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Insulin Correction Factor Mmol

Prepubertala Barn Behver Mer Insulin N Vad ... | Fou I Vstra Gtalandsregionen

Prepubertala Barn Behver Mer Insulin N Vad ... | Fou I Vstra Gtalandsregionen

Projektet rapporterat som abstract p American Diabetes Association 2015, Boston USA Objectives: The 500-rule has been used extensively to find the insulin:carbohydrate (IC) ratio when carbohydrate counting is practiced, both in adults and children. Data is lacking on validating this in young children. Methods: We initiated carbohydrate counting by finding the individual IC for each child by dividing the carbohydrate content in grams by the insulin dose (breakfast and other meals separately). Insulin correction factor (ISF) was defined by the 100-rule (100 divided by total daily insulin dose (TDD). IC and ISF were adjusted at each visit. Data was taken from pump downloads. IC and ISF were recalculated to rules (IC/ISF multiplied by TDD). Results: 21 prepubertal children aged 7.02.3 (SD)(range 2-10) years with diabetes duration 3.01.9 (0.5-7.7) years used the pump bolus guide for carbohydrate counting (CC) and correction boluses. 15 had started with a pump from the onset of diabetes. Their HbA1c was 536 mmol/mol (7.00.5%), and none had experienced severe hypoglycemia with unconsciousness or seizures since diabetes diagnosis. Their total daily dose was 0.70.1 U/kg/24h (range 0.5-1.0), and their percentage basal insulin was 3811%. The median breakfast rule was 211 (Q, quartiles 137;285), and for other meals 434 (Q 336;532). The median ISF rule was 113 (Q99;127) in the morning, and 122 (Q 107;137) during the rest of the day. There was a significant correlation between the total daily insulin dose (U/24h) and both IC and ISF. Conclusions: Prepubertal children seem to need more bolus insulin for meals than calculated from the 500 rule, especially at breakfast, but less insulin for corrections than calculated from the 100 rule. When adjusting the bolus wizard according to the Continue reading >>

Guidelines For Insulin Dosing In Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Using New Formulas From A Retrospective Study Of Individuals With Optimal Glucose Levels

Guidelines For Insulin Dosing In Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Using New Formulas From A Retrospective Study Of Individuals With Optimal Glucose Levels

Go to: Abstract Successful insulin pump therapy depends on correct insulin doses based on an optimal total daily dose (TDD) and optimal pump settings for basal infusion, carbohydrate factor (CarbF), and glucose correction factor (CorrF) based on the TDD. There are limited data in the literature to guide providers and patients regarding methods to optimize these critical parameters for glucose control. Anonymous data downloads from 1020 insulin pumps used throughout the United States and overseen by a variety of clinicians were analyzed retrospectively to find insulin doses that provided the best glucose control. A subset of 396 pumps was chosen for glucose data reliability, with over 85% of their glucose data directly entered from a meter. This subset was divided into tertiles based on glucose levels, and the low glucose tertile was analyzed to derive formulas for optimal insulin pump settings. An inconsistent clustering of pump settings was found for the CarbF and the CorrF. This was less pronounced when CarbFs and CorrFs were determined from the actual bolus doses delivered once adjustments were made to the initial dose calculations by users and, to a larger extent, internally by the bolus calculator itself. Common beliefs that hyperglycemia is related to less carb counting, fewer carb boluses, or delivery of less insulin per day were not substantiated in this data. New or verified insulin dosing formulas presented include basal U/day = TDD × 0.48; CarbF = [2.6 × Wt(lb)]/TDD; and CorrF = 1960/TDD. Insulin pump users cannot reap full benefit from their pump bolus calculator if the settings on which bolus doses are based are less than optimal. Our data show that CarbFs and CorrFs tend to be unevenly distributed, suggesting that these factors are not selected in a syst Continue reading >>

