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Insulin Dosage Calculator

“calculating Insulin Dose” In Type 1 Diabetes From Diabetes Education Online

“calculating Insulin Dose” In Type 1 Diabetes From Diabetes Education Online

Your doctor will prescribe an insulin dosing regimen for you to get you started on your type 1 diabetes that will include the three components of intensive insulin therapy: Basal Insulin Dosage – a once or twice daily dose of long acting insulin [glargine or detemir] Bolus Dosage – a short acting insulin dosage based on the amount of the carbohydrates in each meal [aspart, glulisine, or lispro] (To learn how to determine the amount of carbohydrates in each meal see Counting Carbohydrates from Diabetes Education Online). Bolus Correction Dose For A High Blood Sugar – a correction factor dosage to bring your blood sugar level back to the target range when it gets too high (out of the target range) [aspart, glulisine, or lispro]. However, each of these three dosages can change over time or even throughout the day and you will learn how to adjust up or down each of these three components. Of course, your diabetes team should always be available by phone or internet to counsel you on an appropriate insulin dosage for any of the three components of intensive insulin therapy if you’re unsure. What follows are the first three examples* from “Calculating Insulin Dosage” from Diabetes Education Online which will show you how you will do it: *Example #4, “Formulas commonly used to create insulin dose recommendations” is in the next post of my blog study notes (and, of course, on the “Calculating Insulin Dosage” page from Diabetes Education Online). First, some basic things to know about insulin: Approximately 40-50% of the total daily insulin dose is to replace insulin overnight, when you are fasting and between meals. This is called background or basal insulin replacement. The basal or background insulin dose usually is constant from day to day. The other 50-6 Continue reading >>

Calsulin: A New Electronic Insulin Dose Calculator

Calsulin: A New Electronic Insulin Dose Calculator

Calsulin: A New Electronic Insulin Dose Calculator Calsulin calculates insulin doses for those using syringes and pens. Calsulin calculates the insulin dosage in the same manner as an insulin pump. The four elements calculated are: Blood sugar; Insulin/Carb ratio; Grams of Carbohydrates; and post injection Exercise. Calsulin prompts the user to input information at each stage. Calsulin automatically makes the calculations and displays the number of insulin units to be injected. Continue reading >>

Adjustable Dosing

Adjustable Dosing

Adjustable Dosing NovoLog® stays in step with your activities and mealtimes. Your health care provider will teach you how to adjust your NovoLog® dose to your eating, activity, and blood sugar levels. NovoLog® is designed to closely mimic your body's insulin patterns at mealtime. It is changed slightly so that it acts more quickly than regular human insulin. That is why it is called analog insulin. Keep in mind, you will need to eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes after taking NovoLog®. For information on food labels and carb counting, click here. You and your diabetes care team will also have to see how your physical activity affects your insulin dosage and adjust it as needed. For example, when you are very physically active, you have to decide whether to eat more or take less insulin, since both physical activity and insulin decrease the amount of sugar in the blood. Checking your blood sugar often when you are physically active will help you figure out how each type of physical activity you do affects your blood sugar. NovoLog® Dosing Tool Your diabetes care team can help you learn how to fine-tune your NovoLog® doses throughout the day. While you are figuring out how to adjust your insulin dose, you will want to stay in close touch with your diabetes care team. If you are using NovoLog® FlexPen®, you can select doses from 1 to 60 units in 1-unit steps. NovoPen Echo® provides precise half-unit dosing from 0.5 units up to 30 units. It also records the insulin dose and time passed since the last injection. If you have type 2 diabetes, ask your diabetes care team if the NovoLog® Dosing Tool might be right for you. This tool was created to help with adding and adjusting your mealtime insulin dose. If you’ve been taking NovoLog® for a while and your A1C is not Continue reading >>

