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Insulin Patch Pumps

Insulin Patch - How The Insulin Patch Works, Challenges, Research

Insulin Patch - How The Insulin Patch Works, Challenges, Research

Insulin patches would present a needle free method of taking insulin Insulin patches are currently an experimental form of insulin delivery that are at an early stage of research. An insulin patch aims to painlessly deliver insulin through the skin similar to how transdermal patches such as nicotine patches or muscle pain relief patches work. If insulin patches can be successfully developed, it would present the chance for people on insulin therapy to take insulin without needing to put needles or cannulas (the very thin tube that delivers insulin into the body from insulin pumps) into the body. Looking for information on patch pumps? See types of insulin pumps . An insulin patch works by being placed on the skin and agents within the patch help insulin to pass through the skin and then into blood stream. An insulin patch contains a set dose of insulin that is absorbed over a number of hours. Different types of insulin patches have been developed to release insulin more quickly to counteract rises in blood sugar following meals (bolus insulin patches) and other insulin patches have been developed to counteract the gradual release of glucose through the day by the liver (basal insulin patches). The challenges in developing an insulin patch Insulin patches may seem an obvious form of delivery, however, the challenge in successfully developing an insulin patch has been that insulin is a large molecule and therefore is not usually absorbed by the skin. Insulin patches therefore require agents to help the insulin pass through the skin and to do so in a controlled and consistent way so as to prevent too high or too low blood glucose levels from occurring. A bolus insulin patch is currently being developed by researchers at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. The insulin patch u Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Overview

Insulin Pump Overview

As people with diabetes know, keeping blood sugar levels in a safe range is extremely important. Good blood sugar control not only makes you feel well, but also helps prevent long-term diabetes complications, such as blindness, kidney failure and heart disease. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin, a hormone that helps the body use sugar (glucose), a key source of energy that comes from carbohydrates. If you have type 1 diabetes you must make up for the lack of insulin with insulin therapy. Meanwhile, people with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but their bodies don’t use insulin properly, or they don’t produce enough insulin. Diet, exercise and medication can often work to control glucose levels. However, in certain cases, these measures aren’t enough, and insulin therapy is needed to better control blood sugar levels. While insulin can be given by self-injection, people who take multiple daily injections of insulinmay also consider using an insulin pump. An insulin pump provides continuous delivery of short acting insulin all day long. The insulin pump substitutes the need for long acting insulin. A pump also replaces the need for multiple daily injections with a continuous insulin infusion, and also helps to improve your blood sugar levels. How Do Insulin Pumps Work? Insulin pumps are small, computerized devices that mimic the way the human pancreas works by delivering small doses of short acting insulin continuously (basal rate). The device also is used to deliver variable amounts of insulin when a meal is eaten (bolus). The basal insulin rates are usually set up in your pump with your doctor, and you can have one or multiple basal settings programmed in your pump, based on your needs. You program the amount of insulin for your mealtime bolus di Continue reading >>

Decision Memo For Insulin Infusion Pump (cag-00041n)

Decision Memo For Insulin Infusion Pump (cag-00041n)

To: File: CAG-00041N Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Pumps (CSII) From: Grant P. Bagley, MD, JD Director Coverage and Analysis Group John J. Whyte, MD, MPH Julie K. Taitsman, MD, JD Medical Officers Coverage and Analysis Group Subject: National Coverage Decision Date: August 26, 1999 This memo serves four purposes: (1) outlines the description and treatment of diabetes mellitus; (2) reviews the history of Medicare's coverage policies on diabetes management; (3) analyzes the relevant scientific data related to the continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) pump; (4) delineates the reasons supporting a positive national decision to cover the device for type I diabetics. A. Pathophysiology Diabetes Mellitus is a disease of abnormal glucose metabolism characterized by a deficiency of insulin production, or by development of insulin-resistance, either of which results in abnormally high blood sugars. Diabetes Mellitus is generally subdivided into two categories: (1) Type I diabetes mellitus , (also known as insulin dependent diabetes mellitus [IDDM] or juvenile onset diabetes mellitus) and (2) Type II diabetes mellitus (also known as non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus [NIDDM] or adult onset diabetes mellitus)1 Type I diabetes may begin at any age but onset typically occurs in childhood or adolescence. Type I diabetes results from an immune mediated destruction of pancreatic islet beta cells causing decreased endogenous secretion of insulin and necessitating exogenous insulin therapy to maintain euglycemia. Type II diabetes is marked by peripheral resistance to the effect of insulin rather than absolute insulin deficiency. Approximately 16 million Americans have diabetes, although only slightly more than 10 million are diagnosed. Type I diabetes accounts fo Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

