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Insulin Patch Pumps

Insulin Patch Pumps: Their Development And Future In Closed-loop Systems

Insulin Patch Pumps: Their Development And Future In Closed-loop Systems

Go to: Introduction There has been steady progress over the years toward the development of a so-called “artificial pancreas,” a fully automated, external, closed-loop system for insulin delivery (Fig. 1).1–7 Under experimental conditions, closed-loop glucose control utilizing continuous glucose monitors (CGMs), insulin pumps, and pump-controlling algorithms has shown superiority to open-loop control in being able to achieve greater time in target range, with less hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.8–10 Driving these advances are persistent concerns about short-term risks of severe and potentially fatal hypoglycemia as well as severe hyperglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis. Additionally, there are concerns about long-term risk of complications from hyperglycemia and glycemic variability associated with contemporary methods of insulin administration.11–14 Early glycemic control is particularly important because long-term vascular complications may result from early hyperglycemic stresses, as shown in studies suggesting the importance of “metabolic memory.”15 The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications Study demonstrated that many patients do not reach target blood glucose levels.16 Intensive therapy should lower glucose values and improve outcomes; however, it will expose patients to an increased risk of hypoglycemia. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial11 and the Oxford-Steno group12 reported that severe hypoglycemia (requiring emergent or other forms of medical assistance) affected about one-third of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) (however, all of them were treated with regular insulin at that time), with ∼50% of all episodes occurring in 5% of patients. Use of insulin pumps ha Continue reading >>

Insulin Patch Pumps Market By Insulin Type (bolus Insulin, Basal Insulin, Basal-bolus Insulin), By Condition Type (diabetes Type 1, Diabetes Type 2) - Growth, Future Prospects, And Competitive Analysis, 2017 - 2025

Insulin Patch Pumps Market By Insulin Type (bolus Insulin, Basal Insulin, Basal-bolus Insulin), By Condition Type (diabetes Type 1, Diabetes Type 2) - Growth, Future Prospects, And Competitive Analysis, 2017 - 2025

Diabetes is a chronic disease affecting around 415 million individual worldwide which is expected to 642 million by 2040. Individuals affected by diabetes need to take insulin for lifetime. Thus the development of insulin patch pump technology offers enhanced benefits over traditional multiple daily injection therapy. Rising adoption rate of non-invasive techniques in transdermal drug delivery practices would propel the growth of insulin patch pumps market during the forecast period. Moreover, rising prevalence of diabetes worldwide along with the technological advancements is driving the insulin patch pumps market. The report titled Global Insulin Patch Pumps Market- Growth, Future Prospects and Competitive Analysis, 20172025 offers strategic insights into the insulin patch pumps market along with the market size and estimates for the duration 2017 to 2025. The research study covers in-depth analysis of market segments based on type of insulin, condition type and different geographical region. In order to help strategic decision makers, the report also includes competitive profiling of the leading players in global insulin patch pumps market, attractive investment proposition and market positioning of key manufacturers sections. Geographically, the global insulin patch pumps market is studied for the following regional markets: Market size and forecast for these regional and country level markets are presented in this study for the period 2015-2025. Market growth rates for the forecast period 2015-2025 are also included in this report, considering 2016 as the base year. Along with quantitative information, qualitative information sets and assessment tools are provided in this study for better analysis of the overall market scenario and future prospects. Information su Continue reading >>

