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Insulin Injection Uses

Insulin

Insulin

Tweet Inside the pancreas, beta cells make the hormone insulin. With each meal, beta cells release insulin to help the body use or store the glucose it gets from food. Insulin is prescribed to people with type 1 diabetes. This is because type 1 diabetes destroys beta cells in the pancreas, meaning that the body can no longer produce insulin. People with type 2 diabetes make insulin, but their bodies don’t respond well to it. Some people with type 2 diabetes may take pills or insulin shots to help their bodies use glucose for energy. What you should know about insulin This section covers everything to do with insulin - insulin types, prescription, delivery, side effects, insulin pumps, over-dosage, lancets and more. Explore key guides in this section, including: How many types of insulin are there? There are 4 types of insulin, based on how soon the insulin starts working (onset), when it works the hardest (peak time) and how long it lasts in your body (duration). However, each person responds to insulin in his or her own way. That is why onset, peak time, and duration are given as ranges. The types of insulin are: Rapid-acting insulin (Lispro) reaches the blood within 15 minutes after injection. It peaks 30 to 90 minutes later and may last as long as 5 hours. Short-acting (regular) insulin usually reaches the blood within 30 minutes after injection. It peaks 2 to 4 hours later and stays in the blood for about 4 to 8 hours. Intermediate acting (NPH and lente) insulins reach the blood 2 to 6 hours after injection. They peak 4 to 14 hours later and stay in the blood for about 14 to 20 hours. Long acting (ultralente) insulin takes 6 to 14 hours to start working. It has no peak or a very small peak 10 to 16 hours after injection. It stays in the blood between 20 and 24 hou Continue reading >>

Strategies For Insulin Injection Therapy In Diabetes Self-management

Strategies For Insulin Injection Therapy In Diabetes Self-management

Strategies for Insulin Injection Therapy in Diabetes Self-Management Strategies for Insulin Injection Therapy in Diabetes Self-Management Linda Siminerio, PhD, RN, CDE Director, University of Pittsburgh Diabetes Institute Pittsburgh, PA Karmeen Kulkarni, MS, RD, BC-ADM, CDE Director, Scientific Affairs, R& D Abbott Diabetes Care Adjunct Faculty, University of Utah, College of Health, Department of Nutrition Salt Lake City, Utah Jerry Meece, RPh, FACA, CDM, CDE Director of Clinical Services Plaza Pharmacy and Wellness Center Gainesville, TX Ann Williams, PhD, RN, CDE Diabetes Educator Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, Ohio Marjorie Cypress, PhD, C-ANP, CDE Diabetes Nurse Practitioner ABQ Health Partners Albuquerque, NM Linda Haas, PhC, RN, CDE Endocrinology Clinical Nurse Specialist VA Puget Sound Health Care System Seattle, Washington Teresa Pearson, MS, RN, CDE Director, Diabetes Care Fairview Health Services Minneapolis, Minnesota Helena Rodbard, MD, FACP, MACE Chair, AACE Diabetes Mellitus Clinical Practice Guidelines Past President, American College of Endocrinology Past President, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Private Practice of Endocrinology Endocrine and Metabolic Consultants Rockville, MD Frank Lavernia, MD Private Practice Deerfield Beach, Florida In April 2011, the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) convened a multidisciplinary expert panel to propose guidelines for insulin injection therapy. The panel examined best practices and explored effective problem solving for patients who have difficulty with insulin injections. Among the topics addressed were insulin absorption, pain, injection sites, safety, barriers to insulin therapy, and teaching techniques for various populations. 1©2011 by the American Association Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: Types, Benefits, And How To Use Them