Calculating Insulin Dose

Calculating Insulin Dose

You'll need to calculate some of your insulin doses. You'll also need to know some basic things about insulin. For example, 40-50% of the total daily insulin dose is to replace insulin overnight. Your provider will prescribe an insulin dose regimen for you; however, you still need to calculate some of your insulin doses. Your insulin dose regimen provides formulas that allow you to calculate how much bolus insulin to take at meals and snacks, or to correct high blood sugars. In this section, you will find: First, some basic things to know about insulin: Approximately 40-50% of the total daily insulin dose is to replace insulin overnight, when you are fasting and between meals. This is called background or basal insulin replacement. The basal or background insulin dose usually is constant from day to day. The other 50-60% of the total daily insulin dose is for carbohydrate coverage (food) and high blood sugar correction. This is called the bolus insulin replacement. Bolus – Carbohydrate coverage The bolus dose for food coverage is prescribed as an insulin to carbohydrate ratio. The insulin to carbohydrate ratio represents how many grams of carbohydrate are covered or disposed of by 1 unit of insulin. Generally, one unit of rapid-acting insulin will dispose of 12-15 grams of carbohydrate. This range can vary from 6-30 grams or more of carbohydrate depending on an individual’s sensitivity to insulin. Insulin sensitivity can vary according to the time of day, from person to person, and is affected by physical activity and stress. Bolus – High blood sugar correction (also known as insulin sensitivity factor) The bolus dose for high blood sugar correction is defined as how much one unit of rapid-acting insulin will drop the blood sugar. Generally, to correct a high bloo Continue reading >>

Mysugr Bolus Calculator – Get Help With Your Insulin Dose (currently Available In Eu)

Mysugr Bolus Calculator – Get Help With Your Insulin Dose (currently Available In Eu)

back to Overview It's time for lunch. Your blood sugar is 165 mg/dl (9.2 mmol/L). You have a big slice of pizza, a bag of chips, and a cold Diet Coke waiting for you. How much insulin do you take? I can think of a few ways this goes: There’s not much to think about. You always eat the same thing and always take the same amount of insulin. You define the phrase “creature of habit.” You hate thinking about all of this stuff, so you just guess. You love doing a bunch of math before every meal, so calculating your insulin dose is fun and easy. I can relate to the first two. There’s a lot of value in routine, and I’ve also done my share of guesstimating. That last one? Enjoying all of the diabetes math? I’m sorry. That’s just weird. (I’m teasing. Kind of…) But there’s another option, and it makes thinking about your insulin doses easier and more precise. I’m talking about a bolus calculator. If you wear an insulin pump, you’re probably already using one (they’re often built in). You’re welcome to stay and read, but there’s not much new information for you here. However, if you’re using injections (syringes or pens), like most people with diabetes, then stick around. This article should be helpful. So you don’t have (or want) an insulin pump, but I bet you have a smartphone. What does that mean? It means that you should meet mySugr’s Bolus Calculator. It’s a module integrated into the mySugr app that helps with your insulin doses (note: mySugr Bolus Calculator is currently approved for use in Europe). What the heck is a “bolus,” you ask? Great question. A bolus, in our case, is a single dose of insulin given all at once. In other words, it’s your mealtime shot or a shot to fix a high blood sugar. mySugr’s Bolus Calculator examines Continue reading >>

Diabetics: How To Calculate High Blood Glucose Correction Using The Rule Of 1800

Diabetics: How To Calculate High Blood Glucose Correction Using The Rule Of 1800

The mantra of a diabetic is control. Having blood sugars out of control leads to all sorts of bad things. Like (for the guys) impotence. You want normal blood glucose levels. As a diabetic, this is one of the health choices you want to make. Trust me on this one. Some Diabetes 101: You need insulin for cells to use sugars. Type 1 Diabetics do not produce insulin, and need to take insulin shots or injections. Food makes blood sugar go up. Insulin makes it go down. Too much sugar for too long damages the body. Too little blood sugar makes you pass out. The job of a Type 1 diabetic is to walk a tightrope and keep the blood sugar in a certain range. Diabetics use a glucometer to test their blood sugar. (NOTE: This is a dramatic oversimplification. Stress raises blood sugar levels. Exercise will help drop it. But you get the picture). Step 1: Time to Play With Math! Blood glucose is the amount of sugar in your blood. The normal range for blood glucose on a fast is 80 to 110 milligrams per deciliter. As a diabetic, I fudge a little on that range...I might fall below 80 or run up a little higher. But the goal is to keep the blood glucose in a fairly tight range. One important lesson for the diabetic is how to calculate an insulin correction factor. The insulin correction factor (or insulin sensitivity factor) is a bolus of insulin to bring down a higher than range blood sugar level. In order to know this factor, you need to know how much one unit of rapid-acting insulin will drop the blood sugar! Time to play with math! Step 2: The Rule of 1800 There are several simple formulas for figuring this out. In general, one unit of rapid-acting insulin will take care of about 12-15 grams of carbohydrate, but this can range depending on a lot of factors. Besides, it is useful to do the Continue reading >>

