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Insulin Dependent Diabetes Symptoms

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

The Prevalence Of Gastrointestinal Symptoms In Patients With Non-insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus

The Prevalence Of Gastrointestinal Symptoms In Patients With Non-insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus

INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease provoking several complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. Patients with diabetes have many gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms because hyperglycemia and neuropathy affect GI motility. Seventy-six percent of outpatients have been reported to show one or more GI symptoms [1] and 50-55% of patients with diabetes to have upper GI symptoms [2,3]. However, Maser et al. [4] suggested much lower prevalence rates for GI symptoms in patients with diabetes. The reported prevalence rates in these patients could differ, however, due to differences in subject selection and survey methodology [5-7]. Although active studies on diabetes complications performed in Korea have provided physicians with sufficient information, research on GI symptoms in patients with diabetes is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate GI symptoms in these patients visiting hospitals using a validated questionnaire. METHODS Subjects This study recruited patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) who visited the Catholic University of Korea, School of Medicine, including the Catholic Medical Center, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Holy Family Hospital, Daejeon St. Mary's Hospital, St. Vincent's Hospital, Incheon St. Mary's Hospital, or Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital (three in Seoul, two in Gyeonggy-do, one in Incheon, and one in Daejeon) as outpatients or inpatients for 4 weeks since June 1999. Based on the numbers of outpatients at each hospital, 120 subjects each were identified from the Catholic Medical Center, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, and Holy Family Hospital, and 60 subjects each were identified from Daejeon St. Mary's Hospital, St. Vincent's Hospital, Incheon St. Mary's Hospital, and Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospi Continue reading >>

The Signs, Diagnosis & Types Of Diabetes Mellitus In Cats

The Signs, Diagnosis & Types Of Diabetes Mellitus In Cats

There are certain signs or symptoms which are commonly seen in cats with diabetes mellitus. Unfortunately, these signs also occur in other diseases and conditions. Therefore, laboratory tests are necessary to diagnose diabetes mellitus in cats. The following article includes a discussion of how this diagnosis is made and the types of diabetes found in cats. What are the signs of diabetes mellitus in cats and why do they occur? Depending on how severely insulin production is impaired, there may be few signs of disease, or the signs may be severe. Dogs with diabetes often develop cataracts; cats do not. The most common signs of diabetes are: Increased thirst (polydipsia) and urination (polyuria) Change in appetite Weight loss Change in gait (walking) Decreased activity, weakness, depression Vomiting Increased Thirst and Urination: Because the glucose cannot enter the cells, the glucose levels in the blood become abnormally high (hyperglycemia). The glucose is filtered out by the kidneys and is found in the urine (glucosuria). When it is filtered out, it carries water with it. The animal, then, is losing more water through the urine than normal and has to make up for it by drinking more. Inappropriate Elimination: The increased urination may result in the cat not always urinating in the litter box. This inappropriate urination may be one of the first signs of diabetes in cats. In addition, cats with diabetes can often develop urinary tract infections, which may also result in inappropriate elimination. Change in Appetite: Some diabetic cats eat less, because frankly, they do not feel well. Other cats may have voracious appetites and eat a lot (polyphagia) because their hypothalamus keeps telling them they are hungry. Weight Loss: Because the cat cannot use the calories he Continue reading >>

What Is A Key Supplement To Controlling Diabetes Symptoms?

What Is A Key Supplement To Controlling Diabetes Symptoms?