Insulin Pens: Types, Benefits, And How To Use Them

Insulin pens are used by people with diabetes to inject insulin. The pens include an insulin cartridge, a dial to measure dosage, and a disposable needle. Insulin pens are growing in popularity. They allow insulin to be delivered in a more simple, accurate, and convenient way than the vial and syringe method. Contents of this article: Types of insulin pen There are several different brands and models of insulin pen available. Most fall into two distinct categories: disposable and reusable. A disposable pen: this contains a prefilled insulin cartridge. Once used, the entire pen unit is thrown away. A reusable pen: this contains a replaceable insulin cartridge. Once empty, the cartridge is discarded and a new one put in. A new disposable needle must be used every time insulin is injected. With proper care, reusable insulin pens can last for several years. Choosing an insulin pen The brand, model, and category of pen used will depend on several factors. It is important to discuss this with a doctor before purchase. Some general factors about the pen to consider include: type and brand of insulin available size of the insulin dose it can hold increments by which the dose of insulin can be adjusted material and durability (if reusable) how it indicates remaining insulin levels ability to correct dose levels that are put in wrong size of the numbers on the dose dial level of dexterity required to use the pen Benefits Research has highlighted the benefits of using insulin pens, particularly prefilled disposable pens. People with diabetes are happier using insulin pens than the vial and syringe technique, according to some studies. One reason for this is that insulin pens have many features that make them safe and convenient. For example, greater dose accuracy and autoshield ne Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring And Insulin Administration

Blood Glucose Monitoring And Insulin Administration

Summary The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has become increasingly concerned about the risks for transmitting hepatitis B virus (HBV) and other infectious diseases during assisted blood glucose (blood sugar) monitoring and insulin administration. CDC is alerting all persons who assist others with blood glucose monitoring and/or insulin administration of the following infection control requirements: Fingerstick devices should never be used for more than one person Whenever possible, blood glucose meters should not be shared. If they must be shared, the device should be cleaned and disinfected after every use, per manufacturer’s instructions. If the manufacturer does not specify how the device should be cleaned and disinfected then it should not be shared. Insulin pens and other medication cartridges and syringes are for single-patient-use only and should never be used for more than one person Monitoring of blood glucose levels is frequently performed to guide therapy for persons with diabetes. Blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration can be accomplished in two ways: self-monitoring of blood glucose and insulin administration, where the individual performs all steps of the testing and insulin administration themselves, and assisted monitoring of blood glucose and insulin administration, where another person assists with or performs testing and insulin administration for an individual. Examples of settings where assisted monitoring of blood glucose and insulin administration may occur include: Hospitals or clinics Long term care settings such as nursing homes and assisted living facilities Senior centers Health fairs Correctional facilities Schools or camps Unsafe Practices during Blood Glucose Monitoring and Insulin Administration An underap Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin

Insulin is a hormone made in your pancreas, a gland located behind your stomach. It allows your body to use glucose for energy. Glucose is a type of sugar found in many carbohydrates. After a meal or snack, the digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates and changes them into glucose. Glucose is then absorbed into your bloodstream through the lining in your small intestine. Once glucose is in your bloodstream, insulin causes cells throughout your body to absorb the sugar and use it for energy. Insulin also helps balance your blood glucose levels. When there’s too much glucose in your bloodstream, insulin signals your body to store the excess in your liver. The stored glucose isn’t released until your blood glucose levels decrease, such as between meals or when your body is stressed or needs an extra boost of energy. Diabetes occurs when your body doesn't use insulin properly or doesn't make enough insulin. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes is a type of autoimmune disease. These are diseases in which the body attacks itself. If you have type 1 diabetes, your body can’t make insulin. This is because your immune system has destroyed all of the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas. This disease is more commonly diagnosed in young people, although it can develop in adulthood. In type 2 diabetes, your body has become resistant to the effects of insulin. This means your body needs more insulin to get the same effects. Therefore, your body overproduces insulin to keep blood glucose levels normal. However, after many years of overproduction, the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas burn out. Type 2 diabetes also affects people of any age, but typically develops later in life. Injections of insulin as a replacement or supplement Continue reading >>

What Are The Side Effects Of Insulin Shots?

What Are The Side Effects Of Insulin Shots?

