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Insulin Drug Classification

Byetta, Victoza, Bydureon: Diabetes Drugs And Weight Loss

Byetta, Victoza, Bydureon: Diabetes Drugs And Weight Loss

Tell me about the diabetes drugs Byetta, Victoza and Bydureon. Can they really help people who have diabetes lose weight? Are there side effects? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. Exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon) and liraglutide (Victoza) are taken by injection, similar to insulin, but they're not insulin. These medications are in a class of drugs called incretin mimetics, which improve blood sugar control by mimicking the action of a hormone called glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Among other things, these drugs stimulate insulin secretion in response to rising blood sugar levels after a meal, which results in lowering of the blood sugar. Byetta, Bydureon and Victoza not only improve blood sugar control, but may also lead to weight loss. There are many proposed ways in which these medications cause weight loss. They appear to help suppress appetite. But the most prominent effect of these drugs is that they delay the movement of food from the stomach into the small intestine. As a result, you may feel "full" faster and longer, so you eat less. Byetta is injected twice daily, and Victoza is injected once a day. Bydureon, a newer formulation, is injected once a week. These drugs do have different effects and side effects to consider. Exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon). The most common side effect of exenatide is mild to moderate nausea, which improves with time in most people. Several cases of kidney problems, including kidney failure, have been reported in people who have taken exenatide. Rarely, exenatide may cause harmful inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis). Liraglutide (Victoza). Some studies have found that liraglutide reduces systolic blood pressure and triglycerides, in addition to improving blood sugar control. The most common side effects are headache, nausea and Continue reading >>

Insulin Aspart Overview

Insulin Aspart Overview

Insulin aspart is a prescription medication used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Insulin aspart is a fast-acting form of insulin. It is usually given with a long-acting insulin to provide a steady amount of insulin to control blood glucose (sugar) levels. This medication comes in an injectable form available in vials and prefilled pens. Insulin aspart should be injected just under the skin 5 to 10 minutes before meals. It may also be injected directly into a vein (IV) by a healthcare provider or by an insulin pump. Common side effects of insulin aspart include low blood sugar, reaction at the injection site, and weight gain. Insulin aspart is a prescription medication used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Insulin Aspart may be found in some form under the following brand names: Serious side effects may occur. See "Insulin Aspart Precautions" section. Common side effects of insulin aspart include weight gain, reaction at the injection site, and low blood sugar. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is the most common side effect seen with insulin aspart use. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include: sweating dizziness or lightheadedness shakiness hunger fast heart beat tingling of lips and tongue trouble concentrating or confusion blurred vision slurred speech anxiety, irritability or mood changes headache Severe low blood sugar can cause unconsciousness (passing out), seizures, and death. Know your symptoms of low blood sugar. Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions for treating low blood sugar. Talk to your healthcare provider if low blood sugar is a problem for you. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you ta Continue reading >>

Regular-insulin, Injectable Solution

Regular-insulin, Injectable Solution

Insulin regular (human) injectable solution is available as brand-name drugs. It’s not available in a generic form. Brand names: HumuLIN R, NovoLIN R. Insulin regular (human) comes in three forms: injectable solution, powder for inhalation, and an intravenous injection. Insulin regular (human) injectable solution is used along with a healthy diet and exercise to control high blood sugar caused by type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Low blood sugar warning: Insulin regular (human) can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). If you have a low blood sugar reaction, you’ll need to treat it right away. Symptoms can include: hunger dizziness shakiness lightheadedness sweating irritability headache fast heart rate confusion Thiazolidinedione warning: Taking certain diabetes pills called thiazolidinediones (TZDs) with insulin regular (human) may cause heart failure in some people. This can happen even if you’ve never had heart failure or heart problems before. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse. Your healthcare provider should monitor you closely while you’re taking TZDs with insulin regular (human). Tell your doctor right away if you have new or worse symptoms of heart failure, including: shortness of breath swelling of your ankles or feet sudden weight gain Infection warning: Do not share insulin vials, syringes or prefilled pens with other people. Sharing or reusing needles or syringes with another person puts you and others at risk for various infections. Insulin regular (human) is available as an over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription drug. It comes as a solution that you inject subcutaneously (under your skin). Your healthcare provider will show you how to give yourself the injection. You can also follow this guide for self-injection. Insulin regular (human Continue reading >>