World’s Smallest, Cheapest Patch Pump For Diabetics

World’s Smallest, Cheapest Patch Pump For Diabetics

The patch pumps worn by many people with diabetes are a game-changer in managing the daily infusions of insulin needed to control their chronic condition. Now an Israeli father-son team seeks to further change the game with a significantly lower-cost and “smarter” patch pump, hoping to put the devices in reach of many more patients needing constant medication. Not only millions of diabetics of all ages, but also those with neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, would benefit. Avi Keret of TouchéMedical stresses that he and his inventor son Amir are not reinventing the wheel, rather making it more universally accessible. “Our device gives the same amount of medication as any other pump; it just delivers the drug in a way that allows for a better quality of life,” he tells ISRAEL21c. The device would be especially welcome, he believes, in parts of India and other Asian countries with a rising diabetes rate and a high incidence of thalassemia, a genetic blood disorder often affecting multiple members of the same family. A patch pump is the best solution for administering lifesaving medication continuously, but the high cost forces many of these families to share one device, compromising its effectiveness. “We’ll offer them an alternative,” Keret pledges. “People who have or don’t have medical insurance will be able to afford it. Children all over the world will be able to use it.” Second time a charm TouchéMedical has applied for a grant from the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research to commercialize its prototype pump, which is the result of dogged trial and error. “To build a patch pump is very difficult and complicated because you need expertise in so many areas — medical, electronic, mechanical, chemical and other Continue reading >>

Decision Memo For Insulin Infusion Pump (cag-00041n)

Decision Memo For Insulin Infusion Pump (cag-00041n)

To: File: CAG-00041N Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Pumps (CSII) From: Grant P. Bagley, MD, JD Director Coverage and Analysis Group John J. Whyte, MD, MPH Julie K. Taitsman, MD, JD Medical Officers Coverage and Analysis Group Subject: National Coverage Decision Date: August 26, 1999 This memo serves four purposes: (1) outlines the description and treatment of diabetes mellitus; (2) reviews the history of Medicare's coverage policies on diabetes management; (3) analyzes the relevant scientific data related to the continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) pump; (4) delineates the reasons supporting a positive national decision to cover the device for type I diabetics. A. Pathophysiology Diabetes Mellitus is a disease of abnormal glucose metabolism characterized by a deficiency of insulin production, or by development of insulin-resistance, either of which results in abnormally high blood sugars. Diabetes Mellitus is generally subdivided into two categories: (1) Type I diabetes mellitus , (also known as insulin dependent diabetes mellitus [IDDM] or juvenile onset diabetes mellitus) and (2) Type II diabetes mellitus (also known as non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus [NIDDM] or adult onset diabetes mellitus)1 Type I diabetes may begin at any age but onset typically occurs in childhood or adolescence. Type I diabetes results from an immune mediated destruction of pancreatic islet beta cells causing decreased endogenous secretion of insulin and necessitating exogenous insulin therapy to maintain euglycemia. Type II diabetes is marked by peripheral resistance to the effect of insulin rather than absolute insulin deficiency. Approximately 16 million Americans have diabetes, although only slightly more than 10 million are diagnosed. Type I diabetes accounts fo Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

Insulin pumps are an increasingly common treatment for type 1 diabetes. They can improve glucose control in people with type 1 diabetes but do not suit everyone. An insulin pump delivers insulin every few minutes in tiny amounts, 24 hours a day. It is usually about the size of a deck of cards, but can be much smaller. The insulin flows through a cannula which sits in the subcutaneous tissue (where you inject) and is changed by the pump user every few days. Basal (background) insulin is programmed to meet the pump user’s needs. The bolus insulin is delivered at the touch of a button to cover food or bring down a high blood glucose level. Only rapid-acting insulin is needed and provides all your insulin requirements. Insulin pumps reduce the need for multiple injections and give the user the ability to make smaller, more accurate adjustments to insulin delivery. Note: insulin pumps do not measure blood glucose levels, but some pumps can read the signal from a separate glucose sensor. What sort of insulin pumps are there? There are a number of different types of insulin pump and accessories. They vary in aspects such as weight; units of adjustment; whether they have tubing or not and battery life. A ‘tethered’ pump uses a fine tube to connect the pump to the cannula; the pump is worn in a pocket or clipped to a belt. A patch pump or micro pump has no tubing or a very short tube, and the pump is usually stuck on to the skin. The following suppliers currently offer pumps in the UK: Animas Advanced Therapeutics Cellnovo Medtronic Roche OmniPod A good document for comparison can be downloaded here. Type 1 Technology guide We have produced a family-friendly guide to type 1 diabetes technology, which highlights recommendations from NICE on treatments and technology for chi Continue reading >>