New Online Calculator For The Diabetes Math Impaired

New Online Calculator For The Diabetes Math Impaired

Those of us living with diabetes, especially type 1, feel like we're never-ending math story problems. How many units do you take if you want to eat X amount of carbs, at a current blood sugar of Y, with a sensitivity factor of Z that varies due to time of day, amount of sleep, any stress you may be experiencing, or which way the wind is blowing? We are walking D-Math calculators. Technology makes it easier, without a doubt. Insulin pumps automatically calculate boluses for meals and correcti ons, and many keep track of how much active insulin we have working at any given time. Apps can do some D-Math too, but the need to pull out your phone for every bolus is not for everyone. That's why it was exciting to hear about the new Diabetes Calculator for Kids, a new, online program that can do D-calculations for you. It's developed by Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, OH. But don't be deceived by the names: this free resource can actually help any PWD, of any age. After my mom's recent ER and hospital experience that temporarily affected her D-Math ability in a big way, we turned to this online calculator tool to do the calculations for us. And it worked perfectly! The Diabetes Calculator is apparently the first of its kind -- which is somewhat amazing, because it's really nothing fancy beyond a web-based version of a programmable spreadsheet. The online tool can be personalized so that any PWD or caregiver can create an individualized, printable chart that displays the calculated bolus amounts for food or insulin corrections, in five easy steps. You just plug in your personal information including name and birth date, caregiver's name, and whether you want doses rounded to the nearest half or whole unit. Then you enter the carb-to-insulin ratio, sensitivity factor Continue reading >>

Eli Lilly Gets Fda Clearance For Insulin Dose Calculator App

Eli Lilly Gets Fda Clearance For Insulin Dose Calculator App

Updated with statement from Eli Lilly Indianapolis-based pharma company Eli Lilly recently recieved FDA 510K clearance for a new mobile app called Go Dose, a diabetes management and insulin dosing app for users of Humalog, Lilly's rapid-acting insulin. The clearance is for prescription use, but includes two versions of the app: Go Dose, for patients, and Go Dose Pro, for healthcare providers. "The Go Dose System, comprised of the Go Dose and Go Dose Pro applications, is for use in home and clinical settings to aid in the review, analysis, and evaluation of historical blood glucose test values to support type 2 diabetes mellitus management," the company writes in the submission document. "The Go Dose System is a mobile application for use with iPad or iPhone mobile devices. The Go Dose System provides recommendations for titrating prandial Humalog dosing one meal at a time using blood glucose values entered by the patient." While there are a number of insulin dosage calculator apps available, not many are FDA-cleared despite clear guidance from the FDA that insulin dosage apps require premarket approval. A 2015 study found 46 such apps on iOS and Android stores and reported that "none of the apps included in this study appear to have completed registration, labeling, or other general controls which are the minimal requirements for products in both regimes". Diabetes management app mySugr offers a bolus calculator to European customers but hasn't introduced it to the US because of the regulatory burden. And Eli Lilly's choice of predicate devices -- desktop and Palm Pilot software -- further suggest very few if any FDA clearances exist for smartphone-based insulin dosage calculators. There is at least one, however: Roche's Accu-Check connect app, which launched in 2015. " Continue reading >>

Insulin Units Medical App Provides Simple, User Editable Insulin Calculator

Insulin Units Medical App Provides Simple, User Editable Insulin Calculator

Purpose of App Review to evaluate the ease of calculating insulin doses to explore the robustness of user-editable features Introduction The pancreas is an amazing organ and it needs no calculator. However, when the pancreas stops working and the conscious brain must take over, the insulin-glucose relationship become more complicated. Everybody responds differently to insulin, with those on long-term insulin requiring more compared to insulin-naive bodies. The Insulin Units medical app aims to provide an editable app to make calculating insulin for meal coverage less of a guessing game. User Interface Except for the Help section, the app’s main pages are identical upon first use of the app. The app opens up to the default screen for All Meals. The All Meals section is intended for diabetics whose correction factor and carbohydrate factor are the same for each meal. If that’s you, then this is the only screen you need to use. In order to calculate the recommended insulin dose, the app requires several inputs. The blood sugar goals, correction factor, and carbohydrate factor should be available from your healthcare provider. The pre-meal blood sugar and meal carbohydrates are user-obtained. The app includes a default blood sugar goal, correction factor, and carbohydrate factor. To change these, click on Edit. The grayed numbers then change to blue, indicating that you can edit. When you are happy with what has been entered, tap the Save radio button. With your goals and factors in place, you only have to enter your blood sugar level pre-meal and the grams of carbohydrates to be consumed in the ensuing meal. Once those are entered, simply press calculate and the bottom of the app indicates the recommended insulin amount in actual/calculated units and in rounded units. Continue reading >>

