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Insulin Injection Pen Price

At Sanofi Diabetes, Our Priorities Are Focussed On The Needs Of People With Diabetes Around The World. We Want People To Live 'beyond' Diabetes, To Achieve Aspirations And To Make The Most Of Everyday!

At Sanofi Diabetes, Our Priorities Are Focussed On The Needs Of People With Diabetes Around The World. We Want People To Live 'beyond' Diabetes, To Achieve Aspirations And To Make The Most Of Everyday!

Our Products > Devices >Lantus® SoloSTAR® Pen Instruction Leaflet SoloSTAR® is a prefilled pen for the injection of insulin. Important information for use of SoloSTAR®: Always attach a new needle before each use. Only use needles that have been approved for use with SoloSTAR® Always perform the safety test before each injection (see Step 3). This pen is only for your use. Do not share it with anyone else. If your injection is given by another person, special caution must be taken by this person to avoid accidental needle injury and transmission of infection. Never use SoloSTAR® if it is damaged or if you are not sure that it is working properly. Always have a spare SoloSTAR® in case your SoloSTAR® is lost or damaged. Step 1. Check the insulin A. Check the label on your SoloSTAR® to make sure you have the correct insulin. Lantus® SoloSTAR® is grey with a purple injection button. B.Take off the pen cap. C. Check the appearance of your insulin. Lantus® is a clear insulin. Do not use this SoloSTAR® if the insulin is cloudy, colored or has particles. Step 2. Attach the needle Always use a new sterile needle for each injection. This helps prevent contamination, and potential needle blocks. Before use of needle, carefully read the "Instructions for Use" accompanying the needles. Please note: The needles shown are for illustrative purposes only. Wipe the Rubber Seal with alcohol. A. Remove the protective seal from a new needle. B. Line up the needle with the pen, and keep it straight as you attach it (screw or push on, depending on the needle type). If the needle is not kept straight while you attach it, it can damage the rubber seal and cause leakage, or break the needle. Step 3. Perform a safety test Always perform the safety test before each injection. This ensu Continue reading >>

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

Insulin can be expensive. If you’re one of the 6 million Americans with diabetes relying on this main-stay treatment, you could be paying out-of-pocket costs anywhere from $120 to $400 per month, according to a 2015 New England Journal of Medicine commentary. Drugs such as Lantus (insulin glargine) and Levemir (insulin detemir) have seen significant cost increases, according to a recent trend report by pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts. One reason for the high prices is the lack of generic options for insulin. So for now, you’re stuck having to search around to find affordable options. Where do you shop for more affordable insulin? For some people though, high drug costs can mean making difficult financial choices. Our national polls show people might cut back on groceries and paying bills to pay for their medications. To minimize your costs, consider these options: Prescription Assistance Programs If you don’t have health insurance or are without drug coverage, look into applying for a patient assistance program (PAP). Through the nonprofit NeedyMeds, you can find some programs that offer free or low-cost insulin as long as you meet the eligibility requirements. Those are usually based on your insurance status, income, and diagnosis. You might also qualify for a diagnosis-specific program that can help you save on syringes, pumps, and other diabetes supplies. Pharmacists are also a great resource and can help you find a PAP that meets your financial needs. Switch Drugs Another way to save is by asking your doctor whether there’s a lower-priced insulin that’s right for you. While “long-acting” is a more popular type of insulin, it's also more expensive, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it works better. “It’s mostly a marketing ploy,” says M Continue reading >>

Cheapest Insulin Pen In India

Cheapest Insulin Pen In India

Insulin pen is used for injecting insulin in the body of diabetic for treating it. Most of the diabetic care products such as insulin & pen are imported from foreign countries. And since they are highly priced, common man is out of reach. However you can buy cheapest insulin pen in India manufactured by the top pharmaceutical company – Sanofi Aventis under the brand name B D Micro Fine and Insuman 25/75 Optiset. Here are the details of low cost Insulin pen: 1 Insulin (Human)-80 iu/40iu/100iu Pen can be purchased at Rs. 46 Pen Insuman 25/75 Optiset (100 iu) 5 pen costs Rs. 241.33 (Note: Local taxes are not included) Quality wise generic medicines are similar to branded drugs sold by big pharmaceutical companies and do not pose any health risks provided they are prescribed by the doctors. How to Buy Diabetics can buy cheap insulin pen at healthkartplus with following buying options available: 1) Buy directly online at healthkartplus.com OR 2) E-mail [email protected] along with all the product details. And you will get all the products delivered at your doorstep. Make sure to include your correct mailing address, contact number and PIN code. You can then pay by cash upon receiving the product. Products are delivered within 1-2 days (24*7) Save Money on Diabetes Treatment Apart from buying cheap insulin pen, diabetics can save money on their healthcare costs: Purchasing medicines in bulk as you’ll get discount Buy online as medicines are sold at cheaper rates Many sites also run offers for returning customers. Even if they don’t then you should ask them to provide discounts for all the purchase made Compare prices online at various websites and then buy Always ask your doctor for generic substitute for the prescribed drug Continue reading >>

