differences between insulin formulations, all conventional types of insulin can be administered subcutaneously. Subcutaneous injectio Continue reading >>

Company Introduces Authorized Generic Insulin At Lower Cost

Company Introduces Authorized Generic Insulin At Lower Cost

Company Introduces Authorized Generic Insulin at Lower Cost Eli Lilly and Company today announced a lower-priced version of its insulin lispro injection (Humalog) 100 units/mL for the United States market. This medication, indicated for individuals with diabetes, will have a list price that is 50% lower than its current list price. The lower-priced version will be called Insulin Lisprothe same molecule as Humalogand will be available in vial and pen options. The list price of a single vial will be$137.35. The list price of a five-pack of pens by Eli Lilly will be$265.20. "We've engaged in discussions about the price of insulin with many different stakeholders in America's health care system: people living with diabetes, caregivers, advocacy groups, health care professionals, payers, wholesalers, lawmakers, and leading health care scholars," saidDavid A. Ricks, Lilly's chairman and CEO, in a prepared statement. "Solutions that lower the cost of insulin at the pharmacy have been introduced in recent months, but more people need help." Vials and pens of the lower-priced insulin have been manufactured, and Lilly will now work with supply chain partners to make them available in pharmacies as quickly as possible, company officials said in a press release. The medications will be made available as an authorized generic option through a Lilly subsidiary, ImClone Systems. The cost of insulin can vary dramatically depending on a person's insurance coverage. According to Eli Lilly, the vast majority of patients have flat co-pays and face lower out-of-pocket costs for insulin, so the price they pay at the pharmacy will not change. However, for people with high-deductible insurance plans, the uninsured, or people in the coverage gap ofMedicare Part D, the authorized generic insuli Continue reading >>

The Human Cost Of Insulin In America

The Human Cost Of Insulin In America

These are external links and will open in a new window This is the list of what Laura Marston has sacrificed to keep herself alive: Her car, her furniture, her apartment, her retirement fund, her dog. At 36 years old, she has already sold all of her possessions twice to afford the insulin her body needs every day. Insulin is not like other drugs. It's a natural hormone that controls our blood sugar levels - too high causes vision loss, confusion, nausea, and eventually, organ failure; too low leads to heart irregularities, mood swings, seizures, loss of consciousness. For most of us, our bodies produce insulin naturally. But for Type 1 (T1) diabetics like Ms Marston, insulin comes in clear glass vials, handed over the pharmacy counter each month - if they can afford it. One vial of the insulin Ms Marston uses now costs $275 (210) without health insurance. In 1923, the inventors of insulin sold its patent for $1, hoping the low price would keep the essential treatment available to everyone who needed it. Now, retail prices in the US are around the $300 range for all insulins from the three major brands that control the market. Even accounting for inflation, that's a price increase of over 1,000%. Stories of Americans rationing insulin - and dying for it - have been making national headlines. The most famous case, perhaps, was 26-year-old Alec Smith, who died in 2017 less than a month after he aged out of his mother's health insurance plan. Despite working full-time making more than minimum wage, he could not afford to buy new insurance or pay the $1,000 a month for insulin without it. Image caption Alec Smith's mother holds a vial of her son's ashes during a protest against the high price of insulin outside Sanofi's offices in Massachusetts Ms Marston knows the feeling Continue reading >>

What Is The Iq Of Your Pen? Smart Insulin Pens Are Available Now!

What Is The Iq Of Your Pen? Smart Insulin Pens Are Available Now!

