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Insulin Injection Syringe

Insulin Injection For Pets A Step-by-step Guide For Pet Owners

Insulin Injection For Pets A Step-by-step Guide For Pet Owners

2 Fill the syringe with air by pulling back on the plunger until the black tip is even with the line showing the dose your vet prescribed. It’s important to be precise when measuring! 3 Push the needle through the rubber stopper at the top of the vial. Then, push the plunger all the way down to inject the air into the vial. Keep the needle in the vial. 4 Turn the vial and syringe upside down. Then, fill the syringe with insulin by pulling back on the plunger until the black tip is even with the line showing the dose your vet prescribed. 6 Remove the needle from the vial. Now you’re ready to give the injection to your pet. You need to keep the needle sterile, so don’t let it touch anything. PLUNGER BARREL BLACK TIP NEEDLE Measuring the dose Match the black tip at the end of the plunger with the line on the barrel showing the dose your vet prescribed. This example shows a dose of 7 units. 8 9 10 11 12 2 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 2 1 3 4 5 6 7 EXAMPLE: 7 UNITS PREPARING THE SYRINGE Be sure to read and follow the instructions that accompany the insulin prescribed by your veterinarian. For example, many types of insulin require gentle rolling of the vial to mix the contents before each use. Also make sure you’re using the proper insulin syringe: U-40 and U-100 syringes are not interchangeable. 1 Remove the protective plastic caps from the syringe’s plunger and needle. 5 If there are air bubbles inside the syringe: Gently tap on the side of the syringe, inject the bubbles back into the vial, and pull the plunger back to the prescribed dose. GIVING THE INJECTION Once the syringe has been filled with the correct dose of insulin, take a moment to calm your pet. Giving the injection will go more smoothly if both you and your pet are relaxed. With Continue reading >>

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

But Didn’t Know to Ask Just take your shot. What could be easier, right? Well, you’d be surprised how many errors are made by “veteran” insulin users. It turns out there’s nothing basic about the basics of insulin injections. However, you can improve your technique. This article takes a look at the nitty-gritty details behind successful insulin delivery, why they matter, and how to avoid common pitfalls. The gear Realistically, there are two delivery systems when it comes to injecting insulin: syringes and pens. Yes, there are pumps, but that’s a whole other subject. And yes, there are jet injectors, but they are not widely used. Syringes. The first-ever human insulin shot was delivered by syringe in 1922, and here in the United States, more than half of all insulin is still delivered via syringe. Syringes used to be made of glass, had to be sterilized between uses, and had long, thick, steel surgical needles that could be resharpened on a kitchen whetstone. (No kidding.) But syringes have come a long way since then. Syringes are now disposable, the barrels are made of plastic, and the needles are thin, high-tech, multi-beveled, and coated with lubricants to make them enter the skin smoothly. (Bevels are the slanted surfaces on a needle that create a sharp point.) In the old days, the needle and the syringe were separate components. Nowadays most insulin syringes come with the needle attached. People who use syringes almost always purchase insulin in vials. Vials are glass bottles that generally hold 1,000 units of insulin. Pens. Insulin pens date from the mid-1980s, and while syringes still predominate in the United States, much of the rest of the world has traded in syringes for insulin pens. Pens currently come in two varieties: disposable, prefilled pens Continue reading >>

How To Give An Insulin Injection

How To Give An Insulin Injection

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What do I need to know about insulin syringes? Insulin syringes come in different sizes depending on the dose of insulin you need. Your healthcare provider or pharmacist will help you find the right size syringe. Use the correct size insulin syringe to make sure you get the right dose of insulin. Where do I inject insulin? You can inject insulin into your abdomen, upper arm, buttocks, hip, and the front or side of the thigh. Insulin works fastest when it is injected into the abdomen. Do not inject insulin into areas where you have a wound or bruising. Insulin injected into wounds or bruises may not get into your body correctly. Use a different area within the site each time you inject insulin. For example, inject insulin into different areas in your abdomen. Insulin injected into the same area can cause lumps, swelling, or thickened skin. How do I inject the insulin with a syringe? Clean the skin where you will inject the insulin. You can use an alcohol pad or a cotton swab dipped in alcohol. Grab a fold of your skin. Gently pinch the skin and fat between your thumb and first finger. Insert the needle straight into your skin. Do not hold the syringe at an angle. Make sure the needle is all the way into the skin. Let go of the pinched tissue. Push down on the plunger to inject the insulin. Press on the plunger until the insulin is gone. Keep the needle in place for 5 seconds after you inject the insulin. Pull out the needle. Press on your injection site for 5 to 10 seconds. Do not rub. This will keep insulin from leaking out. Throw away your used insulin syringe as directed. Do not recap the syringe before you throw it away. How can I decrease pain when I inject insulin? Inject insulin at room temperature. If the insulin has been stored in the refr Continue reading >>