Sanofi Launches Re-usable Insulin Pen Priced Rs. 650

Sanofi Launches Re-usable Insulin Pen Priced Rs. 650

Mumbai, Oct 9: The Indian-arm of French company Sanofi has brought out a re-usable insulin delivery pen completely “Made-in-India”. It took three years to develop the indigenously made device sold under the AllStar brand name, designed on the feed back of people in India, said Shailesh Ayyangar, Sanofi India’s Managing Director and Vice-President. Priced at Rs. 650 per pen, the device is pegged at about 20 per cent less than other similar products in the market, he added. A person with diabetes could use the pen-shaped device by fitting it with a cartridge of Sanofi’s insulin and injecting themselves. There are queries for AllStar from South-East Asian and African markets, he said, and a regulatory pathway is being worked out to sell in these markets. India is estimated to have about 64 million people with diabetes. The product has been designed in-keeping with the specific needs of the local market, he said. The device will be made in Gujarat. For the Rs. 2,000-crore Sanofi India, about Rs. 400 crore comes from its diabetes portfolio comprising orally consumed drugs and insulin. Outlining the features of the device, Volker Korger, Sanofi’s Head - Diabetes Device Projects (Frankfurt), said the device was the slimmest, shortest and lightest of pens available in India. The device is the outcome of a multi-country venture, including Germany, the United Kingdom, Taiwan and India, he said. One of the key features of the device is that it allowsaccurate doses of insulin to be administered to the person, he explained. Shashank Joshi, Consultant Endocrinologist at Mumbai’s Lilavati Hospital, pointed out the disturbing feature of India having an increasing number of Type 1, or juvenile diabetes. Of the Type II variety, acquired due to lifestyle, stress and so on, onl Continue reading >>

Get To Know The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

Get To Know The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: Improving Adherence And Reducing Costs

Insulin Pens: Improving Adherence And Reducing Costs

The advantages offered by insulin pens may help improve patient adherence. Currently 8.3% of the United States adult population, or 25.8 million people, have diabetes. Of these cases, more than 90% are cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and at least 1 million are estimated to be cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Although a variety of oral medications are available for patients with diabetes, insulins remain an important component of treatment.1,2 Insulins are the standard therapy in patients with T1DM and are ultimately used in patients with T2DM who do not respond adequately to other treatment modalities. Although in some settings insulins may be administered intravenously (eg, with an insulin pump), the vast majority of insulin administrations are subcutaneous injections.1,2 Available Forms and Administration In the United States, 2 types of insulins are available: recombinant human insulins and insulin analogs. Recombinant human insulin is available from 2 manufacturers (Humulin by Eli Lilly and Novolin by Novo Nordisk); each of these is available in a regular form and in a longer-acting neutral protamine hagedorn (NPH) form. Unlike recombinant human insulins, insulin analogs are structurally modified forms of insulin that are designed to either lower blood sugar rapidly or maintain low blood sugar levels over time. These insulin analogs may be classified as rapid-acting and long-acting insulins. Rapid-acting insulins include insulin lispro, insulin aspart, and insulin glulisine, and long-acting insulins include insulin glargine and insulin detemir. Premixed formulations of insulin are also available.1,2 Regardless of the differences between insulin formulations, all conventional types of insulin can be administered subcutaneously. Subcutaneous injectio Continue reading >>

