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Insulin Correction Dose Calculator

Mysugr Bolus Calculator – Get Help With Your Insulin Dose (currently Available In Eu)

Mysugr Bolus Calculator – Get Help With Your Insulin Dose (currently Available In Eu)

back to Overview It's time for lunch. Your blood sugar is 165 mg/dl (9.2 mmol/L). You have a big slice of pizza, a bag of chips, and a cold Diet Coke waiting for you. How much insulin do you take? I can think of a few ways this goes: There’s not much to think about. You always eat the same thing and always take the same amount of insulin. You define the phrase “creature of habit.” You hate thinking about all of this stuff, so you just guess. You love doing a bunch of math before every meal, so calculating your insulin dose is fun and easy. I can relate to the first two. There’s a lot of value in routine, and I’ve also done my share of guesstimating. That last one? Enjoying all of the diabetes math? I’m sorry. That’s just weird. (I’m teasing. Kind of…) But there’s another option, and it makes thinking about your insulin doses easier and more precise. I’m talking about a bolus calculator. If you wear an insulin pump, you’re probably already using one (they’re often built in). You’re welcome to stay and read, but there’s not much new information for you here. However, if you’re using injections (syringes or pens), like most people with diabetes, then stick around. This article should be helpful. So you don’t have (or want) an insulin pump, but I bet you have a smartphone. What does that mean? It means that you should meet mySugr’s Bolus Calculator. It’s a module integrated into the mySugr app that helps with your insulin doses (note: mySugr Bolus Calculator is currently approved for use in Europe). What the heck is a “bolus,” you ask? Great question. A bolus, in our case, is a single dose of insulin given all at once. In other words, it’s your mealtime shot or a shot to fix a high blood sugar. mySugr’s Bolus Calculator examines Continue reading >>

Insulin Dosing

Insulin Dosing

OTHER HELPFUL PAGES ACRONYMS AND DEFINITIONS ADA - American Diabetes Association Basal Insulin - Long- and Intermediate-acting insulins used to supply constant blood levels of insulin activity Carb- carbohydrate DM1 - Type 1 diabetes DM2 - Type 2 diabetes FDA - U.S. Food and Drug Administration Hypoglycemia - low blood sugar Multidose insulin regimen - Insulin regimens that involve a basal insulin and a premeal insulin given at meals Premeal Insulin - also called “prandial” insulin. Rapid and short-acting insulins given at mealtime for short burst of insulin. Total daily dose of insulin - Sum of premeal and basal insulin given in a day Units/kg/day - units of insulin per kilogram of body weight per day USDA - United States Department of Agriculture 1 kilogram = 2.2 pounds IMPORTANT POINTS ABOUT DOSING INSULIN Overview There are a number of different ways to dose insulin No detailed guidelines for dosing insulin have been issued by professional associations The appropriate method for individual patients will depend on a number of factors including patient education, patient motivation, diabetes control, and resources Low blood sugar (Hypoglycemia) The main concern in most patients when initiating an insulin regimen is the occurrence of low blood sugars Patients need to understand that when they are starting and adjusting insulin, there is an increased risk for low blood sugars A number of things can affect this risk including variations in eating patterns, sensitivity to insulin, and variations in activity level Measures to help prevent low blood sugars Start low and go slow - patients naïve to insulin should start at the lower end of dosing ranges When using a multidose regimen, adjust only one of the regimens every 3 days and alternate between the two (see below f Continue reading >>

