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Insulin Injections And Belly Fat

Insulin Injection Site Dystrophic Calcification With Fat Necrosis: A Case Report Of An Uncommon Adverse Effect

Insulin Injection Site Dystrophic Calcification With Fat Necrosis: A Case Report Of An Uncommon Adverse Effect

Insulin Injection Site Dystrophic Calcification with Fat Necrosis: A Case Report of an Uncommon Adverse Effect Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, Kalapet, Puducherry, India 1Department of Pathology, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, Kalapet, Puducherry, India Address for correspondence: Dr. Sharad Ramdas, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, Kalapet - 605 014, Puducherry, India. E-mail: [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright : Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. We report a case of an uncommon adverse effect of insulin injection resulting in hard subcutaneous swelling in the lower abdomen of a 47-year-oldfemale with type 1 diabetes. Extensive dystrophic calcification and fat necrosis was revealed on histopathological examination. Keywords: Calcification, cutaneous, dystrophic, injection, insulin Cutaneous adverse effects of insulin injections can cause inadvertent fluctuation in the glucose levels by possibly causing interference with absorption at the site. In spite of improvements in the insulin therapy these adverse effects are still common particularly in type 1 diabetics and in patients who do not rotate the injection site. We report one such case with poor glycemic control in which the injection site was cosmetically unsightly and histopathology revealed rare complication of dystrophic calcification. A 47-year-old woman Continue reading >>

Fat Around The Belly & Diabetes

Fat Around The Belly & Diabetes

If you’ve recently moved up a waist size in your pants, you might take pause and evaluate your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Though a multitude of factors such as genetic predisposition and environmental triggers can influence development of type 2 diabetes, carrying excess body weight has long been associated with increased risk. In 2007, the Association for Weight Management and Obesity Prevention, The Obesity Society, and the American Diabetes Association released a consensus statement identifying waist circumference as a “stronger predictor of diabetes” than BMI. (See Reference 2) Type 2 diabetes can be defined as the reduced production of insulin coupled with cell resistance to that insulin. (See Reference 3) Produced by the pancreas, insulin enables cells to take in their energy source from the blood: sugar. Because fat tissue secretes substances that reduce cells’ sensitivity to insulin, the more fat tissue present in the body, the more insulin resistance. Fat tissue concentrated in the abdomen is especially associated with insulin resistance. (See Reference 3) Waist Circumference is More Predictive Than BMI In preparation for their 2007 consensus statement, the Association for Weight Management and Obesity Prevention, The Obesity Society, and the American Diabetes Association extensively reviewed obesity-related clinical research studies as well as large epidemiological studies. Review of the data revealed that waist circumference, not BMI, was a consistently better predictor of whether a person would develop type 2 diabetes or not. (See Reference 2) Evidence from these studies also supports that waist circumference is a better predictor than blood pressure or even blood sugar levels. (See Reference 2) Weight Loss Can Reduce Your Risk The Diabetes Continue reading >>

Stomach Fat Deposits...

Stomach Fat Deposits...

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I am quite a slim type 1 although I have put on a bit of weight recently which is good as I was a bit too thin. I have however always tended to inject in my stomach as my thighs and arms were a bit thin. I have built up fatty lumpy deposits across my tummy which look a little strange. I do move my injection sites around my stomach but have ended up with fatty deposits which are bigger on my left than right side and are starting to really bother me. I am considering moving my injection site to my bottom as I had the same problem when injecting my thighs but also lost a lot of sensation in my thighs when knjecting there which worried me. This sensation has now returned. I guess I just want to know if anyone else has the same issues? If I move to my bottom will the lumps and bumps on my tummy eventually go? I have been doing a lot of exercise recently which is building muscle and if anything has made my stomach look even stranger.... You mustn't inject into fatty deposits as it seriously messes with the rate at which the insulin is absorbed. Are you changing your needle with each injection? I used to think that that was a bit over the top but have been persuaded by my DN to do that; so I'd make sure you do it too. Needles are designed for one use only and so it makes sense really to follow their intended design. Use your bum, your upper arms, your legs and rotate through all of them. Avoid your stomach for a few months until those fatty deposits go away. I hardly have any fat on my thighs, but that is fine for injecting. You'll find different areas will have slightly different absorption times for insulin so you may want to keep an eye on blood sugars if Continue reading >>

