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Insulin Glargine Side Effects

Insulin Glargine Overview

Insulin Glargine Overview

Insulin glargine is a prescription medication used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Insulin glargine, a long-acting form of insulin, works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping the body to use sugar for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. This medication comes in an injectable form to be injected under the skin. Insulin glargine is usually injected once daily. Common side effects include low blood sugar, redness and skin thickening at the injection site, and weight gain. Insulin glargine is a prescription medication used to treat people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. Insulin glargine may be used along with fast-acting insulin or oral medications to control blood sugar. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Insulin Glargine may be found in some form under the following brand names: Insulins, including insulin glargine, can cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), hyperglycemia (high blood sugar), allergy, and skin reactions. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar): Early warning signs of hypoglycemia may be different, less noticeable or not noticeable at all in some people. That is why it is important to check your blood sugar as you have been advised by your doctor. Symptoms of hypoglycemia may include: anxiety, irritability, restlessness, trouble concentrating, personality changes, mood changes, or other abnormal behavior tingling in your hands, feet, lips, or tongue dizziness, light-headedness, or drowsiness nightmares or trouble sleeping headache blurred vision slurred speech palpitations (fast heart beat) sweating tremor (shaking) unsteady gait (walking). If you have hypoglycemia often or it is hard for you to k Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (rx)

Insulin Glargine (rx)

Dosage Forms & Strengths injectable solution 100 units/mL (Lantus; 10mL vial) 100 units/mL (Lantus SoloSTAR; Basaglar KwikPen; 3 mL disposable prefilled pens) 300 units/mL (Toujeo; 1.5 mL SolosStar disposable prefilled pen) Note: Recent studies have suggested that glargine-300 extends blood glucose control well beyond 24 hr Type 1 or 2 Diabetes Mellitus Lantus and Toujeo are recombinant human insulin analogs indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus Dosing Considerations Indicated for once-daily SC administration; exhibits relatively constant glucose-lowering profile over 24 hr May be administered at any time during the day; should be administered SC once daily at the same time every day Dose must be individualized based on clinical response; blood glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Patients adjusting the amount or timing of dosage should do so only under medical supervision with appropriate glucose monitoring In patients with type 1 diabetes, insulin glargine must be used in regimens with short-acting insulin Should not be administered IV or via an insulin pump; IV administration of the usual SC dose could result in severe hypoglycemia As with all insulins, injection sites should be rotated within the same region (abdomen, thigh, or deltoid) from one injection to the next to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy; no clinically relevant difference in insulin glargine absorption after abdominal, deltoid, or thigh SC administration As with all insulins, the rate of absorption and, consequently, the onset and duration of action may be affected by exercise and other variables (eg, stress, intercurrent illness, changes in coadministered drugs, meal patterns) Type 1 diabetes mellitus: Starting dose sho Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine, Recombinant (subcutaneous Route)

Insulin Glargine, Recombinant (subcutaneous Route)

Side Effects Drug information provided by: Micromedex Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: More common Anxiety behavior change similar to being drunk blurred vision chills cold sweats confusion convulsions (seizures) cool, pale skin difficulty with thinking dizziness or lightheadedness drowsiness excessive hunger fast heartbeat headache nausea nervousness nightmares restless sleep shakiness slurred speech tingling in the hands, feet, lips, or tongue unusual tiredness or weakness Less common or rare Fast pulse skin rash or itching over the entire body sweating trouble breathing Incidence not known Bloating or swelling of the face, hands, lower legs, or feet cough decreased urine difficulty with swallowing dry mouth hives increased thirst irregular heartbeat muscle pain or cramps numbness or tingling in the hands, feet, or lips puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue rapid weight gain vomiting Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Fever sore throat stuffy or runny nose Less common or rare Depression of the skin at the injection site itching, pain, redness, or swelling at the injection site thickening of the skin at injection site Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine

Insulin Glargine

Lowers blood sugar. Our bottom line Lantus (insulin glargine) is an effective, long-acting insulin that provides all-day blood sugar control, but it can cause low blood sugar levels, so be sure to have a source of sugar nearby. Insulin is one of the most effective blood sugar-lowering medication and can lower your A1c (average blood sugar over time) by up to 2-3%. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-lasting insulin that provides consistent, all-day sugar control with just once or twice daily dosing. Dose can be easily adjusted to make a customized regimen that's tailored to your body's needs. Lantus (insulin glargine) can be used with liver or kidney problems. You have to take insulin by injection. You may gain some weight, around 4-6 pounds. You have to maintain a consistent schedule to avoid low blood sugar episodes. Dramatic changes in weight or meal patterns will require dose adjustments. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-acting synthetic insulin for diabetes. It acts the same way as the insulin your body produces to break down sugars and fats. Sign up and get Pill Talk, the latest in health & medicine news from Iodine What to expect when you take Lantus (insulin glargine) for Diabetes Possible side effects Source: FDA product label and Iodine pharmacists Side effect rates for Lantus (insulin glargine) Where we got our data » Manufacturers don’t say how common these side effects are when taking Lantus for diabetes Fat accumulation Risks and Warnings for Lantus (insulin glargine) Higher risk if: › Insulin dose too high › Use of other blood sugar lowering medicines › Poor injection techniques Very low blood sugar is life-threatening. Recognize the symptoms of low blood sugar, which include fast heartbeat, sweating, pale skin, feeling shaky, confusion or irr Continue reading >>

Insulin-glargine, Injectable Solution

Insulin-glargine, Injectable Solution

Low blood sugar warning: You may have mild or severe low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) while you’re taking insulin glargine. Severe low blood sugar can be dangerous. It can harm your heart or brain, and cause unconsciousness, seizures, or even be fatal. Low blood sugar can happen very quickly and come on without symptoms. It’s important to check your blood sugar as often as your doctor says to. Symptoms can include: anxiety, irritability, restlessness, trouble concentrating, feeling confused or not like yourself tingling in your hands, feet, lips, or tongue dizziness, lightheadedness, or drowsiness nightmares or trouble sleeping headache blurred vision slurred speech fast heart rate sweating shaking unsteady walking Thiazolidinediones warning: Taking diabetes pills called thiazolidinediones (TZDs) with insulin glargine may cause heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including shortness of breath, swelling of your ankles or feet, and sudden weight gain. Your doctor may adjust your TZD dosage if you have these symptoms. Infection warning: You should never share insulin vials, syringes, or prefilled pens with other people. Sharing or reusing needles or syringes with another person puts you and others at risk of various infections. Low potassium levels warning: All insulin products can decrease the amount of potassium in the blood. Low potassium blood levels may increase your risk of irregular heartbeat while taking this drug. To prevent this, your doctor will check your potassium blood levels before you start taking this drug. Insulin glargine is a prescription drug. It comes as an injectable solution. This drug is self-injectable. Insulin glargine is available as the brand-name drugs Lantus, Basaglar, Toujeo, and Soli Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine Solution Side Effects By Likelihood And Severity

Insulin Glargine Solution Side Effects By Likelihood And Severity

COMMON side effects If experienced, these tend to have a Severe expression Low Blood Sugar INFREQUENT side effects If experienced, these tend to have a Less Severe expression Acute Infection Of The Nose, Throat Or Sinus Backache Cough Head Pain Inflammation Of The Nose Signs And Symptoms At Injection Site Throat Irritation Weight Gain RARE side effects If experienced, these tend to have a Severe expression Abnormally Low Blood Pressure Itching Low Amount Of Potassium In The Blood Rash Trouble Breathing If experienced, these tend to have a Less Severe expression Abnormal Fat Distribution Visible Water Retention Continue reading >>

Lantus Side Effects

Lantus Side Effects

What should I watch for? Visit your health care professional or doctor for regular checks on your progress. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Alcohol may interfere with the effect of this medicine. Avoid alcoholic drinks. A test called the HbA1C (A1C) will be monitored. This is a simple blood test. It measures your blood sugar control over the last 2 to 3 months. You will receive this test every 3 to 6 months. Learn how to check your blood sugar. Learn the symptoms of low and high blood sugar and how to manage them. Always carry a quick-source of sugar with you in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Examples include hard sugar candy or glucose tablets. Make sure others know that you can choke if you eat or drink when you develop serious symptoms of low blood sugar, such as seizures or unconsciousness. They must get medical help at once. Tell your doctor or health care professional if you have high blood sugar. You might need to change the dose of your medicine. If you are sick or exercising more than usual, you might need to change the dose of your medicine. Do not skip meals. Ask your doctor or health care professional if you should avoid alcohol. Many nonprescription cough and cold products contain sugar or alcohol. These can affect blood sugar. Make sure that you have the right kind of syringe for the type of insulin you use. Try not to change the brand and type of insulin or syringe unless your health care professional or doctor tells you to. Switching insulin brand or type can cause dangerously high or low blood sugar. Always keep an extra supply of insulin, syringes, and needles on hand. Use a syringe one time only. Throw away syringe and needle in a closed container to prev Continue reading >>