Insulin is at the center of the diabetes problem. In people with type 2 diabetes, the body does not use insulin effectively. The pancreas compensates by overproducing insulin, and in time, it simply cannot keep up with the demands of the body to keep glucose levels down. To provide enough insulin to the body to manage blood glucose levels, many diabetics are advised to take insulin shots. The insulin in these injections is a chemical that is produced artificially to resemble the insulin made in our pancreas. This insulin works just like natural insulin by escorting sugar from our blood into our cells. Type 2 diabetics deal with a condition known as insulin resistance. It is a phenomenon where cells aren’t sensitive to the action of insulin (escorting blood glucose into cells) and hence, do not respond to it. This leads to the accumulation of glucose in the blood and is called hyperglycemia. Supplemental insulin given to Type 2 diabetics helps the body ‘muscle’ sugar out of the bloodstream and into cells. Insulin injections are used to regulate blood sugar differently for the different diabetes-types: For people who have type 1 diabetes – Their bodies cannot make insulin and therefore they aren’t able to regulate the amount of glucose in their bloodstream. For people who have type 2 diabetes – Their bodies aren’t able to produce enough insulin, or use it effectively. The insulin shots are used because the blood sugar cannot be regulated with oral medications alone. They also stop the liver from producing more sugar. Every type of insulin available in a drug store works in this way. They, mainly, differ in two ways – How quickly they begin to work For how long they can regulate blood sugar levels Mechanism of Action Regulating the process in which glucose Continue reading >>

How To Use The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

How To Use The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

Please check the leaflet for the insulin for complete instructions on how to store SoloSTAR®. If your SoloSTAR® is in cool storage, take it out 1 to 2 hours before you inject to allow it to warm up. Cold insulin is more painful to inject. Keep SoloSTAR® out of the reach and sight of children. Keep your SoloSTAR® in cool storage (36°F–46°F [2°C–8°C]) until first use. Do not allow it to freeze. Do not put it next to the freezer compartment of your refrigerator, or next to a freezer pack. Once you take your SoloSTAR® out of cool storage, for use or as a spare, you can use it for up to 28 days. During this time it can be safely kept at room temperature up to 86°F (30°C). Do not use it after this time. SoloSTAR® in use must not be stored in a refrigerator. Do not use SoloSTAR® after the expiration date printed on the label of the pen or on the carton. Protect SoloSTAR® from light. Discard your used SoloSTAR® as required by your local authorities. Protect your SoloSTAR® from dust and dirt. You can clean the outside of your SoloSTAR® by wiping it with a damp cloth. Do not soak, wash, or lubricate the pen as this may damage it. Your SoloSTAR® is designed to work accurately and safely. It should be handled with care. Avoid situations where SoloSTAR® might be damaged. If you are concerned that your SoloSTAR® may be damaged, use a new one. Continue reading >>

Insulin-injection, Humulin, Iletin I Nph, Novolin

Insulin-injection, Humulin, Iletin I Nph, Novolin

The display and use of drug information on this site is subject to express terms of use. By continuing to view the drug information, you agree to abide by such terms of use. INSULIN-INJECTION, Humulin, Iletin I NPH, Novolin GENERIC NAME: INSULIN - INJECTION (IN-sue-lin) BRAND NAME(S): Humulin, Iletin I NPH, Novolin HOW TO USE: Insulin must be injected. Learn the proper way to inject insulin. Check the dose carefully. Clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site daily to prevent skin bulges or pockets. Do not inject cold insulin. The insulin container you are currently using can be kept at room temperature. The length of time you can store it at room temp. depends on the product. Consult your pharmacist. Insulin is frequently injected 30 minutes before a meal. Some inject at bedtime. Ask your pharmacist or nurse for details of injecting insulin as it varies depending on your insulin treatment plan. Monitor your urine or blood sugar as prescribed. Keep track of your results. This is very important in order to determine the correct insulin dose. Follow all of your doctor's directions carefully. Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication SIDE EFFECTS: Insulin may cause minor and usually temporary side effects such as rash, irritation or redness at the injection site. To help prevent hypoglycemia, eat meals on a regular schedule. Too much insulin can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The symptoms include cold sweat, shaking, rapid heart rate, weakness, headache and fainting which, if untreated, may lead to slurred speech and other behaviors that resemble drunkenness. If you experience these symptoms, eat a quick source of sugar such as glucose (glutose, etc.) table sugar, orange juice, honey or non-diet soda. Tell your doctor about the r Continue reading >>