The Cons Of Pumping Insulin

The Cons Of Pumping Insulin

Making an educated decision about pump therapy means that you should be aware of the potential drawbacks associated with its use. (You can read all about the pros, or advantages, of pumping here.) Financial cost Insulin pumps and disposable pump supplies (infusion sets, cartridges/reservoirs, patch pumps/pump bodies) cost far more than conventional pens and syringes. However, insurance companies have come to realize that insulin pump use can result in better control and fewer health problems. As a result, most private and public insurance plans cover most or all of the cost of pumps and supplies. Adjustment period Just as it took some time to get your blood sugars regulated when you first started on insulin injections, it will take some time to get regulated on the pump. Expect at least a few weeks of “ups and downs” as you and your health team work together to establish proper doses. Inconvenience While insulin pump therapy does allow greater lifestyle flexibility, wearing the pump around the clock can be inconvenient at times. The pump must be worn while you sleep, work, and play in order to provide a continuous flow of basal insulin. However, the compact size of the pump and disconnect mechanism make wearing the pump easier than it might seem. Technical difficulties As with any mechanical device, there are bound to be technical problems from time to time. Though today’s pumps have an excellent reputation for safety and reliability, there remains the possibility of occasional infusion-set clogs, computer glitches, and damage due to typical wear and tear. Every pump user must be prepared to switch back to injection therapy in the event of a pump malfunction. Luckily, all pump manufacturers offer 24/7 customer support, and can usually have replacement equipment de Continue reading >>

Insulin Patch - How The Insulin Patch Works, Challenges, Research

Insulin Patch - How The Insulin Patch Works, Challenges, Research

Insulin patches would present a needle free method of taking insulin Insulin patches are currently an experimental form of insulin delivery that are at an early stage of research. An insulin patch aims to painlessly deliver insulin through the skin similar to how transdermal patches such as nicotine patches or muscle pain relief patches work. If insulin patches can be successfully developed, it would present the chance for people on insulin therapy to take insulin without needing to put needles or cannulas (the very thin tube that delivers insulin into the body from insulin pumps) into the body. Looking for information on patch pumps? See types of insulin pumps . An insulin patch works by being placed on the skin and agents within the patch help insulin to pass through the skin and then into blood stream. An insulin patch contains a set dose of insulin that is absorbed over a number of hours. Different types of insulin patches have been developed to release insulin more quickly to counteract rises in blood sugar following meals (bolus insulin patches) and other insulin patches have been developed to counteract the gradual release of glucose through the day by the liver (basal insulin patches). The challenges in developing an insulin patch Insulin patches may seem an obvious form of delivery, however, the challenge in successfully developing an insulin patch has been that insulin is a large molecule and therefore is not usually absorbed by the skin. Insulin patches therefore require agents to help the insulin pass through the skin and to do so in a controlled and consistent way so as to prevent too high or too low blood glucose levels from occurring. A bolus insulin patch is currently being developed by researchers at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. The insulin patch u Continue reading >>