First of all, if you're already taking medication to manage your diabetes, do not take any supplements without first checking with your doctor as they can have an additive effect. That said... You can moderate blood sugar levels with a number of different supplements, all of which have some clinical data to support their use. I myself take 200 mcg of chromium polynicotinate and 600 mg of ALA (Alpha Lipoic Acid) with each meal. I also take 5-10 grams of l-glutamine daily (which also plays a role in glucose management). This has made a significant impact on my own blood sugar levels; recent blood work showed fasting blood sugar on the cusp of diabetes and my doctor suggested prescribing Metformin. I suggested we hold off, and I'd try this stack instead (my diet is good and I exercise a ton), saying I'd agree to Metfomin if it didn't work. My next fasting blood work showed a significant enough improvement that my doctor was comfortable taking Metformin completely off the table. Anecdotal evidence of course, but it echoes existing clinical data for these supplements. Continue reading >>

Symptoms And Signs Of Diabetes In Dogs

Symptoms And Signs Of Diabetes In Dogs

How Diabetes Affects Dogs There are two types of canine diabetes – diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. Of these, diabetes mellitus – particularly Type 1 or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus - is by far the most common. In healthy animals, insulin is produced and released by specialized cells in the pancreas. Insulin is needed for glucose from ingested food to pass into cells and tissues, where it can be processed and used for energy. Dogs with Type 1 diabetes mellitus do not have enough insulin in their blood streams, because their specialized pancreatic cells are either absent or not functioning normally. This prevents them from properly metabolizing dietary sugar, which in turn causes abnormally high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) and levels of glucose in their urine (glycosuria). Dogs with excess urinary glucose tend to excrete very large amounts of urine, leading to dehydration and unusual thirst. The metabolic abnormalities associated with diabetes mellitus initially increase a dog’s appetite because its cells are unable to take in and use dietary sugars. This is called “going into starvation mode.” The dog’s body starts breaking down stored fat for energy. This causes certain acid byproducts of fat metabolism called “ketones” to build up in the blood. Ultimately, this can cause a very serious and life-threatening condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis. Disruption of the complex metabolic system can lead to a number of different symptoms. While many of these are vague and non-specific, taken together they can suggest the presence of diabetes mellitus and may help owners and veterinarians arrive at an early diagnosis. Symptoms of Diabetes in Dogs Owners of dogs with diabetes mellitus may notice one or more of the following signs in thei Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1.5: Overview

Diabetes Type 1.5: Overview

There are two major types of diabetes, Type 1 ("Juvenile diabetes" or "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus") and Type 2 ("Adult onset" or "non-insulin dependent" diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). This article discusses a newer classification, Type 1.5. Type 1.5 is one of several names now applied to those who are diagnosed with diabetes as adults, but who do not immediately require insulin for treatment, are often not overweight, and have little or no resistance to insulin. When special lab tests are done, they are found to have antibodies, especially GAD65 antibodies, that attack their beta cells. This sort of diabetes is sometimes called Slow Onset Type 1 or Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA). One study performed in Bruneck, Italy [Diabetes, October 1998] found that 84% of the people diagnosed as Type 2 had insulin resistance, but the other 16% did not, suggesting these individuals had Type 1.5 diabetes. Several other studies have shown similar results as well as the presence of antibodies, especially those against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), characteristic of Type 1 in this group of people diagnosed with Type 2. Causes and Development Type 1.5 diabetes has virtually the same underlying cause as type 1. The difference is that type 1.5 happens in people older than 25, whereas type 1 happens in childhood, the teen years and young adulthood. People as old as 80 have been diagnosed with type 1.5. Diagnosis and Tests A misdiagnosis is easy to make when the patient is older and responds well at first to treatment with oral medications. If someone does not clearly fit the model for Type 1 diabetes, they may be mistakenly placed on oral agents even though limited capacity for insulin production remains. The immune system's slower and more selective attack on the beta Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms, And Diagnosis

