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Insulin Needle Size Chart

What You Need To Know About Needles And Injections

What You Need To Know About Needles And Injections

There are so many different needle sizes available that it is sometimes confusing as to which one to use. This is a simple guideline chart to help ease the confusion. This is in no way meant to be used in place of a trained veterinary professional. First of all, there are three different ways to inject medications. It is important to understand the difference and be sure you know which one is correct for the medicine that you are using. Subcutaneous (or SubQ or SQ) means under the skin. This is less invasive and usually requires a shorter and sometimes smaller gauge needle. Gauge is used to measure the diameter or thickness of the needle. Intramuscular (or IM) means injecting into the muscle. It is usually used for small volumes. If unsure ask your veterinarian for injection site recommendations for your specific animal. Intravenous (or IV) literally means into (or within) a vein. Consult your veterinarian. Needle size should be based on factors such as the species, size, and breed of the animal; the type of injection; the volume of injection; and the viscosity of the fluid being injected. The general rule is to use the smallest gauge needle that will allow smooth and timely administration of the injectable product. The smaller the needle, the less painful initial injection; however, a needle that is too small will require the person giving the injection to use more pressure, dramatically hinder injection speed, and, for intravenous injections, lengthen the time it takes for the drug to take effect. Remember the following when giving injections: Do not use disinfectants when cleaning syringes. The disinfectant could destroy a modified live vaccine (MLV). Buy disposables or sterilize with an autoclave. Do not mix products. If traces of bacterin are left in a syringe that Continue reading >>

Why Steroid Needle Selection Is Important

Why Steroid Needle Selection Is Important

One of the scariest things when doing your first cycle (or your 10th) is actually injecting the steroids. To this day, I still remember my first injection of 1.25ml’s of Testosterone. What happened? I was super nervous, I got about ¼ way through and I pulled out because I thought I was about to faint. Round two was much easier, I knew what needed to be done and I got it done. Hundreds of injections later it is second nature now, and that fear that paralyzed me initially was all in my head. When I first began using steroids I had a hard time figuring out needle sizes, changing needle heads, dull needles etc. This all confused me and often led to me delaying the use (or worse, delaying my injection times throwing off the cycle’s half-life) The goal of this article is to show you exactly what types of needles you should use when injecting different types of steroids, and how. The basics Gauge (Size of the needle) The size of the needle that you need to use varies from compound to compound. The size, or thickness of the actual needle is referred to as “Gauge”. The higher the gauge, the smaller the needle is and the longer it will take to inject something. Length The length of the needle is also important, as we need to make sure we are always injecting deep enough into the muscle tissue but not too deep. The following is an example of an actual needle 25g 1.5” – This would be a 25 gauge (very small and takes a long time to inject) 1.5 inches long. 21g 1.0” – This is a 21g with a shorter needle tip. Where you inject What people often misunderstand is that it’s not just the type of compound (or mix) that you are injecting that should determine what needle to use when injecting, the place on your body where you are injecting is equally important. Drawing vs Continue reading >>

Tuberculin Versus Insulin Syringes

Tuberculin Versus Insulin Syringes

Patient was tested for allergies in a primary care doctor's office. He will be getting allergy shots for cat, mold and dust allergies. The technician who is managing the program for the doctor ordered insulin syringes for the allergy shots instead of tb syringes. She claimed that 10 Units on an insuling syringe is equivalent to 0.1 cc on a tb syringe. Is this common practice to use insulin syringes for allergy shots? She said they are cheaper than tb syringes. Thank you Thank you for your inquiry. There are differences between tuberculin and insulin syringes. The two links copied below will take you to websites that discuss these differences. This does not preclude insulin syringes from being used to administer allergy injections, but one has to be very careful about the conversion units involved. In addition, syringes specially designed to administer allergy injections are also available for purchase at suppliers. These are designed specifically for that task. It's All in the Syringe What is the difference between a tuberculin syringe and an insulin syringe? Thank you again for your inquiry and we hope this response is helpful to you. Sincerely, Phil Lieberman, M.D. Continue reading >>