By David Ahn, MD on May 7, 2019 / Insulin , Type 1 / Leave a comment Companion Medical , makers of the first FDA approved smart insulin pen, recently announced their Bluetooth-enabled InPen is now available in retail pharmacies nationwide. At the same time, their new copay assistance program ensures that patients with commercial insurance will never have to pay more than $99 a year to use the InPen. As more people with diabetes start taking advantage of the InPen, other companies like Novo Nordisk have also announced plans to bring wireless pens to the U.S. market. Generally speaking, these smart or connected insulin pens are reusable and work with insulin cartridges, the often forgotten alternate form of insulin (in contrast to vials and disposable pens). Beyond being more friendly to the environment, these smart pens offer a memory feature that records the time/date of insulin injections that have been delivered. Companion Medicals InPen goes several steps further by also pairing with an iPhone or Android app that functions as a bolus calculator, complete with Insulin on Board. When I previously wrote about the InPen here , I had not yet been able to use and prescribe the InPen in real-world use. Having many more patients using the InPen now, I can share a few additional insights regarding this exciting new device. One of the InPens most popular features is its ability to dispense Novolog or Humalog in half-unit increments. Many people with type 1 diabetes take pretty small doses of insulin, so when 5 units might make you go low, but 4 units is not enough insulin to cover a meal, having the option to take 4.5 units is a big deal! Mathematically, thats about a 10% difference in dose, which is clinically meaningful. Other options on the market can also deliver half-uni Continue reading >>

Is Insulin The New Epipen? Families Facing Sticker Shock Over 400 Percent Price Hike

Is Insulin The New Epipen? Families Facing Sticker Shock Over 400 Percent Price Hike

Is insulin is the new EpiPen? In the last eight years, the average price per milliliter of insulin has skyrocketed by over 200 percent. But there's one major difference. If you can't get an EpiPen, there's a chance you might die. If your body doesn't have insulin, you certainly will die. "It feels like they're holding my kid ransom," said Tiffany Cara, whose son has diabetes. Only three major companies make insulin in the U.S. and each has steadily ratcheted up prices, sometimes in lockstep. Since 2004, the manufacturer list price for insulin, known as wholesale acquisition cost, is up by triple digits. Novo Nordisk's insulin Novolog is up 381 percent, Eli Lilly's Humalog is up 380 percent and Sanofi's Lantus is up 400 percent, according to data from Truven Health Analytics. That's sending some diabetic families into sticker shock. Six-year-old Dorian Carra loves to play outside his Texas home and dress up as a super hero. Specifically, Captain America, the World War II version. His mom says her outgoing boy has "never met a stranger." But four years ago he couldn't stay awake. He was breathing oddly. His parents brought his rag doll body to the E.R. Doctors said his blood sugar levels had spiked to 965 milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood. A normal range is 80 to 140. The diagnosis was type-1 diabetes. The prescription was insulin, every day, for the rest of his life. Recently those treatment costs doubled after the Carra's health insurance company switched to cover another brand. Even though the brands are clinically the same, the new medicine isn't available in the dosages he needs, so they have to stick with the more expensive kind. Tiffany Carra, a thirty-two-year-old IT field support analyst, says it now costs them $1,880 a year for insulin and supplies. 6 Continue reading >>

Paying The Price For Insulin

Paying The Price For Insulin

he debate about drug costs can be hard to follow because it is both broad and deep. Between patients not being able to afford their medication, the role of middlemen (pharmacy benefit managers), and lawyers filing class-action lawsuits, the topic is complex and can be emotional for many. Id like to put it into perspective with insulin , a lifesaving drug used by most of my patients and millions of Americans that is a perfect case study of the drug pricing issue. My patient, Jeanne (not her real name) was almost embarrassed to mention that her insulin cost $300 for a single vial that lasts about five days. Thats more than $21,000 a year. Did I have any ideas that might help? I did, and directed Jeanne and her husband to places where they could buy insulin at a discount. Even then, it would cost $1,800 each year but it would be a slower insulin that isnt quite as good as what she was used to. This scenario must have Canadians Frederick Banting and Charles Best spinning in their graves. They discovered insulin one of the most important discoveries of the past century in 1921 and sold the original patent to the University of Toronto for $1, believing that a drug this important should always be available and affordable to individuals who needed it. That ideal got lost along the way. Accounting for inflation, a vial of insulin that cost $1 in 1967 should cost $16.43 today not the $300 it cost my patient. To be fair, the quality of insulin is better today, but not by nearly twentyfold. In the diabetes belt, a small town grapples with growth of the worlds largest insulin maker Many of my patients struggle to pay for insulin. Some of them dont use the full dose each day so they can make it last the month until insurance covers it again. The high cost has been especially onerous Continue reading >>