Type 1 Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms, And Diagnosis

In type 1 diabetes, your body does not produce insulin, which is the hormone necessary for processing glucose. Glucose is used by cells in your body as an energy source, and without insulin, glucose can’t get into those cells. It stays in the blood, and when you have too much glucose in your blood, it can damage your organs and other parts of your body. Therefore, people with type 1 diabetes must take insulin in order to manage their blood glucose levels and make sure their bodies get the energy they need. Type 1 diabetes used to be called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, and you may still hear those names used. Type 1 Diabetes Causes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder, which means that the immune system turns against your body. Instead of protecting the body, the immune system in people with type 1 diabetes starts to destroy beta cells—and those are the cells that are in charge of making insulin. The medical community isn’t sure what causes the immune system to start destroying the beta cells. Some thoughts are: a genetic susceptibility to developing type 1 diabetes certain viruses (for example, German measles or mumps) environmental factors Regardless of what triggers the immune system to turn against the beta cells, the end result is the same in type 1 diabetes: gradually, all beta cells are destroyed and the body is no longer able to produce insulin. Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms Type 1 diabetes develops gradually, but the symptoms come on suddenly. As soon as the body is no longer making insulin, blood glucose levels rise quickly, so the following type 1 diabetes warning signs can develop: extreme weakness extreme tiredness rapid weight loss increased appetite extreme thirst increased urination nausea and/or vomiting fruity breath wounds tha Continue reading >>

Is It Medically Possible To Have Both Types Of Diabetes At The Same Time And Why?

Is It Medically Possible To Have Both Types Of Diabetes At The Same Time And Why?

Diabetes type 1 and type 2 are quite different diseases. Diabetes type 1 is an autoimmune disorder where there is a near complete destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin—so all type 1 diabetics die without insulin injections because they develop ketoacidosis. Diabetes type 1 used to be called juvenile and type 2 adult onset because they seem to be into different age groups of people. Usually a patient diagnosed with type 1 diabetes is diagnosed as a child because they become admitted to the hospital in diabetic ketoacidosis. Type 2 diabetes results from insulin resistance almost always from obesity. Usually a patient is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes when they are found on routine blood test to have an elevated sugar or have symptoms of having excessive thirst, excessive urination or blurry vision. This occurs when the are beta cells (that produce insulin) are down to 50% and gradually as patients lose beta cell function they become insulin dependent when they are down to 10%. The other poster is incorrect in his understanding. Doctors frequently prescribe insulin to type 2 diabetics when the beta cell function drops so low that oral medications are no longer effective. It is not a mistake. Being a type 2 insulin-dependent diabetic does not turn you into a type 1 diabetic. There appears to some overlap between the two but they are generally completely separate diseases. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Signs & Symptoms

Diabetes Signs & Symptoms

In order for the cells of the human body to properly function, they need glucose to fuel their activities. Glucose is a form of sugar provided for the cells of the body naturally by the liver and muscles of the body, and received by the foods we eat. If an inadequate amount of insulin is created, or if the insulin is not functioning suitably, the glucose won’t be received as needed by the cells, and it will build up in the blood stream. This build-up causes high blood sugar, which leads to pre-diabetes or type I or type II diabetes. (If you’re a diabetic living in Alabama, then you may qualify for our diabetes clinical trial in Birmingham, AL.) Type I Diabetes Symptoms Upon the attack of the immune system on the beta cells of the pancreas, the beta cells stop producing insulin. This leads to type I diabetes. Type I diabetes (formerly known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes) is usually diagnosed in children, teenagers and young adults. Without the help of insulin and other diabetic drugs, sugar builds up in the bloodstream and causes bodily damage. This can cause such health problems as kidney disease, heart disease, eye disease and nerve disease. The symptoms of type I diabetes tend to resemble those of other medical conditions, so it is important to talk with your physician if you experience any of them. Symptoms of type I diabetes include the following: An increase in urination (polyurination) Continuous hunger (polyphagia) An increase in thirst (polydipsia) Unexplained unusual weight loss Blurred vision Fatigue Type II Diabetes Symptoms The job of the pancreas is to generate enough insulin to keep up with the increased demand when a person eats a meal and fills his bloodstream with sugar. Over time, the pancreas becomes unable to produce enough i Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Type 1