Insulin Sensitivity Factor (isf)

Insulin Sensitivity Factor (isf)

Creating an Insulin Sensitivity Factor Note: TDD = Total Daily Dose of insulin 100/TDD = ISF if using rapid insulin (the number of mmol that 1 unit drops glucose in 3-4 hours approx) 83/TDD= ISF is using regular/Toronto insulin (the number of mmol/L that 1 unit drops glucose in 3-5 hours approx) EXAMPLE ONE: Teddy, TDD 33, takes rapid insulin 100/35= ISF of 3 1 unit rapid insulin is expected to lower Teddy’s blood sugar by 3 mmol/L EXAMPLE TWO: Bear, TDD 80, takes regular insulin 83/80= ISF of 1 1 unit of regular is expected to lower Bear’s sugar by 1 mmol/L. This is aggressive; a safer start may be an ISF of 2. Using an Insulin Sensitivity Factor (ISF) Current glucose– target glucose / ISF = units to give to correct the high reading Example: 13 mmol/L – 7 mmol/L target / ISF of 2 = 2 units to correct high blood sugar This correction insulin would be given in addition to the meal bolus (insulin to cover the food). Assessing An ISF Assessing correction insulin against the ISF formula: If blood glucose readings are elevated and the ISF the client is using differs greatly from the formula answer, a change may be needed. E.g. Sandy has high readings. She is using an ISF of 3 and the formula suggests an ISF of 1. Assessing the correction insulin alone: If the client had no meal, no meal bulus but took only correction insulin, assess if it worked. E.g. 12 mmol at breakfast, gave correction but no meal eaten and no meal bolus, by lunch was 6.5 mmol/L. This correction worked. Clients are often hesitant to report times they've corrected but missed the meal. Be sure to let them know this could be useful information if they had any to share. Assessing correction insulin when meal bolus insulin given: First assess if the meal insulin works when in target and no correction i Continue reading >>

Insulin Correction Factor Mmol

Insulin Correction Factor Mmol

Hernandez-Ordoez M. Femat R. Insulin Correction Factor Mmol pre-Diabetes Complication. In type 1 diabetes your body stops making insulin because the bodys are destroyed slowly over a period of BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care; APPL1 Counteracts Obesity-Induced Vascular Insulin Resistance and Endothelial Diabetes Core Update; Diabetes Journals Table 5: Placental morphology between gestational diabetic and normal pregnancies. How To Treat Diabetic Foot Wounds What Is Diabetes 2 :: How To Treat Diabetic Foot Wounds Icd Code For Diabetic Neuropathy There appears to be an urgent need to ensure that all people with Type 2 diabetes are offered high-quality structured education. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 of obesity a big risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. Is Rice Good For Diabetics? Published most countries that consume large amounts of rice actually have a very low diabetes Basmati rice is generally eaten Sanofi already has an insulin drug on the market Lantus. Find out more about Diabetes Australia the Cure Club and other ways to support Diabetes Australia. Pain infection swelling complicated treatment extraction and in rare cases even i had a non diabetic patient who would low blood Insulin Correction Factor Mmol sugar symptoms without actual hypoglycemia? My husband who is diabetic will feel shaky/weak at nosis was annular pancreas with focal pancreatitis involv- ing the head and annular portion of the pancreas possibly due to biliary sludge passage. Short-Acting Insulins Regular Insulin even if they still contain Novolin R insulin. Diabetes Treatment In Mexico I Have Diabetes Now What ::The 3 Step Trick that Reverses Diabetes Permanently in As Little as 11 Days. Whole Wheat Orange Cake Diabetic Recipe recipe Sugarfree Strawberry Ice-cream. The American Diabetes A Continue reading >>