Insulin pumps are an increasingly common treatment for type 1 diabetes. They can improve glucose control in people with type 1 diabetes but do not suit everyone. An insulin pump delivers insulin every few minutes in tiny amounts, 24 hours a day. It is usually about the size of a deck of cards, but can be much smaller. The insulin flows through a cannula which sits in the subcutaneous tissue (where you inject) and is changed by the pump user every few days. Basal (background) insulin is programmed to meet the pump user’s needs. The bolus insulin is delivered at the touch of a button to cover food or bring down a high blood glucose level. Only rapid-acting insulin is needed and provides all your insulin requirements. Insulin pumps reduce the need for multiple injections and give the user the ability to make smaller, more accurate adjustments to insulin delivery. Note: insulin pumps do not measure blood glucose levels, but some pumps can read the signal from a separate glucose sensor. What sort of insulin pumps are there? There are a number of different types of insulin pump and accessories. They vary in aspects such as weight; units of adjustment; whether they have tubing or not and battery life. A ‘tethered’ pump uses a fine tube to connect the pump to the cannula; the pump is worn in a pocket or clipped to a belt. A patch pump or micro pump has no tubing or a very short tube, and the pump is usually stuck on to the skin. The following suppliers currently offer pumps in the UK: Animas Advanced Therapeutics Cellnovo Medtronic Roche OmniPod A good document for comparison can be downloaded here. Type 1 Technology guide We have produced a family-friendly guide to type 1 diabetes technology, which highlights recommendations from NICE on treatments and technology for chi Continue reading >>

Insulin Patch Pumps

Insulin Patch Pumps

A New Tool for Type 2 Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes in the world, accounting for 90% to 95% of all cases. When first diagnosed, Type 2 diabetes is typically treated with lifestyle changes, such as increased physical activity and improved diet, and the oral drug metformin. If these measures don’t lower blood glucose levels enough, other drugs are usually added. While insulin is rarely the first drug prescribed for a person with Type 2 diabetes, many people eventually require it to get the best blood glucose control possible. Despite the promise of better control, however, many people are reluctant to start using insulin. Fear – of weight gain, low blood glucose (hypoglycemia), injection pain, and/or handling needles – is often at the root of this reluctance. Some other common barriers include feeling embarrassed about injecting insulin in public and feeling that one has failed at controlling the disease if insulin is necessary. Even when people with Type 2 diabetes agree to take insulin, many regularly skip some doses. The most common reasons reported for skipping injections are a busy lifestyle, travel, skipped meals, stress or emotional problems, and embarrassment. Working with an understanding health-care provider and/or diabetes educator can be a big help in overcoming many of the barriers to starting insulin and using it successfully. It can also help to carefully choose which insulin delivery device to use. For example, for many people, using insulin pens is easier than using syringes and vials. A fairly new option on the market, the insulin patch pump, may also work well for many people with Type 2 diabetes. Traditional insulin pumps are highly technical and have complex features for adjusting basal rates and bolus doses of insulin. Suc Continue reading >>

World’s Smallest, Cheapest Patch Pump For Diabetics

World’s Smallest, Cheapest Patch Pump For Diabetics

The patch pumps worn by many people with diabetes are a game-changer in managing the daily infusions of insulin needed to control their chronic condition. Now an Israeli father-son team seeks to further change the game with a significantly lower-cost and “smarter” patch pump, hoping to put the devices in reach of many more patients needing constant medication. Not only millions of diabetics of all ages, but also those with neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, would benefit. Avi Keret of TouchéMedical stresses that he and his inventor son Amir are not reinventing the wheel, rather making it more universally accessible. “Our device gives the same amount of medication as any other pump; it just delivers the drug in a way that allows for a better quality of life,” he tells ISRAEL21c. The device would be especially welcome, he believes, in parts of India and other Asian countries with a rising diabetes rate and a high incidence of thalassemia, a genetic blood disorder often affecting multiple members of the same family. A patch pump is the best solution for administering lifesaving medication continuously, but the high cost forces many of these families to share one device, compromising its effectiveness. “We’ll offer them an alternative,” Keret pledges. “People who have or don’t have medical insurance will be able to afford it. Children all over the world will be able to use it.” Second time a charm TouchéMedical has applied for a grant from the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research to commercialize its prototype pump, which is the result of dogged trial and error. “To build a patch pump is very difficult and complicated because you need expertise in so many areas — medical, electronic, mechanical, chemical and other Continue reading >>

