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Insulin Glargine Mechanism Of Action

Mechanism Of Action Video Presentation | Levemir

Mechanism Of Action Video Presentation | Levemir

Levemir [package insert]. Plainsboro, NJ: Novo Nordisk Inc; 2015. Klein O, Lynge J, Endhal L, Damholt B, Nosek L, Heise T. Albumin-bound basal insulin analogues (insulin detemir and NN344): comparable time-action profiles but less variability than insulin glargine in type 2 diabetes.Diabetes Obes Metab.2007;9(3):290-299. Philis-Tsimikas A, Charpentier G, Clauson P, Ravn GM, Roberts VL, Thorsteinsson B. Comparison of once-daily insulin detemir with NPH insulin added to a regimen of oral antidiabetic drugs in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes.Clin Ther.2006;28(10):1569-1581. Kurtzhals P. Engineering predictability and protraction in a basal insulin analogue: the pharmacology of insulin detemir.Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord.2004;28(suppl 2):S23-S28. Heise T, Nosek L, Rnn BB, et al. Lower within-subject variability of insulin detemir in comparison to NPH insulin and insulin glargine in people with type 1 diabetes.Diabetes.2004;53(6):1614-1620. Danne T, Datz N, Endahl L, et al. Insulin detemir is characterized by a more reproducible pharmacokinetic profile than insulin glargine in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: results from a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.Pediatr Diabetes.2008;9(6):554-560. King AB. Once-daily insulin detemir is comparable to once-daily insulin glargine in providing glycaemic control over 24 h in patients with type 2 diabetes: a double-blind, randomized, crossover study.Diabetes Obes Metab.2009;11(1):70 fig.1. Levemir is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to Levemir or any of its excipients. Never Share a Levemir FlexTouch Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Dosage adjustment and monitoring: Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated w Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (lantus)

Insulin Glargine (lantus)

What is INSULIN GLARGINE-INJECTABLE, and how does it work (mechanism of action)? Insulin glargine is a bioengineered (man-made) injectable form of long-acting insulin that is used to regulate sugar (glucose) levels in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Individuals with type 1 diabetes do not produce insulin on their own; and individuals with type 2 diabetes do not produce enough insulin, or insulin is not as effective due to insulin resistance. Insulin glargine works the same way as natural human insulin, but it's action lasts longer. It helps diabetic patients regulate glucose or sugar in the body. Insulin glargine works by promoting movement of sugar from blood into body tissues and also stops sugar production in liver. Insulin glargine is man-made insulin that mimics the actions of human insulin. The FDA approved insulin glargine in April 2000. What are the side effects of INSULIN GLARGINE-INJECTABLE? Common side effects of insulin glargine are: Local allergic reactions that may occur at the injection sites are: Long term use of insulin glargine can lead to thickening of fat tissues at the injection site. Severe allergic reactions are: Swelling under the skin Bronchospasm (tightening of chest that leads to difficulty breathing) Individuals should contact a healthcare professional if they experience any of the above reactions. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes can affect all people, regardless of age. Early symptoms of type 2 diabetes may be missed, so those affected may not even know they have the condition. An estimated one out of every three people within the early stages of type 2 diabetes are not aware they have it. Diabetes interferes with the body's ability to metabolize carbohydrates for energy, leading to high levels of blood sugar. These chronically high blo Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Hormone secreted by pancreatic beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans and essential for the metabolism and homeostasis of carbohydrate, fat, and protein. Insulin glargine is a once-daily basal insulin analog without pronounced peaks. BASAGLAR, Lantus, Lantus SoloStar, Toujeo SoloStar BASAGLAR/Lantus/Lantus SoloStar/Toujeo SoloStar Subcutaneous Inj Sol: 1mL, 100U, 300U For the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus. For the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Subcutaneous dosage (100 units/mL, i.e., Lantus, Basaglar) Initially, administer one-third of the total daily insulin requirements/dose subcutaneously once daily. Titrate dosage to achieve blood glucose control and A1C goals in conjunction with a short-acting insulin. Give the dose at the same time every day, at any time. Administration in the morning may avoid nocturnal hypoglycemia. When transferring from once daily NPH insulin, the dose is usually not changed. However, when transferring from twice-daily NPH insulin to insulin glargine, the total daily dose of NPH insulin (or other twice daily basal insulin) should be reduced by 20% and administered as single dose once daily. When transferring from once-daily Toujeo to once-daily Lantus or Basaglar, the recommended initial Lantus or Basaglar dose is 80% of the Toujeo dose that is being discontinued. Thereafter, the dosage of insulin glargine should be adjusted to response. Children and Adolescents 6 years and older Insulin requirements are highly variable and must be individualized based on patient-specific factors and type of insulin regimen. During partial remission phase, total combined daily insulin requirement is often less than 0.5 units/kg/day. Prepubertal children (outside the partial remission phase) usually require 0.7 to Continue reading >>