Diabetes - Type 1

Description An in-depth report on the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of type 1 diabetes. Alternative Names Type 1 diabetes; Insulin-dependent diabetes; Juvenile diabetes Highlights Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is involved in regulating how the body converts sugar (glucose) into energy. People with type 1 diabetes need to take daily insulin shots and carefully monitor their blood glucose levels. Type 1 diabetes is much less common than type 2 diabetes. It accounts for 5 - 10% of all diabetes cases. Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, but it usually first develops in childhood or adolescence. Symptoms of Diabetes Symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes include: Frequent urination Excessive thirst Extreme hunger Sudden weight loss Extreme fatigue Irritability Blurred vision In general, the symptoms of type 1 diabetes come on more abruptly and are more severe than those of type 2 diabetes. Warning Signs of Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) occurs when blood sugar (glucose) levels fall below normal. All patients with diabetes should be aware of these symptoms of hypoglycemia: Sweating Trembling Hunger Rapid heartbeat Confusion It is important to quickly treat hypoglycemia and raise blood sugar levels by eating sugar, sucking on hard candy, or drinking fruit juice. Patients who are at risk for hypoglycemia should carry some sugar product, or an emergency glucagon injection kit, in case an attack occurs. In rare and worst cases, hypoglycemia can lead to coma and death. Regular blood sugar monitoring throughout the day can help you avoid hypoglycemia. Patients are also encouraged to wear a medical alert ID bracelet or necklace that states they have diabetes and that they take insulin. Pati Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age. It is most often diagnosed in children, adolescents, or young adults. Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas by special cells, called beta cells. The pancreas is below and behind the stomach. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar (glucose) into cells. Inside the cells, glucose is stored and later used for energy. With type 1 diabetes, beta cells produce little or no insulin. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream instead of going into the cells. This buildup of glucose in the blood is called hyperglycemia. The body is unable to use the glucose for energy. This leads to the symptoms of type 1 diabetes. The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. Most likely, it is an autoimmune disorder. This is a condition that occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys healthy body tissue. With type 1 diabetes, an infection or another trigger causes the body to mistakenly attack the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. The tendency to develop autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, can be passed down through families. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is much less common than type 2 diabetes and typically affects younger individuals. Type 1 diabetes usually begins before age 40, although there have been people diagnosed at an older age. In the United States, the peak age at diagnosis is around 14. Type 1 diabetes is associated with deficiency (or lack) of insulin. It is not known why, but the pancreatic islet cells quit producing insulin in the quantities needed to maintain a normal blood glucose level. Without sufficient insulin, the blood glucose rises to levels which can cause some of the common symptoms of hyperglycemia. These individuals seek medical help when these symptoms arise, but they often will experience weight loss developing over several days associated with the onset of their diabetes. The onset of these first symptoms may be fairly abrupt or more gradual. To learn more about type 1 diabetes basics, see our type 1 diabetes slideshow. It has been estimated that the yearly incidence of type 1 diabetes developing is 3.7 to 20 per 100,000. More than 700,000 Americans have this type of diabetes. This is about 10% of all Americans diagnosed with diabetes; the other 90% have type 2 diabetes. What You Need to Know about Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Causes Type 1 diabetes usually develops due to an autoimmune disorder. This is when the body's immune system behaves inappropriately and starts seeing one of its own tissues as foreign. In the case of type 1 diabetes, the islet cells of the pancreas that produce insulin are seen as the "enemy" by mistake. The body then creates antibodies to fight the "foreign" tissue and destroys the islet cells' ability to produce insulin. The lack of sufficient insulin thereby results in diabetes. It is unknown why this autoimmune diabetes develops. Most often Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