So Long, Syringes: New Insulin Patch Makes It Easier To Manage Diabetes

So Long, Syringes: New Insulin Patch Makes It Easier To Manage Diabetes

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – There’s a new option for diabetics who have to give themselves insulin shots every day. As CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez reported, the new insulin patch is easier to use and helps keep blood sugar under tighter control. It’s sort of a cross between a skin patch and a mini insulin pump. Ask most diabetics what they hate most about their condition and they’ll probably say it’s having to have multiple shots a day – carrying syringes and insulin around, excusing yourself to administer the shots, etc. Full-time student Barb Kendall was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 10 years ago. “I was not prepared for it at 40,” she said. She tried to control her blood sugar with pills, because she was terrified of insulin. “The shots, the vials, the measuring,” she said. But when the day came that she needed insulin, her doctor offered her a patch instead of syringes. It’s called V-Go. After the patient loads it with insulin, it goes on the arm, leg or abdomen like a Band-Aid. A tiny needle inside the patch goes into the skin with the press of a button. It delivers a constant dose of rapid-acting insulin, and depending on finger stick readings, additional insulin can be clicked at meal time. The patch is changed every 24 hours, and Kendall says it doesn’t hurt. “You sleep in it, you shower in it, you everything in it,” she said. “It’s just so easy.” V-Go is for people who need multiple insulin injections a day and who might be missing shots. “There are no batteries, there’s no software – nothing for the patients to be bothered with,” said Dr. Kamala Rajupet, of Partners in Nephrology & Endocrinology. “The insulin – they’re carrying it with them, they don’t have to remember to take something else with them wherever they go, Continue reading >>

Advances In Pump Technology: Insulin Patch Pumps, Combined Pumps And Glucose Sensors, And Implanted Pumpsregard Prospectif Sur La Technologie Des Pompes Insuline: Pompes-patch, Pompes Couples Aux Capteurs De Glucose, Pompes Implantes

Advances In Pump Technology: Insulin Patch Pumps, Combined Pumps And Glucose Sensors, And Implanted Pumpsregard Prospectif Sur La Technologie Des Pompes Insuline: Pompes-patch, Pompes Couples Aux Capteurs De Glucose, Pompes Implantes

Volume 37, Supplement 4 , December 2011, Pages S85-S93 Advances in pump technology: insulin patch pumps, combined pumps and glucose sensors, and implanted pumpsRegard prospectif sur la technologie des pompes insuline: pompes-patch, pompes couples aux capteurs de glucose, pompes implantes Author links open overlay panel P.Schaepelynck Get rights and content This review discusses the most recent developments in insulin pump technology. The benefits of the insulin pump to patients with type 1 diabetes are recognized both for its metabolic effectiveness and its positive effects on quality of life. The current pumps are reliable, small and light, and are becoming more and more sophisticated. Nevertheless, there remain practical and psychological constraints for the patient. However, recent patch-pump advances should simplify the technical aspects of pump treatment and enhance patient comfort. Another advance combines the insulin pump with a glucose sensor. Such a combination is logical for optimizing pump use and, to that end, developing an automated or closed-loopsystem that permits the delivery of subcutaneous insulin adjusted according to measured levels of subcutaneous glucose. Finally, implanted insulin pumps have proven their worth not only because of their simple use, but also for their contribution in the artificial pancreas project. Indeed, the prompt response with intraperitoneal administration of insulin makes it of interest for use in a closed-loop system. Cette revue prsente les dveloppements rcents et en perspective de la technologie des pompes insuline. Les avantages de la pompe insuline chez les patients diabtiques de type 1 sont reconnus que ce soit pour son efficacit mtabolique ou pour son bnfice sur la qualit de vie. Les pompes actuelles sont fiables, pet Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everyone needs insulin to live. Insulin is a hormone that helps our bodies use and store the food we eat. People with Type 1 Diabetes no longer make insulin and have to give insulin in order to sustain life. People with Type 2 Diabetes don’t use their own insulin well, and over time can have trouble making enough. So, all people with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes need insulin. When people give insulin injections, they may take 1-2 injections of a long acting insulin every day and 3+ injections of rapid acting insulin for meals and snacks. The typical person with Type 1 Diabetes could take anywhere from 4-7+ injections a day. Many people currently give insulin through an insulin pen or a syringe. But, there is another option, an insulin pump. An insulin pump delivers rapid acting insulin in two ways. First, the pump is programmed to give you insulin every hour throughout the hour referred to basal insulin. Basal, think “base,” is the insulin your body needs even in the absence of food, it is also referred to as background insulin. This basal rate replaces the long acting injection that you take. Second, is bolus, this is the insulin you take for food or to correct a high blood sugar. If you get basal and bolus confused, think “bowl”, as in you eat out of a bowl, to help you remember bolus is for food. Once you are on a pump, all insulin is delivered through the pump and shots are no longer necessary. Components There are a few things necessary to make a pump work. When a pump is shipped to someone: they will also need to send infusion sets, reservoirs, and possibly batteries, depending on your pump. Let’s talk about each component. Infusion Sets An infusion set is the part that is actually inserted into the body and has tubing that conn Continue reading >>