Insulin Aspart (rx)

Insulin Aspart (rx)

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Improvement of glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus May administer 0.2-0.6 unit/kg/day in divided doses; conservative doses of 0.2-0.4 unit/kg/day often recommended to reduce risk of hypoglycemia Total maintenance daily insulin requirement may vary; it is usually between 0.5 and 1 unit/kg/day; nonobese may require 0.4-0.6 unit/kg/day; obese may require 0.6-1.2 units/kg/day Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes inadequately controlled by diet, weight reduction, exercise, or oral medication 10 units/day SC (or 0.1-0.2 units/kg/day) in evening or divided q12hr of an intermediate (eg, NPH) or long-acting insulin at bedtime recommended; conversely, regular insulin or rapid-acting insulin (aspart insulin) before meals also recommended Dosing Considerations When used in a meal-related SC injection treatment regimen, 50-75% of total insulin requirements may be provided by an intermediate-acting or long-acting insulin; the remainder is divided and provided before or at mealtimes as a rapid-acting insulin, such as insulin aspart Because of insulin aspart’s comparatively rapid onset and short duration of glucose-lowering activity, some patients may require more basal insulin and more total insulin to prevent premeal hyperglycemia than they would need when using human regular insulin Dosage must be individualized; blood and urine glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Insulin requirements may be altered during stress or major illness or with changes in exercise, meal patterns, or coadministered drugs Dosage Modifications Patients with hepatic and renal impairment may be at increased risk of hypoglycemia and may require more frequent dose adjustment and more frequent blood glucose monitoring Continue reading >>

Insulin – Pharmacology, Therapeutic Regimens And Principles Of Intensive Insulin Therapy

Insulin – Pharmacology, Therapeutic Regimens And Principles Of Intensive Insulin Therapy

Go to: Since the introduction of insulin analogs in 1996, insulin therapy options for type 1 and type 2 diabetics have expanded. Insulin therapies are now able to more closely mimic physiologic insulin secretion and thus achieve better glycemic control in patients with diabetes. This chapter reviews the pharmacology of available insulins, types of insulin regimens and principles of dosage selection and adjustment, and provides an overview of insulin pump therapy. For complete coverage of this and related aspects of Endocrinology, please visit our FREE web-book, www.endotext.org. Go to: PHARMACOLOGY In 1922, Canadian researchers were the first to demonstrate a physiologic response to injected animal insulin in a patient with type 1 diabetes. In 1955, insulin was the first protein to be fully sequenced. The insulin molecule consists of 51 amino acids arranged in two chains, an A chain (21 amino acids) and B chain (30 amino acids) that are linked by two disulfide bonds (1) (Figure 1). Proinsulin is the insulin precursor that is transported to the Golgi apparatus of the beta cell where it is processed and packaged into granules. Proinsulin, a single-chain 86 amino acid peptide, is cleaved into insulin and C-peptide (a connecting peptide); both are secreted in equimolar portions from the beta cell upon stimulation from glucose and other insulin secretagogues. While C-peptide has no known physiologic function, it can be measured to provide an estimate of endogenous insulin secretion. Go to: SOURCES OF INSULIN With the availability of human insulin by recombinant DNA technology in the 1980s, use of animal insulin declined dramatically. Beef insulin, beef-pork and pork insulin are no longer commercially available in the United States. The United States FDA may allow for persona Continue reading >>