Soliqua 100/33 (insulin Glargine Plus Lixisenatide) Receives Fda Approval For Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

Soliqua 100/33 (insulin Glargine Plus Lixisenatide) Receives Fda Approval For Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

Soliqua 100/33 (Insulin Glargine plus Lixisenatide) Receives FDA Approval for Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes affects more than 29 million people in the United Statesapproximately 9% of the US population.1 In addition, an estimated 86 million US adults (more than 33% of the US population) have prediabetes, a condition that substantially increases the risk for diabetes.1 Based on the current trends and the aging of the US population in the next few decades, the prevalence of diabetes is projected to increase to 1 in 3 adults by 2050.2 However, appropriate intervention and management of diabetes can help reduce its rising prevalence.2 Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90% to 95% of all cases of diabetes and is characterized by insulin resistance and gradual decline in the ability of the pancreas to produce insulin.1 Type 1 diabetes accounts for 5% of all cases of diabetes, and is characterized by the destruction of pancreatic beta cells and the insufficiency or the absence of insulin production by the pancreas.1 Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States in 2013, and is a major cause of stroke, heart disease, kidney failure, blindness, and other serious conditions.1 Furthermore, diabetes is associated with microvascular, macrovascular, and neuropathic complications that can be disabling, life-threatening, and can have a profound impact on a patients health and quality of life.3,4 In the United States, the annual healthcare costs attributed to diabetes totaled $245 billion in 2012, including $176 billion in direct medical costs and $69 billion in indirect costs (ie, absenteeism, reduced/lost productivity, and disability).5 Overall, the medical costs for patients with diabetes are 2.3 times higher than the costs for individuals without diabetes, w Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine [rdna Origin] Injection)

Lantus (insulin Glargine [rdna Origin] Injection)

The following drug information is obtained from various newswires, published medical journal articles, and medical conference presentations. Specific Treatments: For adults and children w/Type 1 diabetes, or adults w/Type 2 diabetes requiring basal insulin to control hyperglycemia Lantus is the first FDA approved long-acting (basal) recombinant human insulin analog with a once-daily administration and a 24-hour glucose-lowering effect. This biosynthetic insulin, injected subcutaneously and designed to mimic NPH human insulin, is indicated for both adult and pediatric patients with Type 1 diabetes. It may also be used for the treatment of adults with Type 2 diabetes who require basal insulin for the control of hyperglycemia. The chemical structure of Lantus allows for regulated release of the insulin into the circulation with a glucose-lowering effect over a 24-hour period. In clinical studies, no specific pronounced peak was detected over this period. In clinical studies, the efficacy of Lantus, measured by metabolic control, was comparable to NPH human insulin. In addition, Lantus had a slower absorption rate than NPH human insulin. This absorption allowed for a relatively constant concentration/time profile over 24-hours. The glucose-lowering effect was detected over the entire 24-hour period. As with other insulin therapies, Lantus can cause the following side effects (with hypoglycemia being the most common adverse effect): Hypoglycemia Worsening of diabetic retinopathy Lipodystrophy Skin reactions (such as injection-site reaction, pruritus, and rash)* Allergic reactions Sodium retention Edema *In clinical trials, patients treated with Lantus had a higher incidence of injection-site pain (2.7%) than did patients receiving NPH human insulin (0.7%). In general, the re Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin glargine is used to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to treat people with type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control their diabetes. In people with type 1 diabetes, insulin glargine must be used with another type of insulin (a short-acting insulin). In people with type 2 diabetes, insulin glargine also may be used with another type of insulin or with oral medication(s) for diabetes. Insulin glargine is a long-acting, manmade version of human insulin. Insulin glargine works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin glargine comes as a solution (liquid) to inject subcutaneously (under the Continue reading >>

