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Insulin Lispro Nursing Implications

Insulin Lispro

Insulin Lispro

Insulin lispro, sold under the brand name Humalog among others, is a fast acting insulin analog. It was first approved for use in the United States in 1996, making it the first insulin analog to enter the market.[2] Engineered through recombinant DNA technology, the penultimate lysine and proline residues on the C-terminal end of the B-chain are reversed. This modification does not alter receptor binding, but blocks the formation of insulin dimers and hexamers. This allows larger amounts of active monomeric insulin to be immediately available for postprandial injections.[3] Insulin lispro has one primary advantage over regular insulin for postprandial glucose control. It has a shortened delay of onset, allowing slightly more flexibility than regular insulin, which requires a longer waiting period before starting a meal after injection. Both preparations should be coupled with a longer acting insulin (e.g. NPH insulin) for good glycemic control. Medical uses[edit] Insulin lispro is an FDA approved drug used to treat people living with Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes.[4] Insulin lispro has non-FDA labeled uses for diabetic neuropathy prevention and cardiovascular disease prevention.[4] Side effects[edit] Common side effects include skin irritation at the site of injection, hypoglycemia, hypokalemia, and lipodystrophy.[4] Other serious side effects include anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions.[4] Contraindications[edit] Do not administer insulin lispro during episodes of hypoglycemia, or if the patient has a hypersensitivity to insulin lispro or any of its excipients.[4] Cost[edit] In the United States as of 2015 the cost is between 10.06 and 29.36 USD per 100 units.[5] In Europe the price is far lower. The cost in the UK is between £1.66 (about $2.50) and £1.9 Continue reading >>

Humalog Side Effects

Humalog Side Effects

Generic Name: insulin lispro (IN soo lin LISS pro) Brand Names: HumaLOG, HumaLOG Cartridge, HumaLOG KwikPen, HumaLOG KwikPen (Concentrated) What is Humalog? Humalog (insulin lispro) is a fast-acting insulin that starts to work about 15 minutes after injection, peaks in about 1 hour, and keeps working for 2 to 4 hours. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Humalog is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Humalog is used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. Humalog is also used to treat type 1 diabetes in adults and children who are at least 3 years old. Important information Humalog is a fast-acting insulin that begins to work very quickly. If you use this medication with meal, use it within 15 minutes before or just after you eat. Never share an injection pen, cartridge, or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. You should not use Humalog if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Humalog is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels. Before taking this medicine You should not use Humalog if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Humalog should not be given to a child younger than 3 years old. Humalog should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure Humalog is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if Continue reading >>

Insulin Lispro - Oakwood University Department Of Nursing...

Insulin Lispro - Oakwood University Department Of Nursing...

insulin lispro - OAKWOOD UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF NURSING BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM PATIENT MEDICATION FORM DATE INTIALS EM 1 2 TRADE NAME insulin lispro - OAKWOOD UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF NURSING... This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 2 pages. OAKWOOD UNIVERSITYDEPARTMENT OF NURSINGBACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMPATIENT MEDICATION FORMDATE: JANUARY 25, 2015PATIENTS INTIALS: EM1.TRADE NAME: HUMALOGGENERIC NAME: INSULIN LISPRO2.THERAPEUTIC USES:TREATMENT OF INSULIN-DEPENDENT TYPE I DIABETES MELLITUS3.CONTRAINDICATIONS: HYPERSENSIVITY, HYPOGLYCEMIA4.SIDE EFFECTS: LOCALIZED REDDNESS, SWELLING, ITCHING, ALLERGY5.ROUTE/DOSAGE:6.NURSING IMPLICATIONSA.WHAT SHOULD YOU ASSESS BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER MEDICATION? ASSESS FOR HYPOGLYCEMIA, COOL, WET SKIN, TREMORS, DIZZINESS, ASSESS FOR SLEEPINESS, RESTLESSNESS, DIM Unformatted text preview: VISION, FATIGUE B. WHAT LAB TEST(S) SHOULD YOU CONSIDER WHEN GIVING MEDICATION? BLOOD GLUCOSE LEVEL C. WHAT SHOULD YOU CONSIDER WHEN GIVING MEDICATION? D. WHAT SHOULD YOU EXPECT FROM GIVING THE MEDICATION? E. WHAT SHOULD YOU TEACH THE PATIENT/FAMILY? INSTRUCT ON PROPER TECHNIQUE FOR ADMINISTRATION, TESTING GLUCOSE, AND SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS, STICK TO PRESCRIBED DIET, CARRY CANDY AND SUGAR IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, WEAR OR CARRY MEDICAL ALERT BRACELET... As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students. Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business 17, Course Hero Intern I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. Its truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to surv Continue reading >>