Blasted Belly Fat: What You Can Do

Blasted Belly Fat: What You Can Do

As frustrating as it is to carry around that spare tire or suffer from “muffin top” syndrome, you might find some comfort in the fact that a slimmer, trimmer middle is something that everyone strives for, even celebrities (OK, I realize that’s little consolation). But my point is that, whether your goal is to lose weight to improve your health, to look better, or to feel better — or all three — it can be a challenge. Fortunately, there are steps that you can take to whittle your waist somewhat and, perhaps most importantly, lower your risk for a host of health problems. Blasting Away Belly Fat: Here’s How Losing weight can be a challenge, and it seems to be harder for some than others. Plus, depending on how much you want to lose, you may be in it for the long haul. Keep in mind that everyone is different, and what may work for one person may not be the best option for someone else. There really is no magic bullet…yet. And if there were, all of us would have heard of it by now. That being said, last week I mentioned that liposuction (not exactly a feasible option for many people due to the cost) is not a contender for losing visceral fat. So what does work? Here are some possible options: Move it. Yes, you do need to exercise. There’s no way around it. For some people, exercise doesn’t result in actual weight loss (meaning, the scale may not budge), but it can and does shrink visceral fat. Even if you haven’t gained weight, you may notice that fat redistributes itself and tends to settle around your middle. This is especially true of women who have gone through menopause. A study done at Duke University showed that men and women who did no exercise for six months increased their visceral fat by 9%; those who exercised regularly decreased their viscer Continue reading >>

Body Fat / Scar Tissue From Abdominal Insulin Injections

Body Fat / Scar Tissue From Abdominal Insulin Injections

body fat / scar tissue from abdominal insulin injections I found a post from a kid on this forum who had the same problem I describe below, no one really answered his question so I thought I would try again. I am 35, but from about age 16-25 I would rotate my injections very well, but the abdomen was the easiest since I was in sports, etc.. I noticed what for most would appear to be a slight "belly" ridge forming and stopped giving injections completely in my abdomen.My endocrinologist said after 2-3 years it would dissipate, well it's been 10 years now and it hasn't dissipated. But I've never really tried to get my body fat down to maybe 8-9% where it would be feasible to have my body attack it.I am 6'1" tall and 190lbs.I've lost 5 lbs in the past 3 weeks and now have a 15.5% body fat, I am going to get down to 8-9% and see if the belly deposits simply stick out more as I get skinnier or if they too are reduced. If they don't go away through a rigorous daily exercise and a reduced calorie diet, then I am going to see a specialist to see if it's possible to liposuction the scar tissue out of there...call me a narcissist but it bugs me! I am finding it very difficult to find any information on this problem or ways to correct it!!Help! Continue reading >>

Does Injected Insulin Hold Fat In The Stomach?

Does Injected Insulin Hold Fat In The Stomach?

I am 83 years old and have had diabetes for 48 years. I have tried for seven years to lose weight, and I lose it everywhere except my stomach. I've injected insulin in my stomach for 45 years. Is it true that the insulin I inject holds the fat in my stomach? If so, how can I get rid of the stomach fat without moving the injection site to other parts of my body? Continue reading >>

Could A Weekly Injection Get Rid Of Harmful Belly Fat?

Could A Weekly Injection Get Rid Of Harmful Belly Fat?

Could a weekly injection get rid of harmful belly fat? Scientists may be on the verge of an effective new treatment for diabetes and obesity, after designing a drug that can be injected directly into potentially harmful white fat and transform it into "good" brown fat. Researchers have found a way to deliver drugs directly to areas of white fat and convert it to brown fat. White fat, or white adipose tissue, is a form of body fat that stores calories and accumulates as an energy reserve. It also provides insulation and helps to protect body tissue against injury by acting as a cushion. However, consuming too many calories or not getting enough exercise can lead to an excess buildup of white fat. This may lead to obesity and associated health problems, such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease , particularly when white fat accumulates around the abdominal area. Brown fat, or brown adipose tissue, is often referred to as the "good" body fat, as it burns calories to generate heat. As such, researchers have been searching for ways to increase brown fat in the body and reduce white fat, as a means of treating obesity and related conditions. In previous research , Meng Deng - an assistant professor of agricultural and biological engineering, biomedical engineering, and materials engineering at Purdue University in West Lafayette, IN - and colleagues found that inhibiting "Notch signaling" in white fat can convert it into brown fat. In detail, the team found that blocking the activity of a gene called Notch1 in white fat cells increases the expression of uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) - which is a protein that promotes fat burning - and leads to the browning of white fat. Their latest study builds on this finding; the team has discovered a way to deliver a Notch-signaling inhibi Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Diabetic Diet