Glargine Drug Information, Professional

Glargine Drug Information, Professional

Glargine HOE 71GT HOE 901 Note:For a listing of dosage forms and brand names by country availability, see Dosage Forms section(s). Diabetes mellitus (treatment)Insulin glargine is indicated in the treatment of diabetes mellitus for the control of hyperglycemia in adult and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes and in adult patients with type 2 diabetes who require insulin {01} . Analog of human insulin created by replacing the amino acid at position 21 of the A-chain (asparagine) with glycine and by adding two arginines to the C-terminus of the B-chain. {01} Synthesized by recombinant DNA process involving a genetically engineered Escherichia coli {01} . Like other types of insulin, the primary action of insulin glargine is to regulate glucose metabolism {01} . Also, insulin glargine lowers the blood glucose concentration by stimulating glucose uptake especially by muscle and fat {01} . It also inhibits hepatic glucose production {01} . Insulin also inhibits lipolysis in adipocytes, inhibits proteolysis, and enhances protein synthesis. {01} Insulin glargine was formulated to have a low aqueous solubility at neutral pH {01} . The insulin glargine solution has a pH of 4, and at this pH, it is completely soluble {01} . However, in the neutral pH of the subcutaneous tissue, microprecipitates are formed from which small amounts of insulin glargine are slowly released {01} . This results in a relatively constant concentration over 24 hours {01} . There is no pronounced peak with insulin glargine. {01} . Like other insulins, the time course of action of insulin glargine may vary between individuals and within the same individual {01} . In contrast to other insulin products, the duration of action of insulin glargine was similar after subcutaneous injection into abdominal, d Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

LANTUS® (insulin glargine) Injection DESCRIPTION LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) is a sterile solution of insulin glargine for subcutaneous use. Insulin glargine is a recombinant human insulin analog that is a long-acting, parenteral blood-glucose-lowering agent [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY]. Insulin glargine has low aqueous solubility at neutral pH. At pH 4 insulin glargine is completely soluble. After injection into the subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized, leading to formation of microprecipitates from which small amounts of insulin glargine are slowly released, resulting in a relatively constant concentration/time profile over 24 hours with no pronounced peak. This profile allows oncedaily dosing as a basal insulin. LANTUS is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli (K12) as the production organism. Insulin glargine differs from human insulin in that the amino acid asparagine at position A21 is replaced by glycine and two arginines are added to the C-terminus of the B-chain. Chemically, insulin glargine is 21A-Gly-30Ba-L-Arg-3030b-L-Arg-human insulin and has the empirical formula C267H404N72O78S6 and a molecular weight of 6063. Insulin glargine has the following structural formula: LANTUS consists of insulin glargine dissolved in a clear aqueous fluid. Each milliliter of LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) contains 100 Units (3.6378 mg) insulin glargine. The 10 mL vial presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, 20 mcg polysorbate 20, and water for injection. The 3 mL prefilled pen presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, and water for inje Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine Mechanism Of Action

Insulin Glargine Mechanism Of Action

The Internet It Just Gives and Gives and Gives. Read Important Safety Information on this page. Understand the Levemir insulin mechanism of action by watching an informative video & reading info. Insulin Glargine. 2 FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION 1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE BASAGLARis indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 Toujeo 300 units/ml solution for injection in a pre-filled pen - by SANOFI Information about the mechanism of action of Abasaglar, for UK registered HCPs in response to your question The primary activity of insulin, including insulin glargine, is regulation of glucose metabolism. Long-Acting Insulin's, Insulin Detemir, Levemir ... (up to 24-hour duration of action). 1,2 c Average Tier 1 co-pay may vary by benefit design. Insulin Glargine is a recombinant human insulin analog with long-acting, blood glucose-lowering activity. Watch a video presentation on the Levemir mechanism of action, available on the Levemir health care professionals website. ... for the insulin receptor than human insulin. Lantus is a long-acting insulin for diabetes treatment. Duration of Action & Profile ... See how Tresiba compares with insulin glargine U-100 Insulin Glargine. a Hypo=hypoglycemia. Xultophy 100 units/ml insulin degludec + 3.6 mg/mL liraglutide solution for injection in a pre-filled pen - by Novo Nordisk Limited Mechanism of action. Original video by Sanofi: Mechanism of Action Insulin glargine is a recombinant human insulin analogue that does provide 24-hour duration of action in most, but not all, patients with T1DM. Know the structure, mechanism of action and release, development of Lantus, Lantus studies and more. Mechanism of action/Effect: ... Like other insulins, the time course of action of insulin glargine may vary Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine

