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Insulin And Weight Loss Or Weight Gain

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Lose Weight

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Lose Weight

Weight loss is a common recommendation for treatment for type 2 diabetes. Many people are overweight when they’re first diagnosed, and that extra fat actually increases their insulin resistance (when their bodies can’t properly use the hormone insulin). By losing weight, people with type 2 diabetes can become less insulin resistant, and they’re able to use insulin better. (To learn more about how the hormone insulin works, read our article on how insulin regulates blood glucose levels.) If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and you're overweight, you should get started as soon as possible on a weight loss plan. It is important to work with a registered dietitian to help you figure out a plan that will work for you—a healthy meal plan, physical activity, and realistic goals will help you reach a healthy weight. There are many advantages to losing weight (and not just diabetes-related ones): Boost your energy level Lower your cholesterol levels (especially important for people with type 2 diabetes) Protect your heart (also important for people with diabetes, since heart-related complications are very common) Make it easier to control your blood glucose level As you may already know, losing weight can be a challenge, but don’t let that stop you. Do whatever you need to in order to stay motivated. It is the amount of calories we eat that contributes to weight gain. Make small changes. Learn portion sizes and reduce the amount of snacks in your day to reduce the total amount of calories you consume each day. Find cookbooks with healthier recipes using low-fat options. For a little fun, take our carb counting quiz to see how well you know the carb content of certain foods; this can help you make healthier choices. Work with a registered dietitian Continue reading >>

12 Myths About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

12 Myths About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin facts vs. fiction When you hear the word “insulin,” do you picture giant needles (ouch!) or pop culture portrayals of insulin users with low blood sugar (like Julia Roberts losing it in Steel Magnolias)? Either way, most people think of insulin as a difficult, painful, or potentially scary medical treatment. The problem is that if you have type 2 diabetes, you need to know the real deal before you can make an informed choice about whether or not this potentially lifesaving therapy is right for you. Here, we take a look at the facts and fiction about insulin when it comes to treating type 2 diabetes. Diabetics always need insulin Not necessarily. People with type 1 diabetes (about 5% to 10% of diabetics) do need insulin. If you have type 2, which includes 90% to 95% of all people with diabetes, you may not need insulin. Of adults with diabetes, only 14% use insulin, 13% use insulin and oral medication, 57% take oral medication only, and 16% control blood sugar with diet and exercise alone, according to the CDC. The point is to get blood sugar—which can be a highly toxic poison in the body—into the safe zone by any means necessary. Taking insulin means you’ve ‘failed’ “This is a big myth,” says Jill Crandall, MD, professor of clinical medicine and director of the diabetes clinical trial unit at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in the Bronx, N.Y. “Many people who try very hard to adhere to a diet, exercise, and lose weight will still need insulin.” The fact is that type 2 diabetes is a progressive illness, meaning that over time you may need to change what you do to make sure your blood sugar is in a healthy range. Eating right and exercise will always be important, but medication needs can vary. “A large percentage of people with ty Continue reading >>

Insulin And Weight Gain

Insulin And Weight Gain

Q. I am 13 and have had diabetes for seven years and I used to be very big. It wasn't just 'puppy fat', I over eat a lot. At 10 I was very insecure and decided to lose loads of weight. At 12 I was very secure; I looked great and couldn't weight for summer bikinis to come to round it all off. Now I have started excessively eating again, and mum has noticed I am looking 'bigger'. I don't know what to do?! Is it the insulin? What can I do to help this. I really don't want to be upset by the way I look again. A. I do get a lot of queries about whether insulin puts weight on. Insulin does not put the weight on, however, if someone is trying to lose weight it can take longer. From what I understand from reading your question is that you're worried that you're going to start feeling upset about the way you look. This is because you have been feeling good about the way you look previously. You write about eating excessively, so I suppose the first thing to do is to think about that. Now of course you are 13 and that means your body is going to be changing. When you go through adolescence your body is just flooded with a huge amount of hormones. You feel physical changes because of this and you feel emotional changes because of this, also. Physical changes As a teenager you want to look good and fit in with your mates, and I think the trick to looking good is to work with your body and not against it. So if you are thinking about diets to lose weight, the most successful way to do this is start with small steps. Crash diets All the diets you see celebrities doing are crash diets for rapid weight loss. They do this by usually eliminating a food group and this kind of starves the body of what it needs for energy and so the body is forced to break down muscle and fat. The side effe Continue reading >>

