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Insulin Delivery Devices

Diabetes Tech On The Horizon – New Insulin Delivery Systems Coming In 2018

Diabetes Tech On The Horizon – New Insulin Delivery Systems Coming In 2018

By Maeve Serino and Adam Brown Learn about what’s new and what’s coming soon in Smart Pens, automated insulin delivery, pumps, and more Diabetes technology moves fast, so to help you keep track, we’ve rounded up some of the latest offerings – and options coming soon – for insulin delivery. (You can read diaTribe’s updates about the latest diabetes apps and software here, and CGM here.) Below, you’ll find products that have recently become available or are expected to launch in the next year or so based on the most recent timing updates we’ve heard. This article is not entirely comprehensive – and timelines often change – but this list covers many of the most notable products in insulin delivery, including smart pens, automated insulin delivery, improved pump technologies, and more. A more detailed description of each product follows the table of contents below. Click to jump to a product, which are organized chronologically by their expected launch date within each category: New Insulin Delivery Devices Medtronic MiniMed 670G Hybrid Closed Loop – currently available in the US (over 20,000 users), though a sensor shortage has slowed new shipments. International launch expected by April 2018 Tandem t:slim X2 with Predictive Low Glucose Suspend (PLGS) – expected US launch in summer 2018 Insulet Omnipod Dash touchscreen personal diabetes manager – limited US market release expected in mid-2018 Medtronic MiniMed Pro Infusion Set with BD FlowSmart technology – relaunch expected by September 2018 BD Patch Pump for type 2 diabetes and smart pen needles – possible launches as early as October 2018 and as late as September 2019 Companion Medical InPen (smart pen + smartphone app) Now available in the US What’s New? Companion Medical’s Bluetooth-e Continue reading >>

Overview Of Insulin And Non-insulin Delivery Devices In The Treatment Of Diabetes

Overview Of Insulin And Non-insulin Delivery Devices In The Treatment Of Diabetes

Go to: INSULIN Guidelines from the ADA and the AACE highlight the importance of early and aggressive treatment of diabetes to achieve and maintain glucose levels comparable with those of nondiabetic patients in order to prevent chronic complications. Insulin preparations (Table 1) are currently the most effective treatments for diabetes and the only therapeutic options for patients with T1DM. They may also be used in patients with T2DM who have failed treatment with oral agents or who have hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels greater than 10%.13 Health care providers, however, are reluctant to prescribe insulin because of the need for frequent dose adjustments, the potential for hypoglycemia, and the time required to educate patients regarding insulin administration. Patients, in turn, are often reluctant to use insulin because of their fear of injections, their belief that insulin is difficult to administer, and their perception that insulin preparations have adverse side effects.14 These barriers to treatment may be overcome by the use of insulin-delivery devices. For all patients with T1DM and some with T2DM, an ideal insulin regimen mimics the body’s own insulin-release pattern (basal–bolus dosing).13 Intermediate-acting insulin (i.e., neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH] insulin) and long-acting insulin analogs (i.e., insulin detemir and insulin glargine) provide basal insulin coverage, whereas short-acting regular human insulin and rapid-acting insulin analogs provide prandial coverage.13 Insulin-Delivery Pens Insulin-delivery pens eliminate the need to draw up insulin, which allows more convenient administration compared with syringes. An insulin pen looks like a large fountain pen. The pen is prefilled with insulin, and the only preparation required is attaching the ne Continue reading >>