Insulin Resistance Diabetic Diet

Insulin Resistance and the Diabetic Diet have been a greatly misunderstood health problem among men and women. For many of us, we do not realize the Diabetic gene causes Belly Fat formation. Many have the mistaken belief that insulin resistance gene in our bodies only happens in those who are overweight. Also many of us who are not familiar with Insulin Resistance or Diabetes think you have it if you eat too many sweets and carbs. Some people think that it leads inevitably to Diabetes. Furthermore, some people believe they can’t lose weight if they’re insulin resistance. That is why we introduce a customized Diabetic Diet that can reverse Insulin Resistance in our patients. While it’s true that many men and women are insulin resistant, or they are well on their way. But the great news is that insulin resistance and Diabetes is something we can prevent and even reverse naturally! Low Carb Diets – Diabetic Diet With Real Food Reversing insulin resistance and onset diabetes is really a matter of understanding insulin’s role in the body. Insulin allows glucose to travel from the bloodstream into the cells. For most of us, this will cause us to develop a lot if belly fat. This is where it is used for cell functioning. Furthermore, when we eat foods high in refined carbohydrates, insulin levels surge to remove the sugar from the blood. At this point the sugar get it into your cells. This mechanism works very well for the most part. Although, if insulin spikes to often from a diet rich in the high carb foods, it will trigger insulin secretion. This means your cells respond by decreasing the reactivity and number of insulin receptors on their surfaces. Eventually, this prevents glucose from getting into your cells. This can easily lead to high blood sugar and, eventua Continue reading >>

Painful Fat Necrosis Resulting From Insulin Injections

Painful Fat Necrosis Resulting From Insulin Injections

Go to: The case is a 34-year-old woman with long-standing type 1 diabetes mellitus with existing follow-up in the outpatient clinic at the Warwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, UHCW. She had maintained good glycaemic control and glycaemic stability with basal bolus regimen for many years. She had not developed any diabetes-related complications and had no other co-morbidities. Six months ago, she presented to A&E with sudden-onset, well-localised and severe pain in the right iliac fossa, just lateral to the para-umbilical area. Her biochemistry was normal. Ultrasound scan, however, revealed a right-sided ovarian cyst, which was thought to have caused pain to her. She was discharged from A&E with simple analgesia. On subsequent gynaecological follow-up 4 weeks later, her pain remained severe and examination revealed an exquisitely tender subcutaneous nodule at the same location measuring 2 cm in diameter. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan at the time revealed a 1 cm mass in the subcutaneous adipose tissue, which co-localised to her pain. The mass demonstrated a central fat signal surrounded by a peripheral ring: observations consistent with fat necrosis. There were other smaller subcutaneous nodules also observed in the left para-umbilical area. Subsequent surgical resection of the main area of fat necrosis was performed. The patient made an excellent recovery and her pain resolved post-operatively. Histology confirmed the presence of fat necrosis. Fat necrosis is a rare complication of s.c. insulin injection. This case illustrates the importance of considering this diagnosis in patients who inject insulin and develop localised injection-site pain. Fat necrosis is a rare complication of insulin injections that can manifest wi Continue reading >>