Balance These 4 Hormones If You Want To Lose Weight

Balance These 4 Hormones If You Want To Lose Weight

One of the most common questions women ask me as they get older is:“if I’m eating right and exercising, why is it so hard to lose weight?” You may be doing the same things you’ve always done, but suddenly find it’s not enough to stay fit. Even if you know you’re entering perimenopause or menopause, you might not realize that hormonal fluctuations could be playing a part in your weight gain. Your first thought now might be: “can estrogen cause weight gain?” Estrogen dominance can—it’s when you have a disproportionate amount of estrogen in relation to your progesterone. But there are also three other hormones that need to be balanced at any age in order to maintain a healthy weight. Read on to discover the four key hormones that affect your weight—estrogen, cortisol, leptin and insulin—and how to balance them naturally to lose weight and feel great. Your hormones impact so many things—from your mood and energy levels to yes, your weight. Your hormones fluctuate monthly, but also throughout the course of your life as you go from puberty to adulthood and then into menopause. Unfortunately, our hormonal changes don’t get discussed much in the mainstream media. So I want to educate and empower you to know your body and know your hormones. If you have some stubborn weight that just won’t come off, you’ve probably gotten so frustrated that you feel like it’s impossible. But I’m here to empower you and show you that you can lose weight, and you can do it naturally by bringing key hormones into balance. I’ve gotten a lot of great information on hormonal imbalances from Dr. Sara Gottfried. She is a Harvard-trained doctor and hormone expert, and she offers up ways to balance your hormones—whether they’ve become imbalanced due to perimenopau Continue reading >>

The Carbohydrate-insulin Model Of Obesity: Falsified

The Carbohydrate-insulin Model Of Obesity: Falsified

Overview: Carbs, Insulin, Sugar and Obesity This is a topic that clogs up every comment section about weight loss, calories, tracking, IIFYM, flexible dieting, "clean" foods, calorie deficits, energy balance, insulin resistance, metabolisms, and just about anything else nutrition related. Everyone has an opinion. Sadly, Science doesn't care much for opinions. This is a look at the current body of scientific evidence on the topic of insulin, carbohydrates and body weight. This article hopes to highlight: 1: What is the carbohydrate-insulin model of obesity? 2: The evidence that falsifies this model 3: Why low carb diets may still work well for you, and the studies that support them as a useful method for achieving a calorie deficit. Enjoy! The carbohydrate insulin model of obesity makes the following assertions: 1: Carbohydrates raise insulin levels 2: Insulin up regulates fat storage and down regulates fat metabolism. 3: This causes increased body fat This is a widely held belief made popular in books such as: The Case Against Sugar - Taubes Why We Get Fat - Taubes The Diet Delusion - Taubes Fat Chance, the hidden truth about sugar, obesity and disease - Lustig The Obesity Code - Fung It is also the basis for arguments along the lines of: 1: Sugar and carbohydrates are the main drivers of weight gain. 2: People with insulin resistance, PCOS or hormonal imbalances can’t lose weight 3: Eating “clean” unprocessed foods are necessary for weight loss 4: Sugar and white bread are inherently bad for us But is it true? 1: It is scientifically demonstrable that carbohydrates do raise insulin levels 2: It is scientifically demonstrable that insulin is a driver of fat storage and down regulate fat metabolism 3: The notion that increases in insulin directly cause weight gain, Continue reading >>

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

People with diabetes receive mixed messages about weight loss from magazines, newspapers, friends, family, and, yes, even health professionals. Few subjects have accumulated as much misleading and potentially dangerous folklore as the subject of obesity. A common message is that losing weight is just a matter of willpower, and if you have been losing weight and reach a plateau, it's because you've lost your willpower and are no longer following your diet. Furthermore, for people with type 2 diabetes, the message often is that weight loss is the answer to improving glucose control: “If you just lose 20 lb, you won't need insulin.” What does research tell us about these issues, and what should our messages as health professionals be to people with diabetes? Obesity is a serious worldwide problem and is associated with the risk of developing diabetes. Today, more than 1.1 billion adults worldwide are overweight, and 312 million of them are obese.1 In the past 20 years, the rates of obesity have tripled in developing countries that have adopted a Western lifestyle, with the Middle East, Pacific Islands, Southeast Asia, India, and China facing the greatest increase. Consequently, the number of people with diabetes in these countries is expected to increase from 84 million in 2000 to 228 million by 2030. Thus, preventing obesity is a high priority for the prevention of diabetes and other chronic diseases. According to some obesity researchers, it may not be possible to decrease the current numbers of overweight and obese people in the United States, but we need to try to slow or prevent the increase that has been occurring at an alarming rate.2 The hope is that slowing the rising prevalence of obesity will also slow the diabetes epidemic. Can this be accomplished? Thus fa Continue reading >>