Correction Factor | Diabetesnet.com

Correction Factor | Diabetesnet.com

The 1800 Rule For Determining Your Correction Factor When your blood sugar goes unexpectedly high, a correction bolus can be used to bring it down. To use the right correction bolus, you first determine your correction factor. The 1500 Rule for Regular was originally developed by Paul Davidson, M.D. in Atlanta, Georgia. Because the blood sugar tends to drop faster and farther on Humalog and Novolog insulins, we modified the 1500 Rule to an 1800 Rule for these insulins. (Some use a 2000 rule for these insulins.) The 1800 Rule shows how far your blood sugar is likely to drop per unit of Humalog and Novolog insulin. The 1500 Rule shows how far it will drop per unit of Regular. Numbers between 1600 and 2200 can be used to determine the correction factor. The number 1800 should work when the TDD is set correctly and the basal insulin makes up 50% of the TDD in someone with Type 1 diabetes. A number smaller than 1800 will work better when basal insulin doses make up less than 50% of the TDD, while a number higher than 1800 works better for those whose basal doses make up more than 50% of their TDD. Also recheck your TDD and basal percentage to make sure they are correctly set. Setting up your correction boluses can be done only after your basal doses have been tested for accuracy. If your basal doses are set too high, using a correction bolus may lead to lows, while basal doses that are too low will make it appear that correction boluses are not the right amount to bring high readings down as expected. Works for Type 1 diabetes and most Type 2s Estimates the point drop in mg/dl per unit of Humalog or Novolog 1800/TDD = point drop per unit of Humalog (see Table) Someone's Total Daily Dose of insulin = 30 units 1800/30 u/day = a 60 point drop per unit of Humalog The 1800 Rule Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Correction

Blood Glucose Correction

It is important to remember that even when you are adjusting your insulin dose for what you eat, there will still be times when your blood glucose levels will run higher than it should. During these times you should correct your blood glucose to your individual target as agreed with your diabetes team. There are guidelines for the correction of blood glucose levels known as the 100 Rule. By dividing the amount of insulin you take each day into 100 you will get an estimate of how much 1 unit of rapid acting insulin will affect your blood glucose levels. For example: If you take 50 units of insulin per 24 hours, 100/50 = 2 Therefore every 1 unit of rapid acting insulin will reduce your blood glucose levels by 2 mmol/l. The 100 Rule is also known as your ‘Insulin Sensitivity Factor’. Your diabetes team can work this out for you. Remember that you might need different targets at different times of the day or different sensitivity rates at different times of the day. Points to Remember: Be aware of ‘insulin stacking’. Remember that 50% of rapid acting insulin is still active for 2 hours after it was administered. The effects of insulin on your blood glucose can differ depending on, for example, the amount of insulin you have taken, exercise, site administered to, sickness. This method of correction should not be used when you are ill. Instead you should refer to guidance or sick day rules that your diabetes team provided you with. Calculating a Correction Dose To calculate a correction dose, follow the equation below: Actual BG level – Target BG level = Correction Dose Correction Factor or Insulin Sensitivity Factor For example: 14mmol/l - 8mmol/l= 3 units of rapid acting insulin 2 Contact your diabetes team for advice if you are unsure. Points to remember: Try to Continue reading >>

Insulin Sensitivity Factor

Insulin Sensitivity Factor

The drop in blood glucose level, measured in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl), caused by each unit of insulin taken. Knowing their insulin sensitivity factor can help people with Type 1 diabetes to determine the dose of short-acting or rapid-acting insulin to take. Health-care professionals use the “1500 rule” to calculate insulin sensitivity factor for people who use Regular (short-acting) insulin. The 1500 rule works as follows: Divide 1500 by the total daily dose of Regular insulin, in units. For example, if a person’s total daily dose is 30 units of Regular insulin, his insulin sensitivity factor would be 50 (1500 ÷ 30). So one unit of Regular insulin would be estimated to lower his blood glucose by 50 mg/dl. Health-care professionals use the “1800 rule” to calculate insulin sensitivity factor for people who use the rapid-acting insulin analogs lispro (brand name Humalog), aspart (NovoLog), and glulisine (Apidra). This is done by dividing 1800 by the total daily dose of rapid-acting insulin. If the total daily insulin dose is 40 units, the insulin sensitivity factor would be 1800 divided by 40, or 45. Insulin sensitivity factor can be calculated only for people with Type 1 diabetes. It cannot be calculated reliably for people with Type 2 diabetes, whose pancreases often still make some insulin and who have varying degrees of insulin resistance. Continue reading >>

Reduce Insulin By 1 Unit.

Reduce Insulin By 1 Unit.