Insulin Regular

Insulin Regular

Generic Name: insulin regular (IN soo lin REG yoo lar) Brand Names: HumuLIN R, NovoLIN R, ReliOn/HumuLIN R What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Regular insulin is a short-acting form of insulin. Regular insulin is used to treat diabetes. Insulin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Important information Do not use this medicine if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of insulin. Symptoms include headache, hunger, dizziness, sweating, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, fainting, or seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Before using insulin Do not use this medicine if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). To make sure you can safely use insulin, tell your doctor if you have liver or kidney disease. Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially oral diabetes medications such as pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (which are sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medications while you are using insulin may increase your risk of serious heart problems. FDA pregnancy category B. Insulin is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether insulin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use regular insulin? Follow all directions on your prescr Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Many forms of insulin treat diabetes. They're grouped by how fast they start to work and how long their effects last. The types of insulin include: Rapid-acting Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Pre-mixed What Type of Insulin Is Best for My Diabetes? Your doctor will work with you to prescribe the type of insulin that's best for you and your diabetes. Making that choice will depend on many things, including: How you respond to insulin. (How long it takes the body to absorb it and how long it remains active varies from person to person.) Lifestyle choices. The type of food you eat, how much alcohol you drink, or how much exercise you get will all affect how your body uses insulin. Your willingness to give yourself multiple injections per day Your age Your goals for managing your blood sugar Afrezza, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin, is FDA-approved for use before meals for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The drug peaks in your blood in about 15-20 minutes and it clears your body in 2-3 hours. It must be used along with long-acting insulin in people with type 1 diabetes. The chart below lists the types of injectable insulin with details about onset (the length of time before insulin reaches the bloodstream and begins to lower blood sugar), peak (the time period when it best lowers blood sugar) and duration (how long insulin continues to work). These three things may vary. The final column offers some insight into the "coverage" provided by the different insulin types in relation to mealtime. Type of Insulin & Brand Names Onset Peak Duration Role in Blood Sugar Management Rapid-Acting Lispro (Humalog) 15-30 min. 30-90 min 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin covers insulin needs for meals eaten at the same time as the injection. This type of insulin is often used with Continue reading >>

Insulin, Regular Human

Insulin, Regular Human

font size A A A 1 2 3 4 Next Brand Name: Humulin R, Novolin R, Humulin R U-500 Generic Name: Insulin Regular Human Drug Class: Antidiabetics, Insulins; Antidiabetics, Short-Acting Insulins What Is Insulin and How Does It Work? Insulin Regular Human is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. This man-made insulin product is the same as human insulin. It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. It is a short-acting insulin. It works by helping blood sugar (glucose) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. This medication is usually used in combination with a medium- or long-acting insulin product. This medication may also be used alone or with other oral diabetes drugs (such as metformin). Insulin Regular Human is available under the following different brand names: Humulin R, Novolin R, and Humulin R U-500. Dosages of Insulin: Dosage Forms and Strengths Injectable solution Over-the-counter (OTC) 100units/mL (3mL vial) 100units/mL (10mL vial) Prescription (Rx) 500units/mL (20mL vial); prescribe with U-500 syringes to avoid conversion for U-100 tuberculin syringes 500units/mL (3mL pen) Dosage Considerations – Should be Given as Follows: Adult Initial: 0.2-0.4 units/kg/day subcutaneously (SC) divided every 8 hours or more frequently Maintenance: 0.5-1 unit/kg/day subcutaneously (SC) divided every 8 hours or more frequently; in insulin-resistant patients (e.g., due to obesity), substantially higher daily insulin may be required Approximately 50-75% of the total daily insulin require Continue reading >>

Insulin Lispro Overview

Insulin Lispro Overview

Insulin Lispro is a prescription medication used to treat type 1 diabetes. It can also be used to treat some patients with type 2 diabetes. Insulin Lispro is a fast-acting form of insulin and is often used with other forms of insulin. Insulin Lispro is administered with meals. Insulin is naturally produced by the body to control the amount of sugar (glucose) in the blood. In patients with type 1 diabetes, the body does not make insulin and must be replaced by injections of insulin. In patients with type 2 diabetes, the body makes insulin but does not use it efficiently or appropriately. Common side effects of Insulin Lispro include redness, swelling, or itching in the place where you injected Insulin Lispro or changes in the feel of your skin such as skin thickening or a little indentation in the skin. Insulin Lispro can also cause low blood sugar, which can cause drowsiness and dizziness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Insulin Lispro affects you. Insulin Lispro is a prescription medication used to treat type 1 diabetes. It can also be used to treat some patients with type 2 diabetes. It is a fast-acting form of insulin. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Continue reading >>