Blasted Belly Fat: Types Of Fat

Blasted Belly Fat: Types Of Fat

It’s no secret that having excess fat anywhere in the body isn’t so healthy. When’s the last time you took a good long look at your body in a full-length mirror? If you’re like many people, you probably don’t do this, and if you do, you might quickly glance away. Yes, Americans are overweight and obese. In fact, just a couple of weeks ago, the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation released their annual report, entitled “F As in Fat”, stating that obesity rates in a dozen US states have risen above 30%. To put that in perspective, four years ago, only one US state had an obesity rate above 30%. So yes, being overweight or obese is a growing problem (no pun intended) and unfortunately, there is no one right or easy way to fix it. And no doubt, for those of you who struggle with your weight, you’re likely tired of hearing about obesity statistics and how important it is to reach a healthy weight. It’s hard and it’s discouraging. Saddlebags vs. Spare Tires If it’s any consolation, you might be able to feel a little bit better based on where most of your fat stores are located. Admittedly, you may never be thin and you may never lose those 50 or 100 pounds. But you can still do a lot to stay as healthy as possible and limit your chances of heart disease, high blood pressure, gallbladder disease, and some types of cancer. The type of fat you have also can affect your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Go back to your mirror and take a long hard look. Where is most of your fat located? If you tend to carry your weight more in your hips and thighs (sometimes called “saddlebags” or being a “pear” shape), you can breathe a little sigh of relief. Carrying weight in these areas is what scientists believe to be less “har Continue reading >>

Insulin And Weight Gain: Keep The Pounds Off

Insulin And Weight Gain: Keep The Pounds Off

Insulin and weight gain often go hand in hand, but weight control is possible. If you need insulin therapy, here's how to minimize — or avoid — weight gain. Weight gain is a common side effect for people who take insulin — a hormone that regulates the absorption of sugar (glucose) by cells. This can be frustrating because maintaining a healthy weight is an important part of your overall diabetes management plan. The good news is that it is possible to maintain your weight while taking insulin. The link between insulin and weight gain When you take insulin, glucose is able to enter your cells, and glucose levels in your blood drop. This is the desired treatment goal. But if you take in more calories than you need to maintain a healthy weight — given your level of activity — your cells will get more glucose than they need. Glucose that your cells don't use accumulates as fat. Avoid weight gain while taking insulin Eating healthy foods and being physically active most days of the week can help you prevent unwanted weight gain. The following tips can help you keep the pounds off: Count calories. Eating and drinking fewer calories helps you prevent weight gain. Stock the refrigerator and pantry with fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Plan for every meal to have the right mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins, and fats. Generally, experts recommend that meals consist of half non starchy vegetable, one-quarter protein and one quarter a starch such as rice or a starchy vegetable such as corn or peas. Trim your portion sizes, skip second helpings and drink water instead of high-calorie drinks. Talk to your doctor, nurse or a dietitian about meal-planning strategies and resources. Don't skip meals. Don't try to cut calories by skipping meals. When you skip Continue reading >>

'belly Bottom': A Graphic Warning Of What Happens When Diabetics Inject Insulin At The Same Site Every Day

'belly Bottom': A Graphic Warning Of What Happens When Diabetics Inject Insulin At The Same Site Every Day

A 55-year-old man with type 1 diabetes shocked his doctors, after he revealed what looked like two bottom cheeks hanging below his navel. The patient from South Africa, had been told to inject his life-saving insulin jabs into two areas of his stomach to control his blood-sugar levels. However, he hadn't realised that he needed to rotate the injection site around different parts of his body because the hormone insulin encourages the build up of soft fatty swellings within the layers of the skin. The man went on to develop 'firm and pendulous' masses on his stomach - a condition known as lipohypertrophy. Mild cases are surprisingly common, however this patient had a severe case as he hadn't changed his injection sites for three decades. Dr Stan Landau, from the Centre for Diabetes and Endocrinology in Joannesburg, was part of the team who treated the patient. He told Mail Online: 'We are a group of five senior doctors with many years experience between us and have never seen such a case before. 'We felt we needed to publish the picture in a journal because it was such an extreme case.' Dr Landau said the patient had continued to inject himself in his stomach because he thought the lumps were normal in insulin users. 'He had seen others with similar, but smaller masses in the same location. Sadly the lumps, though painless, had never been inspected,' the expert said. Dr Landau added that although the lumps may shrink slightly the disfiguration would be permanent without plastic surgery. The patient was encouraged to rotate the injection-site and use a smaller needle. He was also given a different type of insulin. Unfortunately the team lost contact with the patient after he failed to return for follow-up appointments. Writing in the New England Journal of Medicine, the te Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Permanently Banish Belly Fat