What To Know About Insulin Jet Injectors

What To Know About Insulin Jet Injectors

Introduction Insulin jet injectors can allow people with diabetes to inject insulin without using a needle. However, many people shy away from these small devices because they can be expensive and complex to use. Read on to learn how they work and their pros and cons. Using a jet injector Insulin jet injectors typically contain three parts: the delivery device (shaped like a pen) a disposable injector nozzle a disposable insulin vial adapter The tiny opening at the end of the disposable injector nozzle usually measures less than 0.009 inches in diameter. This is the same measurement as the 32-gauge needle used in current insulin syringes. How you use it You load the pen by filling the insulin adapter with insulin. Once the device is loaded, you set the gauge to your prescribed insulin dose. Then, you place the device against your skin, typically in an area with some fatty tissue. A good spot could be your stomach, the front or side of your thigh, or the upper, outer section of your buttocks. When you press the button, the jet forces a high-pressure stream of insulin through the very tiny hole at the end of the disposable injector nozzle. The insulin turns into a vapor that passes through the outer layer of your skin. It then moves through the lower layers of your skin and into your bloodstream. How it works Insulin jet injectors use a compressed spring or a compressed gas cartridge to create the pressure to send the insulin through the pen into your skin. Compressed springs are used more often. They’re lightweight, small, durable, and inexpensive. Compressed gas cartridges typically contain either nitrogen or carbon dioxide. They can produce more pressure than compressed springs, but they cost quite a bit more, weigh more, and need to be replaced more often. Are there Continue reading >>

Soaring Insulin Prices Have Diabetics Feeling The Pain

Soaring Insulin Prices Have Diabetics Feeling The Pain

Insulin price spike leads to lawsuitInsulin is fast becoming a medication that only the well-insured or well-heeled diabetic can afford. With the price of insulin more than tripling in a decade, some diabetics are having to make tough choices about how to pay for the medication. In some cases, diabetics are cutting back or even going without the drug. Many of the 26 million Americans with diabetes must use insulin daily to treat the disease, or else risk illnesses such as kidney failure and disabilities such as blindness. While American diabetics may have faced monthly costs of $100 to $200 several years ago, some are now grappling with costs of $400 to $500 per month. Insulin prices for American patients are far higher than in other countries, a recent survey of patients from the advocacy group T1International discovered. American diabetics said they pay $13.47 per milliliter for Eli Lilly’s (LLY) Humalog insulin, the highest price among the countries surveyed and about four times more than what Canadian diabetics pay. “People are suffering a lot,” said Allison Bailey, a college student in Iowa with Type 1 diabetes. “There are no generics. We have to go through these big companies, and they charge so much.” Bailey said she paid about $130 for several vials of Eli Lilly’s Humalog in 2010. This year, her insulin prescription has a price tag of about $495. She noted that she switched from using pump therapy in 2010 and now injects insulin with a pen, and that while the prices aren’t apples-to-apples, costs have overall sharply increased. She said she should go back to pump therapy, but she doesn’t believe she can afford it given the higher cost of insulin as well as the expense of a pump, which can cost more than $5,000. Others are also caught in a bind. B Continue reading >>

Insulin Prices Have Skyrocketed, Putting Drug Makers On The Defensive

Insulin Prices Have Skyrocketed, Putting Drug Makers On The Defensive

Here’s a sticking point for diabetics: the cost of insulin more than tripled — from $231 to $736 a year per patient — between 2002 and 2013, according to a new analysis. The increase reflected rising prices for a milliliter of insulin, which climbed 197 percent from $4.34 per to $12.92 during the same period. Meanwhile, the amount of money spent by each patient on other diabetes medications fell 16 percent, to $502 from $600, according to a research letter published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. “Insulin is a life-saving medication,” said Dr. William Herman, a coauthor of the analysis and a professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. “There are people with type 1 diabetes who will die without insulin. And while there have been incremental benefits in insulin products, prices have been rising. So there are people who can’t afford them. It’s a real problem.” The analysis also found that the cost of various widely used oral diabetes drugs either dropped in price or did not rise nearly as significantly as insulin. Metformin, for instance, which is available as a generic, fell to 31 cents in 2013 from $1.24 per tablet in 2002. And the newer class of diabetes drugs known as DPP-4 inhibitors rose 34 percent since becoming available in 2006. The researchers analyzed data from nearly 28,000 diabetes patients found in the Medical Expenditure Panel, a database on health care costs maintained by the US Department of Health and Human Services. About 1 in 4 people used insulin and two-thirds took a pill. Toward the end of the study period, a small percentage began taking new injectable medicines that are designed to complement pills. There have been previous efforts to track insulin pric Continue reading >>

Doh Insulin Access Program - Get The Cheapest Insulin In The Philippines!

Doh Insulin Access Program - Get The Cheapest Insulin In The Philippines!