Cam Med Partners With Jdrf To Develop Flexible, Bandage-like Insulin Patch Pump

Cam Med Partners With Jdrf To Develop Flexible, Bandage-like Insulin Patch Pump

/ Cam Med partners with JDRF to develop flexible, bandage-like insulin patch pump Cam Med partners with JDRF to develop flexible, bandage-like insulin patch pump Medical device startup Cam Med has partnered with JDRF to develop an ultra-thin, flexible insulin patch pump to be used with next-generation artificial pancreas systems. The goal of the partnership is to speed up the development of Cam Meds Evopump a conformable, disposable patch pump so that the device can be integrated into closed-loop insulin delivery systems and cut back on the systems overall size. CES 2020: Medical technologies you need to know The mobile health devices and wearables trend is seemingly accelerating this year, with 546 digital health and 635 wearable devices being touted at the annual CES show in Las Vegas. Digital health devices and wearables on display are up from the 505 and 620 devices, respectively, presented at CES 2019. Health and medical devices being [] FDA reduces controls on electrical stimulation devices for anxiety, insomnia The FDA recently downgraded the cranial electrical stimulator (CES) devices designed to treat anxiety and insomnia from Class III to Class II, leaving CES devices for depression in the most highly regulated Class III category. New CES devices intended to treat anxiety or insomnia will require 510(k) clearance rather than the more stringent premarket review [] The 10 greatest medtech advances of the 2010s From disposable endoscopes to TAVR to robotic surgery, theres a whole host of medtech advances widely available now that werent around much 10 years ago. In terms of technological advances, I would put this past decade as one of the most important for medical technology. From connected devices and robotics, to advances in material sciences [] MD&M West se Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Painful Injections For Diabetes

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Painful Injections For Diabetes

Media contact: Mark Derewicz, 919-923-0959, [email protected] CHAPEL HILL, NC – Painful insulin injections could become a thing of the past for the millions of Americans who suffer from diabetes, thanks to a new invention from researchers at the University of North Carolina and NC State, who have created a “smart insulin patch” that can detect increases in blood sugar levels and secrete doses of insulin into the bloodstream whenever needed. The patch – a thin square no bigger than a penny – is covered with more than one hundred tiny needles, each about the size of an eyelash. These “microneedles” are packed with microscopic storage units for insulin and glucose-sensing enzymes that rapidly release their cargo when blood sugar levels get too high. The study, which is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that the new, painless patch could lower blood glucose in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes for up to nine hours. More pre-clinical tests and subsequent clinical trials in humans will be required before the patch can be administered to patients, but the approach shows great promise. “We have designed a patch for diabetes that works fast, is easy to use, and is made from nontoxic, biocompatible materials,” said co-senior author Zhen Gu, PhD, a professor in the Joint UNC/NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering. Gu also holds appointments in the UNC School of Medicine, the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, and the UNC Diabetes Care Center. “The whole system can be personalized to account for a diabetic’s weight and sensitivity to insulin,” he added, “so we could make the smart patch even smarter.” Diabetes affects more than 387 million people worldwide, and that number is expected to grow to 592 mill Continue reading >>

Finesse Disposable Insulin Patch Pump

Finesse Disposable Insulin Patch Pump

Finesse Disposable Insulin Patch Pump Finesse is a small, flat, disposable, mealtime insulin delivery patch that is about one-quarter inch thick and just a little longer than a mid-sized paper clip. Entirely mechanical with no batteries, no electronics, no separate infusion sets, it stays comfortably adhered for up to three days through showering, exercising, sleeping, intimacy. To dose insulin during mealtimes, snack times, or for correction boluses, patients can simply squeeze the 2 buttons together on the patch right through clothing. Unlike syringes or insulin pens, no prep is ever needed, it takes only a few seconds to dose, and no one can see. Continue reading >>