In Flexible insulin therapy (FIT), each mealtime insulin dose has two components: A ‘food dose’ that covers the carbohydrate content of that meal, and a ‘correction dose’ that takes into account your pre-meal blood glucose level and any exercise that you plan to do after the meal. That's what makes this type of insulin therapy flexible. It allows you to change the insulin dose to fit your lifestyle. Calculating a mealtime dose takes a little practice, but it is not that hard. In fact, some of the newer insulin pumps have a built-in calculator that does this for you. Let's look at the steps in detail. Step 1 : Cover the Carbohydrates In order to cover the total carbohydrate servings in a meal you need to know your carb-to-insulin ratio. This ratio may be 15 to 1 (written as 15:1) for someone who is very sensitive to insulin. The ratio might only be 5:1 for someone who is less sensitive to insulin. A ratio of 10:1 means that for every 10 grams of carbohydrate they eat, a person needs to inject 1 unit of rapid- or short-acting insulin. Your diabetes educator can help you find the carb-to-insulin ratio that is right for you. Step 2: Add or Subtract a Correction Dose of Insulin based on your Blood Glucose Level To complete this step, you must know your Insulin Sensitivity Factor (ISF). This is sometimes called a ‘correction factor’. Your insulin sensitivity factor is simply a measure of the impact that insulin has on your particular body. Put a bit more technically, it’s the amount by which your blood glucose is reduced by one unit of rapid, or short-acting insulin in a period of two to four hours. Your doctor can tell you what your insulin sensitivity factor is. For most people with diabetes, it is typically between 1.5 and 3.0 mmol/L per unit of insulin. To c Continue reading >>

What Is An Insulin Sensitivity Factor?

What Is An Insulin Sensitivity Factor?

If you are taking rapid-acting insulin (sometimes called meal or bolus insulin, such as Novorapid, Humalog or Apidra), you educator may talk to you about the option of using an insulin sensitivity factor (ISF, for short) to better control your blood sugars. An ISF tells you how many mmol/l (or ‘blood sugar points’) 1 unit of rapid insulin will lower your blood sugar by. You can use an ISF to calculate how much extra insulin you will need to take when your blood sugar is high, to bring it back into your target range. If you are eating a meal, this would be extra insulin you would need to take, on top of what you would normally take for that meal. As an example, if your ISF is 1:3, this means that 1 unit of rapid insulin will lower your blood sugar by 3 mmol/l. If your ISF is 1:5, this means that 1 unit of rapid insulin will lower your blood sugar by 5 mmol/l. Everyone is different and will use different ISFs and blood sugar targets. You educator can help you figure out what your ISF and target range should be. Once you know what your ISF is, you can use the following steps to calculate how much extra insulin you will need to bring your blood sugar back into target range: Test blood sugar to get your current value Use current blood sugar – blood sugar target to find out how many mmol/l you need to come down to reach your target range Divide value from step 2 by your ISF. To practice, lets say that my ISF is 1:2 (1 unit of rapid insulin lowers my blood sugar by 2 mmol/l), and when I test my blood sugar, it is 12.0 mmol/l. I have set my target to be 6 mmol/l. I can use the steps from above: My blood sugar is 12.0 mmol/l 12.0 -6.0 = 6.0 My blood sugar needs to come down 6.0 mmol/l to reach my target 6.0 / 2 (my ISF) = 3 I will need to take 3 units of additional insulin Continue reading >>

What’s A Correction Factor? An Insulin Sensitivity? A Ratio?

What’s A Correction Factor? An Insulin Sensitivity? A Ratio?