What You Can Expect From Lantus® Insulin

What You Can Expect From Lantus® Insulin

For starters, Lantus® may give you improved blood sugar management. When you add Lantus® to your diabetes treatment plan, which can include other diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise,* you may improve your blood sugar management, helping you move towards your target blood sugar and A1C goals. *Caffeine, alcohol, medication, medication interactions, stress, lack of sleep, jetlag, allergies, illness, smoking, menstruation, altitude, as well as injection site issues including scar tissue or lipodystrophy can all affect glucose levels. Why Lantus® (insulin glargine injection) 100 Units/mL May Be the Right Choice for You Improved blood sugar management. Lantus® has been shown to lower A1C as part of an overall diabetes treatment plan, which includes diet, exercise, and other diabetes medicines. Once-a-day. One dose of Lantus® at the same time each day works all day and all night. Dial-in Dosing. With the Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen, you get the dose you dial every time, plus push-button administration. Risks of Insulin The most common side effect of insulin, including Lantus®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. Severe hypoglycemia may be serious and life-threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Other possible side effects may include swelling, weight gain, injection site reactions, and allergic reactions. In rare cases, some allergic reactions may be life-threatening. Other people may not experience symptoms of hypoglycemia. It is, therefore, important to monitor your blood sugar levels regularly. See Prescribing Information for complete details. Discuss this with your doctor and find out more about the benefits and risks associated with Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) - Side Effects And Adverse Reactions

Lantus (insulin Glargine) - Side Effects And Adverse Reactions

Lantus (Insulin Glargine) - Side Effects and Adverse Reactions The following adverse reactions are discussed elsewhere: Hypoglycemia [See ] Warnings and Precautions Hypersensitivity and allergic reactions [See ] Warnings and Precautions Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying designs, the adverse reaction rates reported in one clinical trial may not be easily compared to those rates reported in another clinical trial, and may not reflect the rates actually observed in clinical practice. The frequencies of treatment-emergent adverse events during LANTUS clinical trials in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus are listed in the tables below. Table 1: Treatment emergent adverse events in pooled clinical trials up to 28 weeks duration in adults with type 1 diabetes (adverse events with frequency 5%) Table 2: Treatment emergent adverse events in pooled clinical trials up to 1 year duration in adults with type 2 diabetes (adverse events with frequency 5%) Table 3: Treatment emergent adverse events in a 5-year trial of adults with type 2 diabetes (adverse events with frequency 10%) Table 4: Treatment emergent adverse events in a 28-week clinical trial of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (adverse events with frequency 5%) Hypoglycemia is the most commonly observed adverse reaction in patients using insulin, including LANTUS. Tables 5, and 6 and 7 summarize the incidence of severe hypoglycemia in the LANTUS individual clinical trials. Severe symptomatic hypoglycemia was defined as an event with symptoms consistent with hypoglycemia requiring the assistance of another person and associated with either a blood glucose below 50 mg/dL (56 mg/dL in the 5-year trial and 36 mg/dL in the ORIGIN trial) or prompt recovery afte Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine Pen