Insulin Type

Insulin Type

Insulin Type: Rapid-acting analogue (clear) Humalog (insulin Lispro) NovoRapid (insulin Aspart) Apidra (insulin glulisine) Onset Peak Humalog 1-2 h NovoRapid 1- 1.5 h Apidra 1-1.5 h Duration Humalog 3.5 - 4.75 h Novorapid 3 -5 h Apidra 3 - 5 h Considerations Client should eat within 10–15 minutes of injection. Insulin Compatibility Rapid-acting insulin can be mixed with N, NPH. Mixture should be given within 15 minutes of a meal. Insulin Type: Short-acting analogue (clear) Humulin R Novolin ge Toronto Onset 30 minutes Peak 2 - 3 hours Duration 6.5h Considerations Should be given 30 - 45 minutes prior to meals. Insulin Type: Intermediate-acting (cloudy) Novolin ge NPH Humulin N Onset 1 – 3 hours Peak 5 - 8 hours Duration Up to 18 hours Considerations Must be adequately re-suspended before injecting. Insulin Compatibility N or NPH & short-acting insulin may be mixed & used immediately or stored, refrigerated, for future use. Pre-filled syringes should be stored in the fridge, with needle tips up. They are stable for 1 month. NPH or N cannot be mixed with Lentus or Levemir insulin. Insulin Type: Long - acting analogues (clear) Lantus (insulin glargine) Levemir (insulin detemir) Onset 90 min Peak not applicable Duration Up to 24 h (glargine 24 h, determir 16-24 h) Considerations Lantus is available in vials, catridges & pre-filled disposable pens (SoloStar). Levemir is only available in catridges. Both Lantus and Levemir are clear. Clients must be alerted to the potential danger of confusing Lantus or Levamir with other clear insulin (rapid or short-acting insulins). Use of pre-filled syringes are not recommended Insulin Compatibility Glargine and Levemir cannot be mixed with any other insulin or solution Insulin Type: Premixed (cloudy) A single vial contains a fixed ra Continue reading >>

Medication Prescribing Error Reporting And Prevention Program: A 14-year Experience

Medication Prescribing Error Reporting And Prevention Program: A 14-year Experience

Medication-Use Issue "Targeted" by Process Leadership and oversight responsibility for all aspects of medication use within medical center. Multidisciplinary team reviews all Formulary decisions for issues related to safety/optimal medication use. Reviews all policies, procedures, protocols, pathways for patient safety issues. Reviews all medication errors, adverse drug reaction reports. Initiates/implements appropriate medication system changes. Safety issues related to all medications considered in evaluation of medications within medical center. Formulary decision may include, restrictions on uses, restrictions on site of use, monitoring requirements, required use of protocols, pathways and order sheets, special labeling, standardized preparation and administration, etc. AMC Printed/Electronic Formulary Information Availability of information on appropriate medication use Reference to all relevant AMC policies, procedures, protocols, pathways. Formulary written as an "action-oriented" drug information source and medication use guide, with specific recommendations for care giver actions (see renal drug dosing, food-drug and drug-drug interaction, programs below as examples). Includes special warnings and recommendations related to reducing risk to patients. Provides process to standardize and limit variability in care (eg, prescribing restrictions, available drug formulations, drug preparation, drug administration, monitoring, patient education, etc.) Each drug monograph includes cross reference to all relevant order sheets, protocols, policies, and procedures. Formulary available in print and electronic form (intranet) to all prescribers and nursing staff. Consistency of order review, improved use of RPh expertise, improved communication between pharmacist and other Continue reading >>

Insulin Lispro Injection (admelog)

Insulin Lispro Injection (admelog)

By William Elliott, MD, FACP, and James Chan, PharmD, PhD Dr. Elliott is Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Chan is Associate Clinical Professor, School of Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco. Drs. Elliott and Chan report no financial relationships relevant to this field of study. The FDA has approved a new short-acting insulin as a follow-on biologic (FOB) product. Insulin lispro-FOB was approved in the European Union as a biosimilar, but in the United States it was approved using the FDAs abbreviated approval 505(b)(2) pathway.1 This relies partly on the agencys finding of safety and effectiveness of the innovator insulin lispro (Humalog) to support approval. This is the second follow-on insulin, after the FDA approved insulin glargine (Basaglar) in December 2015. Insulin lispro-FOB is indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients 3 years of age with type 1 diabetes mellitus and adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.2 The recommended dose is given by subcutaneous administration within 15 minutes before a meal or immediately after a meal. It also can be administered by continuous subcutaneous infusion (insulin pump) or intravenous infusion. The dosage is individualized based on the route of administration and the patients metabolic needs, blood glucose monitoring results, and glycemic control goals.1 Insulin lispro-FOB is available in 10 mL multiple-dose vials and 3 mL single-patient use prefilled pens (SoloSTAR). Insulin lispro-FOB provides another option and market competition for insulin lispro (Humalog), potentially lowering the cost of therapy. It is not clear whether insulin lispro-FOB is interchangeable with Humalog, as interchangeability has not been demonstrated. Continue reading >>