Calculating Insulin Dose

Calculating Insulin Dose

You'll need to calculate some of your insulin doses. You'll also need to know some basic things about insulin. For example, 40-50% of the total daily insulin dose is to replace insulin overnight. Your provider will prescribe an insulin dose regimen for you; however, you still need to calculate some of your insulin doses. Your insulin dose regimen provides formulas that allow you to calculate how much bolus insulin to take at meals and snacks, or to correct high blood sugars. In this section, you will find: First, some basic things to know about insulin: Approximately 40-50% of the total daily insulin dose is to replace insulin overnight, when you are fasting and between meals. This is called background or basal insulin replacement. The basal or background insulin dose usually is constant from day to day. The other 50-60% of the total daily insulin dose is for carbohydrate coverage (food) and high blood sugar correction. This is called the bolus insulin replacement. Bolus – Carbohydrate coverage The bolus dose for food coverage is prescribed as an insulin to carbohydrate ratio.The insulin to carbohydrate ratio represents how many grams of carbohydrate are covered or disposed of by 1 unit of insulin. Generally, one unit of rapid-acting insulin will dispose of 12-15 grams of carbohydrate. This range can vary from 4-30 grams or more of carbohydrate depending on an individual’s sensitivity to insulin. Insulin sensitivity can vary according to the time of day, from person to person, and is affected by physical activity and stress. Bolus – High blood sugar correction (also known as insulin sensitivity factor) The bolus dose for high blood sugar correction is defined as how much one unit of rapid-acting insulin will drop the blood sugar. Generally, to correct a high blood Continue reading >>

Calculating Bolus Injections

Calculating Bolus Injections

How do I calculate my bolus insulin doses? You will need to figure out (calculate) your bolus insulin dose based on carbohydrate eaten, blood glucose level or both added together. Calculating a bolus dose for carbohydrate (meal bolus) Use the Insulin to Carbohydrate Ratio (ICR) to calculate your insulin dose. ICR is the amount of rapid-acting insulin (I) you need for a specific amount of carbohydrate (C) in food. This is the number of grams of carbohydrates that 1 unit of rapid-acting insulin will cover. Example: 1 unit of rapid-acting insulin will cover 10 grams carbohydrates. This may also be written 1:10. The ratio may be different at different meals. Using the ICR will control blood glucose best if insulin is given before meals. Calculate your ICR based on what you WILL be eating. We strongly suggest that rapid-acting insulin be given before meals. The Diabetes Sick Day Calculator and Sick Day Journal are available in our free myChildren's mobile application. NOTE: You may give insulin right after a meal if do not know the amount of carbohydrates that will be eaten, like with a very young child or sickness. Do not give rapid-acting insulin when you eat carbohydrate to treat a low blood glucose or to prevent a low blood glucose. Example: A meal has 60 grams of carbohydrates. Your carbohydrate ratio is 1:10. 60 (grams of carbohydrates) divided by (÷) 10 (carbohydrate ratio) = 6 (carbohydrate bolus), so You would give 6 units rapid-acting insulin for carbohydrate bolus Calculating a bolus dose for high blood glucose (correction bolus) Use the high blood glucose (hyperglycemia) correction factor, also called correction factor (CF) or sensitivity. Use this to calculate the correction bolus. Correction factor is how much 1 unit of rapid-acting insulin will reduce the blo Continue reading >>

Tips For Calculating A Total Daily Dose Of Insulin

Tips For Calculating A Total Daily Dose Of Insulin

You can use one of several methods to determine a safe, initial dose Published in the August 2007 issue of Today’s Hospitalist. Evidence keeps mounting that high blood sugars lead to worse outcomes in hospitalized patients “and that sliding scale regimens produce both more hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. But as hospitalists switch from sliding scale to basal and bolus dosing, how do they calculate a safe total daily dose to start with? Experts say that physicians can use any of three different strategies, depending on whether patients have been using insulin as either an outpatient or in the ICU. ~ Deepak Asudani, MD Baystate Medical Center Any one of these approaches will produce a safe, conservative initial dose, but experts warn that none of the strategies by itself is a slam dunk. You still have to bring art to each approach, adjusting doses according to such factors as illness severity and eating status. Related article: Keeping it simple with insulin regimens, July 2013 Here’s a look at how two hospitalists use these strategies in their day-to-day practice. 1. Base total sub-Q dose on insulin infusion rates. When Deepak Asudani, MD, a hospitalist at Baystate Medical Center in Springfield, Mass., transitions patients from IV insulin in the ICU to sub-Q insulin on the wards, he uses the following formula: Take the average hourly insulin infusion rate over the past six hours and multiply that rate by 20. That gives you a number that should equal 80% of the daily infusion dose. “It’s a little correction to prevent any hypoglycemia,” says Dr. Asudani. Because patients’ insulin needs are tapering down a bit as they exit the ICU, he adds, you don’t need to supply the same daily dose. For patients eating substantial amounts of food, you can use that calcul Continue reading >>