Insulin Prices: Pumps, Pens, Syringes, And More

Insulin Prices: Pumps, Pens, Syringes, And More

Insulin Prices: Pumps, Pens, Syringes, and More Medically reviewed by Lindsay Slowiczek, PharmD on September 21, 2018 Written by Jacquelyn Cafasso The price of insulin can be overwhelming, especially if you need it to stay healthy. Even with insurance, you could be paying hundreds of dollars in out-of-pocket costs each month. Insulin is absolutely necessary for people with type 1 diabetes. Its often needed for people with type 2 diabetes as well. Roughly 7.4 million Americans with diabetes take insulin. If your diabetes requires insulin, its essential to learn how to get the cost down to something you can manage, while simultaneously learning how to control your condition. There are several types of devices available to deliver insulin, and each come with their own set of pros and cons. The best insulin device for you depends on many factors, including how much your blood sugar fluctuates each day and your lifestyle. Nowadays, cost is becoming an increasingly important factor to consider when deciding on a device. Vials and syringes: Pros, cons, and costs The most common way to inject insulin is with a vial and syringe (needle). Syringes are considered the cheapest form of insulin delivery, but theyre certainly not cheap at least not anymore. One study found that the price of insulin tripled in just 10 years. Vials of insulin can be either rapid-acting, short-acting, intermediate-acting, or long-acting. This relates to how long they are effective in the bloodstream. Syringes usually cost between $15 and $20 for a box of 100 depending on where you get them from. Depending on where you live, you can purchase them over the counter or online at diabetes supplies stores. Vial prices vary for each brand. For example, Humalogs list price is roughly $275 per 10-mL vial . Admel Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Insulin

The Cost Of Insulin

The price of insulin has more than tripled in ten years. Not everybody pays full price, but many find the cost of insulin complicates their life. This week, we’ll cover why insulin prices are so high. Next week, we’ll address what to do about it. According to this story on CBS News, people with diabetes are “cutting back [on their insulin doses] or even going without the drug,” putting them at greater risk for complications. Insulin costs have soared from $100–$200 per month a few years ago to $400–$500 a month now. CBS News quotes a college student saying her bill for insulin has risen from $130 to $495 per month. She has given up her insulin pump and gone back to injections because of expense. One of her friends has cut her dose down to 80% of what’s ordered to save money. This has become common practice for many. A doctor in Montana reported that insulin prices greatly complicate people’s care. “I have patients who tell me that they have to make a decision between food and insulin, and their rent and insulin.” Why is this happening? When insulin was discovered the 1920s, the doctors who found it gave it away. It immediately started saving lives for people with Type 1 diabetes. Now insulin has become a $24-billion-a-year market globally and is predicted to pass $48 billion in only five more years. And people around the world who need it can’t afford it. There are several causes for the price spikes, but many of them come down to America’s pretend “free market” approach to health care. We are seeing these problems now with the controversy over one brand of epinephrine injections, whose manufacturer increased their price by 500% and then paid their CEO a nearly $19 million salary. Here are some ways American economics are making insulin unaff Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen—the “ipod” For Insulin Delivery (why Pen Wins Over Syringe)

Insulin Pen—the “ipod” For Insulin Delivery (why Pen Wins Over Syringe)