Nursing Implications Diabetes - Aol Search Results

Nursing Implications Diabetes - Aol Search Results

@ Diabetic Foot Care Nursing Interventions Diabetes ... diabetescx.com/diabetic-foot-care-nursing-interventions=v8787 Diabetic Foot Care Nursing Interventions ::The 3 Step Trick that Reverses Diabetes Permanently in As Little as 11 Days.[ DIABETIC FOOT CARE ... Nursing Care Plan for Constipation | New Health Advisor m.newhealthadvisor.com/Nursing-Care-Plan-for-Constipation.html The nursing care plan for constipation involves conducting a thorough assessment of the patients lifestyle and health condition, goals and criteria for outcome. The role of the nurse in health promotion - Hospital News hospitalnews.com/the-role-of-the-nurse-in-health-promotion The role of the nurse in health promotion. 42906. ... think about nursing and the impact the occupation has on the health and wellness of our society. @ Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Nursing Care Plan Scribd - Type ... www.diydiabetestreatment.com/diabetes-mellitus-type-2-nursing-care... [[DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2 NURSING CARE PLAN SCRIBD]] Diabetes Destroyer Scam Or Not ?, Type 2 Diabetes Effects On Lifestyle We Have Tried Diabetes Destroyer. Senokot S Uses, Side Effects & Warnings - Drugs.com Physician reviewed Senokot S ... It is not known whether Senokot S passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing ... What other drugs will affect Senokot S? Patient Education | Joslin Diabetes Center www.joslin.org/care/patient-education.html Patient education is an integral part of the diabetes care at Joslin. Get more information about the diabetes patient education programs offered at Joslin. Multivitamin - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs ... www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/multivitamin My Daily Diabetes; Settings; ... milk and may harm a nursing ... in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects. Many multivitamin prod Continue reading >>

Insulin Lispro Injection

Insulin Lispro Injection

Insulin lispro is used to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to treat people with type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control their diabetes. In patients with type 1 diabetes, insulin lispro is always used with another type of insulin, unless it is used in an external insulin pump. In patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin lispro may be used with another type of insulin or with oral medication(s) for diabetes. Insulin lispro is a short-acting, man-made version of human insulin. Insulin lispro works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin lispro comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid Continue reading >>

Spontaneous Bleeding; Transient Thrombocytopenia; Fever, Chills, Skin Rash; Hyperkalemia; Pain At Injection Site; Ecchymosis

Spontaneous Bleeding; Transient Thrombocytopenia; Fever, Chills, Skin Rash; Hyperkalemia; Pain At Injection Site; Ecchymosis

Trade G Generic Class May be given Therapeutic Effect Major Side Effects Major Nursing Implications Heparin Lovenox Heparin Sodium Enoxaprin Anticoagulant Anticoagulant Subcutaneous IV piggyback (IVPB) Subcutaneous Enhances the inhibitory effect of antithrombin III (heparin cofactor) on several factors essential to normal blood clotting thereby blocking the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin, and fibrinogen to fibrin. Same as above Spontaneous bleeding; transient thrombocytopenia; fever, chills, skin rash; hyperkalemia; pain at injection site; ecchymosis Same as above DOES NOT lyse (or dissolve) already existing thrombi, but may prevent their extension or formation of new clots. Obtain baseline blood tests prior to administration. Monitor APPT (PPT) closely (follow hospital policy for times) CBC, platelet count, urine and stool for occult blood. Routine coagulation test not required. Coumadin Warfarin Sodium Anticoagulant Oral Indirectly interferes with blood clotting by depressing hepatic synthesis of Vitamin K- dependent coagulation factors: II, VII, IX, and X. In essence, coumadin prevents conversion of prothrombin (factor II) to thrombin. Hemorrhage; anorexia; elevated serum transaminase levels; jaundice DOES NOT break up existing clots, but prevents extension and formation of new clots. Closely monitor PT/INR (especially INR) Careful patient education concerning food and drug interactions Plavix Clopidrogrel Bisulfate Antithrombotic Platelet aggregation inhibitor oral Inhibits platelet aggregation by selectively preventing the binding of adenosine diphosphate to its platelet receptor, and the subsequent ADP-mediated activation of the glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa complex. This results in prolonged bleeding time. Clopidogrel also inhibits platelet aggregation induced b Continue reading >>