Buying Syringes For Melanotan Guide

Buying Syringes For Melanotan Guide

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. When I was getting started I was so confused about buying syringes. I got a lot of help from others in this forum and I wanted to put it all here for my reference, and possibly for anyone else that might be confused. Youre looking for disposable insulin syringes. These are so cheap theres no point not to get a bunch of them so you never have to reuse, share, use expired syringes, etc. You can get 100 for as cheap as $15, which would last more than 3 months even if you dosed every day. Theres 3 numbers when it comes to purchasing syringes: You have the option of 28, 29, 30 and 31 gauge needles. The higher numbers mean smaller width. So to minimize pain you want the highest gauge needle available, in this case 31g. The next number measures how much liquid the syringe will hold. 1 CC is equal to a cubic centimeter, or 1 ml. In America the syringes will be measured in CC's, but if you're buying them in Europe (and most places), they'll be measured in ml. For example 3/10 CC would be 0.3ml, and 1/2cc would be 0.5ml, etc. You want a relatively smaller size because it helps you measure the small doses needed for melanotan. Because of the doses we're using, 1/2cc (0.5ml) or 1cc (1 ml) sized syringes would probably be best so you can easily measure out - 2 ml. I got 3/10cc as its the smallest and thought it'd be less intimidating but I didnt fully understand it can only hold 0.3 ml at a time, which means that it's a huge pain to measure out 1 ml for reconstitution! Next time I'll probably get 1/2cc (0.5ml) size. The Continue reading >>

Injecting With Pen Needles: What’s The Best Length?

Injecting With Pen Needles: What’s The Best Length?

Insulin is required for all patients who have type 1 diabetes. It is often required in patients with type 2 diabetes as well. Insulin and other injectable medications are commonly given in a pen device. An insulin Pen is usually prefilled, disposable, and allows patients to dial the correct dose. An insulin pen requires a needle to be placed on it and then removed after each use. Insulin is injected into the fatty layer of the body (just under the skin). In order to ensure proper delivery of insulin, you need to use the correct size needle. Needle size refers to both the gauge (thickness) of the needle and also the length of the needle. Currently the gauges of needles vary from 29 (thickest) to 32 (thinnest). The needle length is important because a needle that is too long will deliver insulin into the muscle instead of the fat layer where it should be. This means that the pen needle should be long enough to cross through the skin but short enough not to hit the muscle. Pen needles are available in the following lengths12.7mm, 8mm, 5mm, and 4mm. Adult skin thickness ranges from 1.25 – 3.25 mm in length regardless of age, race or weight. This means that for most people, a needle can be as short as 4mm to deliver insulin to the right place. Longer needles are not needed. Most children have a thinner fat layer than adults, which is why it is especially important to use the shortest available needle in children. Studies have shown that the 4mm needle provides equivalent blood glucose control compared to both the 5mm and 8mm needle, even in obese patients. Patients who used the 4mm needle compared with an 8mm needle also experienced less pain. It is important to use proper injection technique when using pen needles, which includes rotating injection sites and using a new n Continue reading >>

How To Determine Needle Size

How To Determine Needle Size

There are several factors which need to be considered in choosing the size of a needle to use for an injection or “shot”. They include such issues as: • the type and viscosity of the medication • the size and age of the patient • the mobility status of the patient • the desired absorption rate for the medication In general for IM (intramuscular) injections you would use a 21 to 23 gauge needle 1 to 1.5 inches long for an adult. In a child you use a 1 inch long, 25 to 27 gauge needle. In obese patients, 1.5 to 2 inch needles may be necessary.** For SQ (subcutaneous) injections you would typically use a 25 to 27 gauge needle 3/8 to 5/8 inches long for adults and children alike. Some newer medications such as Byetta for diabetes recommends using 30 or 31 gauge 1/3 inch needles which are ultra fine. SQ medications are deposited into the loose connective tissue just below the dermis. This is not richly supplied with blood vessels so the absorption rate is slow. There are many pain receptors in this tissue so only non- irritating, water-soluble medications in small doses should be given by the SQ route. Intramuscular tissue is richly supplied with blood vessels so the medication is more rapidly absorbed by this route. There are few pain receptors so viscous and irritating drugs can be injected into the muscle tissue with less discomfort. In choosing a site consider deep muscle tissue for the most irritating or viscous medications to reduce the possibility of tissue damage. Using a Z-track method may be recommended as well. Care must be taken to avoid blood vessels, and you must always aspirate with an IM injection to ensure that you have not hit a vessel. If you aspirate blood, remove the needle and prepare a new syringe. Never inject the blood back into the tissu Continue reading >>