How Many Times Can You Reuse A Syringe?

How Many Times Can You Reuse A Syringe?

To the naked eye, an insulin syringe looks perfectly unharmed after simply one or two injections…so why not use it again and save a few bucks in the longterm? Well, unfortunately, there’s a really good reason why (and I’m just as guilty for not always following it). Take a look at the magnified syringe needle image below: Not pretty, eh? This applies to both syringes and pen needles. According to DiabetesHealth, “You may be tempted to reuse your syringes, but manufacturers say doing so could dull the needle (ouch!) or lead to infection or tissue damage.” It’s actually very common to reuse both syringes and lancets (for finger pricks) for the sake of saving money–it’s not as though there’s much else in diabetes management that can be reused! So the image above only highlights the dulled, destroyed tip of the needle but what it can’t reveal is the bacteria and lack of sanitation. That used needle will then be pushed into the top of an insulin vial and could potentially transfer a “contaminant” into the actual insulin vial, let alone into your skin. Albeit rare, it’s still a clear risk. What you do next with that needle is also important: When disposing of syringe needles be sure to collect them in a solid container such as an empty milk jug, an empty laundry detergent jug, an empty coffee can, or an actual sharps container purchased at the pharmacy. When the container is full of syringes and/or syringe needles (you can use a syringe clipper, also found at pharmacy, to clip off the sharp end), seal it properly with duct-tape or another reliable sealant. Label the container with a marker that says, “used sharps” so the waste-management crew in your area are aware of the dangerous contaminants. (Remember, it’s not just dangerous because of ger Continue reading >>

Disposable Syringes For Insulin Injection.

Disposable Syringes For Insulin Injection.

Results of a questionnaire on use of glass syringes among diabetic patients showed considerable variation in methods of keeping the syringes and in the duration of their useful life. Thirty patients took part in an investigation in which each patient used the same disposable syringe in place of the glass syringe for up to two months. No clinical or bacteriological evidence of infection was found. Used in this way, disposable syringes were less expensive than glass syringes. They are lighter than glass syringes, less susceptible to damage, and more easily carried on journeys. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (377K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. Links to PubMed are also available for Selected References. These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article. Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen—the “ipod” For Insulin Delivery (why Pen Wins Over Syringe)

Insulin Pen—the “ipod” For Insulin Delivery (why Pen Wins Over Syringe)

Go to: Introduction Glycemic control is so critical for our diabetic patients because every major study published has shown convincingly that lower hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) equals a reduction in diabetes-related complications.1 For most patients though, the only way to prevent or minimize these complications is to use insulin therapy because of the progressive nature of type 2 diabetes. For decades, insulin was delivered only via vials and syringes with larger bore needles that caused a lot of pain. Many people with diabetes still believe that these needles are still large and painful, but in 2008, this could not be further from the truth. There are numerous reasons why using pen devices make a whole lot of sense. Compliance with treatment is better because a pen device is easier to carry around, easy to use, provides greater dose accuracy, and is more satisfactory to patients as compared with a syringe. Injecting with devices makes the process discreet, and the overall cost of managing diabetes is also reduced. The surprising fact is that among industrialized countries, the United States ranks last in terms of pen usage by diabetic individuals, even though the use of pen is increasing. Continue reading >>