Insulin Delivery Devices

Insulin Delivery Devices

Insulin is a necessary part of the treatment plan for all people with Type 1 diabetes and many with Type 2. Insulin helps get glucose from the bloodstream into the muscle and fat cells to be used for fuel. It cannot be taken as a pill or a swallowed liquid, because it would be broken down by the digestive system before it reached the bloodstream, where insulin does its work. Instead, insulin is injected or infused into the fatty tissue under the skin. There are a number of devices that can be used to deliver insulin, including syringes, insulin pens, jet injectors, and insulin pumps. No single device or type of device works well for everyone. The decision of which to use may be based on a person’s insulin regimen, ability to manipulate or operate a particular device, visual ability, insurance coverage or ability to afford a particular device and related supplies, occupation, and daily schedule or leisure-time activities. Discussing your needs and preferences with your diabetes care team is the best way to pick the device that will work well for you and get the training you need to use it correctly. Syringes The most common method of insulin delivery in the United States is by syringe. Medical syringes are relatively small, are disposable, and have fine needles with special coatings that make injecting as easy and painless as possible. To take insulin with a syringe, the user first pulls back on the plunger to draw in air equal to the amount of insulin to be drawn, inserts the syringe needle into a vial of insulin, pushes the air into the vial, pulls back on the plunger until the correct dose is drawn into the syringe barrel, then inserts the needle through the skin and presses down on the plunger until the barrel is emptied. People who have difficulty drawing up insul Continue reading >>

Design Of Insulin Delivery Devices Based On Glucose Sensitive Membranes

Design Of Insulin Delivery Devices Based On Glucose Sensitive Membranes

Volume 18, Issue 1 , January 1992, Pages 59-80 Design of insulin delivery devices based on glucose sensitive membranes Get rights and content A theoretical model has been developed to evaluate possible designs for an insulin delivery system which is responsive to glucose. The system is based upon a glucose sensitive hydrogel containing immobilized glucose oxidase and catalase. The requirement of molecular oxygen for the enzymic reactions ordinarily limits the response of the system to levels of glucose (less than 50 mg%) below the patho-physiological range (501000 mg%) The theoretical model dcveloned desrnbes the transient as well as steady state diffusion and reaction of glucose, oxygen and gluconic acid within the macroporous hydrogel for various designs chosen to alleviate the oxygen limitation. The designs are evaluated in terms of the average pH change within the gel in response to increasing concentrations of glucose. The model predicts the oxygen limitation that has been seen experimentally for a thin glucose sensitive membrane (GSM). The modeling studies have also revealed four device configurations that overcome this limitation. Each design uses silicone rubber to create additional pathways for oxygen delivery to the gel interior. A thin GSM loaded with insulin and placed over a silicone rubber drum, sealed to form a gaseous reservoir, was found to be sensitive to glucose concentrations in the 0500 mg% range. A second design using a silicone rubber tube filled with GSM (also preloaded with insulin), exhibited glucose sensitivity in the 0400 mg% range. A combined design, with a central gaseous reservoir bounded by plugs of GSM in a silicone rubber tube, retained a linear response even in the 300500 rag% range. Finally a fourth design, with an insulin loaded GSM Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Products For 2017: Insulin Delivery Devices

New Diabetes Products For 2017: Insulin Delivery Devices

For the last year, Diabetes Self-Management has been following all the new innovations and products aimed at helping to improve the lives of those living with diabetes. From the latest glucometers and monitoring systems to insulin pumps, pens, and treatments, several major advancements made their impact on the diabetes community in 2016. When selecting some of the new products, we first talked to Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, clinical director of Integrated Diabetes Services of Wynnewood, Pennsylvania. Scheiner, known as the MacGyver of diabetes products, has lived with Type 1 diabetes for more than 30 years. He tries out new products before recommending them to patients. “It’s important to see new products from the user’s point of view, not just from the [health-care practitioner’s] side of things,” said Scheiner. In 2016, the pace of innovation continued to race ahead with unbelievable technology right out of a Star Trek episode. The growing use of smartphone technology and mobile applications has led to better access to blood glucose readings, general health information, and much more. Read on to learn about the newest products. We guarantee you there’s something here for everyone, whether you live with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. In this installment, we look at insulin delivery devices that have recently hit the market. Insulin pumps, pens, and patches Joining its family of insulin pumps, Tandem Diabetes Care introduced the t:slim X2 Insulin Pump — similar to the t:slim — late last year. The new pump features an advanced two-way Bluetooth radio and uses technology to update software remotely, much like a mobile phone. The pump is compatible with the Tandem Device Updater, a new tool that allows users to update the software from a personal computer. The pump Continue reading >>

Insulin Delivery Devices Market Overview :

Insulin Delivery Devices Market Overview :