Levemir® Flextouch® Is Ready To Use In Just A Few Steps

Levemir® Flextouch® Is Ready To Use In Just A Few Steps

Levemir® FlexTouch®, a prefilled insulin pen with no push-button extension, requires low force to inject at all doses and is ready to use in just a few steps.a In fact, Levemir® FlexTouch® has up to 77% less injection force than Lantus® SoloSTAR®. From the makers of the world’s #1-selling prefilled insulin pen,b Levemir® FlexTouch® is: Accurate—Accurate dosing from 1 to 80 units Prefilled—Each pen is prefilled with 300 units of Levemir® Discreet—Fits in your pocket, purse, or nightstand On the go—Take it with you almost anywherec aPlease see the Patient Information for complete Instructions For Use. cOnce in use, Levemir® FlexTouch® must be kept at room temperature below 86°F for up to 42 days. Injecting with Levemir® FlexTouch® You may have concerns about using an injectable medicine for type 2 diabetes. But it’s important to realize the positive effect it may have on the management of your diabetes. And once you gain a little practice in giving injections on your own, Levemir® injections will become part of your daily routine. If you were given instructions from your health care provider on how to use Levemir® FlexTouch® and you have read the Instructions for Use in the Patient Information, you may be ready for your first injection. Your health care provider will tell you what dose of Levemir® is right for you and how many times to take it each day. Your dose may be adjusted based on your blood sugar. Please consult your health care provider prior to adjusting your dose. No compatible source was found for this video. Levemir® can be injected in the thigh, abdomen, or upper arm. It’s important to change the injection site within your injection area each time you inject and not inject into the exact same spot each time. Rotating where yo Continue reading >>

Insulin Syringes & Needles

Insulin Syringes & Needles

Insulin injections have come a long way since they were first used to treat diabetes. There are not only different types of insulin to meet each user’s individual needs, but also different ways to inject insulin. Sites for insulin injection include the abdomen, the thigh, the arm and the buttocks. Insulin is absorbed at different speeds depending on where you inject, so it’s best to consistently rotate within the same part of the body for each of your daily injections. The fastest absorption is at the abdomen (where most people usually inject their insulin and hence is the preferred site), followed by the arm, the thigh and the buttocks. For injection into the abdomen area, stay at least two inches away from the belly button or any scars you may already have. Injecting in the same place most of the time can cause hard lumps or extra fat deposits to develop. These lumps are not only unsightly, they can also change the way insulin is absorbed, making it more difficult to keep your blood sugar on target. When rotating sites within one injection area, keep the injections points about an inch (or two finger - widths) apart. Do not inject into scar tissue or areas with broken vessels or varicose veins. Scar tissue may interfere with absorption. Insulin syringes come in different capacities of 3/10cc, 1/2cc and 1cc. Choose the smallest syringe that is big enough to hold the largest dose you inject each time. The smaller the syringe, the easier it is to read the markings and draw up an accurate dose. If your largest dose is close to the syringe’s maximum capacity, you may want to buy the next size up to handle any increases in your dose adjustments. Needle size for both syringes and insulin pens refers to both the length and gauge of the needle. Other points to note: 1 Ke Continue reading >>

Know Your Needles

Know Your Needles

Needle Tips Getting more comfortable with injecting. If you have concerns about using an injectable medicine for your diabetes, you’re not alone. Many people living with diabetes have a fear of injections. Learning more about needles may help you get over the hurdle of injecting. Why one needle might be a better fit than another. Needles come in all different sizes—there are a lot of options to choose from. Health care providers and pharmacists can help recommend the right needle for you. Here are some things you should know: Needle length Needles come in all different lengths. NovoFine® Plus is 4 mm in length, our shortest insulin pen needle currently available. Although its size may suggest otherwise, when compared with longer and thicker needles, a 4 mm needle effectively delivers insulin regardless of patient body mass index (BMI). However, everyone is different and there are several factors that are considered to determine the appropriate needle length for you. Talk to your doctor to find out which type of needle is best for you. Needle gauge You can tell a needle’s thickness by looking at its gauge (G). You might think the higher the number, the thicker the needle, but it’s actually the opposite. The higher the number, the thinner the needle is. For example, 32G needles, like those available with NovoFine® Plus, NovoFine®, and NovoTwist®, are thinner than a 27G needle. These needles are also designed with SuperFlow Technology™, which improves flow rates and helps to reduce injection force. NovoFine® Plus, NovoFine®, and NovoTwist® needles—some of the shortest and thinnest needles available from Novo Nordisk. Risks of reusing needles. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a ser Continue reading >>