Tuberculin Versus Insulin Syringes

Tuberculin Versus Insulin Syringes

Patient was tested for allergies in a primary care doctor's office. He will be getting allergy shots for cat, mold and dust allergies. The technician who is managing the program for the doctor ordered insulin syringes for the allergy shots instead of tb syringes. She claimed that 10 Units on an insuling syringe is equivalent to 0.1 cc on a tb syringe. Is this common practice to use insulin syringes for allergy shots? She said they are cheaper than tb syringes. Thank you Thank you for your inquiry. There are differences between tuberculin and insulin syringes. The two links copied below will take you to websites that discuss these differences. This does not preclude insulin syringes from being used to administer allergy injections, but one has to be very careful about the conversion units involved. In addition, syringes specially designed to administer allergy injections are also available for purchase at suppliers. These are designed specifically for that task. It's All in the Syringe What is the difference between a tuberculin syringe and an insulin syringe? Thank you again for your inquiry and we hope this response is helpful to you. Sincerely, Phil Lieberman, M.D. Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Insulin Administration Tips

Diabetes, Insulin Administration Tips

If your pet has diabetes, your veterinarian may have prescribed insulin for her. Some pet owners balk at the idea of giving their pet a regular injection, but the types of syringes used, the small amount injected, and the ease of injecting subcutaneously ensure that most pet owners can quickly learn to give the most comfortable injection possible. Insulin measurement: The concentration of insulin is measured in units. Insulin syringes are marked in units, and may also be marked in milliliters. Be sure to use the unit scale. Also, be sure you are using the appropriate insulin syringe for the concentration of insulin you are using. Insulin is available in concentrations of 40 and 100 units/ml. There are corresponding syringes to use for the measurement of the two concentrations of insulin. Pharmacy Note: Insulin comes in a glass vial with a rubber stopper, and must be stored in the refrigerator. Do not use the insulin beyond its expiration date. Different insulin types require different syringes: It is imperative to measure and administer the correct dose of insulin using the correct syringe. For instance, if you use insulin with 40 U/ml, you must measure and administer it with a U-40 syringe; if you used a U-100 syringe, it would result in the wrong amount of insulin being given, with perhaps a fatal outcome. Find out from your veterinarian (or pharmacist) what syringes are available for you to use with the concentration of insulin your pet is receiving. Pharmacy Note: An insulin syringe has 4 basic parts: the barrel, plunger, needle, and needle guard. Many brands of syringes have the needle permanently attached to the syringe barrel so it cannot be removed. How to draw up insulin for your pet: Prior to removing a dose of insulin from the vial, mix the contents by gently Continue reading >>

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful because the needles are short and thin and the insulin shots are placed into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. In some cases, the doctor prescribes a mixed dose of insulin. This means taking more than one type of insulin at the same time. A mixed dose allows you to have the benefits of both short-acting insulin along with a longer acting insulin — without having to give 2 separate shots. Usually, one of the insulins will be cloudy and the other clear. Some insulins cannot be mixed in the same syringe. For instance, never mix Lantus or Levemir with any other solution. Be sure to check with your doctor, pharmacist, or diabetes educator before mixing. These instructions explain how to mix two different types of insulin into one shot. If you are giving or getting just one type of insulin, refer to the patient education sheet Insulin: How to Give a Shot. What You Will Need Bottles of insulin Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Syringe with needle (You will need a prescription to buy syringes from a pharmacy. Check with your pharmacist to be sure the syringe size you are using is correct for your total dose of insulin.) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of a Syringe and Needle You will use a syringe and needle to give the shot. The parts are labeled below. Wash the work area (where you will set the insulin and syringe) well with soap and water. Wash your hands. Check the drug labels to be sure they are what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date o Continue reading >>