A Promising Innovation In Insulin Delivery: The Onetouch Via Patch

A Promising Innovation In Insulin Delivery: The Onetouch Via Patch

A promising innovation in insulin delivery: the OneTouch Via patch The pain of insulin injections is well-documented, and the diabetes community is always searching for better alternatives. One such promising technology is the long-awaited OneTouch Via, an insulin patch pump from Johnson & Johnson subsidiary Calibra Medical. Designed for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, the OneTouch Via is a very small (2 x 1 x 0.25 inches) patch pump that stores up to 200 units of prandial (aka fast-acting) insulin, which can be delivered by discretely pressing two mechanical buttons on both sides of the pump. It can be worn for up to 3 days, and would be used in combination with basal (or long-acting) insulin. A replacement for Multiple Daily Injections Both doctors and patients dread starting multiple daily insulin injections (aka MDI). It means more painful pokes, more potential for public embarrassment, and more opportunities to forget a dose of insulin. Thanks to new classes of non-insulin therapies (eg Victoza, Trulicity, Invokana, etc), starting mealtime insulin can often be prevented or delayed, but millions of people with Type 2 diabetes (and all with Type 1) will still requireMDI. Mealtime insulin usually requires carrying around insulin injection supplies (insulin pens and needles or vials and syringes) and injecting before meals, which can be embarrassing and/or cumbersome. Traditional insulin pumps present their own challenges, as most have long tubing and complicated electronic interfaces that are not user-friendly. Similar to the V-Go from Valeritas, the OneTouch Via is an entirely mechanical, tubeless, and disposable patch pump. There is no screen or complicated electronics, which keeps costs down, and makes for an easy-to-use interface. The user just presses two butto Continue reading >>

V-go: Patch Pump For Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

V-go: Patch Pump For Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin is produced in the pancreas, which is used to control and maintain blood sugars in the body. For people with Type 1 diabetes their pancreas does not make any insulin and people with Type 2 diabetes their pancreas doesn’t work as well and makes less insulin. This requires people with Type 1 diabetes to receive multiple doses of insulin daily compared to Type 2 diabetes who may require only one injection daily but over time if diabetes progresses they may need multiple injections per day. V-Go is not like traditional insulin pumps. It’s a patch pump that allows patients with Type 2 diabetes to receive insulin. You fill the V-Go patch pump with rapid acting insulin (Novolog™ or Humalog™), and then once filled the patch is applied to the body. It can be placed on the abdomen or back of the arms. With the push of a button the needle is inserted into the skin and slow amounts of insulin is delivered throughout 24 hours and when needed with meals without requiring any tubes or batteries. The V-Go pump does two things; it gives background insulin (basal) and also gives mealtime insulin (bolus.) The V-Go pump comes in three different strengths, V-Go 20, V-Go 30, and V-Go 40. These numbers refer to the amount of background insulin that is released in a 24 hour period. During meals when background insulin is not sufficient, V-Go allows you to give 2 units increments of mealtime insulin (bolus) by the push of two buttons. For example if you require 6 units of mealtime insulin then you would have to push the buttons 3 times each. All three strengths of V-Go can be filled with up to 36 units of mealtime insulin (bolus). The amount of background insulin will be either 20 units, 30 units or 40 units delivered throughout the 24 hours. Depending on how much insulin you ne Continue reading >>

Why Johnson & Johnson's New Wearable For Diabetics Should Be A Home Run

Why Johnson & Johnson's New Wearable For Diabetics Should Be A Home Run

Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) has good news for the 29 million diabetics in the U.S., as well as the company's investors: The healthcare conglomerate's wearable insulin delivery device, OneTouch Via, is being submitted for final FDA approval and has an expected launch within the next twelve months. The device should make life easier for diabetics, since it makes supplemental insulin delivery painless and discrete. Also: since the wearable has basically no competition--being the only on-demand insulin delivery device--it could well bring in sales of $800-$1.3 billion for the company's lagging medical-devices division. And that should have J&J investors cheering as well. Here's how the new wearable could improve life for diabetics, as well as begin to restore J&J's cutting edge in medical devices. Diabetics now have a better option for taking insulin at mealtimes OneTouch Via is an updated version of an earlier patch insulin injection wearable acquired when J&J bought Calibra Medical back in 2012. It is worn on the patient's abdomen, underneath clothing. It's not like the patch pumps on the market from ??? , which continuously deliver insulin. Instead, the OneTouch Via is in an entirely new category of on demand insulin delivery product that delivers mealtime doses only -simply by squeezing two buttons in its sides. The patch can be worn continuously for up to three days and provides injection-free insulin delivery whenever needed. According to studies, most diabetics find the wearable a big improvement over pens and syringes. After 60 days, 86% of diabetics using the wearable said they were very satisfied with it. In another study, 75% of doctors said they would prescribe it, as it was a better solution than insulin pens. One hundred percent said it was an improvement ove Continue reading >>