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. NovoLog® (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin therapy. The timing of hypoglycemia may reflect the time-action profile of the insulin formulation. Glucose monitoring is re Continue reading >>

Selecting Syringes And Needles

Selecting Syringes And Needles

Most of us can recognize a syringe, with a needle sticking out of a long plastic body. For many, it is one childhood horror that they can never forget! But while your early years may have been spent dreading a needle, your teens or adulthood might require you to keep a supply of syringes ready for a doctor prescribed medication. When you start your own family, you may need a syringe supply for a family member to treat a medical condition. In this case, not only do you need to forget your old dread of this small medical device, but will also need to know how to use it. Most importantly, you need to know that not all syringes are the same, and that they are used for different purposes. Syringe and Needle Types Syringes are available in several different designs and varieties. Most syringes are disposable and many come with an attached needle or with no needle at all. You may select the size of the syringe by the volume of medication it holds. Needles are selected by the gauge size and the length of the needle. Selecting the needle thicknesses and gauge, with varying needle lengths are entirely dependent upon where the injection is being administered. A very common type of syringe is the U-100 insulin syringe and needle used commonly for diabetic medications. It is for one time use only, and is thus, a very low cost syringe with needle combination. Below are images depicting the anatomy of a syringe and the anatomy of a needle. Selecting the Right Syringe Syringe selection is mostly based upon the volume of medication to be administered and the desired pressure flow. Volumes are usually measured in centimeters (cc) or milliliters (mL). Both types of measurements are equivalent in volume. A 1 cc syringe is the same as a 1 mL syringe. Large volumes of medication require larg Continue reading >>

Syringe & Needle Basics

Syringe & Needle Basics

Syringes and needles are designed for the purpose of introducing a drug into the body. The term "syringe" technically refers to the reservoir (that holds the liquid) and the plunger (which pushes the liquid out of the reservoir). The "needle" is the part that enters the body, whether into a vein, under the skin, or into muscle. The word "syringe" is also sometimes used to refer to the entire reservoir/plunger/needle combination. The two most commonly available varieties of syringe/needle sets are insulin and tuberculin. "Insulin needles" are used by diabetics for injecting insulin, while "tuberculin needles" are used to inject tuberculin during the diagnosis of the tuberculous infection. Many countries and U.S. states have legal restrictions on possession and over-the-counter sale of needles. Drug paraphernalia laws often prohibit possession of syringes for purpose of illicit drug use. Medical prescription laws may prohibit over-the-counter pharmacy sales, or possession without a prescription. As of 2013, 166 cities in the U.S. have one or more syringe services programs. [Syringe Exchange Program Coverage in the United States - Foundation for AIDS Research, July 2013.] Syringes sold by pharmacies and online medical suppliers are typically for diabetics and other uses including post-operative conditions, vitamin deficiencies and intramuscular medications. They come in a variety of sizes, but the most common reservoir size is 1cc (1 cubic centimeter (cc) = 1 milliliter), with a 25 gauge needle size or smaller. NEEDLE GAUGE refers to the size of the bore or hole in the needle. The higher the gauge, the thinner the needle (and the smaller the hole). A 28 gauge needle (abbreviated 28G) is therefore thinner than a 25 gauge needle, which is in turn thinner than an 18 gauge nee Continue reading >>

