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Insulin Cartridges

Humalog Cartridges

Humalog Cartridges

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. What is in this leaflet This leaflet is designed to provide you with answers to some common questions about these medicines. It does not contain all the available information and does not take the place of talking with your doctor. The information in this leaflet was last updated on the date shown on the final page. More recent information on this medicine may be available. Make sure you speak to your pharmacist, nurse or doctor to obtain the most up to date information on this medicine. You can also download the most up to date leaflet from www.lilly.com.au. The updated leaflet may contain important information about HUMALOG and its use that you should be aware of. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has more information about these medicines than is contained in this leaflet. Also, your doctor has had the benefit of taking a full and detailed history from you and is in the best position to make an expert judgement to meet your individual needs. If you have any concerns about using these medicines, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. What the HUMALOG insulins are used for HUMALOG insulins are used to reduce high blood sugar (glucose) levels in insulin dependent diabetic patients. Diabetes is a condition in which your pancreas does not produce enough insulin to control your blood sugar level. Extra insulin is therefore needed. Type 1 diabetes - also called Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (IDDM). Patients with type 1 diabetes always need insulin to control their blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes - also called Non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Some patients with type 2 diabetes may also need insulin after initial treatment with diet, exercise an Continue reading >>

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. NovoLog® (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin therapy. The timing of hypoglycemia may reflect the time-action profile of the insulin formulation. Glucose monitoring is re Continue reading >>

Insulin, Oh Insulin, Where For Art Thou, Insulin?

Insulin, Oh Insulin, Where For Art Thou, Insulin?

I can’t do it. I simply just can’t do it. I can’t bear to think that I’m throwing away as much insulin as I am with every cartridge change with Tandem’s insulin pump. It just doesn’t feel right. Not sure what I’m talking about? Let me give you a run-down. With any competitor pump out there, you can fill the cartridge and probably waste an average of 10 to 15 units filling the tubing and site during set up. From there, you can simply run the pump down to no insulin at all if you’d like, and only be losing that 10-15 units. Over a month (if you change out every 3 days), you’re looking at a grand total of 100 to 150 units per month that you’re losing due to the space in the tubing that needs to be filled. With *my* Tandem t:slim pump, because it’s made with a bag-design, the pump can’t read all of the units that are placed in the pump. (Emphasis on MY because apparently this is different for others. I must have gotten a dud or something) Take for instance, last night. I filled the cartridge with 160 units. The pump recognized only 115 units of that. That is a difference of 45 units that will not be usable unless after I use the cartridge, I draw it back out and re-use it in the next cartridge (which is TOTALLY not recommended). But if you were to follow everything by the letter, I am wasting a massive average if 45-55u per cartridge. That doesn’t even account for the extra 10 units that it takes to fill the tubing on top of the already standard 10-15 units. So, overall, 55-60 u per change out… every three days. That’s 550-600u per month. That’s a half of a bottle of insulin or more per month that I’m throwing in the trash can, never to be used. Just since starting back on it, in ONE week, I’m down a half-vial. I’ve NEVER used that much Continue reading >>

Warning: Inaccurate Dosing After Insulin Withdrawn From Pen Cartridge

Warning: Inaccurate Dosing After Insulin Withdrawn From Pen Cartridge

Patients or medical professionals who withdraw insulin from pen cartridges are at risk for dangerous errors. A pharmacist received a call from a nurse who was concerned that a patient’s insulin pen did not deliver the correct amount of insulin. In an effort to discover the problem, the nurse took a standard insulin syringe, dialed the pen to 10 units, and injected the insulin into the syringe to measure how much would reach the patient. She found that the insulin syringe only contained 5 units. This was repeated twice, and again, only 5 units were found in the syringes. The pharmacist went to the nursing unit, repeated the experiment, and also got just 5 units. When laying the pen down on the table, the pharmacist noticed that an air bubble was visible. Knowing how that could affect insulin delivery from the pen, he obtained a new pen from stock and repeated the previous experiment. This time 10 units were measured in the syringe. The problem was tracked to nurses using insulin pen cartridges as “mini” vials of insulin, drawing the dose out of the pen with a standard insulin syringe. It’s a practice we’ve warned against because it’s known to lead to inaccurate dose measurement (www.ismp.org/Newsletters/acutecare/articles/20080508.asp). The problem may be inadequate staff training. When nurses are not sure how to use a pen or encounter problems when trying to use it, they may solve the problem by removing the pen cartridge and using it as if it was a vial. In the process, they may accidentally introduce air into the pen. In this instance, the patient was subjected to several injections and less effective blood glucose control because the pen was used in a manner not intended. This practice is clinically ill-advised and should be strongly discouraged. Once any Continue reading >>