Insulin Glargine Pen

Uses Insulin glargine is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Insulin glargine is a man-made product that is similar to human insulin. It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. It acts longer than regular insulin, providing a low, steady level of insulin. It works by helping blood sugar (glucose) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. Insulin glargine may be used with a shorter-acting insulin product. It may also be used alone or with other diabetes drugs. How to use Insulin Glargine Pen Read the Patient Information Leaflet and Instructions for Use if available from your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist. This insulin product is a concentrated form of standard insulin (3 times as much insulin in each milliliter). Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package. Check that you are using the correct insulin before injecting this medication. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin. Insulin glargine should be clear and colorless. Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the skin and to avoid developing problems under the skin (lipodystrophy). Insulin glargine may be injected in the stomach area, the thigh, or the upper arm. Do not Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin glargine is used to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to treat people with type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control their diabetes. In people with type 1 diabetes, insulin glargine must be used with another type of insulin (a short-acting insulin). In people with type 2 diabetes, insulin glargine also may be used with another type of insulin or with oral medication(s) for diabetes. Insulin glargine is a long-acting, manmade version of human insulin. Insulin glargine works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin glargine comes as a solution (liquid) to inject subcutaneously (under the Continue reading >>

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) or type 2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes. The most common side effects of Lantus is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Symptoms include: hunger, sweating, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Other common side effects of Lantus include pain, redness, swelling, itching, or thickening of the skin at the injection site. These side effects usually go away after a few days or weeks. Lantus should be administered subcutaneously (under the skin) once a day at the same time every day. Dose is determined by the individual and the desired blood glucose levels. Lantus may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, or beta-blockers. Many other medicines can increase or decrease the effects of insulin glargine on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Lantus. Discuss a plan to manage blood sugar with your doctor before becoming pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Insulin needs may change while breastfeeding. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding. Our Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (lantus)

Insulin Glargine (lantus)

What is INSULIN GLARGINE-INJECTABLE, and how does it work (mechanism of action)? Insulin glargine is a bioengineered (man-made) injectable form of long-acting insulin that is used to regulate sugar (glucose) levels in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Individuals with type 1 diabetes do not produce insulin on their own; and individuals with type 2 diabetes do not produce enough insulin, or insulin is not as effective due to insulin resistance. Insulin glargine works the same way as natural human insulin, but it's action lasts longer. It helps diabetic patients regulate glucose or sugar in the body. Insulin glargine works by promoting movement of sugar from blood into body tissues and also stops sugar production in liver. Insulin glargine is man-made insulin that mimics the actions of human insulin. The FDA approved insulin glargine in April 2000. What are the side effects of INSULIN GLARGINE-INJECTABLE? Common side effects of insulin glargine are: Local allergic reactions that may occur at the injection sites are: Long term use of insulin glargine can lead to thickening of fat tissues at the injection site. Severe allergic reactions are: Swelling under the skin Bronchospasm (tightening of chest that leads to difficulty breathing) Individuals should contact a healthcare professional if they experience any of the above reactions. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes can affect all people, regardless of age. Early symptoms of type 2 diabetes may be missed, so those affected may not even know they have the condition. An estimated one out of every three people within the early stages of type 2 diabetes are not aware they have it. Diabetes interferes with the body's ability to metabolize carbohydrates for energy, leading to high levels of blood sugar. These chronically high blo Continue reading >>

Lantus

Lantus

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. Insulin glargine is an extended, long-acting insulin. It takes about 90 minutes to begin working after injection, and it stops working after about 24 hours. After injection, insulin glargine is released slowly and constantly into the bloodstream. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? Vial Each mL of sterile solution contains 100 u Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

What Is Lantus (Insulin Glargine)? Lantus is the brand name of insulin glargine, a long-acting insulin used to treat adults and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus to control high blood sugar. Lantus replaces the insulin that your body no longer produces. Insulin is a natural substance that allows your body to convert dietary sugar into energy and helps store energy for later use. In type 2 diabetes mellitus, your body does not produce enough insulin, or the insulin produced is not used properly, causing a rise in blood sugar. Like other types of insulin, Lantus is used to normalize blood sugar levels. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual dysfunction. Proper control of diabetes has also been shown to reduce your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Lantus is meant to be used alongside a proper diet and exercise program recommended by your doctor. Lantus is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. It was approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000 as the first long-acting human insulin administered once a day with a 24-hour sugar-lowering effect. Lantus Warnings You will be taught how to properly inject this medication since that is the only way to use it. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. Always wash your hands before measuring and injecting insulin. Lantus is always clear and colorless; look for cloudy solution or clumps in the container before injecting it. Do not use Lantus to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. A short-acting insulin is used to treat this condition. It is recommended that you take a diabetes education program to learn more about diabetes and how to manage it. Other medical problems may affect the use of this Continue reading >>

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