Insulin Dose Calculation Definitions Ï‚§carbohydrate Ratio

Insulin Dose Calculation Definitions Ï‚§carbohydrate Ratio

Information Needed to Get Started How many grams of carbs the child is eating Blood glucose (BG) taken before eating Important numbers from primary caregiver: – Carbohydrate Ratio – Correction Target – Correction Factor How many grams of carbohydrates will be covered by one unit of insulin Correction Target Target blood glucose value used for insulin dose calculations when the blood glucose is high Correction Factor How many points (mg/dL) one unit of insulin will lower the blood glucose over several hours Bolus Insulin Calculation Worksheet Insulin for carbs Insulin for high blood glucose Add insulin for carbs to insulin for high blood glucose Bolus Insulin Calculation Worksheet Place the example numbers on the worksheet. Carbohydrate Ratio: 15 Correction Target: 120 Correction Factor: 30 15 30120 Bolus Insulin Calculation Worksheet Place the example numbers on the worksheet. Carbohydrate Ratio: 15 Correction Target: 120 Correction Factor: 30 15 30120 Bolus Insulin Calculation Worksheet Place total carbs and blood glucose on the worksheet. Carb Grams: 68 Blood Glucose: 214 15 30120 68 214 Bolus Insulin Calculation Worksheet Calculate carb bolus: 68 ÷ 15 = 4.533 Round answer to nearest tenths 15 30120 68 214 For example: 4.533 rounds to 4.5 4.555 rounds to 4.6 Bolus Insulin Calculation Worksheet Calculate Correction Bolus: 214–120 = 94 ÷ 30 = 3.133 Round answer to nearest tenths 15 30120 68 214 4.5 94 3.1 For example: 3.133 rounds to 3.1 3.155 rounds to 3.2 Bolus Insulin Calculation Worksheet Add the carb bolus to the correction bolus: 4.5 + 3.1 = 7.6 15 30120 68 214 4.5 94 3.1 4.5 3.1 7.6 Bolus Insulin Calculation Worksheet The final Rounded Total Insulin Bolus depends if the child uses half units or Continue reading >>

What Is An Insulin-to-carb Ratio?

What Is An Insulin-to-carb Ratio?

If you use fast-acting insulin and count carbohydrates, you want to know your insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio. An insulin-to-carb ratio allows you to easily figure out how much of your fast-acting insulin is needed for the amount of carbohydrate you consume. You can talk to your health care provider or certified diabetes educator (CDE) to help you know where to start and then through trial and error you can figure out the right ratio for you. An example of an insulin-to-carb ratio is 1:15 meaning one unit of insulin is needed for every 15 grams of carbohydrate. Someone needing more insulin may have a ratio of 1:10 and someone needing less insulin may have a ratio of 1:20. When you are trying to figure out your correct ratio, it is helpful to write down your blood sugar levels and check more frequently to see how the insulin-to-carb ratio you used affected your blood sugar levels two hours after eating. Calculating the best insulin-to-carb ratio is a process of trial and error: Check your blood sugar before eating and write down your result. Count your carbs and give your insulin and write down the insulin-to-carb ratio you are using. Check your blood sugar 2 hours after eating and write down your result. Try this process out a for a few days before adjusting your ratio. When you do adjust your ratio, do so in small, safe increments. When an insulin-to-carb ratio works consistently well, keep it! But remember that factors like illness, skipping a meal, extra exercise, stress and other changes in routine may cause your insulin-to-carb ratio to change. In the book Using Insulin, the authors share the Rule of 500 to figure out a good starting ratio. This applies to people with type 1 diabetes who are taking multiple daily injections of insulin. They write: Your body is often Continue reading >>