Insulin Glargine

Insulin glargine, marketed under the names Lantus, among others, is a long-acting basal insulin analogue, given once daily to help control the blood sugar level of those with diabetes. It consists of microcrystals that slowly release insulin, giving a long duration of action of 18 to 26 hours, with a "peakless" profile (according to the insulin glargine package insert). Pharmacokinetically, it resembles basal insulin secretion of non-diabetic pancreatic beta cells. Sometimes, in type 2 diabetes and in combination with a short acting sulfonylurea (drugs which stimulate the pancreas to make more insulin), it can offer moderate control of serum glucose levels. In the absence of endogenous insulin—type 1 diabetes, depleted type 2 (in some cases) or latent autoimmune diabetes of adults in late stage—insulin glargine needs the support of fast acting insulin taken with food to reduce the effect of prandially derived glucose. Medical uses[edit] The long-acting insulin class, which includes insulin glargine, do not appear much better than neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin but have a significantly greater cost making them, as of 2010, not cost effective.[1] It is unclear if there is a difference in hypoglycemia and not enough data to determine any differences with respect to long term outcomes.[2] Mixing with other insulins[edit] Unlike some other longer-acting insulins, glargine must not be diluted or mixed with other insulin or solution in the same syringe.[3] However, this restriction has been questioned.[4] Adverse effects[edit] Cancer[edit] As of 2012 tentative evidence shows no association between insulin glargine and cancer.[5] Previous studies had raised concerns.[6] Pharmacology[edit] Mechanism of action[edit] Insulin glargine has a substitution of glycine for Continue reading >>

The Evolution Of Insulin Glargine And Its Continuing Contribution To Diabetes Care

The Evolution Of Insulin Glargine And Its Continuing Contribution To Diabetes Care

The Evolution of Insulin Glargine and its Continuing Contribution to Diabetes Care Gerhard Seipke , Harald Berchtold , and David R. Owens Institute of Biochemistry, Center for Structural and Cell Biology in Medicine and Center for Brain, Behavior and Metabolism, University of Lbeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lbeck, Germany Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Shanghai, China Institute of Biochemistry, Center for Structural and Cell Biology in Medicine and Center for Brain, Behavior and Metabolism, University of Lbeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lbeck, Germany Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Shanghai, China Sanofi-Aventis Deutschland GmbH, Frankfurt am Main, Germany Diabetes Research Group, Institute of Life Sciences College of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea, Wales Rolf Hilgenfeld, Phone: +49 451 500 4060, Email: [email protected] . Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are credited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The epoch-making discovery of insulin heralded a new dawn in the management of diabetes. However, the earliest, unmodified soluble insulin preparations were limited by their short duration of action, necessitating multiple daily injections. Initial attempts to protract the duration of action of insulin involved the use of various additives, including vasoconstrictor substances, which met with limited success. The subsequent elucidation of the chemical and three-dimensional structure of insulin and its chemical synthesis and biosynthesis al Continue reading >>

Long-acting Insulins

Long-acting Insulins

Rapid-Acting Analogues Short-Acting Insulins Intermediate-Acting Insulins Long-Acting Insulins Combination Insulins Drug UPDATES: TRESIBA ®- insulin degludec injection [Drug information / PDF] Click link for the latest monograph Dosing: Click (+) next to Dosage and Administration section (drug info link) Initial U.S. Approval: 2015 Mechanism of Action: The primary activity of insulin, including TRESIBA, is regulation of glucose metabolism. Insulin and its analogs lower blood glucose by stimulating peripheral glucose uptake, especially by skeletal muscle and fat, and by inhibiting hepatic glucose production. Insulin also inhibits lipolysis and proteolysis, and enhances protein synthesis. TRESIBA forms multi-hexamers when injected into the subcutaneous tissue resulting in a subcutaneous insulin degludec depot. The protracted time action profile of TRESIBA is predominantly due to delayed absorption of insulin degludec from the subcutaneous tissue to the systemic circulation and to a lesser extent due to binding of insulin-degludec to circulating albumin. INDICATIONS AND USAGE: TRESIBA is indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use TRESIBA is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Dosing: Individualize dose based on type of diabetes, metabolic needs, blood glucose monitoring results and glycemic control goal. Rotate injection sites to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy. Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin or solution. Administer subcutaneously once daily at any time of day. Do NOT perform dose conversion when using the TRESIBA U-100 or U-200 FlexTouch pens. The TRESIBA U-100 and U-200 FlexTouch pens dose window shows the number of insulin units to be delivered and NO conversion is needed. HOW SUPPLIE Continue reading >>

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