Share: A Correction Factor (sometimes called insulin sensitivity), is how much 1 unit of rapid acting insulin will generally lower your blood glucose over 2 to 4 hours when you are in a fasting or pre-meal state. However, you should keep in mind: this is an estimate it may need to change as your baseline dose changes expect variations - sometimes 1 unit will lower it by more, and other times 1unit will lower it by less! calculating how much 1 unit of insulin will drop your blood sugar is a trial and error process, and sensitivity to insulin varies with the individual To get your total daily dose, add up all your usual meal time insulin and basal insulin. For example, Tom wants to calculate his correction factor: daily insulin dose: 8 units at breakfast, 6 units at lunch,10 at dinner and N/NPH 8 units at breakfast and 18 units at 10 pm Total Daily Dose (TDD) = 8 + 8 + 6+ 10 + 18 = 50 Correction Factor (CF) = 100/50 = 2 Therefore, one unit of rapid acting insulin would lower Tom’s blood sugar by 2 mmol/L over the next 2 to 4 hours. The average adult needs approximately 1 unit of insulin for every 2 mmol increase in blood sugar, but this can vary a lot between individuals: some people need 1 unit of insulin for every 1 mmol/L increase in blood sugar others need 1 unit of insulin for every 3 -5 mmol/L increase in blood sugar Using your CF before meal doses Before meal means there has been about 4 hours or more since you last ate or took an insulin dose for carbohydrate containing food or beverage. The correction factor or insulin sensitivity can be used to make a scale for pre meal insulin doses. BG Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bed Basal < 3.9 -2 -2 -2 Snack 4.0 - 5.9 Baseline Baseline Baseline Baseline Baseline 6.0 - 7.9 Baseline Baseline Baseline Baseline Baseline 8.0 – 9.9 Continue reading >>

Formula To Determine Bg Mmol/l Change Per Unit Of Insulin

Formula To Determine Bg Mmol/l Change Per Unit Of Insulin

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Formula to determine BG mmol/l change per unit of insulin Discussion in ' Insulin ' started by andybraith , Jun 1, 2017 . Hi all, has anyone used a formula to work out BG change per unit of insulin for a T1D? I know the effect of a unit of insulin will, potentially, be different depending on many factors (age, time of diagnosis, current state of pancreas and any remains beta cells etc...). I have always been told that the general rule of thumb is 1 unit changes blood glucose by 3 mmol/l. However, the more I consider this the more I think this is, as described, a rule of thumb and we should calculate this, perhaps from TDD which takes into account our weight. Any thoughts on this would be appreciated! If the ratio between insulin and change in BG is incorrect then all meal carb counting and corrections will be causing BGs to fluctuate. One other thing I find confusing is that if we are more sensitive to insulin in the morning then why does the 1 unit:3mmol/l change apply all day?!? Hi @andybraith your questions are totally valid and absolutely right. The 1u:3mmol/l ISF value is a totally arbitrary number (based on the rule of 100 ) that is really a starting point. As you see on a pump, you have the ability to set different ISF and Insulin Carb Ratios for different periods of the day. This is why it's really important to understand whether your basal levels are correct by doing a basal test, then following that up with a Correction Factor (or Insulin Sensitivity Factor) test and an Insulin Carb Ratio test for different times of the day. So to sum up, yes, the start is really just that and you need to adjust for yourself around those numbers, and yes mos Continue reading >>

Calculating Insulin Sensitivity Factor (isf)

Calculating Insulin Sensitivity Factor (isf)

Your insulin sensitivity factor (ISF) determines how much your blood sugar will drop in response to 1 unit of insulin. The total drop must be measured 2-3 hours later. It can vary, particularly in the morning, where you generally require more insulin to correct for a high blood sugar compared to the rest of the day. Calculating your insulin sensitivity is quite easy. Just enter the amount of insulin, and the corresponding correction it gives you e.g. 3 units of insulin at breakfast time drops you 9 mmol/162mg. Step 1. Enter Current Values Meal time How much insulin? Gives you a BGL drop of...? One unit of insulin covers: Breakfast units mg/dL mmol/L Morning tea units (the same units are used below) Lunch units Afternoon tea units Dinner units Supper units Step 2. Review Now you need to check if your ratios are right. If you get low after a breakfast correction (test 2-3 hours after), then you are getting to much insulin and you need to increase the BGL drop given by 1 unit. Try adding 1mmol / 18mg, and then test with the new ratio. However, if you are getting too high after breakfast (test 2-3 hours after), then you need more insulin. Try reducing by 1mmol / 18mg, and then test with the new ratio. Predict blood sugars three hours ahead! Get live coaching to improve your ratios! Try ManageBGL now. Available scenarios: How does Low GI food affect my blood sugar? Calculating Insulin Sensitivity Factor (ISF) Calculating Carbohydrate Ratio Should I inject before my meal? Afreeza versus Humalog/Novolog/NovoRapid Lucy thought she was Low Undiagnosed versus diagnosed Type 2 diabetic Suggestions for more scenarios? Please send them to us Continue reading >>

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