Advanced Sealing Technology Enables The Next Generation Of Insulin Delivery Devices

Advanced Sealing Technology Enables The Next Generation Of Insulin Delivery Devices

Advanced Sealing Technology Enables the Next Generation of Insulin Delivery Devices Diabetes is not only one of the most common chronic diseases, it is also complex and difficult to treat. Insulin is often administered between meals to keep blood sugar within target range and at mealtimes based on the number of carbohydrates to be ingested. A variety of insulin types are used to regulate blood sugar levels, including fast acting, short acting, intermediate acting, long acting, and premixed. With more than 400 million adults worldwide suffering from diabetes and 1.5 million deaths directly attributed to the disease each year, its no wonder so many scientists, inventors, and pharmaceutical and medical device companies are turning their attention to improving insulin delivery devices. Patch pumps and other progressive methods of drug delivery are making insulin delivery much more convenient for diabetics. Insulin is introduced into the body via a wide variety of devices, including traditional syringes, injection ports, insulin pens, conventional insulin pumps, and patch pumps. This article examines the current state of insulin delivery and the technology requirements for the next generation of devices to address this chronic disease. In particular, it focuses on the insulin pump sealing technology including seal design and material selection. These pumps will require strong seals that not only have a long life but that also provide an adequate friction rate, sufficient breakaway forces, and material biocompatibility. New complex seal designs enabled by versatile materials are allowing engineers to create insulin delivery devices that are lighter and smarter than ever. Currently, insulin delivery devices range from basic to cutting edge. Following are overviews of each typ Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump

Insulin Pump

An insulin pump is a medical device used for the administration of insulin in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy. The device configuration may vary depending on design. A traditional pump includes: the pump (including controls, processing module, and batteries) a disposable reservoir for insulin (inside the pump) a disposable infusion set, including a cannula for subcutaneous insertion (under the skin) and a tubing system to interface the insulin reservoir to the cannula. Other configurations are possible. For instance, more recent models may include disposable or semi-disposable designs for the pumping mechanism and may eliminate tubing from the infusion set. An insulin pump is an alternative to multiple daily injections of insulin by insulin syringes or an insulin pen and allows for intensive insulin therapy when used in conjunction with blood glucose monitoring and carb counting. Medical uses[edit] Advantages[edit] Users report better quality of life (QOL) compared to using other devices for administering insulin. The improvement in QOL is reported in type 1 and insulin-requiring type 2 diabetes subjects on pumps.[1] The use of rapid-acting insulin for basal needs offers relative freedom from a structured meal and exercise regime previously needed to control blood sugar with slow-acting insulin.[citation needed] Programmable basal rates allow for scheduled insulin deliveries of varying amounts at different times of the day. This is especially useful in controlling events such as the dawn phenomenon resulting in less low blood sugar during the night.[2] Many users feel that bolusing insulin from a pump is more convenient and discreet than injection.[2][3] Insulin pumps make it possible to deliver more pre Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Painful Injections For Diabetes

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Painful Injections For Diabetes