Weight Gain And Insulin Therapy

Weight Gain And Insulin Therapy

over 80% of type 2 diabetics are overweight - insulin therapy often exacerbates this problem (1) in the UKPDS (2) - weight gain was highest in insulin-treated patients - the amount of weight gain correlated directly with mean serum insulin levels in type 1 diabetes patients are often underweight at diagnosis - it is often assumed that weight gain associated with insulin treatment represents normalisation of body weight but: evidence from DCCT revealed that weight gain is greater with intensive treatment (3); weight gain may proceed to levels that are beyond ideal weight (1) weight gain is known to adversely affect cardiovascular risk (1) Why does insulin treatment promote weight gain? Various mechanisms have been described: calorie conservation - insulin therapy can, in some cases, restore blood glucose levels to below the renal threshold for glucose excretion - leading to an improved conservation of ingested calories (1) compensation for hypoglycaemia or ‘defensive snacking’ - this is a widely accepted theory although difficult to prove (1) deranged pharmacodynamic and metabolic profile insulin treatment regimens do not perfectly recreate normal physiological’ insulin secretion profiles - there are often show considerable day-to-day variations the unpredictability of insulin could result in hypoglycaemic episodes and may affect compliance and promote weight gain through ‘defensive snacking’ (1) endogenous insulin is secreted into the portal circulation. This contrasts with subcutaneous insulin which circulates systemically before reaching the liver therefore in insulin therapy via the sc route, the liver is ‘underinsulinised’ and the periphery ‘over insulinsed’ (and hence exposing the systemic circulation to increased metabolic effects associated with Continue reading >>

Insulin-associated Weight Gain In Diabetes--causes, Effects And Coping Strategies.

Insulin-associated Weight Gain In Diabetes--causes, Effects And Coping Strategies.

Abstract Insulin therapy or intensification of insulin therapy commonly results in weight gain in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This weight gain can be excessive, adversely affecting cardiovascular risk profile. The spectre of weight gain can increase diabetic morbidity and mortality when it acts as a psychological barrier to the initiation or intensification of insulin, or affects adherence with prescribed regimens. Insulin-associated weight gain may result from a reduction of blood glucose to levels below the renal threshold without a compensatory reduction in calorie intake, a defensive or unconscious increase in calorie intake caused by the fear or experience of hypoglycaemia, or the 'unphysiological' pharmacokinetic and metabolic profiles that follow subcutaneous administration. There is, however, scope for limiting insulin-associated weight gain. Strategies include limiting dose by increasing insulin sensitivity through diet and exercise or by using adjunctive anorectic or insulin-sparing pharmacotherapies such as pramlintide or metformin. Insulin replacement regimens that attempt to mimic physiological norms should also enable insulin to be dosed with maximum efficiency. The novel acylated analogue, insulin detemir, appears to lack the usual propensity for causing weight gain. Elucidation of the pharmacological mechanisms underlying this property might help clarify the mechanisms linking insulin with weight regulation. Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance And Weight Gain

Insulin Resistance And Weight Gain

Hormones are powerful and you should not take them lightly. Several hormones may either speed-up or impede your weight loss success. Insulin is one such hormone. Resistance to insulin causes diabetes and weight gain. Escaping insulin resistance can give you control over your blood sugar and your weight too! What is Insulin? But, what is insulin? What does it do? Insulin is a hormone released by your pancreas - an organ in your abdomen. When you eat, your body senses that and signals your pancreas to release insulin. Your body releases insulin in response to glucose, amino acids and fats in your meals (1-3). But, its secretion is highest when you eat sugary foods. What Does Insulin Do? After its release, insulin assists the entry of glucose from your food into your body cells. Think of insulin as a key that unlocks the door for glucose to enter into your body cells. When your system gets loaded with glucose, it causes a shift in your metabolism. It slows down the breakdown of fat. More importantly, it starts the synthesis of new fat. Insulin redirects excess glucose into fat cells and triggers ‘adipogenesis’- synthesis of fat (4-7). No wonder sugary stuff is so fattening! Insulin Sensitivity vs. Insulin Resistance Insulin sensitivity is the term for how your body responds to insulin. If your body is ‘sensitive’ to insulin, it means everything is on the right track. The key is turning the locks just fine and there is no need to worry. But, things become different when ‘resistance’ replaces ‘sensitivity’. When you become resistant to insulin, it means the key is not turning the locks the way it is supposed to. Glucose is not entering into the cells and fat synthesis is on the rise (8). Insulin Resistance - Cause or Consequence? The link between insulin resi Continue reading >>

Why Do I Find It So Hard To Lose Weight?