I have been recently reunited to Insulin after breaking up my almost a year of relationship with oral medicines because it is not working well with me anymore. As a Type 1 diabetic, I should not even consider going on oral medications but cost of Insulin is a major concern for me, I'm just glad there is no serious complications that arises while I was under Glucophage (Metformin HCl). Even if I have work, it's really a burden for me to buy Insulin because it is indeed very costly. Imagine Lantus Solostar 3mL Pen costs around 850+ pesos and I consume it for only 6 days, Humalog 3mL cartridge I consume for about 10 days that costs 800+ pesos. If I'm going to sum all my expenses on medicines and syringes alone it will cost me around 6,000 pesos a month, that's roughly half of what I am getting from my job, and I still need to pay for the house rent, water, electric and telephone bills and ofcourse my son's therapy and food. I haven't included the cost of blood glucose strips yet, that's gonna be around 5,000 pesos if you test pre and post meals in a month. For an average earner like me, it's gonna be a challenge on how to budget my monthly salary with everything that's coming my way. No wonder some people give up and die from diabetes complications, especially the poor that can't afford to pay for Insulin to live. Because of the need, I tried my best to look for other ways to earn money to fund my medications and this lead me to go on research as to where I can get Insulin at the cheapest rate here in the Philippines. After some time of asking Doctors and fellow diabetics as to where I can get a cheaper stash, an answer came to me from a click of the mouse on the google search engine. I stumble upon Department Of Health (DOH) Website and found Insulin Access Program. What Continue reading >>

The Rising Price Of Insulin

The Rising Price Of Insulin

Diabetes is a chronic disease that afflicts 25.8 million Americans. Insulin, one of the primary treatments for diabetes, has been around since the 1920s. Yet, somehow the drug is still priced beyond the reach of many Americans. One of our advocates recently left a comment on our Facebook page regarding this problem, which encouraged us to take a closer look at it. Medication nonadherence (patients not taking medicine as prescribed) is undeniably related to diabetes-related health complications that result in emergency room visits and lost productivity. Diabetes is an expensive and deadly disease. It is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. and cost the country $245 billion last year. A few big pharmaceutical firms dominate the insulin market due to lengthy patents and lack of generic competition. Insulin is a biologic drug, which means that it is made up of living organisms rather than chemical compounds. This makes it more difficult to copy, which biotech companies often use as justification for the exorbitant prices they charge for the drugs. We’ve had anecdotal evidence from a consumer of a big price hike on her Humalog insulin this year. When she was trying to find out further information about the price increase, she was told by her insurance company to expect the drug to go up 25 percent more in December. News reports indicate that the cost of Lantus, a top-selling insulin produced by Sanofi, has gone up twice already this year, first 10 and then 15 percent. In addition, Novo Nordisk has also increased the price of Levemir, another common insulin treatment, by 10 percent. What’s going on here? Overall drug spending is slightly down due to generic drug utilization being up. And generic competition isn’t too far off for many of these drugs. It looks l Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen—the “ipod” For Insulin Delivery (why Pen Wins Over Syringe)

Insulin Pen—the “ipod” For Insulin Delivery (why Pen Wins Over Syringe)

Go to: Introduction Glycemic control is so critical for our diabetic patients because every major study published has shown convincingly that lower hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) equals a reduction in diabetes-related complications.1 For most patients though, the only way to prevent or minimize these complications is to use insulin therapy because of the progressive nature of type 2 diabetes. For decades, insulin was delivered only via vials and syringes with larger bore needles that caused a lot of pain. Many people with diabetes still believe that these needles are still large and painful, but in 2008, this could not be further from the truth. There are numerous reasons why using pen devices make a whole lot of sense. Compliance with treatment is better because a pen device is easier to carry around, easy to use, provides greater dose accuracy, and is more satisfactory to patients as compared with a syringe. Injecting with devices makes the process discreet, and the overall cost of managing diabetes is also reduced. The surprising fact is that among industrialized countries, the United States ranks last in terms of pen usage by diabetic individuals, even though the use of pen is increasing. Continue reading >>

A 93-year-old Drug That Can Cost More Than A Mortgage Payment Tells Us Everything That's Wrong With American Healthcare

A 93-year-old Drug That Can Cost More Than A Mortgage Payment Tells Us Everything That's Wrong With American Healthcare