Bd™ Insulin Syringes

Bd™ Insulin Syringes

Source: BD Diabetes Healthcare BD is the leading brand of insulin syringes. It is the brand most recommended by health care professionals. BD insulin syringes are available in a variety of sizes so that you can choose the right BD insulin syringe size for your patient. Needle gauge-the higher the number, the thinner the needle. Does your patient prefer to have the thinnest needle available or a thicker one that is less flexible? BD insulin syringe needles are available in three gauges: Needle length-BD insulin syringes are available with 2 different length needles: the standard ½" length (12.7mm) and the short 5/16" length (8mm) which is 37% shorter. The psychological benefits of a short needle may make the transition to insulin easier for some patients. Short needles are appropriate for approximately 82% of patients with diabetes; not just children or lean adults. Note: a patient's blood sugar levels should be carefully monitored and evaluated after changing to a shorter needle Maximum Dose- BD Ultra-Fine II, BD Ultra-fine and BD Micro-fine needle syringes are all available in three dose capacities: To make it easier to measure an accurate dose, choose the smallest syringe that will hold the largest dose your patient takes. The BD insulin syringe product line BD Ultra-fine™ II Short Syringe Needle Catalog # NDC # 1cc (100 unit) 328418 08290328418 1/2cc (50 unit) 328468 08290328468 3/10cc (30 unit) 328438 08290328438 BD Ultra-Fine™ Original Syringe Needle Catalog # NDC # 1cc (100 unit) 328411 08290328411 1/2cc (50 unit) 328466 08290328466 3/10cc (30 unit) 328431 08290328431 BD Micro-Fine™ IV Syringe Needle Catalog # NDC # 1cc (100 unit) 328410 08290328410 1/2cc (50 unit) 328465 08290328465 3/10cc (30 unit) 328430 08290328430 BD products can not be purchased direc Continue reading >>

Perfect Insulin Needle Size Chart - Myhomeimprovement

Perfect Insulin Needle Size Chart - Myhomeimprovement

it is for one time use only and is thus a very low cost syringe with needle combination below are images depicting the anatomy of a syringe and the ava hypodermic needle sizes gauge tubing painless injection middle east figure 5 technique of suture lifting and cutting by a hypodermic needle insulin needles sizestype 2 diabetes fact sheettype i diabetes treatment you shoud know extended data figure 4 insulin decreases blood glucose level in surface fish bqanebr article 3 beef quality assurance program university of syringe and needle selection guide by burt cancaster medical needle size chart needle gauge sizes for serum humalog and insulin levels after subcutaneous injection of regular human insulin or humalog 02 name hcg men estradioljpg views 29286 size 1225 kb 10pcslot us uk canada sizes knitting needle gauge inch cm ruler tool all in if you overindulged this christmas and are looking to jump on the new year diet bandwagon our favourite a list health guru is here to help it is important to train patients on proper product administration tresiba has the longest in use time of any once daily long acting basal insulin1 5 magellan safety needle syringe combination syringe with needle and brown ampoule powerpoint templates 2 Continue reading >>

Tips For Prescribing Insulin Therapy And Diabetes Supplies

Tips For Prescribing Insulin Therapy And Diabetes Supplies

There are many different insulin preparations and supplies available in order to create individualized regimens for patients. Here are some tips and a checklist to help avoid getting future calls from pharmacies. · Standard concentration is 100 units/mL (there’s also a 500 units/mL but rarely used) § Before a pen or vial is opened, it won’t expire until the labeled expiration (could be a year) § After a pen or vial is opened, it expires in 28 days o Dispensed as 5 pens (3mL or 300 units each so 1500 units per box). The pharmacy won’t split a box so you can’t prescribe <5 pens. If you do, the pharmacist will round up to one box anyway. Insulin syringe prescribing: Insulin syringes availability: Capacity For doses up to: Gauge Needle length 3/10 mL 30 units 28 1/2" 29 1/2" 31 5/16” 1/2 mL 50 units 28 1/2" 29 1/2" 31 5/16” 1 mL 100 units 27 5/8” 28 1/2" 29 1/2" 31 5/16” Example: You want to prescribe 14 units three times a day. Select 3/10 mL because it holds up to 30 units. If you select a larger than necessary size, accuracy decreases and it becomes harder to read the markings on the barrel. Select the 31 gauge as this is generally more comfortable than thicker gauges. *Note: If someone’s insulin is around 30 units and they’ll be adjusting their dose in the future, give them the 1/2 mL (50 units maximum) since they won’t be able to use the 3/10 mL once they get to 31 units per injection. Insulin pen needles availability Needle Length Gauge Nano 4 mm (5/32”) 32 Mini 5 mm (3/16”) 31 Short 8 mm (5/16”) 31 Original 12.7 mm (1/2”) 29 · Don’t write “Use as directed” on any diabetes supply prescriptions (except glucometer) o Write out the whole directions on each of the prescriptions. Sometimes people go to different pharmacies so if the Continue reading >>

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