Injecting Lantusâ® With A Vial And Syringe

Injecting Lantusâ® With A Vial And Syringe

BEFORE YOU GET STARTED: • Wash your hands. • Make sure the insulin is clear and colorless. Do not use it if it is cloudy or if you see particles; throw it away. • Do not mix or dilute Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended, and you may lose blood sugar control. • Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Always use a new syringe. • Relax. STEP 1: PREPARE THE DOSE • Remove the cap—If you are using a new vial, remove the protective cap. Do not remove the stopper. • Sterilize the top—Wipe the top of the vial with an alcohol swab. • Inject air into the vial—Draw air into the syringe that is equal to your insulin dose. • Put the needle through the rubber top of the vial and push the plunger to inject the air into the vial. • Draw up the dose—Leave the syringe in the vial and turn both upside down. Hold the syringe and vial firmly in one hand. Make sure the tip of the needle is in the insulin. With your free hand, pull the plunger to withdraw the correct dose into the syringe. STEP 2: REMOVE AIR BUBBLES • Check for bubbles—Before you take the needle out of the vial, check the syringe for air bubbles. • Tap to release—If bubbles are in the medicine, hold the syringe straight up and tap the side of the syringe until the bubbles float to the top. • Eject the air—Push the bubbles out with the plunger and draw insulin back in until you have the correct dose. • Remove the needle—Remove the needle from the vial. Do not let the needle touch anything. You’re now ready to inject. Please see additional Important Safety Information for Lantus® on the next page. Pl Continue reading >>

Does Insulin Syringe Needle Length Matter?

Does Insulin Syringe Needle Length Matter?

When it comes to diabetes therapy, insulin is pharmacists’ most valuable weapon. Although oral therapies can offer convenience and reduce hypoglycemia risk, the glucose-lowering effects of insulin remain unrivaled. Simply put, insulin is diabetic hormone replacement therapy. Patients with hypothyroidism receive levothyroxine, while patients no longer making sufficient insulin can replace it exogenously. Unfortunately, patients may resist starting insulin for many reasons, one of which is a fear of needles. Injecting insulin can be painful, especially when using longer needles. Painful injections are not only unpleasant for patients, but can also lead to medication noncompliance and poorer health outcomes. Although longer needles are often prescribed for patients with increased body fat, this practice actually has no clinical basis. Insulin is meant to be injected into subcutaneous tissue, human skin is only 1.6 mm to 2.4 mm thick, on average. Because skin thickness doesn’t increase significantly in overweight and obese patients, a 4-mm needle is sufficient to deliver insulin to subcutaneous tissue in patients of all sizes. Furthermore, choosing longer needles can negatively impact therapy in thinner patients. If patients inject insulin intramuscularly because their needle is too long, the drug’s absorption will be accelerated, while it’s duration of action will be shortened. Initiating insulin is often a significant lifestyle change for patients. Pharmacists can play a substantial role in helping patients overcome their fear of injection. For example, providing demonstrations and patient counseling about insulin—along with assuring patients that short-length, small-gauge needles can be used—can go a long way in promoting insulin acceptance and adherence. ◄ Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin is a hormone that helps cells use glucose (sugar) for energy. It works as a “key,” allowing the sugar to go from the blood and into the cell. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t make insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin correctly, which can lead to the pancreas not being able to produce enough — or any, depending on the progression of the disease —insulin to meet your body’s needs. Diabetes is normally managed with diet and exercise, with medications, including insulin, added as needed. If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin is required for life. This may seem difficult at first, but you can learn to successfully administer insulin with the support of your healthcare team, determination, and a little practice. There are different ways to take insulin, including syringes, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and jet injectors. Your doctor will help you decide which technique is best for you. Syringes remain a common method of insulin delivery. They’re the least expensive option, and most insurance companies cover them. Syringes Syringes vary by the amount of insulin they hold and the size of the needle. They’re made of plastic and should be discarded after one use. Traditionally, needles used in insulin therapy were 12.7 millimeters (mm) in length. Recent research shows that smaller 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm needles are just as effective, regardless of body mass. This means insulin injection is less painful than it was in the past. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, which means into the fat layer under the skin. In this type of injection, a short needle is used to inject insulin into the fatty layer between the skin and the muscle. Insulin should be injected into the fatty tissue just below your skin. If you inject the insulin deeper int Continue reading >>