A person administers an injection of insulin. AP Insulin has been around since 1923, so it came as a surprise in July 2015 when Cole LePere's doctor told his mother, Janine, to prepare to pay a lot at the pharmacy for it. Cole, who was 10, had just been found to have Type 1 diabetes. But even the pharmacist was shocked to see the price. Over and over, the pharmacist told Janine LePere, "This is really expensive." Each time she would respond, "I know, thanks, but I still need the medicine." The pharmacist finally gave the LePeres the supplies — and a bill for $1,550. That was after a $350 coupon. As lawmakers and the public scrutinize dramatic price increases for other old drugs — most recently with the Mylan-owned EpiPen, which saw its cost go up by 500% in the past nine years — the next flash point may be insulin, a drug both ubiquitous and complicated. And the story of why the LePeres are now paying as much as their mortgage payment on insulin, even though they have insurance and even though there are competing drugs on the market, is really the story of what has happened to the healthcare industry in America since the start of the century. The need for insulin The human body produces its own insulin. Some people can't. When he got the diagnosis, Cole LePere found himself one of nearly 29.1 million Americans known to have one of the two types of diabetes. Cole's kind, known as Type 1, is an autoimmune disease. His body mistakenly kills so-called beta cells that are supposed to make the body's insulin, a hormone that helps people absorb and process the sugar in food. The roughly 1.25 million people in the US who have Type 1 diabetes need to inject insulin to live. Type 2 diabetes, the more common form, is something that develops either based on genetic or lifesty Continue reading >>

Insulin In The Philippines

Insulin In The Philippines

I have been diabetic for almost 25 years now. Type 2 diabetes. Usually, for type 2 diabetics, we control our blood glucose through diet and oral medication. However, if you have been a type 2 diabetic for a long time, it is common that you will end up having to use insulin, because the oral medications and diet will no longer be completely effective in controlling your blood glucose. Recently, I have joined the ranks of those using insulin. I used to think that it would be scary to use insulin, perhaps it would be difficult to give myself an injection. However, now that I have been using insulin for a few weeks, I am actually quite surprised at how easy it is to administer to myself. Additionally, I am so happy that I decided to start using insulin, because I feel much better than I did before I started using it. My doctor actually encouraged me to begin using insulin almost a year ago, but I didn’t want to do it. I tried extra hard to get more exercise and to reduce my diet, but in the end, I simply was not able to use those methods, and decided to follow the doctor’s advice and begin using insulin. According to my doctor, he feels that my body no longer produces insulin, and if it is producing any insulin at all, it is only a small amount, thus the injections of insulin are really necessary for my body to function as it should. The cost of Insulin For diabetics, one of the big concerns is the cost of insulin. It is not cheap. If you do not have insurance to cover the cost of such treatments, the cost could be overwhelming for some, especially for the local population here in the Philippines. There are many different types of insulin, and the costs vary. For the type of insulin that I am using, and at the dosage that I am using, paying the full price would run me a Continue reading >>

Is Insulin The New Epipen? Families Facing Sticker Shock Over 400 Percent Price Hike

Is Insulin The New Epipen? Families Facing Sticker Shock Over 400 Percent Price Hike

Is insulin is the new EpiPen? In the last eight years, the average price per milliliter of insulin has skyrocketed by over 200 percent. But there's one major difference. If you can't get an EpiPen, there's a chance you might die. If your body doesn't have insulin, you certainly will die. "It feels like they're holding my kid ransom," said Tiffany Cara, whose son has diabetes. Only three major companies make insulin in the U.S. and each has steadily ratcheted up prices, sometimes in lockstep. Since 2004, the manufacturer list price for insulin, known as wholesale acquisition cost, is up by triple digits. Novo Nordisk's insulin Novolog is up 381 percent, Eli Lilly's Humalog is up 380 percent and Sanofi's Lantus is up 400 percent, according to data from Truven Health Analytics. That's sending some diabetic families into sticker shock. Six-year-old Dorian Carra loves to play outside his Texas home and dress up as a super hero. Specifically, Captain America, the World War II version. His mom says her outgoing boy has "never met a stranger." But four years ago he couldn't stay awake. He was breathing oddly. His parents brought his rag doll body to the E.R. Doctors said his blood sugar levels had spiked to 965 milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood. A normal range is 80 to 140. The diagnosis was type-1 diabetes. The prescription was insulin, every day, for the rest of his life. Recently those treatment costs doubled after the Carra's health insurance company switched to cover another brand. Even though the brands are clinically the same, the new medicine isn't available in the dosages he needs, so they have to stick with the more expensive kind. Tiffany Carra, a thirty-two-year-old IT field support analyst, says it now costs them $1,880 a year for insulin and supplies. 6 Continue reading >>

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