Drug Office - Information On Diabetic Medications

Drug Office - Information On Diabetic Medications

Diabetes is a group of diseases marked by high levels of blood glucose resulting from deficiency in insulin production, insulin action, or both. It is a major chronic disease in Hong Kong. Diabetes may lead to various complications and it is also the major cause of death. Studies showed that patients on appropriate treatment with satisfactory control may reduce the risk of developing complications by 50 to 70%. Therefore, patients should follow the guidance from healthcare professionals and receive long term therapy, in order to stabilize their blood glucose level and reduce the occurrence of complications. As either high or low blood glucose level can lead to serious health consequences, and different drugs used in diabetes have their unique properties, patients should strictly follow the dosing guidance given by doctor. Most of the drugs used in diabetes are prescription medicines and can only be sold by a registered pharmacy under the supervision of a pharmacist. They can be classified into two categories, namely insulin injection and antidiabetic drugs Insulin injection lowers blood glucose level by supplementing the insulin of diabetic patients. Insulin injection can be used in both Type I and Type II diabetes. The injection will usually be used with antidiabetic drugs when treating Type II diabetes. Insulin should not be taken orally as it would be destroyed in the stomach. Currently, only injection forms of insulin are available in Hong Kong. Insulin injection is usually classified by its duration of efficacy: Very short-acting: to be injected 15 minutes before meal or with meal; short-acting: to be injected 30 minutes before meal. Inspect your medication every time before use. It should be clear and colourless. Do not use if it becomes cloudy. Just before use, Continue reading >>

Insulin Regular Human Solution

Insulin Regular Human Solution

Uses Insulin regular is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. This man-made insulin product is the same as human insulin. It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. It is a short-acting insulin. It works by helping blood sugar (glucose) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. This medication is usually used in combination with a medium- or long-acting insulin product. This medication may also be used alone or with other oral diabetes drugs (such as metformin). How to use Insulin Regular Human Solution Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist. Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin. Insulin regular should be clear and colorless. Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the skin and to avoid developing problems under the skin (lipodystrophy). Insulin regular may be injected in the stomach area, the thigh, the buttocks, or the back of the upper arm. Do not inject into a vein or muscle because very low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) may occur. Do not rub the area after the injection. Do not inject into skin that is red, swollen, or itchy. Do Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Lispro (humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog Kwikpen, Humalog Pen)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Lispro (humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog Kwikpen, Humalog Pen)?

HUMALOG (insulin lispro) Injection DESCRIPTION HUMALOG® (insulin lispro injection) is a rapid-acting human insulin analog used to lower blood glucose. Insulin lispro is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli. Insulin lispro differs from human insulin in that the amino acid proline at position B28 is replaced by lysine and the lysine in position B29 is replaced by proline. Chemically, it is Lys(B28), Pro(B29) human insulin analog and has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 and a molecular weight of 5808, both identical to that of human insulin. HUMALOG has the following primary structure: HUMALOG is a sterile, aqueous, clear, and colorless solution. Each milliliter of HUMALOG U-100 contains insulin lispro 100 units, 16 mg glycerin, 1.88 mg dibasic sodium phosphate, 3.15 mg Metacresol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.0197 mg zinc ion, trace amounts of phenol, and Water for Injection. Insulin lispro has a pH of 7.0 to 7.8. The pH is adjusted by addition of aqueous solutions of hydrochloric acid 10% and/or sodium hydroxide 10%. Each milliliter of HUMALOG U-200 contains insulin lispro 200 units, 16 mg glycerin, 5 mg tromethamine, 3.15 mg Metacresol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.046 mg zinc ion, trace amounts of phenol, and Water for Injection. Insulin lispro has a pH of 7.0 to 7.8. The pH is adjusted by addition of aqueous solutions of hydrochloric acid 10% and/or sodium hydroxide 10%. font size A A A 1 2 3 4 5 Next What is Type 2 Diabetes? The most common form of diabetes is type 2 diabetes, formerly called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or "adult onset" diabetes, so-called because it typically develops in adults over age 35, though it can develop at any age. Type 2 diabetes i Continue reading >>