Knowledge Of Carbohydrate Counting And Insulin Dose Calculations In Paediatric Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Knowledge Of Carbohydrate Counting And Insulin Dose Calculations In Paediatric Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Highlights • All children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus, require dietetic input to optimize diabetes outcomes. • In a unit without a dedicated paediatric diabetes dietitian, the knowledge of carbohydrate counting and insulin dosing is poor. • In this study, this did not correlate statistically with HbA1c but this may be due to low patient numbers. Abstract Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) who are able to adjust their insulin doses according to the carbohydrate content of a meal, as well as their blood glucose, are likely to have improved glycaemic control (Silverstein et al., 2005). With improved glycaemic control, patients have a lower risk of developing long-term microvascular complications associated with T1DM (Diabetes Control and Complications Trial Research Group, 1993). To assess the carbohydrate and insulin knowledge of patients attending our paediatric diabetes clinic at the University Hospital Limerick (UHL), the validated PedCarbQuiz (PCQ) was applied to our clinic population. This study was completed by applying a questionnaire called the PedCarbQuiz (PCQ) to children exclusively attending our paediatric diabetes clinic at UHL. Of the clinic's 220 patients, 81 participated in the study. The average total PCQ score (%) was higher in the continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) group compared with the multiple daily insulin (MDI) injection user group (79.1 ± 12.1 versus 65.9 ± 6.6 p = 0.005). The CSII group also had a higher average carbohydrate score (%) compared with the MDI group (79.4 ± 12.4 versus 66.3 ± 16.2, p = 0.004). This study demonstrates that in a representative Irish regional paediatric T1DM clinic, knowledge of carbohydrates and insulin is better among patients treated with CSII compared with MDI. However, knowledge Continue reading >>

Mysugr Bolus Calculator – Get Help With Your Insulin Dose (currently Available In Eu)

Mysugr Bolus Calculator – Get Help With Your Insulin Dose (currently Available In Eu)

back to Overview It's time for lunch. Your blood sugar is 165 mg/dl (9.2 mmol/L). You have a big slice of pizza, a bag of chips, and a cold Diet Coke waiting for you. How much insulin do you take? I can think of a few ways this goes: There’s not much to think about. You always eat the same thing and always take the same amount of insulin. You define the phrase “creature of habit.” You hate thinking about all of this stuff, so you just guess. You love doing a bunch of math before every meal, so calculating your insulin dose is fun and easy. I can relate to the first two. There’s a lot of value in routine, and I’ve also done my share of guesstimating. That last one? Enjoying all of the diabetes math? I’m sorry. That’s just weird. (I’m teasing. Kind of…) But there’s another option, and it makes thinking about your insulin doses easier and more precise. I’m talking about a bolus calculator. If you wear an insulin pump, you’re probably already using one (they’re often built in). You’re welcome to stay and read, but there’s not much new information for you here. However, if you’re using injections (syringes or pens), like most people with diabetes, then stick around. This article should be helpful. So you don’t have (or want) an insulin pump, but I bet you have a smartphone. What does that mean? It means that you should meet mySugr’s Bolus Calculator. It’s a module integrated into the mySugr app that helps with your insulin doses (note: mySugr Bolus Calculator is currently approved for use in Europe). What the heck is a “bolus,” you ask? Great question. A bolus, in our case, is a single dose of insulin given all at once. In other words, it’s your mealtime shot or a shot to fix a high blood sugar. mySugr’s Bolus Calculator examines Continue reading >>

A Voice Activated Device For Insulin Dosage Calculations For Visually Impaired Diabetes

A Voice Activated Device For Insulin Dosage Calculations For Visually Impaired Diabetes

1. INTRODUCTION This paper sought to address the shortcomings of bolus calculators with respect to visually impaired users. Visual impairment is a common complication of diabetes this has the potential to exacerbate the problem as the visual impairment can hinder the user's ability to use the tools available to manage their diabetes; the bolus calculator is one such case. By implementing a word recognition interface into a bolus calculator we aim to overcome this barrier to proper diabetes management. Diabetes is estimated to afflict 23.6 million people in the United States [1]. Of those, approximately 40 to 45% suffer from some form of diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy varies in severity from blurred vision to blindness [2]. This impairment of vision can limit the user's ability to use small displays. All type I and many type II diabetics require regular injections of insulin to manage their illness. This is often accomplished through a basal/bolus regime. Each morning and night a basal dose of insulin is administered to match the basal metabolic rate. Furthermore, a bolus dose of fast acting insulin is administered prior to each meal. The user must calculate this bolus based upon the quantity of carbohydrates about to be consumed and the deviation of their blood glucose level from their target level. This calculation will be discussed further in section 4. Bolus calculators have been developed to assist users calculating this bolus. However, models reviewed have required the use of small buttons and screens to operate them, creating a barrier to use for the visually impaired. Continue reading >>