Insulin Delivery Devices Market Overview : Global Insulin Delivery Devices Market is estimated to reach $22.8 billion by 2024; growing at a CAGR of 8.9% from 2016 to 2024. Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas, which is essential in regulating blood glucose levels. Insulin plays a vital role in metabolism as the lack of insulin production or inability to respond to insulin leads to the development of diabetes. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes requires to take insulin shots externally in order to prevent long-term complications and to aid the body in processing glucose and avoid complications related to hyperglycemia. The most commonly prescribed insulins for medication are synthetic insulins, that are given through injection pen, syringe, insulin pumps and other devices. The type of devices used to deliver insulin varies among end-users depending upon their ability to operate, insulin regimen, and others. Increasing number of geriatric and obesity population, technological advancements in insulin delivery systems, and favoring reimbursement policies are the drivers boosting the growth of the global insulin delivery devices market. Moreover, increasing awareness among consumers on availability of several delivery devices and development of human insulin devices are also fueling the growth of the market. However, high cost of these devices and risks associated with the misuse of drug delivery devices may hamper the growth of the market. Furthermore, market expansion and growing R&D activities would provide several opportunities for players in the market. The global insulin delivery devices market is bifurcated into device type and geography. Device type is categorized into insulin pumps, insulin syringes, insulin pens and insulin jet injectors. By geography, th Continue reading >>

How Should I Take It?

How Should I Take It?

“My Doctor Says I Need Insulin to Control My Diabetes...†BD Getting Started™ Insulin Delivery Devices 1 2 Why is Insulin So Important? Insulin is a life-saving drug for people with diabetes. It helps your body cells use the glucose in the food you eat for energy. When you have diabetes you are either not making enough insulin, or your body can not use the insulin that you do make. A key part of diabetes care is to keep your blood glucose (blood sugar) level as normal as possible. Your healthcare provider will give you a target range for your blood glucose that is best for you. Your goal is to keep your blood glucose in that range most of the time. Insulin is one of the medications that will help you control your blood glucose and keep it inside your target goals. Insulin Works at Different Speeds Insulin products are designed to act the same way insulin works in your body. Some types of insulin work very quickly and are usually given just before or right after a meal. Others take longer to work and are given in the morning, at dinner and/or at bedtime. Your doctor will suggest a type, or mix of types, that should work well for you. Your job is to learn what kind of insulin you are taking and understand how it works. Note: Never substitute one type of insulin for another unless you are instructed to do so by your healthcare provider. Insulin Delivery Systems: Three Devices You Can Use for Taking Insulin Did you know that it is not possible to take insulin as a pill? Insulin is a protein that would be destroyed by the acids in your stomach! It must be taken by injection in a syringe, pen, doser or pump. 1. Syringe – tried and true Modern comfort – Today’s injections don’t hurt very much. The needles are now so fine, smooth and Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Tech On The Horizon: What’s Coming By Mid-2017 In The Us?

New Diabetes Tech On The Horizon: What’s Coming By Mid-2017 In The Us?

By Lynn Kennedy, Ava Runge, and Adam Brown What Abbott, Dexcom, LifeScan, Medtronic, Tandem, and others are bringing to make diabetes easier and less burdensome Want more news just like this? We’re living in the most exciting time ever in diabetes technology, and a slew of soon-to-launch products are going to subtract hassle from living with diabetes – fewer injections and fingersticks, less math, less data overload, less pain, and less worry. Equally important, most emerging technology shows excellent potential to improve glucose outcomes that matter, among them hypoglycemia, time-in-range, hyperglycemia, and A1c. Curious what’s coming? Read on for a summary of the insulin delivery and glucose monitoring devices expected to launch in the US by mid-2017 or earlier, based on the most recent company timelines (listed chronologically). This list is not fully comprehensive, but does cover the major device launches expected. A more detailed description of each device follows further below. New Insulin Delivery Devices Tandem’s t:slim X2 Insulin Pump – October-December 2016. The latest Tandem pump will add a new Bluetooth radio and enable software updates to add future Dexcom G5 connectivity and automated insulin delivery algorithms. Medtronic MiniMed Pro Infusion Set with BD FlowSmart technology – around late 2016. The long-awaited infusion set has several key improvements, most notably a new catheter that allows insulin to flow out of two holes (less occlusions). LifeScan’s OneTouch Via – early 2017. The bolus-only, super slim wearable device holds 200 units of insulin and can be worn for three days. Squeezing two buttons (including through clothes) – will discreetly deliver a two-unit bolus. Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G/Enlite 3 Hybrid Closed Loop – by Ap Continue reading >>