Insulin Correction

Insulin Correction

Correction dose of insulin Summary: This calculator is intended to help calculate a corrected insulin dose for adults with hyperglycemia. Corrected doses calculated here are suggested based on the inputs you provide. Please temper administration of large doses of insulin with good clinical judgement. <-- What is the current blood sugar? (mg/dL) NOTE: Hyperglycemia may warrant monitoring and correction in an inpatient setting. <-- What is the goal blood sugar? (mg/dL) <-- What is the patient's usual total daily dose of insulin? (units) Add up all the insulin the patient normal takes in a day. This includes long-, intermediate-, short-, and/or rapid-acting insulins. This value must be more than 0. <-- What type of insulin will you use to correct the hyperglycemia? Rapid-acting insulin includes aspart and lispro insulins. When Regular insulin is selected, the 1500 rule will be used. When Rapid-acting insulin is selected, the 1700 rule will be used. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Insulin Sensitivity Factor (ISF) using Insulin_Type insulin: ISF The ISF means that one unit of Insulin_Type insulin would be expected to lower the blood sugar by ISF mg/dL. The suggested correction dose of Insulin_Type insulin: correction units. Continue reading >>

Calculating Insulin Sensitivity Factor (isf)

Calculating Insulin Sensitivity Factor (isf)

Your insulin sensitivity factor (ISF) determines how much your blood sugar will drop in response to 1 unit of insulin. The total drop must be measured 2-3 hours later. It can vary, particularly in the morning, where you generally require more insulin to correct for a high blood sugar compared to the rest of the day. Calculating your insulin sensitivity is quite easy. Just enter the amount of insulin, and the corresponding correction it gives you e.g. 3 units of insulin at breakfast time drops you 9 mmol/162mg. Step 1. Enter Current Values Meal time How much insulin? Gives you a BGL drop of...? One unit of insulin covers: Breakfast units mg/dL mmol/L Morning tea units (the same units are used below) Lunch units Afternoon tea units Dinner units Supper units Step 2. Review Now you need to check if your ratios are right. If you get low after a breakfast correction (test 2-3 hours after), then you are getting to much insulin and you need to increase the BGL drop given by 1 unit. Try adding 1mmol / 18mg, and then test with the new ratio. However, if you are getting too high after breakfast (test 2-3 hours after), then you need more insulin. Try reducing by 1mmol / 18mg, and then test with the new ratio. Predict blood sugars three hours ahead! Get live coaching to improve your ratios! Try ManageBGL now. Available scenarios: How does Low GI food affect my blood sugar? Calculating Insulin Sensitivity Factor (ISF) Calculating Carbohydrate Ratio Should I inject before my meal? Afreeza versus Humalog/Novolog/NovoRapid Lucy thought she was Low Undiagnosed versus diagnosed Type 2 diabetic Suggestions for more scenarios? Please send them to us Continue reading >>

Mealtime Dosage Calculator

Mealtime Dosage Calculator

The mealtime dosage calculator is intended as an aid in figuring mealtime rapid-acting insulin requirements. It should only be used under the supervision and guidance of your health care team. Mealtime Dosage Calculator Instructions **IMPORTANT!!! Do not use the Mealtime Dosage Calculator without first discussing your exact insulin requirements with the clinician who prescribes your insulin. All values entered into the calculator should be determined with the guidance of your health care team. note: the Mealtime Dosage Calculator will work on most major spreadsheet programs, including Excel. To Use The Mealtime Insulin Dose Calculator: 1. You will need to enter your insulin dosage formulas into the boxes in the top left. Information can only be entered in the YELLOW boxes. First, enter the meal/situation that the chart applies to. For example, “breakfast” or “lunch before exercise” or “all meals”. Second, enter your target blood glucose (your “ideal value”). This should be one exact number in mg/dl, such as “100” or “120”. Third, enter your sensitivity factor. This is the amount that one unit of insulin lowers your blood glucose. Fourth, enter your carb:insulin ratio. This is the grams of carbohydrate “covered” by one unit of insulin. Fifth, enter an exercise factor (if needed). An exercise factor of 1.00 means that you will not be exercising and want to take your usual dose. If you want to lower your doses by 25% in anticipation of exercise, enter “.75”. If you want to lower your doses by 33%, enter “.67”. If you want to take half of your usual doses, enter “.50”. 2. The numbers on the large chart will update to reflect your mealtime insulin doses based on the parameters entered above. Find the grams of carbohydrate in the top ro Continue reading >>