By the dLife Editors Type 2 diabetes—previously referred to as adult-onset or non-insulin dependent diabetes—accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all diabetes cases in the United States. It’s characterized by the body’s inability to use insulin effectively. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps the body turn glucose into energy. Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, who do not produce insulin at all, people with type 2 diabetes do make insulin. They may not, however, produce enough to handle the concentration of glucose in their blood. Or, they may have insulin resistance, which means the body produces enough but it can’t use the insulin anymore to break down all the glucose. Type 2 Diabetes Causes The exact causes of type 2 diabetes aren’t completely understood, but it’s widely accepted that a combination of inherited genetic risk factors and environmental triggers is involved. Risk factors include: obesity, physical inactivity, poor diet, smoking, chronic stress, low birth weight, high blood pressure, a history of gestational diabetes, and high fasting blood glucose levels. Individuals with a parent or sibling with type 2 diabetes have a higher chance of developing the disease than those with no family history. African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Native Americans, some Asians, and Pacific Islanders are at greater risk for type 2 diabetes. Risk increases with age, but it is important to note that rates of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents have been on the rise recently. Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms Not everyone with type 2 diabetes has symptoms, particularly in the early stages of the disease. In fact, 8.1 million of the 29.1 million people with diabetes in America are unaware that they even have the disease. 8.9 percent of Americans Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes - Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

Type 1 Diabetes - Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

Southern Cross Medical Library Southern Cross Medical Library information is necessarily of a general nature. Always seek specific medical advice for treatment appropriate to you. For more articles go to the Medical Library index page. Diabetes is diagnosed when a person has too much glucose (sugar) in the blood, as a result of the body having insufficient insulin or resisting the effects of insulin. Type 1 diabetes is a life-long variation of the disease that typically takes hold in childhood or adolescence, and is the result of the body’s immune system destroying the pancreas where insulin is made. Symptoms of Type 1 diabetes can appear suddenly. The condition can cause serious health complications over time but can be managed with insulin replacement therapy and lifestyle changes. General information Diabetes mellitus (commonly referred to as diabetes) is a group of diseases characterised by high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period of time. This page deals with type 1 diabetes. Other diabetes variations include: Type 2 diabetes – associated with a person being overweight Gestational diabetes – where a mother cannot produce enough insulin during pregnancy Type 1 diabetes accounts for 5-8% of people with diabetes, while type 2 diabetes is much more common, accounting for 85–90% of diabetes cases. Type 1 diabetes used to be known as juvenile diabetes and most often occurs in childhood, but it can also develop in adults. The condition may affect around one in every 5000 New Zealanders under the age of 15. Type 1 diabetes is more common in New Zealand Europeans than other ethnic groups. Causes Although the exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown, it is generally considered to be an autoimmune condition in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks Continue reading >>

What Is Type 1 Diabetes?: Signs, Symptoms, Causes And Treatment

What Is Type 1 Diabetes?: Signs, Symptoms, Causes And Treatment

Diabetes type 1 may occur at any age; however, it’s more common in children, adolescents and young adults under the age of 40 years. What is Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)? T1D is a chronic ailment in which there is a high blood glucose level because the body is unable to produce insulin. It is also known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes. Insulin hormone is produced by the beta cells located in the pancreas. Insulin is important to move blood glucose into the cells. Excess sugars are stored in the muscle cells and liver; they are used later as a source of energy, particularly between meals or while sleeping. Glucose or sugar is obtained from the foods eaten or consumed. With juvenile diabetes, the beta cells release little or no insulin. With the absence of insulin hormone, sugars build up in your bloodstream rather than going into the cells. The body is unable to utilize the sugars as a source of energy and this triggers the signs and symptoms of type I diabetes which can trigger short-term or long-term complications. Type II diabetes is more common than insulin dependent diabetes. Signs and Symptoms of Juvenile Diabetes The condition develops rapidly over a couple of days or weeks than diabetes type II which may take years before it is diagnosed. Most of the times, T1D symptoms may appear harmless and are often vague. When people experience them, they aren’t worried about the signs since they are mild and usually link them to being busy at work, for example being tired; it is obvious that after a tedious day at work, one will be exhausted. That’s why it’s vital to be vigilant to be able to detect the signs, such as: Frequent thirst – after taking a glass of water, you still feel the urge of drinking more water. What is the explanation for this? The Continue reading >>

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