Go to: Introduction Glycemic control is so critical for our diabetic patients because every major study published has shown convincingly that lower hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) equals a reduction in diabetes-related complications.1 For most patients though, the only way to prevent or minimize these complications is to use insulin therapy because of the progressive nature of type 2 diabetes. For decades, insulin was delivered only via vials and syringes with larger bore needles that caused a lot of pain. Many people with diabetes still believe that these needles are still large and painful, but in 2008, this could not be further from the truth. There are numerous reasons why using pen devices make a whole lot of sense. Compliance with treatment is better because a pen device is easier to carry around, easy to use, provides greater dose accuracy, and is more satisfactory to patients as compared with a syringe. Injecting with devices makes the process discreet, and the overall cost of managing diabetes is also reduced. The surprising fact is that among industrialized countries, the United States ranks last in terms of pen usage by diabetic individuals, even though the use of pen is increasing. Continue reading >>

Express Scripts Offers Diabetes Patients A $25 Cap For Monthly Insulin

Express Scripts Offers Diabetes Patients A $25 Cap For Monthly Insulin

Express Scripts Offers Diabetes Patients a $25 Cap for Monthly Insulin Drug makers, insurers and pharmacy benefit managers face mounting pressure from Congress and the public to reduce the high list prices of drugs like insulin. A Type 1 diabetes patient filling his insulin pump at home. Express Scripts announced a plan on Wednesday to limit out-of-pocket costs for insulin to $25 a month. Credit...Kim Raff for The New York Times Consumers whose drug benefits are managed by Express Scripts could see their out-of-pocket costs for insulin limited to $25 a month under a plan announced on Wednesday. The move is aimed at addressing rising anger over the cost of the lifesaving product, whose list price has skyrocketed in recent years. Express Scripts said about 700,000 people filed a claim for insulin last year through its Cigna or Express Scripts plans. The average monthly savings for those whose employers opted into the plan would be about $16 a month. Insurers and drug manufacturers have been under pressure to show that they are doing something about the rising list price of drugs, in particular insulin, which many people with diabetes need to survive. The average price of insulin, versions of which have been around since the 1920s, roughly doubled to about $450 a month in 2016 from around $234 a month in 2012, according to the Health Care Cost Institute . And the cost has risen even higher since 2016, putting people without insurance and those with high-deductibles at risk of rationing their doses and, in some cases, going without treatment. For people with diabetes, insulin can be as essential as air, said Dr. Steve Miller, the executive vice president and chief clinical officer of Cigna, which merged last year with Express Scripts . We need to ensure these individuals f Continue reading >>

A 93-year-old Drug That Can Cost More Than A Mortgage Payment Tells Us Everything That's Wrong With American Healthcare

A 93-year-old Drug That Can Cost More Than A Mortgage Payment Tells Us Everything That's Wrong With American Healthcare

A person administers an injection of insulin. AP Insulin has been around since 1923, so it came as a surprise in July 2015 when Cole LePere's doctor told his mother, Janine, to prepare to pay a lot at the pharmacy for it. Cole, who was 10, had just been found to have Type 1 diabetes. But even the pharmacist was shocked to see the price. Over and over, the pharmacist told Janine LePere, "This is really expensive." Each time she would respond, "I know, thanks, but I still need the medicine." The pharmacist finally gave the LePeres the supplies — and a bill for $1,550. That was after a $350 coupon. As lawmakers and the public scrutinize dramatic price increases for other old drugs — most recently with the Mylan-owned EpiPen, which saw its cost go up by 500% in the past nine years — the next flash point may be insulin, a drug both ubiquitous and complicated. And the story of why the LePeres are now paying as much as their mortgage payment on insulin, even though they have insurance and even though there are competing drugs on the market, is really the story of what has happened to the healthcare industry in America since the start of the century. The need for insulin The human body produces its own insulin. Some people can't. When he got the diagnosis, Cole LePere found himself one of nearly 29.1 million Americans known to have one of the two types of diabetes. Cole's kind, known as Type 1, is an autoimmune disease. His body mistakenly kills so-called beta cells that are supposed to make the body's insulin, a hormone that helps people absorb and process the sugar in food. The roughly 1.25 million people in the US who have Type 1 diabetes need to inject insulin to live. Type 2 diabetes, the more common form, is something that develops either based on genetic or lifesty Continue reading >>

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