Correction Factor

Correction Factor

The 1800 Rule For Determining Your Correction Factor When your blood sugar goes unexpectedly high, a correction bolus can be used to bring it down. To use the right correction bolus, you first determine your correction factor. The 1500 Rule for Regular was originally developed by Paul Davidson, M.D. in Atlanta, Georgia. Because the blood sugar tends to drop faster and farther on Humalog and Novolog insulins, we modified the 1500 Rule to an 1800 Rule for these insulins. (Some use a 2000 rule for these insulins.) The 1800 Rule shows how far your blood sugar is likely to drop per unit of Humalog and Novolog insulin. The 1500 Rule shows how far it will drop per unit of Regular. Numbers between 1600 and 2200 can be used to determine the correction factor. The number 1800 should work when the TDD is set correctly and the basal insulin makes up 50% of the TDD in someone with Type 1 diabetes. A number smaller than 1800 will work better when basal insulin doses make up less than 50% of the TDD, while a number higher than 1800 works better for those whose basal doses make up more than 50% of their TDD. Also recheck your TDD and basal percentage to make sure they are correctly set. Setting up your correction boluses can be done only after your basal doses have been tested for accuracy. If your basal doses are set too high, using a correction bolus may lead to lows, while basal doses that are too low will make it appear that correction boluses are not the right amount to bring high readings down as expected. The 1800 Rule: Works for Type 1 diabetes and most Type 2s Estimates the point drop in mg/dl per unit of Humalog or Novolog 1800/TDD = point drop per unit of Humalog (see Table) Example: Someone's Total Daily Dose of insulin = 30 units 1800/30 u/day = a 60 point drop per unit of Continue reading >>

Insulin Calculation

Insulin Calculation

Ads by Google Insulin calculation formula in this page is the generalized rule for find daily insulin dosage both basal and bolus requirement. However, bear in mind your insulin requirement can be lower if you are newly diagnosed and still making insulin on your own and requirement is higher if you are very resistant to insulin. Monitor your BS; vary your insulin requirement for the best insulin dose to meet your individual needs. How do you do the insulin calculation? The insulin requirements for type 1 diabetes cannot calculate precisely because every individual is different. However, to begin the treatment, there is a simple thumb rule formula exist, which can help you provide just close to your insulin requirement. After by trial and measurement, you can fine-tune your insulin treatment. Before proceed further, you should learn some important term in your insulin calculations, they are: Total daily dose of insulin is the insulin requirement of both basal and bolus insulin. The basal insulin (background insulin) is the insulin requirement; overnight, during fasting and in-between meals. The bolus insulin is the insulin requirement to cover the mealtime carbohydrate and blood sugar correction. Insulin to the carb ratio is the grams of carbohydrate the body can dispose by one unit of insulin. CHO insulin dose is the insulin requirement to cover the total grams of carbohydrate. Insulin sensitivity factor or Blood sugar correction factor is defining, as one unit of insulin (rapid acting) will drop the blood-sugar level Blood sugar insulin correction dosage is the insulin requirement to cover the blood sugar deviation from the target. Total mealtime bolus insulin is the insulin requirement to cover the mealtime carbohydrate and deviation in the blood sugar. Calculate your Continue reading >>

What’s A Correction Factor? An Insulin Sensitivity? A Ratio?

What’s A Correction Factor? An Insulin Sensitivity? A Ratio?