Media contact: Mark Derewicz, 919-923-0959, [email protected] CHAPEL HILL, NC – Painful insulin injections could become a thing of the past for the millions of Americans who suffer from diabetes, thanks to a new invention from researchers at the University of North Carolina and NC State, who have created a “smart insulin patch” that can detect increases in blood sugar levels and secrete doses of insulin into the bloodstream whenever needed. The patch – a thin square no bigger than a penny – is covered with more than one hundred tiny needles, each about the size of an eyelash. These “microneedles” are packed with microscopic storage units for insulin and glucose-sensing enzymes that rapidly release their cargo when blood sugar levels get too high. The study, which is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that the new, painless patch could lower blood glucose in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes for up to nine hours. More pre-clinical tests and subsequent clinical trials in humans will be required before the patch can be administered to patients, but the approach shows great promise. “We have designed a patch for diabetes that works fast, is easy to use, and is made from nontoxic, biocompatible materials,” said co-senior author Zhen Gu, PhD, a professor in the Joint UNC/NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering. Gu also holds appointments in the UNC School of Medicine, the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, and the UNC Diabetes Care Center. “The whole system can be personalized to account for a diabetic’s weight and sensitivity to insulin,” he added, “so we could make the smart patch even smarter.” Diabetes affects more than 387 million people worldwide, and that number is expected to grow to 592 mill Continue reading >>

The Latest And Greatest In Insulin Pumps And Sensor Technology

The Latest And Greatest In Insulin Pumps And Sensor Technology

The Latest and Greatest in Insulin Pumps and Sensor Technology By Carla Cox, COX, PHD, RD, CDE, FAADE, CPT As a certified diabetes educator (or as I prefer to say, type 1 coach), I have started literally hundreds of patients on insulin pumps over the last few decades. I have a disclaimer: I do not wear a pump and do not have type 1 diabetes. But I have worked in the field from clinics to ski and summer camps, as a dog sled driver for little munchkins with our team of sled dogs, to backpacking and canoe trips all with people who do have type 1 diabetes. Sometimes I grunt and groan when I get up to start an adventure, but then I meet up with the group and see someone taking shots! My emotions turn to glee when someone has a pump and a sensorI realize it sometimes feels like being the bionic man or woman with all this technology but hey, whats wrong with being such a diabetes stud or studdette? So what is so cool about pump and sensor technology? Well, if youre like me and you like to participate in group sports or activities, the technology is amazing. Lets say you are just starting off on an adventure (whatever that may be) with a group and you note on your sensor that your blood glucose (BG) is 50 mg/dL. Who wants to stop the whole team from proceeding? But then you realize you can take in some carbohydrates, lower your basal rate temporarily, and watch your sensor to see if you are coming up and are not only good to go, but where you will be in 5, 10, 15, 20 minutesyou get the idea. What are the options available right now to help you manage your diabetes? The Omnipod insulin pump is the only full functioning patch pump, meaning it is programmable with insulin-to-carb ratios, target BG, correction factors, etc. so your math is done for you.At this time, the Omnipod pu Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Living With An Insulin Pump

Diabetes: Living With An Insulin Pump

More and more people with diabetes are using insulin pumps instead of daily shots to manage their disease. The pumps give them more freedom to eat, sleep, and exercise when they want. A pump can be an important tool in preventing problems like very low blood sugar. But using an insulin pump takes some getting used to. The more you learn about your pump and how to live with it, the happier you will be. Some people say choosing which pump to use is actually harder than deciding to switch to a pump in the first place. There are a number of insulin pump companies, and each pump is slightly different. Ask members of your diabetes team which pumps they recommend. If your provincial health plan covers the cost of a pump, find out which pump brands are covered. Then ask those companies to send you information. Insulin pump companies also have websites where you can get all kinds of information. Your diabetes educator likely will have a variety of pumps that you can look at. Because improvements in insulin pumps are happening so fast, your local hospital may have open houses a few times a year so that pump makers can show their products and tell you how they work. Ask the company to send a sales representative to your home. That way you can see each pump you are considering, see how easy it is to program the pump, and learn how to give yourself a bolus (extra insulin). You should be able to try out the pump with saline solution. That way you can really see how it works and feels. The infusion site is the area on your body where you have attached your infusion set. Infusion sites can get infected, so it's important to know how to place the catheter correctly and to keep the area clean. Replace your infusion set every 2 or 3 days or as often as your doctor advises. Insert a new i Continue reading >>

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