Insulin Delivery Methods: Past, Present And Future

Insulin Delivery Methods: Past, Present And Future

Go to: INTRODUCTION The prevalence of diabetes is increasing throughout the world. The International Diabetes Federation estimated 366 million people had diabetes in 2011 and is expected rise to 552 million by 2030.[1] Though type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) accounts for 85-95% of diabetes, the prevalence of T1DM has increased by 2-3% in certain parts of Europe and USA.[1,2] Thus, diabetes has become one of the most common noncommunicable diseases worldwide. Discovery of insulin was one of the greatest medical discoveries of the last century. All patients with T1DM and many patients with long standing T2DM require insulin therapy to achieve good glycemic control.[3,4,5] The early insulins were derived from bovine and porcine pancreas and were associated with immunological reactions, lipodystrophy and unpredictable insulin absorption from subcutaneous tissue. Hence, initial research focused on the purification of insulin.[4] There has been marked progression in the development of insulins such as rapid and long acting insulin analogs in the last five decades.[4] The landmark Diabetes Control and Complication Trial (DCCT), demonstrated the importance of intensive insulin therapy (IIT) in T1DM for prevention of micro- and macro-vascular complications.[5] However, IIT results in increased risk for hypoglycemia, which is a major obstacle in achieving glycemic targets.[6,7] Therefore, emphasis has evolved to achieving tight glycemic control with minimal hypoglycemia by focusing on delivering insulin that mimics endogenous insulin secretion by the pancreas.[4] Insulin is a peptide hormone, therefore, destroyed by gastric acid if taken orally. Intradermal absorption of insulin is not reliable, and it cannot mimic physiological insulin secretion. In addition, intradermal, intramu Continue reading >>

Global Insulin Delivery Devices Market Size, Share, Trends, Growth, Export Value, Volume & Trade, Sales, Pricing Forecast

Global Insulin Delivery Devices Market Size, Share, Trends, Growth, Export Value, Volume & Trade, Sales, Pricing Forecast

The globalinsulin delivery devices market features a largely fragmented vendor landscape, according to a recent report by Transparency Market Research. The intense level of competition in the market owing to the presence of several international and local players has compelled vendors to introduce products with competitive pricing and differentiating features. The focus on strategic alliances, collaborations with the constantly rising numbers of diabetes clinics, and aggressive marketing practices has increased in the recent years. The report states that the market will exhibit a promising 8.6% CAGR from 2017 to 2025, rising to a valuation of US$20.9 bn by the end of 2025 from US$10.2 bn in 2016. Insulin Pens to Remain Most In-demand Product Variety Geographically, the market in North America held the top spot in the global insulin delivery devices market, acquiring a nearly 37% of the overall demand in 2016. The high prevalence of the condition in the U.S. and the high rate of adoption of advanced mechanisms are expected to help the region maintain its spot over the forecast period as well. In terms of the variety of insulin delivery devices available in the market, the segment of insulin pen accounted for the dominant 42% share of overall global demand in the said year. Rising Global Burden of Diabetes to have High Impact on Market Growth The rapidly spreading epidemic of diabetes across the globe has kept the interest level in diabetes-related R&D immensely high in the recent years. Despite the condition affecting millions of people worldwide, scientists and researchers have not been able to find a cure for the disease and controlling it by the effective and timely administration of insulin remains an indispensable measure for patients with type-1 diabetes to lead a Continue reading >>