Share: A Correction Factor (sometimes called insulin sensitivity), is how much 1 unit of rapid acting insulin will generally lower your blood glucose over 2 to 4 hours when you are in a fasting or pre-meal state. However, you should keep in mind: this is an estimate it may need to change as your baseline dose changes expect variations - sometimes 1 unit will lower it by more, and other times 1unit will lower it by less! calculating how much 1 unit of insulin will drop your blood sugar is a trial and error process, and sensitivity to insulin varies with the individual To get your total daily dose, add up all your usual meal time insulin and basal insulin. For example, Tom wants to calculate his correction factor: daily insulin dose: 8 units at breakfast, 6 units at lunch,10 at dinner and N/NPH 8 units at breakfast and 18 units at 10 pm Total Daily Dose (TDD) = 8 + 8 + 6+ 10 + 18 = 50 Correction Factor (CF) = 100/50 = 2 Therefore, one unit of rapid acting insulin would lower Tom’s blood sugar by 2 mmol/L over the next 2 to 4 hours. The average adult needs approximately 1 unit of insulin for every 2 mmol increase in blood sugar, but this can vary a lot between individuals: some people need 1 unit of insulin for every 1 mmol/L increase in blood sugar others need 1 unit of insulin for every 3 -5 mmol/L increase in blood sugar Using your CF before meal doses Before meal means there has been about 4 hours or more since you last ate or took an insulin dose for carbohydrate containing food or beverage. The correction factor or insulin sensitivity can be used to make a scale for pre meal insulin doses. BG Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bed Basal < 3.9 -2 -2 -2 Snack 4.0 - 5.9 Baseline Baseline Baseline Baseline Baseline 6.0 - 7.9 Baseline Baseline Baseline Baseline Baseline 8.0 – 9.9 Continue reading >>

Insulin Correction Dose Calculator -beta

Insulin Correction Dose Calculator -beta

perinatology.com Please enable JavaScript to view all features on this site. Insulin Correction Dose Calculator Select the type of insulin, enter the total daily dose of insulin used, the carbohydrate content of the meal, and press 'calculate' button to estimate the amount of insulin needed to cover the carbohydrate content of the meal. All calculations must be confirmed before use. The suggested results are not a substitute for clinical judgment. Neither Perinatology.com nor any other party involved in the preparation or publication of this site shall be liable for any special, consequential, or exemplary Insulin Type Rapid acting Insulin (Humalog, Novolog) Short acting (Regular) Total Daily Dose of Insulin (TDD) units Carbohydrate Content of meal : grams Current Blood Glucose mg/dL Target Pre-Meal Blood Glucose mg/dL Carbohydrate Ratio = One unit of insulin covers grams of carbohydrate Insulin Sensitivity Factor (ISF) = One unit insulin decreases blood glucose by mg/dL Insulin required to cover carbohydrate in meal units Correction to Dose Of Insulin units Dose Of Insulin for meal units Meal related insulin boluses are calculated according to the carbohydrate content of the meal using the carbohydrate-to-insulin ratio (CIR) The carbohydrate-to-insulin ratio (CIR) is the number of grams of carbohydrate that are covered by 1 unit of insulin. The CIR is calculated by dividing the constant 450 by the Total Daily Dose (TDD). The CIR may be different for different meals of the day. CIR-= 450 / TDD Example: TDD= 50 units insulin CIR= 450 /50 = 9 grams/unit The meal has 90 grams of carbohydrate Meal insulin bolus = carbohydrates/carbohydrate to insulin ratio CIR =90/9= 10 units If the post meal blood sugar is above the targeted blood sugar range for 2 to 3 days then consider Continue reading >>