Using Tresiba® Flextouch®

Using Tresiba® Flextouch®

Do not take Tresiba® if you: are having an episode of low blood sugar are allergic to Tresiba® or any of the ingredients in Tresiba® Before taking Tresiba®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions, including if you are: pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements Talk to your health care provider about low blood sugar and how to manage it. Do not take Tresiba® if you: are having an episode of low blood sugar are allergic to Tresiba® or any of the ingredients in Tresiba® Before taking Tresiba®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions, including if you are: pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements Talk to your health care provider about low blood sugar and how to manage it. Read the Instructions for Use and take Tresiba® exactly as your health care provider tells you to Do not do any conversion of your dose. The dose counter always shows the selected dose in units Know the type and strength of insulin you take. Do not change the type of insulin you take unless your health care provider tells you to Adults - If you miss or are delayed in taking your dose of Tresiba®: Take your dose as soon as you remember, then continue with your regular dosing schedule Make sure there are at least 8 hours between doses If children miss a dose of Tresiba®: Call the healthcare provider for information and instructions about checking blood sugar levels more often until the next scheduled dose of Tresiba® Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should che Continue reading >>

Other Non-diabetic Uses Of Insulin

Other Non-diabetic Uses Of Insulin

Insulin potentiation therapy (IPT) is unique in the world. But it is not alone. Insulin does many things in the body, and over the past 79 years people have come up with many ways to use it. Of course, treatment of diabetes is the only one that is generally known to the public. However, the many non-diabetic uses of insulin help support the credibility of the positive reports of the IPT doctors. The diversity of these approaches is amazing. I am sure that a comprehensive review of the literature will uncover many more that are little known or forgotten. I also believe that by looking at many of these other approaches, we can spin new ideas for ways to improve IPT and extend it. Here are the non-diabetic uses of insulin that I have run into during my years of involvement with IPT: Intravenous feeding solutions (for total parenteral nutrition). One of the ingredients used in IV solutions for feeding the body is often a small amount of insulin. This is known to improve the absorption of nutrients. And insulin combined with growth hormone or insulin-like growth hormone (which insulin cross-reacts with) reverses negative protein balance. Intravenous GIK solution (glucose, insulin, and potassium) has been used for 40 years to decrease mortality rates in cases of acute myocardial infarction (heart attack) and postoperative cardiac failure. Articles. In very high doses, it is sometimes used to cause cardiac arrest for purposes of heart surgery or transplantation. Apparently GIK infusion is a way to quickly infuse potassium into all the cells of the heart, even where circulation is impaired. My question: would K infusion work even better if the insulin were given first, with the glucose and potassium delayed a few minutes? Weight regulation. I have read that in the early years o Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection

Insulin Injection

Insulin injection is used to control blood sugar in people who have type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not make insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or in people who have type 2 diabetes (condition in which the blood sugar is too high because the body does not produce or use insulin normally) that cannot be controlled with oral medications alone. Insulin injection is in a class of medications called hormones. Insulin injection is used to take the place of insulin that is normally produced by the body. It works by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. All of the types of insulin that are available work in this way. The types of insulin differ only in how quickly they begin to work and how long they continue to control blood sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to be injected subcutaneousl Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment: Using Insulin To Manage Blood Sugar