Humalog (insulin Lispro (u-100) Cartridges And Pens) - Drugs.com

Humalog (insulin Lispro (u-100) Cartridges And Pens) - Drugs.com

View Frightful (But Dead Serious) Drug Side Effects What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Humalog? If you have an allergy to insulin or any other part of Humalog (insulin lispro (U-100) cartridges and pens). If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives ; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing ; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs. This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with Humalog (insulin lispro (U-100) cartridges and pens). Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins ) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take Humalog (insulin lispro (U-100) cartridges and pens) with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor. What are some things I need to know or do while I take Humalog? Tell all of your health care providers that you take Humalog (insulin lispro (U-100) cartridges and pens). This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists. Allergic reactions have happened with Humalog (insulin lispro (U-100) cartridges and pens). Rarely, some reactions can be very bad or life-threatening. Talk with the doctor. Low blood sugar may happen with Humalog (insulin lispro (U-100) cartridges and pens). Very low blood sugar can lead to seizures , passing out, long lasting brain damage, and sometimes death. Talk with the doctor. Low blood potassium may happen with Humalog (insulin lispro (U-100) cartridges and pens). If not treated, this can lead to a heartbeat that is not normal, very bad breathing problems, Continue reading >>

Incompatibility Of Insulin Pens And Cartridges

Incompatibility Of Insulin Pens And Cartridges

Sir Frits Holleman and colleagues' (Nov 29, p 1601)1 recommendation that insulin cartridges are safely inter-changeable between insulin injector systems is misguided and could lead to serious adverse incidents. The Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) has published a report dealing with insulin pens.2 Our experience is that generally insulin cartridges are not interchangeable, although there could be a few exceptions. However, drawing attention to these exceptions causes confusion among diabetic patients, which can result in accidents. Manufacturers may, without notice, change cartridge specifications without regard to compatibility with other manufacturers' devices. The internal diameter of Humulin (Eli Lilly) and Actrapid (Novo Nordisk) 1·5 mL cartridges are nominally the same (6·70 mm). Therefore, the doses given with a specific pen system with either cartridge would also be expected to be nominally the same. However, the inside diameter is not the only factor that determines cartridge interchange-ability. For instance, if a 1·5 mL Humalog (Eli Lilly) or Humulin, cartridge is inserted into a NovoPen I, the device cannot be assembled properly, because the Lilly cartridges are longer than Novo cartridges. This can lead to malfunction. The choice of pen is initially determined by the brand of insulin prescribed. However, difficulties might arise when an individual patient has a preference for a pen from a different manufacturer and attempts to use an incompatible pen/cartridge combination. For example, in August, 1997, our laboratory received a report of an incident in which a woman had lost control of her diabetes. A faulty device was suspected as the cause. Closer investigation revealed that the user had been modifying Lilly cartridges so that they cou Continue reading >>

Pen Devices For Insulin Administration

Pen Devices For Insulin Administration

GENERAL INFORMATION: What is an insulin pen? An insulin pen is a device used to inject insulin. The pen contains a cartridge of insulin and a needle. The pen may be reusable or disposable. You may need a different pen for each type of insulin you use. How do I get the insulin ready to use? Wash your hands before and after you use an insulin pen. Check the label and appearance of the insulin: Check that you are injecting the right type of insulin. Check the expiration date. Use a new insulin cartridge or disposable pen if the expiration date has passed. Check that the insulin is clear, colorless, and free of particles or clumps. Use a new insulin cartridge or disposable pen if the insulin does not look right. Follow the pen manufacturer's instructions for inserting an insulin cartridge into a reusable pen. Mix cloudy insulin: Roll the pen gently in the palms of your hands 10 times. A small bead in the cartridge mixes the insulin. Tilt the pen back and forth straight up, then straight down 10 times to make sure the insulin is mixed well. After you roll and tilt the pen, the insulin should be evenly mixed. If the insulin does not appear to be evenly mixed, repeat the mixing process. Do not use the insulin if there are clumps in it after mixing. How do I get the pen ready to use? Attach the disposable needle to the pen: Remove the pen cap. Clean the rubber seal on the insulin cartridge with a sterile alcohol swab. Attach the disposable needle to the pen. Remove the outer needle cap and save it to use after your injection. Remove the inner needle cap and throw it away. Use a new needle every time you inject insulin. Prime the pen before each injection: This releases a small amount of insulin into the pen to help get rid of air bubbles that may be in the pen. Air bubbles can Continue reading >>