The Best Delivery Systems For Insulin Treatments

The Best Delivery Systems For Insulin Treatments

Diabetes keeps your body from using insulin correctly -- or in the case of type 1 diabetes, making insulin. Insulin treatments can control your diabetes safely and easily. They can also give your body the blood sugar levels you need to stay healthy. You can’t take insulin as a pill. If you did, your body would digest it before it could get to your blood. So you have to put it right into your bloodstream. The most common devices for this are: Syringes Pens Pumps Inhalers But which is right for you? Most people make their decision based on the needle, says Janet McGill, MD, professor of medicine at Washington University in St. Louis. In reality, McGill says, the needle should be a small part of the decision. It’s more important to think about how your treatment will fit into your daily life. “You have to consider things like your social discomfort or ability to give yourself insulin at the right time,” McGill says. Here’s a breakdown to help you decide which device is best for you. Syringe How it works: A syringe is a thin, hollow needle connected to a chamber with a plunger. You draw up the amount of insulin you need from a vial, insert the needle into the fatty part of your skin, and push the plunger. Pros: Got a tight budget? A syringe is your best bet. “It's the cheapest of the devices, because a lot of insulin comes in a vial,” says David Klonoff, MD, of the Diabetes Research Institute at Mills-Peninsula Health Services in San Mateo, CA. Cons: Multiple steps means a higher chance of making a mistake. McGill says that’s especially true if you’re very young or elderly and have trouble with your hands or with your eyes. “Some may have difficulty seeing the syringe to draw insulin up accurately,” McGill says. Treating yourself without anyone noticin Continue reading >>

Insulin Delivery Devices

Insulin Delivery Devices

Tweet There are many different types of insulin delivery devices available including syringes, pens, jet injectors, oral insulin and pumps which are detailed below. Furthermore, insulin that can be inhaled and other new approached to insulin treatment are at different stages of availability and development throughout the world. Insulin Syringes Direct subcutaneous insulin injection remains the most common form of delivery, using a needle and syringe. The capacity of the syringe should be chosen depending on the dosage of insulin.Other factors are needle gauge and needle length, both of which should be adjusted for comfort. Your diabetes healthcare professional should be able to advise which needle length you need. Diabetes and Injecting Insulin External Insulin Pumps Although external insulin pumps remain hard to access and expensive, many people with diabetes find them to be accurate, precise and flexible as insulin delivery systems providing tight blood glucose control. Like most insulin delivery aids, it is important to monitor blood glucose regularly whilst on a pump. Guide to Insulin Pumps Implantable Insulin Pumps At this stage, implantable insulin pumps are still in development. Research teams across the globe are working to develop implantable insulin pumps to measure blood glucose levels and provide the precise insulin dose needed. Those pumps being developed are small, extremely discreet, and weigh very little. This type of pump is implanted surgically, and can deliver a continuous basal dose of insulin and a bolus dose when required. Insulin Pens Insulin pens are a very useful way to transport insulin in a discreet way, allowing you to administer insulin on the move or whenever suits you. Insulin pens are either disposable one-shot devices or they have replac Continue reading >>

Eli Lilly Bets Big On Insulin-delivery Devices

Eli Lilly Bets Big On Insulin-delivery Devices

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.—Eli Lilly & Co., one of the biggest makers of insulin, has been planning a risky new business venture: making the high-tech devices that deliver insulin to diabetes patients. In a research laboratory Lilly opened here in 2015, scientists have been developing a wearable, automated insulin-delivery device designed to reduce the decision-making and guesswork of conventional insulin injections. They are also developing a “smart pen” injection device that can wirelessly transmit dosing information to a patient’s phone, to ensure proper dosing. Lilly’s previously undisclosed projects, for which the company has enlisted several design and device-firm partners, including the inventor of the Segway scooter, is an unusual example of diversification at a time when much of the drug industry is moving in the opposite direction—shedding nondrug businesses to focus on pharmaceuticals. Indianapolis-based Lilly, the first company to mass produce insulin in 1923, faces competitive pressures including the expected arrival of lower-cost copies of its top-selling insulin, Humalog. And it sees growth in the market for advanced insulin-delivery devices. Enrique Conterno, head of Lilly’s diabetes business, said he believed Lilly’s insulin business would become “obsolete” if the company remained largely an insulin provider without delivery systems. “Do we want to be just an insulin provider that just goes into a system, or do we want to be the integrator of the system?” he said at the Cambridge lab this month. “To me, it’s clear where the business is going.” ​Lilly’s insulin products currently generate about 20% of the company’s total revenue. Still, the projects are a risky bet because Lilly will compete with medical-device heavyweights like Continue reading >>