Antidiabetic Medications

Antidiabetic Medications

Cardiovascular system Fatty acids can be bound or attached to other molecules, such as in triglycerides or phospholipids. When they are not attached to other molecules, they are known as "free" fatty acids. The uncombined fatty acids or free fatty acids may come from the breakdown of a triglyceride into its components (fatty acids and glycerol). However as fats are insoluble in water they must be bound to appropriate regions in the plasma protein albumin for transport around the body. The levels of "free fatty acid" in the blood are limited by the number of albumin binding sites available. Free fatty acids are an important source of fuel for many tissues since they can yield relatively large quantities of ATP. Many cell types can use either glucose or fatty acids for this purpose. In particular, heart and skeletal muscle prefer fatty acids. The brain cannot use fatty acids as a source of fuel; it relies on glucose, or on ketone bodies. Ketone bodies are produced in the liver by fatty acid metabolism during starvation, or during periods of low carbohydrate intake. Oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen and a biological system's ability to readily detoxify the reactive intermediates or easily repair the resulting damage. All forms of life maintain a reducing environment within their cells. This reducing environment is preserved by enzymes that maintain the reduced state through a constant input of metabolic energy. Disturbances in this normal redox state can cause toxic effects through the production of peroxides and free radicals that damage all components of the cell, including proteins, lipids, and DNA. * Continue reading >>

Nursing Care Related To The Gastrointestinal System

Nursing Care Related To The Gastrointestinal System

Lesson 72.Nursing Implications For Administration of Insulin 1-72. NURSING IMPLICATIONS FOR ADMINISTRATION OF INSULIN a. Be certain to give the correct type of insulin. b. Prepare the correct dosage. Have another nurse double-check the dose before you administer the injection. c. Use the correct syringe. Never use a regular syringe for insulin. Use a syringe calibrated in "units." d. Before drawing up the insulin, gently "roll" the bottle between your palms to mix and warm the solution. e. Eliminate all air bubbles from the syringe. One small air bubble may displace 2 or 3 units of insulin. f. Cleanse the skin with alcohol and allow to dry. This helps avoid pitting of the skin. g. Give the injection subcutaneously. Rotate the injection site with each dose. (Rotating the sites prevents tissue necrosis.) Refer to figure 1-9 for injection sites. h. Always check to see whether the patient is and has been eating his normal diet. (1) Administration of the regular dosage of insulin when the patient's intake of food has been decreased or withheld could cause the blood sugar level to drop too much. (2) A patient who is experiencing vomiting will require adjustment of the insulin dosage. (3) A patient who is being held NPO for procedures or tests should not receive his regular insulin dosage. This could precipitate a hypoglycemic reaction. Notify the physician for instructions. Routinely, insulin is withheld until the procedure is completed and the patient is permitted to eat. Continue reading >>

Insulin Lispro, Rdna Origin | Definition Of Insulin Lispro, Rdna Origin By Medical Dictionary

Insulin Lispro, Rdna Origin | Definition Of Insulin Lispro, Rdna Origin By Medical Dictionary

Insulin lispro, rDNA origin | definition of insulin lispro, rDNA origin by Medical dictionary insulin lispro protamine suspension/insulin lispro injection mixtures, rDNA origin See for more information concerning insulins Control of hyperglycemia in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. stimulating glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and fat, A rapid-acting insulin with more rapid onset and shorter duration than human regular insulin; should be used with an intermediate- or long-acting insulin. Control of hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. Absorption: Very rapidly absorbed from subcutaneous administration sites (within a few minutes). Distribution: Identical to endogenous insulin. Metabolism and Excretion: Metabolized by liver, spleen, kidney, and muscle. 75% insulin lispro protamine suspension/25% insulin lispro injection subcut Contraindicated in: Hypoglycemia; Allergy or hypersensitivity to insulin lispro; Hypoglycemia. Use Cautiously in: Stress or infectionmay temporarily insulin requirements); Renal/hepatic impairmentmay insulin requirements; Must be used with a longer-acting insulin in patients with type 1 diabetes; Concomitant use with pioglitazone or rosiglitazone ( risk of fluid retention and worsening HF) Obstetric: Pregnancy may temporarily insulin requirements; Pediatric: Children <3 yr (safety of lispro insulin not established) or <18 yr (safety of 75/25 mix not established). allergic reactions including anaphylaxis (life-threatening) Beta blockers, clonidine, and reserpine may mask some of the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia.Corticosteroids, thyroid supplements, estrogens, isoniazid, niacin,phenothiazines,, and rifampin may insulin requirements.Alcohol, ACE inhibitors, MAO inhibitors, octreotide, oral hypoglycemic agents, and salicylates, m Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