Insulin Types: Types Of Insulin

Insulin Types: Types Of Insulin

Usually taken before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation from eating Used with longer-acting insulin Usually taken about 30 minutes before a meal to cover blood glucose elevation from eating Covers the blood glucoseelevations when rapid-acting insulins stop working Often combined with rapid- or short-acting insulin and usually taken twice a day Long acting: insulin glargine , ultralente insulin, insulin detemir Often combined, when needed, with rapid- or short-acting insulin Lowers blood glucose levels when rapid-acting insulins stop working American Diabetes Association. Insulin Basics. April 7, 2014. American Diabetes Association. Available at . Elizabeth Blair. Insulin A to Z: A Guide on Different Types of Insulin. 2015. [Full Text] . Usually taken before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation from eating Used with longer-acting insulin Usually taken about 30 minutes before a meal to cover blood glucose elevation from eating Covers the blood glucoseelevations when rapid-acting insulins stop working Often combined with rapid- or short-acting insulin and usually taken twice a day Long acting: insulin glargine , ultralente insulin, insulin detemir Often combined, when needed, with rapid- or short-acting insulin Lowers blood glucose levels when rapid-acting insulins stop working Abimbola Farinde, PharmD, PhDFaculty, Columbia Southern University Francisco Talavera, PharmD, PhDAdjunct Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference Disclosure: Received salary from Medscape for employment. for: Medscape. All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright 1994-2018 by WebMD LLC. This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties. This website uses cookies to deli Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

What are Insulin Insulin is a hormone that occurs naturally in the body and can also be given by injection as a treatment for diabetes. Naturally-occurring insulin is made by the beta cells of the Islets of Langerhans located in the pancreas. It helps the cells of the body to uptake glucose (sugar) found in the carbohydrates we eat so that it can be used as energy or stored for later use. Insulin also controls glucose release from the liver. One of the main roles of insulin is to keep blood glucose levels from going too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia). People with type 1 diabetes do not make enough insulin to satisfy their body's needs or make none at all. Insulin given by injection acts similarly to naturally occurring insulin. There are more than 20 different types of insulin available for diabetes treatment in the United States. The various types of insulin differ in several ways: such as source (animal, human or genetically engineered), the time for insulin to take effect and the length of time the insulin remains working (ie, rapid acting, short acting, intermediate acting, long acting or very long acting). Insulin is used to treat Type 1 diabetes and it may be used together with oral medications in the later stages of Type 2 diabetes. List of Insulin: Filter by: -- all conditions -- Drug Name View by: Brand | Generic Reviews Avg. Ratings Humulin R (Pro, More...) generic name: insulin regular 0 reviews 10 NovoLog Mix 70 / 30 FlexPen (More...) generic name: insulin aspart/insulin aspart protamine 0 reviews 10 Humalog Mix 75 / 25 (More...) generic name: insulin lispro/insulin lispro protamine 2 reviews 9.5 NovoLog Mix 70 / 30 (More...) generic name: insulin aspart/insulin aspart protamine 3 reviews 9.5 ReliOn / Novolin 70 / 30 (More...) generic name: i Continue reading >>

Insulin (medication)

Insulin (medication)

"Insulin therapy" redirects here. For the psychiatric treatment, see Insulin shock therapy. Insulin is used as a medication to treat high blood sugar.[3] This includes in diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2, gestational diabetes, and complications of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states.[3] It is also used along with glucose to treat high blood potassium levels.[4] Typically it is given by injection under the skin, but some forms may also be used by injection into a vein or muscle.[3] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] Insulin can be made from the pancreas of pigs or cows.[5] Human versions can be made either by modifying pig versions or recombinant technology.[5] It comes in three main types short–acting (such as regular insulin), intermediate–acting (such as NPH insulin), and longer-acting (such as insulin glargine).[5] Insulin was first used as a medication in Canada by Charles Best and Frederick Banting in 1922.[6] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[7] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$2.39 to $10.61 per 1,000 iu of regular insulin and $2.23 to $10.35 per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[8][9] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of regular or NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds, while this amount of insulin glargine costs 30.68 pounds.[5] Medical uses[edit] Giving insulin with an insulin pen. Insulin is used to treat a number of diseases including diabetes and its acute complications such as diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

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