7 Ways To Permanently Banish Belly Fat

Sixty-nine percent of American adults are overweight, and over 35 percent are obese1. These conditions aren’t just aesthetically unpleasing. Obesity increases your risk for numerous conditions including heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and cancer2. Sadly, about 3.4 million adults die each year3 from being overweight or obese. Globally, obesity now kills about the same as tobacco and more than all wars, terrorism, and violence. Nearly all people who are overweight already have “pre-diabetes” and have significant risks of disease and death. They just don’t know it. When you begin to put on weight, especially lethal belly fat, your biology shifts out of balance, veering into the unstable and unhealthy territory of disease —which in turn makes you fatter. A vicious, deadly cycle ensues unless you take control of your weight. Insulin: The Key Player in Belly Fat Numerous hormones contribute to belly fat, but none proves more powerful than insulin, your fat storage hormone. High levels of insulin tell your body to gain weight around the belly, and you become more apple-shaped over time. Insulin also drives inflammation and oxidative stress, creating myriad downstream effects. Eventually you become insulin resistant, which leads your body to generate belly fat and hold on to that spare tire for dear life. Fatigue after meals, sugar cravings, blood sugar swings or hypoglycemia, high triglycerides, low HDL, low sex drive, and problems with blood clotting are also common among people who are overweight. Simply put, less insulin equals less belly fat, since insulin makes you hungry and stores belly fat. The best thing you can do to prevent diabesity and all its problems is to lose weight. The Number One Thing You Can Do to Reduce Belly Fat Hig Continue reading >>

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Insulin is a hormone that helps manage diabetes when it is injected into the body. It can't be taken as a pill or oral medication. This is because the enzymes in the stomach will break down the insulin before it reaches the bloodstream. Insulin injections are one of many ways to treat and manage diabetes. Others include dietary and lifestyle changes, and oral medications. For people who require insulin injections, there are different types of insulin available. It is important to understand and follow the instructions that the doctor provides about how and where to inject insulin. Common injection sites Insulin is injected into the layer of fat directly under this skin, known as subcutaneous tissue. It is injected with a small needle or a device that looks like a pen. There are several different sites where insulin can be injected, including: Abdomen The abdomen is a common site for insulin injection that many people with diabetes choose to use. To give an injection into the abdomen, take a pinch of the fatty tissue from either side between the waist and the hipbones. It should be about 2 inches away from the belly button. This site is easy to access and some people report that it causes less discomfort than other sites. Upper Arms The upper arm is another site where insulin injections can be given. The needle should be placed into the back of the arm (tricep area), about halfway between the elbow and the shoulder. The main disadvantage of this site is that it is very difficult to use for self-administration and may require somebody else to do it. It may be more comfortable to inject into the non-dominant arm. This means injecting into the left arm of a right-handed person or the right arm of a left-handed person. Thighs The thigh is also a very easy area for self-injec Continue reading >>

Abdominal Fat & Insulin Resistance

Abdominal Fat & Insulin Resistance

If you have insulin resistance, you’re not alone -- this disorder of the body’s endocrine system affects up to 80 million Americans, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians. If untreated, insulin resistance can develop into serious health problems like type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Because increased belly fat is one of the primary risk factors, treatment for insulin resistance involves lifestyle changes such as losing weight and exercising. Video of the Day Insulin resistance means that your body’s muscle, fat and liver cells don’t respond normally to insulin, requiring your pancreas to produce increasing amounts of insulin to help blood glucose enter cells so it can be used as energy. All that excess glucose builds up in your bloodstream and can lead to diabetes and other diseases. Scientists have also learned that abdominal fat cells can disrupt the normal balance and functioning of hormones such as leptin and adiponectin, which are thought to play a role in your body’s response to insulin, according to Harvard University Medical School. Left untreated, insulin resistance not only causes diabetes, but it can lead to obesity, high cholesterol and cardiovascular disease, although the relationship between insulin resistance and the development of these conditions isn't yet known, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians. The AAFP also notes there is a strong relationship between abdominal obesity and the degree of insulin resistance, regardless of how much you weigh overall. To estimate your level of abdominal obesity, you can use the waist-hip ratio by measuring your waist at its narrowest point, usually just above the belly button, and your hips at their fullest point around the buttocks. Then, you divide your waist measureme Continue reading >>

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