Consumer Level Recall Of Insulin Cartridge

Consumer Level Recall Of Insulin Cartridge

Pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk A/S, in consultation with the TGA, has initiated a consumer level recall of some batches of their NovoPen Echo insulin cartridge holder after detecting there is a possibility they may crack or break if exposed to chemicals in certain cleaning agents. PDF printable version of Consumer Level Recall of insulin cartridge - PDF 270 KB 11 July 2017 Pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk A/S, in consultation with the TGA, has initiated a consumer level recall of some batches of their NovoPen Echo insulin cartridge holder after detecting there is a possibility they may crack or break if exposed to chemicals in certain cleaning agents. People using a device with a cracked or broken cartridge holder can result in the device delivering a smaller dose of insulin than expected leading to high blood sugar levels, potentially putting the person at risk of hyperglycaemia. Novo Nordisk has advised that if people clean the pens as described in the User Guide, there is no reason that cracking of the cartridge holder will occur. The recall only relates to some batches of the cartridge holders and there are no reported problems with the insulin being administered. Novo Nordisk advises that the risk of patients experiencing high blood sugar levels due to an affected cartridge holder is extremely low. Novo Nordisk is recalling all pens in the affected batches not currently issued to a patient. People with diabetes who use a NovoPen Echo should immediately check the batch number and if it is from one of the affected batches they should not use it but apply to Nova Nordisk for a replacement. Batch no. as shown on NovoPen® Echo® carton Batch no. as shown on NovoPen® Echo® pen EVG3310-6 EVG3310 EVG4252-2 EVG4252 EVG4253-2 EVG4253 FVG8218-4 FVG8218 FVG8412-3 FV Continue reading >>

Tandem Diabetes Care Announces Launch Of T:lock Connector For Its Insulin Pump Cartridges And Infusion Sets

Tandem Diabetes Care Announces Launch Of T:lock Connector For Its Insulin Pump Cartridges And Infusion Sets

Tandem Diabetes Care Announces Launch of t:lock Connector for its Insulin Pump Cartridges and Infusion Sets August 23, 2017 08:30 AM Eastern Daylight Time SAN DIEGO--( BUSINESS WIRE )--Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. (NASDAQ: TNDM), a medical device company and manufacturer of the only touchscreen insulin pumps available in the United States, today announced the launch of the t:lock Connector for its insulin pump cartridges and infusion sets. All of the infusion sets currently offered by the Company will be made available with the new t:lock Connector, produced and supplied by Unomedical a/s, a ConvaTec Group Plc company. The t:lock Connector was designed to look and feel like the previous Luer-lock connector, while improving the customer experience of filling an infusion set with insulin. The Connector incorporates a smaller inner cavity, which reduces the amount of insulin used in the process and reduces the time required to fill the infusion set tubing. This launch strengthens our overall insulin delivery systems, addressing one of our customers most frequent requests to make the infusion set fill process more efficient, said Kim Blickenstaff, President and CEO of Tandem Diabetes Care. We continue to invest in ways to improve our products and deliver new technology, as part of our overall mission to provide innovative solutions to help improve the lives of people with diabetes. We are excited to further our current partnership with Tandem Diabetes Care with the implementation of their optimized t:lock Connector, said John M. Lindskog, President of ConvaTec Infusion Devices (Unomedical). The available t:lock line of infusion sets offers a variety of solutions for their customers, and we look forward to working with Tandem to further expand their offerings in the future. U Continue reading >>

