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Insulin Effect On Kidney

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The Impact Of Insulin Resistance On The Kidney And Vasculature

The impact of insulin resistance on the kidney and vasculature Cora Weigert is Professor of Molecular Medicine at the University Hospital Tbingen, Germany. She obtained her PhD in biochemistry from Erlangen University, Germany. Her research focuses on the molecular mechanism of insulin signalling and the effect of exercise on mitochondrial function. Andreas Fritsche is Professor of Nutritional Medicine and Prevention at the University Hospital Tbingen, Germany and Department Head at the Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholtz Center Munich at the University of Tbingen. He is a diabetologist and his research focus is the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Norbert Stefan is Heisenberg Professor at the University Hospital Tbingen, Germany, and Head of the Department of Pathophysiology of Prediabetes at the Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholtz Centre Munich at the University of Tbingen. In his research he applies a clinicalexperimental approach to understand the mechanisms that underlie metabolically healthy obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and dysregulated hepatokine production. Hans-Ulrich Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. rwongton

    Insulin increases risk of kidney complications?

    I was speaking with a friend and she told me that she has researched that using insulin increases your risk for having renal problems. has anyone heard the same? i have never and was curious to know why would that be the reason.
    thanks.

  2. coravh

    That doesn't really make a lot of sense. If a T1 doesn't take insulin, they won't have to worry about renal complications - they'll be dead.
    It is possible that in T2s who have moved to insulin that they have an increased occurance (notice I didn't say "risk") of kidney issues. But the odds are that they had uncontrolled blood sugars before moving to insulin.
    That's my take on it anyway.
    Cora

  3. trinitarian3n1

    High insulin levels can certainly promote plaque build-up in the vessels, but high sugar levels can also damage the kidney microvasculature via oxidative stress and inflammation. Using the right amount of insulin to maintain normal sugar levels is the preferred method, IMO.

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The Effects Of Insulin On The Body

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas. Its function is to allow other cells to transform glucose into energy throughout your body. Without insulin, cells are starved for energy and must seek an alternate source. This can lead to life-threatening complications. The Effects of Insulin on the Body Insulin is a natural hormone produced in the pancreas. When you eat, your pancreas releases insulin to help your body make energy out of sugars (glucose). It also helps you store energy. Insulin is a vital part of metabolism. Without it, your body would cease to function. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is no longer able to produce insulin. In Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas initially produces insulin, but the cells of your body are unable to make good use of the insulin (insulin resistance). Uncontrolled diabetes allows glucose to build up in the blood rather than being distributed to cells or stored. This can wreak havoc with virtually every part of your body. Complications of diabetes include kidney disease, nerve damage, eye problems, and stomach problems. People with Type 1 diabetes need insulin therapy to live. Some people with Type 2 diabetes must also take insulin therapy to c Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. rwongton

    Insulin increases risk of kidney complications?

    I was speaking with a friend and she told me that she has researched that using insulin increases your risk for having renal problems. has anyone heard the same? i have never and was curious to know why would that be the reason.
    thanks.

  2. coravh

    That doesn't really make a lot of sense. If a T1 doesn't take insulin, they won't have to worry about renal complications - they'll be dead.
    It is possible that in T2s who have moved to insulin that they have an increased occurance (notice I didn't say "risk") of kidney issues. But the odds are that they had uncontrolled blood sugars before moving to insulin.
    That's my take on it anyway.
    Cora

  3. trinitarian3n1

    High insulin levels can certainly promote plaque build-up in the vessels, but high sugar levels can also damage the kidney microvasculature via oxidative stress and inflammation. Using the right amount of insulin to maintain normal sugar levels is the preferred method, IMO.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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When Your Doctor Says It's Time To Start Insulin

If you have type 2 diabetes and your blood glucose isn't well controlled through diet and oral medicines, your provider may want you to start insulin. You may feel some of the following concerns. You don't understand what you've done wrong. Diabetes usually progresses over time. There comes a time when more and stronger treatment is needed. When the pills that have controlled your blood glucose no longer work, insulin is needed. This doesn't mean you have failed. It is expected in the course of the disease. You are not alone! Most healthy patients with diabetes can expect to live long lives after their disease is diagnosed. A large number will require insulin at some point. Many are not happy about taking injections, but most adjust to them well. You feel like your life is going to change. In some cases, insulin treatment may be temporary. In others, it is not. Whatever is needed to control your blood glucose should be used. That's what keeps you healthy. When your blood glucose is well controlled, you may have more energy, sleep better, and enjoy better moods. You can still do all of your usual activities, eat meals out, and live your life. You may need to check your blood glucose Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. rwongton

    Insulin increases risk of kidney complications?

    I was speaking with a friend and she told me that she has researched that using insulin increases your risk for having renal problems. has anyone heard the same? i have never and was curious to know why would that be the reason.
    thanks.

  2. coravh

    That doesn't really make a lot of sense. If a T1 doesn't take insulin, they won't have to worry about renal complications - they'll be dead.
    It is possible that in T2s who have moved to insulin that they have an increased occurance (notice I didn't say "risk") of kidney issues. But the odds are that they had uncontrolled blood sugars before moving to insulin.
    That's my take on it anyway.
    Cora

  3. trinitarian3n1

    High insulin levels can certainly promote plaque build-up in the vessels, but high sugar levels can also damage the kidney microvasculature via oxidative stress and inflammation. Using the right amount of insulin to maintain normal sugar levels is the preferred method, IMO.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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