Diabetes Treatment: Using Insulin To Manage Blood Sugar

Understanding how insulin affects your blood sugar can help you better manage your condition. Insulin therapy is often an important part of diabetes treatment. Understand the key role insulin plays in managing your blood sugar, and the goals of insulin therapy. What you learn can help you prevent diabetes complications. The role of insulin in the body It may be easier to understand the importance of insulin therapy if you understand how insulin normally works in the body and what happens when you have diabetes. Regulate sugar in your bloodstream. The main job of insulin is to keep the level of glucose in the bloodstream within a normal range. After you eat, carbohydrates break down into glucose, a sugar that serves as a primary source of energy, and enters the bloodstream. Normally, the pancreas responds by producing insulin, which allows glucose to enter the tissues. Storage of excess glucose for energy. After you eat — when insulin levels are high — excess glucose is stored in the liver in the form of glycogen. Between meals — when insulin levels are low — the liver releases glycogen into the bloodstream in the form of glucose. This keeps blood sugar levels within a narrow range. If your pancreas secretes little or no insulin (type 1 diabetes), or your body doesn't produce enough insulin or has become resistant to insulin's action (type 2 diabetes), the level of glucose in your bloodstream increases because it's unable to enter cells. Left untreated, high blood glucose can lead to complications such as blindness, nerve damage (neuropathy) and kidney damage. The goals of insulin therapy If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin therapy replaces the insulin your body is unable to produce. Insulin therapy is sometimes needed for type 2 diabetes and gestational diabete Continue reading >>

Insulin (ranbaxy) 40 Iu Injection

Insulin (ranbaxy) 40 Iu Injection

Insulin (RANBAXY) 40 IU Injection is used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Insulin is a natural substance produced by the body which helps in utilizing the glucose for energy production. The patients with diabetes mellitus may not be able to utilize glucose due to the insufficient production of insulin or due to the body's inability to use the insulin produced or both. This medicine helps in the utilization of glucose and controlling blood glucose levels in such patients. Patients are advised to follow a strict exercise and diet regimen along with this medicine to get the best possible effect. Continue reading >>

Insulin Isophane Side Effects

Insulin Isophane Side Effects

What Is Insulin Isophane (NPH)? Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin isophane is an intermediate-acting insulin that starts to work within 2 to 4 hours after injection, peaks in 4 to 12 hours, and keeps working for 12 to 18 hours. Insulin isophane is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Insulin isophane may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Never share an injection pen or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. You should not use insulin isophane if you are allergic to it, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Do not give insulin isophane to a child without a doctor's advice. To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using insulin may increase your risk of serious heart problems. Follow your doctor's instructions about using insulin if you are pregnant or breast-feeding a baby. Blood sugar control is very important during pregnancy, and your dose needs may be different during each trimester of pregnancy. Your dose needs may also be different while you are breast-feeding. Get emergency medical help if you have signs of insulin allergy: redness or swelling where an injection was given, itchy skin rash over the entire body, trouble breathing, fast heartbeats, feeling like you might pass out, or swelling in your tongue or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have: fluid retention--weight gain, sw Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin is a hormone that helps cells use glucose (sugar) for energy. It works as a “key,” allowing the sugar to go from the blood and into the cell. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t make insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin correctly, which can lead to the pancreas not being able to produce enough — or any, depending on the progression of the disease —insulin to meet your body’s needs. Diabetes is normally managed with diet and exercise, with medications, including insulin, added as needed. If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin is required for life. This may seem difficult at first, but you can learn to successfully administer insulin with the support of your healthcare team, determination, and a little practice. There are different ways to take insulin, including syringes, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and jet injectors. Your doctor will help you decide which technique is best for you. Syringes remain a common method of insulin delivery. They’re the least expensive option, and most insurance companies cover them. Syringes Syringes vary by the amount of insulin they hold and the size of the needle. They’re made of plastic and should be discarded after one use. Traditionally, needles used in insulin therapy were 12.7 millimeters (mm) in length. Recent research shows that smaller 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm needles are just as effective, regardless of body mass. This means insulin injection is less painful than it was in the past. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, which means into the fat layer under the skin. In this type of injection, a short needle is used to inject insulin into the fatty layer between the skin and the muscle. Insulin should be injected into the fatty tissue just below your skin. If you inject the insulin deeper int Continue reading >>

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