Insulin Delivery Devices Market By Type (insulin Pens (reusable, Disposable), Insulin Pumps (external/tethered, Patch), Pen Needles (standard, Safety), Insulin Syringes) And End User (patients/homecare, Hospitals & Clinics) - Global Forecast To 2021

Insulin Delivery Devices Market By Type (insulin Pens (reusable, Disposable), Insulin Pumps (external/tethered, Patch), Pen Needles (standard, Safety), Insulin Syringes) And End User (patients/homecare, Hospitals & Clinics) - Global Forecast To 2021

Table 1 10 Countries/Territories With the Highest Number of Diabetics (2079 Years), 2015 & 2040 Table 2 FDA Approvals in the Insulin Delivery Devices Market (20142016) Table 3 Conferences, Meetings, and Congresses Focusing on Insulin Delivery Devices (20142017) Table 4 Global Market Size, By Type, 20142021 (USD Million) Table 5 Global Market Size, By Type, 20142021 (Thousand Units) Table 6 Pens Market Size, By Type, 20142021 (USD Million) Table 7 Pens Market Size, By Type, 20142021 (Thousand Units) Table 8 Pens Market Size, By Region, 20142021 (USD Million) Table 9 Pens Market Size, By Region, 20142021 (Thousand Units) Table 10 Reusable Insulin Pens Market Size, By Region, 20142021 (USD Million) Table 11 Reusable Insulin Pens Market Size, By Region, 20142021 (Thousand Units) Table 12 Disposable Insulin Pens Market Size, By Region, 20142021 (USD Million) Table 13 Disposable Insulin Pens Market Size, By Region, 20142021 (Thousand Units) Table 14 Insulin Pumps Market Size, By Type, 20142021 (USD Million) Table 15 Insulin Pumps Market Size, By Type, 20142021 (Thousand Units) Table 16 Insulin Pumps Market Size, By Region, 20142021 (USD Million) Table 17 Insulin Pumps Market Size, By Region, 20142021 (Thousand Units) Table 18 External/Tethered Pumps Market Size, By Region, 20142021 (USD Million) Table 19 External/Tethered Pumps Market Size, By Region, 20142021 (Thousand Units) Table 20 Patch Pumps Market Size, By Region, 20142021 (USD Million) Table 21 Patch Pumps Market Size, By Region, 20142021 (Thousand Units) Table 22 Pen Needles Market Size, By Type, 20142021 (USD Million) Table 23 Pen Needles Market Size, By Type, 20142021 (Thousand Units) Table 24 Pen Needles Market Size, By Region, 20142021 (USD Million) Table 25 Pen Needles Market Size, By Region, 20142021 (Thousand Continue reading >>

World's First Automated Insulin-delivery Device Approved In The U.s.

World's First Automated Insulin-delivery Device Approved In The U.s.

MORE The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the first automated insulin-delivery system. This represents a step toward a so-called artificial pancreas that could automatically regulate blood sugar levels for people who have diabetes. The device, made by the manufacturer Medtronic, has been approved to treat people with type 1 diabetes who are ages 14 and older. The product is set to start shipping in the spring of 2017, according to Medtronic. "The FDA is dedicated to making technologies available that can help improve the quality of life for those with chronic diseases, especially those that require day-to-day maintenance and ongoing attention," Dr. Jeffrey Shuren, director of the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in a statement. "This first-of-its-kind technology can provide people with type 1 diabetes greater freedom to live their lives without having to consistently and manually monitor baseline glucose levels and administer insulin." [Bionic Humans: Top 10 Technologies] Though the new product, called the MiniMed 670G, has been dubbed an artificial pancreas, it's a far cry from a truly biological cure for diabetes, as it does not replace the cells destroyed by the body. The device's insulin-delivery system relies on three elements: a coin-size transmitter attached to a tiny needle inserted into the skin that continuously tracks glucose levels, a pump that delivers precise doses of insulin as they are needed through a separate catheter inserted into the skin, and a computer chip that uses data from both to optimize the delivery of insulin on a minute-by-minute basis. Elusive control In people with type 1 diabetes, the body mistakes the beta cells in the pancreas, which make insulin, for foreign invaders, and attacks and destroys them Continue reading >>

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