Syringe

Syringe

Disposable syringe with needle, with parts labelled: plunger, barrel, needle adaptor, needle hub, needle bevel, needle shaft. A typical plastic medical syringe, fitted with a detachable stainless steel needle. According to the World Health Organisation, about 90% of the medical syringes are used to administer drugs, 5% for vaccinations and 5% for other uses such as blood transfusions.[1] A syringe is a simple reciprocating pump consisting of a plunger (though in modern syringes it's actually a piston) that fits tightly within a cylindrical tube called a barrel[2]. The plunger can be linearly pulled and pushed along the inside of the tube, allowing the syringe to take in and expel liquid or gas through a discharge orifice at the front (open) end of the tube. The open end of the syringe may be fitted with a hypodermic needle, a nozzle or a tubing to help direct the flow into and out of the barrel. Syringes are frequently used in clinical medicine to administer injections, infuse intravenous therapy into the bloodstream, apply compounds such as glue or lubricant, and draw/measure liquids. The word "syringe" is derived from the Greek σύριγξ (syrinx, meaning "tube") via back-formation of a new singular from its Greek-type plural "syringes" (σύριγγες). Medical syringes[edit] See also: Hypodermic needle The threads of the Luer lock tip of this 12mL disposable syringe keep it securely connected to a tube or other apparatus. An old glass syringe. Sectors in the syringe and needle market include disposable and safety syringes, injection pens, needleless injectors, insulin pumps, and specialty needles.[3] Hypodermic syringes are used with hypodermic needles to inject liquid or gases into body tissues, or to remove from the body. Injecting of air into a blood vessel i Continue reading >>

Injecting Insulin With A Syringe

Injecting Insulin With A Syringe

Tweet The following guide will help with injecting insulin using a syringe. If you have any questions about injecting, contact your health team. Before injecting, it is recommended to check the expiry date on the insulin you’re using to ensure it is in date. Wash your hands before handling your syringe and starting the process. 1. Preparing the syringe Remove the caps at either end of the syringe, taking particular care with the cap covering the needle. Pull the plunger back to draw up air into the syringe. You should draw up the same number of units of air as the number of units of insulin you intend to inject. 2. Preparing the insulin vial With the insulin vial standing upright, push the syringe needle into the vial and inject the air into the vial. This ensures the pressure inside the vial helps you to draw up insulin. If the insulin is a cloudy insulin, roll the vial gently between the palms of your hands until the insulin is fully mixed. 3. Drawing up the insulin Hold the vial of insulin upside down and push the needle of the syringe into the vial. Ensure that the end of the needle of the syringe is surrounded by the insulin and not by air. Draw up the required number of units plus a few units more. 4. Remove any bubbles Hold the syringe with the needle pointing up and tap the syringe with a finger or fingernail to move any bubbles, that might be in the syringe, towards the top of the syringe. With the syringe still upright, push the plunger into the syringe until the required number of units remain in the syringe. Remove the syringe from the vial. If air is still in the syringe, you will need to repeat from step 3. 5. Prepare a place to inject Insulin should be injected into a soft fatty area of the body. The belly, the top of the thighs and the buttocks can be Continue reading >>

Insulin Injections

Insulin Injections

​Injecting a child with insulin​ is probably one of the biggest challenges parents face. Many are nervous about needles, so it can be hard to think of giving one to their own child. Some children are also frightened of needles, which makes the adjustment difficult. With practice, however, children and parents quickly grow comfortable with administering insulin. And increasingly, children prefer to receive their insulin using pre-loaded injectable pens. Teenagers, and some younger children, quickly become quite good at taking their own insulin. At first, however, both parents need to become skilled at this too. Other caregivers, such as grandparents and babysitters, should also be able to give an injection in case of illness or emergency. Older children who are preparing and injecting their own insulin must be supervised. This must be done to ensure that the dose is accurate, the insulin is actually injected, and the child does not use the same injection site day after day. Supervision will remind them that insulin is important and could be dangerous if too much is given at one time. When there is sufficient amount of support, families adapt better to diabetes management. Needles and syringes Syringes Syringes are designed to measure different amounts of insulin. Insulin syringes are generally available in 3 sizes: 3/10 mL (for doses of 30 units or less) ½ mL (for doses of 31 to 50 units) 1 mL (for doses of 51 to 100 units) The syringe has three parts: the needle, the plunger, and the barrel. Needles Needles are available in many lengths and thicknesses. Thickness is measured by gauge. The higher the gauge number, the finer the needle. For example, a 31-gauge needle is thinner than a 29-gauge needle. Generally, children prefer finer needles because they hurt less. T Continue reading >>

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