Insulin Vials Vs. Insulin Cartridges: Further Cost Considerations

Insulin Vials Vs. Insulin Cartridges: Further Cost Considerations

Go to: 1. Introduction Diabetes is difficult to control and treatment involves several approaches which are associated with different costs. In the Royal Medical Services (RMS), after diagnosis of the disease and by excluding the regular visits to the clinics, the core costs incurred by the RMS in diabetes treatment can be confined to the cost of medications dispensed to patients and hospitalization due to diabetes complications. Many patients need insulin in the regimen of diabetes treatment. For outpatients, insulin can be administered by two main approaches: traditional vials and cartridges. In the RMS, both approaches are available; however, it is believed that adopting one of these approaches could be more cost-effective from the RMS perspective. Both types of insulin packages contain 100 IU/ml of biphasic insulin aspart. The vial contains 10 ml (1000 IU), while the cartridge used to refill the pen contains 3 ml (300 IU). Although, it is assumed that both approaches produce the same pharmacological outcomes, the ease of use and patient adherence have been compared widely in the literature (Baser et al., 2010; Bohannon, 1999; Rakel, 2009). The comparison between these approaches strongly favors the use of cartridges due to many reasons, for example, pens provide more accurate dosing, less pain due to smaller needle gauge, increased social acceptability and better quality of life (Bohannon, 1999); moreover, patient adherence was improved by using pens without significant increase in the cost (Baser et al., 2010). A study conducted in Mayo Clinic found that converting patients to insulin pens provided an overall cost savings (Ward and Aton, 2011). Another study, in the USA, found that overall annual health care costs were significantly decreased by starting or convert Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens

Insulin Pens

Managing diabetes often requires taking insulin shots throughout the day. Insulin delivery systems such as insulin pens can make giving insulin shots much easier. If you currently use a vial and syringe to deliver your insulin, switching to an insulin pen may make it easier to take your insulin and increase your compliance. Insulin pens do not eliminate your need to poke yourself with a needle. They simply make measuring and delivering your insulin easier. Insulin pens deliver anywhere from .5 to 80 units of insulin at a time. They can deliver insulin in increments of one-half unit, one unit, or two units. The maximum dose and the incremental amount vary among pens. The amount of total insulin units in the cartridges vary as well. The pens come in two basic forms: disposable and reusable. A disposable insulin pen contains a prefilled cartridge, and the entire pen is thrown away when the cartridge is empty. Reusable pens allow you to replace the insulin cartridge when it’s empty. The insulin pen you use depends on the type of insulin you require, the number of units you typically need per insulin shot, and the available pens for that insulin type. The needles on insulin pens come in different lengths and thicknesses, and most fit on all of the available insulin pens. Talk to your doctor or healthcare provider to decide which pen is best for you. Similar to vials of insulin, insulin pens do not require constant refrigeration once they’ve been opened. Insulin pens only require refrigeration before their first use. After its initial use, simply keep your insulin pen out of direct sunlight and in a room-temperature setting. Insulin pens typically stay good for 7 to 28 days after the initial use, depending on the type of insulin they contain. However, if the expiration da Continue reading >>

Disposable Insulin Cartridge Pen

Disposable Insulin Cartridge Pen

Source: Penjet Inc., A Visionary Medical Products Company (VMPC) The VMPC disposable insulin cartridge pen from Visionary MedicalProducts Corporation can administer from 1 to 70 units with a 300 unit cartridge The VMPC disposable insulin cartridge pen from Visionary MedicalProducts Corporation can administer from 1 to 70 units with a 300 unit cartridge inone unit increments, or from 0.5 to 35 units with a 150 unit cartridge inhalf unit increments. Regardless of the injection amount, the plungermovement is constant at about half an inch. The user can install the cartridge of their choice, since the VMPCdisposable insulin pen can be manufactured in several cartridgeconfigurations. Pens can be manufactured for use with most all of theavailable and soon to be released insulin brands and types, includinginsulin cartridges from Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk and Hoechst (Germany andthe Netherlands only). It uses any of the available insulin pen needles.A new reusable cartridge insulin pen, based on this disposable pen, isunder development by VMPC. The disposable insulin pen recently received notice of patentallowance. Visionary Medical Products Corporation, Phone: 310- 201-0800. Continue reading >>