New Apps Calculate Your Insulin Doses

New Apps Calculate Your Insulin Doses

Trying to calculate your insulin doses for injections, without the help of an insulin pump "wizard"? There's an app for that! (of course) First came basic insulin dose calculators like RapidCalc. But providing more personalized recommendations in a so-called "insulin titration app" was something of a challenge, because these provide real medical treatment decision support and therefore require FDA approval -- as opposed to so many diabetes logging apps that do not. The first regulatory breakthrough for a "mobile prescription therapy aid" that analyzes users' past data trends to deliver personalized recommendations came with WellDoc's BlueStar app in 2013. That was followed in 2015 by the Accu-Chek Connect app, that also calculates and recommends insulin amounts. WellDoc just recently snagged an expanded label for its BlueStar app that allows patients to use it without a doctor's prescription -- adding to the accessibility of this mobile tech tool. The FDA's decision last year to allow a dosing claim for the Dexcom G5 CGM system seems to have helped pave the way for even more smartphone-based decision therapy tools. And now, two new apps have snagged FDA clearance and are almost ready for prime time: Lilly's Go Dose In December, Eli Lilly got FDA clearance on its new mobile app called Go Dose, which can be used for the Lilly-branded Humalog insulin to titrate doses. This is the company's first class II ("moderate-risk") mobile app approved by the FDA. This one is designed for adults with type 2 diabetes, and is focused on meal-time insulin use for Humalog U-100 only. There is a Go Dose version for patients to use at home, and the Go Dose Pro clinical version for use by healthcare professionals. As of now, it's only compatible with iOS devices (iPads and iPhones), but hop Continue reading >>

Insulin Dose Calculator

Insulin Dose Calculator

This insulin dose calculator helps people with type 1 diabetes to determine the total daily dose of insulin, basal & bolus insulin, insulin to carb ratio, carb insulin dose, insulin sensitivity factor, BS correction insulin, and total meal-time bolus-insulin. Insulin calculator for type 1 diabetes To calculate the type 1 diabetes insulin requirement, you need to input certain details such as: Enter your body weight, select unit (pounds or kilogram), click "calculate total insulin" to get total, basal & bolus insulin and proceed further by pressing Next (insulin to the carb ratio). You do not require to note down the value, because finally, you will be presented with all the values. Select your bolus insulin type (regular or Humalog & Novolog), click "calculate ICR & BSCF" to get insulin to carb ratio & insulin sensitivity factor, and proceed further by pressing Next (BS correction insulin). Enter your present BS & target BS, select the unit (mmol/l or mg/dl), click "calculate BS correction" to get BS correction insulin and proceed further by pressing Next (total meal time insulin). Enter grams of carbohydrate in your meal, click "calculate meal bolus insulin" to get the insulin dose to cover meal time carbohydrate and total meal-time bolus-insulin and proceed further by pressing Next (consolidated result). Here you are presented with all the details of your insulin treatment dosages. Thanks for using our insulin calculator. The insulin dosage provided by this calculator is for your reference purpose only, you need to consult with your doctor before start taking the suggested insulin dosage. You need to adjust your daily dose of insulin Insulin dose adjustment has based on the TDD (total daily dose of insulin) you received in the preceding 24 hours. If your BS at any tim Continue reading >>

Interactive Dosing Calculator

Interactive Dosing Calculator

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Insulin Initiation Dose Calculator (type 2 Diabetes)

Insulin Initiation Dose Calculator (type 2 Diabetes)

Tweet This calculator helps people with diabetes to determine the correct initial insulin dose for type 2 diabetes patients. This calculator was invented in the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (Source: N England Journal of Medicine; 357: September 21). How to use the Insulin Initiation Dose Calculator To calculate the number of units required per day, simply input: Your weight Your height Your fasting blood glucose Your gender You will then be presented with the initial dose in IU/day. This tool is meant for indicative purposes only. Please consult your GP or healthcare team to determine your insulin initiation dose. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cases worldwi Continue reading >>

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