Insulin is a drug that is used to control glucose in patients with diabetes mellitus. It is the only parenteral antidiabetic agent available for exogenous replacement of low levels of insulin. Insulin is the hormone produced by the pancreatic beta cells of the islets of Langerhans. It is released into circulation when the levels of glucose around the cells arise. Insulin circulates through the body and reacts with specific insulin receptor sites to stimulate the transport of glucose into cells to be used for energy (facilitated diffusion). Originally prepared from pork and beef pancreas, virtually all insulin is prepared by recombinant DNA technology now. This is a purer form of insulin and is not associated with sensitivity problems that many patients developed with the animal products. 1 Disease Spotlight: Diabetes Mellitus Disease Spotlight: Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes Mellitus (literally, “honey urine”) is a condition wherein there is a complex disturbance in the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. This alteration results in thickening of the layer below the endothelial lining of the blood vessels. This, in turn, causes narrowing, vessel remodeling, and decreased blood flow through vessels. Most frequent clinical signs include hyperglycemia (fasting blood sugar of >106 mg/dL) and the presence of sugar in the urine (glycosuria). Diabetes is classified into two: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes is common in younger people and is connected with cases of viral destruction of beta cells of the pancreas. On the other hand, type 2 is adult-onset and is associated with not enough insulin to maintain glucose control. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) results when there is an increase in glucose in the blood. Clinical signs and symptoms include fatigue, letha Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Lispro (humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog Kwikpen, Humalog Pen)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Lispro (humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog Kwikpen, Humalog Pen)?

HUMALOG (insulin lispro) Injection DESCRIPTION HUMALOG® (insulin lispro injection) is a rapid-acting human insulin analog used to lower blood glucose. Insulin lispro is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli. Insulin lispro differs from human insulin in that the amino acid proline at position B28 is replaced by lysine and the lysine in position B29 is replaced by proline. Chemically, it is Lys(B28), Pro(B29) human insulin analog and has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 and a molecular weight of 5808, both identical to that of human insulin. HUMALOG has the following primary structure: HUMALOG is a sterile, aqueous, clear, and colorless solution. Each milliliter of HUMALOG U-100 contains insulin lispro 100 units, 16 mg glycerin, 1.88 mg dibasic sodium phosphate, 3.15 mg Metacresol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.0197 mg zinc ion, trace amounts of phenol, and Water for Injection. Insulin lispro has a pH of 7.0 to 7.8. The pH is adjusted by addition of aqueous solutions of hydrochloric acid 10% and/or sodium hydroxide 10%. Each milliliter of HUMALOG U-200 contains insulin lispro 200 units, 16 mg glycerin, 5 mg tromethamine, 3.15 mg Metacresol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.046 mg zinc ion, trace amounts of phenol, and Water for Injection. Insulin lispro has a pH of 7.0 to 7.8. The pH is adjusted by addition of aqueous solutions of hydrochloric acid 10% and/or sodium hydroxide 10%. font size A A A 1 2 3 4 5 Next What is Type 2 Diabetes? The most common form of diabetes is type 2 diabetes, formerly called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or "adult onset" diabetes, so-called because it typically develops in adults over age 35, though it can develop at any age. Type 2 diabetes i Continue reading >>

Insulin Lispro Overview

Insulin Lispro Overview

Insulin Lispro is a prescription medication used to treat type 1 diabetes. It can also be used to treat some patients with type 2 diabetes. Insulin Lispro is a fast-acting form of insulin and is often used with other forms of insulin. Insulin Lispro is administered with meals. Insulin is naturally produced by the body to control the amount of sugar (glucose) in the blood. In patients with type 1 diabetes, the body does not make insulin and must be replaced by injections of insulin. In patients with type 2 diabetes, the body makes insulin but does not use it efficiently or appropriately. Common side effects of Insulin Lispro include redness, swelling, or itching in the place where you injected Insulin Lispro or changes in the feel of your skin such as skin thickening or a little indentation in the skin. Insulin Lispro can also cause low blood sugar, which can cause drowsiness and dizziness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Insulin Lispro affects you. Insulin Lispro is a prescription medication used to treat type 1 diabetes. It can also be used to treat some patients with type 2 diabetes. It is a fast-acting form of insulin. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Continue reading >>

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