Cartridge | Diabetes In Pets | Fandom Powered By Wikia

Cartridge | Diabetes In Pets | Fandom Powered By Wikia

A closer look at a PenFill cartridge; this is Novo Nordisk's Novolin 70/30 insulin. Cartridges are sealed plastic containers that hold insulin for refillable insulin pens . Most contain 3ml (300U normally) of insulin. Cartridges are made to fit only certain types of pens; if you have a Novo Nordisk pen, neither Eli Lilly nor Aventis insulin cartridges will fit it. In Europe, 3 ml cartridges may be more commonly sold than vials. Certain Analog , r-DNA/GE/GM , and some CP Pharma bovine and porcine insulins are available in cartridge form. Aventis Lantus is available in Europe in packages of three, versus packages of five available in the U.S. In the US, Levemir , Lantus , and some other brands are available in either cartridge or prefilled pen form. The reason for choosing this format is price. For cats and small dogs who seldom finish an entire 10ml vial, 3ml cartridges are much more economical to try to use up before they expire. Plastic cartridges (at least according to Novo Nordisk) are actually made of glass, and coated with plastic, to avoid interaction between the insulin and the plasticizer chemicals. So essentially they are small vials. Like a vial, you can extract insulin from them using a syringe for its greater dosage precision, though you need to remember an important rule: Don't replace a cartridge in a pen after using a syringe on it. Prefilled disposable Insulin pens such as the Novo Nordisk Flexpen [1] are essentially cartridges too, and may also be used with syringes as above. Again, don't use them as pens after using with a syringe. Lente insulins and PZI insulins of any origin are not available in any types of cartridges because the insulins can't be properly resuspended for use in them. Continue reading >>

Is An Insulin Pen Right For You?

Is An Insulin Pen Right For You?

Thinking About Trying an Insulin Pen? For decades, taking insulin required a syringe and a vial. Another option for taking insulin began about 20 years ago when the first insulin pen hit the market. Insulin pens, which look like oversize ink pens, generally contain 300 units of one type of insulin or a fixed combination of two insulins. The pen is a convenient, accurate, and discreet way to take insulin. The ability to quickly and easily deliver a dose of insulin wherever and whenever you need is the pen's biggest advantage. Also, if you lack dexterity in your fingers, an insulin pen might be easier for you to manage than a vial and syringe. "When a person's health plan will cover pens, I try to prescribe them," says cardiologist Steven Nash, M.D., of Manlius, New York. "I think they're much easier to use than syringes." Insulin pens are also great for traveling because they're small and can be kept at room temperature. "My insulin pen has made taking insulin easier," says Marsha LaClair, 41, of Austin, Texas, who has type 1 diabetes. "I travel frequently, and now packing to manage my diabetes is a breeze." Reusable and Disposable Pens Insulin pens fall into two categories: reusable and disposable. Reusable insulin pens use replaceable cartridges filled with insulin; they usually contain 300 units of insulin each. When the cartridge is empty, or if you've stored your pen and cartridge at room temperature for more than 28 days, the cartridge is discarded and a new one is inserted. The more commonly used disposable pens come prefilled with insulin. When the pen is empty or has been stored at room temperature for more than 28 days, discard the whole pen. However, insulin pens do not come with a needle attached. You need to attach an insulin-pen needle to the end of the pen Continue reading >>

Tandem Diabetes Care Recalls Cartridge Lots: T:slim Insulin Pump

Tandem Diabetes Care Recalls Cartridge Lots: T:slim Insulin Pump

Tandem Diabetes Care Recalls Cartridge Lots: t:slim Insulin Pump List of affected cartridge lot numbers expands Tandem Diabetes Care announced that it is initiating a voluntary recall of specific lots of insulin cartridges that are used with the t:slim Insulin Pump. The affected cartridges may be at risk for leaking. A cartridge leak could potentially result in the device delivering too much or too little insulin, which can lead to a serious adverse event. Affected Lot Numbers Announced January 20, 2014 M000857, M000869, M001344, M001345, M001346, M001347, M001389, M001390, M001391, M001392, M001393, M001414, M001415, M001416, M001417, M001420, M001421, M001422, M001423, M001451, M001452, M001453, M001454, M001455, M001456, M001457, M001458, M001459, M001460, M001528, AffectedLot Numbers Announced January 10, 2014 Shipped from December 17, 2013 to January 10, 2014 M001963, M001964, M001973, M001974, M001979, M001980, M001987, M001988, M001990, M001991, M002027, M002028, M002029, M002030, M002082, M002083, M002096, M002097, Customers should discontinue using cartridges labeled with the affected lots. Customers who received affected cartridges are being contacted by the company or its authorized distributors and asked to call Tandem Technical Support to receive replacement cartridges at no charge. Tandem expects to have sufficient quantities of cartridges to replace affected lots in a timely manner. Tandem Customer Support is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at 1-877-801-6901. Patient Guide to Treating High Cholesterol and Diabetes Diabetic hyperlipidemia sounds a bit intimidating, doesnt it? As we always do here on EndocrineWeb, were going to break down that concept for you, and thats why weve put together this Patient Guide to Treating High Cholesterol and Diabe Continue reading >>

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