Pain-free Insulin Patch For Diabetes

Pain-free Insulin Patch For Diabetes

First published on Fri 9 Apr 2004 04.48EDT A company behind a "diabetes patch" which will allow insulin-dependent patients to take the hormone painlessly has won national lottery funding for their invention's development. Starbridge Systems of Swansea hopes that within five years the patch - which looks like a cross between a credit card and a first-aid plaster - will be helping thousands. The technology could be modified to help other patients who have to use large, unwieldy pumps with tubes and long needles to administer their drugs at home. The National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts, funded by the lottery, has awarded the company 140,000 to develop a prototype, hopefully by the end of the year. The firm believes the principle behind products such as nicotine patches, which release the tobacco ingredient slowly into the bloodstream through the skin, can be applied to treat conditions needing more carefully controlled and precise delivery. Joseph Cefai, the co-founder and chief executive of Starbridge Systems, explained that the firm was developing tiny pumps able to respond to high-density light bursts. The system involves the wax in the pumps melting and pushing drugs through tiny needles. The laser-started pumps will be held in disposable "plasters" measuring about 10cm by 5cm (4in by 2in). These plasters will be controlled by small panels programmed by the patients, to allow doses to be varied according to blood-sugar levels. Mr Cefai believes the patch will be able to carry up to three days' supply of insulin and will be easy to remove and stick to various parts of the body. "It will release diabetics from the need to use syringes and needles, enabling them to continuously infuse insulin," he said. "They will be able to lead a normal life." Techn Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

The most common way to take insulin therapy is via self-injection. However, some people with diabetes choose to take their insulin using an insulin pump instead. There are a number of potential reasons for this, for example: • A pump may fit their daily routine better • A pump may be easier than an injection if they are cared for by someone else • They may find a pump more discreet than an injection • The pump may provide them with a superior background insulin The idea of an insulin pump is that instead of delivering separate injections throughout the day, it releases insulin gradually over the course of the day, just like your body would naturally. This means a pump substitutes for background insulin. When it’s time for a meal, the pump is used to give a mealtime dose of insulin. A pump is essentially made up of two parts: The two parts are connected by a small, flexible tube. The pump is fitted onto a person’s lower abdomen and held in place with an adhesive patch, or worn in a belt around the waist, armband, bra or other accessory. The average pump is about the size of a pack of cards. It has a digital display screen, and buttons for programming – with a little training you’ll soon learn to use an insulin pump. There are lots of different types of pumps available with different features. For example, some of the more modern pumps have touchscreens, or can connect wirelessly to a glucometer. Your doctor or nurse will be able to help you select a model that’s best suited to your needs and lifestyle. Like this? You may also be interested in: Continue reading >>

Hey Uhc, Here Are 16 Reasons Pumps Arent A Commodity

Hey Uhc, Here Are 16 Reasons Pumps Arent A Commodity

Hey UHC, Here are 16 Reasons Pumps Arent a Commodity A certified diabetes educator takes UnitedHealthcare to task for giving Medtronic pumps preferred status. By now, many of you have heard that UnitedHealthcare, one of the nations largest health insurers, has opted to restrict choice of insulin pumps for its members to one brand. Because they were able to negotiate a more favorable price, UHC has designated Medtronic as their preferred provider. This will make it more difficult and more costly for adults covered by UHC to obtain an insulin pump other than one made by Medtronic. Im all for reducing healthcare costs, especially for people with diabetes. But in this case, UHC is essentially saying that all insulin pumps perform basically the same function and should be viewed as mere commodities. In other words, UHC is suggesting that there is as much difference in pump brands and models as there is in milk or wheat from various farms. This move has far-reaching implications. You can bet your bottom dollar that other health plans are watching closely to see if this cost-cutting measure works in the long term before implementing it themselves. If it succeeds, other diabetes management tools (blood glucose monitors, CGMs, and even insulin types) will also come to be viewed more often as mere commodities, with the risk that the lowest-cost tool will be covered, rather than the most effective. Insulin pumps are not commodities. There are a number of features that differentiate insulin pumps and make them more suitable for certain people. Below are a few pump features that affect ones ability to use a pump safely and manage blood sugars successfully. 1. Insulin volume Different pumps hold different amounts of insulin. Users need their pump to hold enough insulin to last at le Continue reading >>

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