Smartphone Apps For Calculating Insulin Dose: A Systematic Assessment

Smartphone Apps For Calculating Insulin Dose: A Systematic Assessment

Go to: Abstract Medical apps are widely available, increasingly used by patients and clinicians, and are being actively promoted for use in routine care. However, there is little systematic evidence exploring possible risks associated with apps intended for patient use. Because self-medication errors are a recognized source of avoidable harm, apps that affect medication use, such as dose calculators, deserve particular scrutiny. We explored the accuracy and clinical suitability of apps for calculating medication doses, focusing on insulin calculators for patients with diabetes as a representative use for a prevalent long-term condition. We performed a systematic assessment of all English-language rapid/short-acting insulin dose calculators available for iOS and Android. Results Searches identified 46 calculators that performed simple mathematical operations using planned carbohydrate intake and measured blood glucose. While 59% (n = 27/46) of apps included a clinical disclaimer, only 30% (n = 14/46) documented the calculation formula. 91% (n = 42/46) lacked numeric input validation, 59% (n = 27/46) allowed calculation when one or more values were missing, 48% (n = 22/46) used ambiguous terminology, 9% (n = 4/46) did not use adequate numeric precision and 4% (n = 2/46) did not store parameters faithfully. 67% (n = 31/46) of apps carried a risk of inappropriate output dose recommendation that either violated basic clinical assumptions (48%, n = 22/46) or did not match a stated formula (14%, n = 3/21) or correctly update in response to changing user inputs (37%, n = 17/46). Only one app, for iOS, was issue-free according to our criteria. No significant differences were observed in issue prevalence by payment model or platform. Conclusions The majority of insulin dose calcu Continue reading >>

Bolus Calculators

Bolus Calculators

Go to: Carbohydrate Counting and Bolus Calculation One method for matching meal insulin to CHO intake is called ‘carbohydrate counting’ (CC).5 It is a systematic approach for insulin bolus size calculation, and in addition to improving metabolic control, CC has been shown to improve quality of life, treatment satisfaction, and psychological well-being and to increase dietary freedom without concomitant deteriorations in cardiovascular risk factors in patients with T1D.6,7 Insulin dose calculations by CC concern only bolus insulin, but a prerequisite for success is a correct basal insulin dose in the form of either long-acting insulin or a basal rate. Basal insulin dosing can be evaluated by diabetes diary review or basal rate check.8 The correction factor (CF) and the insulin to carbohydrate ratio (ICR), are patient specific empirically estimated parameters included in the insulin bolus calculation.8 CF is the decrease in BG level caused by 1 unit of subcutaneously injected rapid-acting insulin. ICR is the amount of CHO needed to match the BG lowering effect of 1 unit of rapid-acting insulin. Guides to CF and ICR estimations have been published.9,10 The clinician should however note that there is often a need for further parameter adaptation and that CF and ICR values may vary during the day. With basal insulin dosing, CF and ICR in place, the next step in the insulin bolus calculation procedure is to estimate the meal CHO content. To do this, knowledge about the CHO content of different foods is required. Furthermore, a BG measurement must be obtained and a BG target set. The BG target is patient specific depending on individual patient goals and may also vary according to time of day. Now the patient is ready to calculate an insulin bolus. The insulin bolus equati Continue reading >>

New Online Calculator For The Diabetes Math Impaired

New Online Calculator For The Diabetes Math Impaired

Those of us living with diabetes, especially type 1, feel like we're never-ending math story problems. How many units do you take if you want to eat X amount of carbs, at a current blood sugar of Y, with a sensitivity factor of Z that varies due to time of day, amount of sleep, any stress you may be experiencing, or which way the wind is blowing? We are walking D-Math calculators. Technology makes it easier, without a doubt. Insulin pumps automatically calculate boluses for meals and correcti ons, and many keep track of how much active insulin we have working at any given time. Apps can do some D-Math too, but the need to pull out your phone for every bolus is not for everyone. That's why it was exciting to hear about the new Diabetes Calculator for Kids, a new, online program that can do D-calculations for you. It's developed by Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, OH. But don't be deceived by the names: this free resource can actually help any PWD, of any age. After my mom's recent ER and hospital experience that temporarily affected her D-Math ability in a big way, we turned to this online calculator tool to do the calculations for us. And it worked perfectly! The Diabetes Calculator is apparently the first of its kind -- which is somewhat amazing, because it's really nothing fancy beyond a web-based version of a programmable spreadsheet. The online tool can be personalized so that any PWD or caregiver can create an individualized, printable chart that displays the calculated bolus amounts for food or insulin corrections, in five easy steps. You just plug in your personal information including name and birth date, caregiver's name, and whether you want doses rounded to the nearest half or whole unit. Then you enter the carb-to-insulin ratio, sensitivity factor Continue reading >>

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