Why Do I Find It So Hard To Lose Weight?

There are lots of myths about weight gain, weight loss and dieting, but the most damaging is that it’s all about willpower. “If only I had a stronger willpower”, people say to themselves, “I would eat more healthily and become slim again”. If you believe that then you will also believe that if you are fat then it is all your own fault. So, you go on a diet and when it fails (which many do) then naturally you blame yourself. You get depressed, gorge on carbs and give up. The fact is that experts who work in weight loss management are well aware that weight loss is about far more than simply trying to eat fewer calories. Most overweight people have a metabolic problem, one that makes them hungry all the time. The normal feedback mechanisms that tell you that you are full no longer work. Willpower fails because you are up against one of the most basic drives we have, hunger. This metabolic problem will not only stop you losing weight, it will also lead to serious health problems such as high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes. Unless you do something about it this is a problem that will get worse over time. Once you solve the metabolic problem (and the good news is that it can be solved) your appetite will shrink and you will find it not only easier to lose weight but to keep it off. It starts with developing Insulin resistance At the heart of weight gain is the hormone, insulin. One of the main reasons why so many people struggle to lose weight is not because they are idle or greedy but because their muscles have become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by your pancreas. It controls your blood sugar levels, but it does far more than that. It also controls fat storage. When you eat a meal, particularly one that is rich in sugary carbs, y Continue reading >>

Insulin And Weight Gain

Insulin And Weight Gain

Tweet In many people taking insulin, a common side effect is weight gain. Insulin can cause people to gain weight for several reasons. For example, insulin reduces the removal of glucose (sugar) from the body, and this excess glucose is stored as fat. However, taking insulin does not automatically mean you will gain weight. If you are taking insulin and notice that you are gaining weight, you may be able to control your weight with proper diet and exercise. Weight gain is one of the most frustrating and seemingly unfair side effects of insulin. While many people gain weight while taking insulin, there are ways to help prevent or reduce the weight gain that often comes with insulin use. Why Does Insulin Cause Weight Gain? There are a few different reasons why insulin causes weight gain. Probably, the most significant reason is that insulin reduces the removal of glucose (sugar) through the urine. With uncontrolled diabetes, the body cannot use (or store) glucose properly, and glucose is lost through the urine. This means that you can consume more calories than you need, and your body cannot use it or store it as fat as well as normal. As soon as you correct the situation with insulin, all of a sudden, your body can access the glucose in the blood. Any excess glucose is not lost through the urine; it is stored as fat. In this sense, insulin is not really causing the weight gain; it is simply correcting the problem (high diabetes) that once allowed you to eat more than you needed. Secondly, insulin can cause episodes of low blood sugar levels. These episodes are very frightening. People who have experienced low blood sugar episodes due to insulin may be more likely to overeat in order to avoid future episodes. This overeating can lead to weight gain. Thirdly, some people f Continue reading >>

Should I Worry About Weight Gain With Insulin?

Should I Worry About Weight Gain With Insulin?

I am almost 20 years old, have had type 1 diabetes for eight years, and use insulin glargine (Lantus). Should I try to lower the need for insulin to prevent weight gain? I haven't been gaining weight, but I am concerned that I'll get into a cycle of increased insulin dosages and weight gain. Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Difficult For Women With Insulin Resistance

Weight Loss Difficult For Women With Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance is not a very common topic of discussion when it comes to women and their weight loss. In fact, most women have never heard of the term and don’t even realize that insulin resistance is probably one of the biggest causes of their weight loss frustration. As one of the top physicians in the field of bariatrics—the study of medical weight management—Dr. Caroline Cederquist knows just how significant of a hurdle insulin resistance in women can be. Many women who suffer from insulin resistance don’t even know they have it until they are tested for it. “Ninety percent of the people in my medical practice are insulin resistant. In this case, the body makes the hormone insulin, but it doesn’t work properly within cells,” says Dr. Caroline Cederquist. “The insulin receptors on these cells don’t open up properly. This prevents glucose from turning into stored energy, and as result, our cells become starved.” People who suffer from insulin resistance have a hard time losing weight because their cells are constantly producing more insulin, but their cells aren’t turning that insulin into needed nutrients and energy. This over-production of insulin can make it difficult to lose weight, and can lead to health problems, like diabetes. For many women, genes can play a factor when it comes to insulin resistance. In many cases, insulin resistance develops due to genetic influences, increased weight gain, or both. If your parents were insulin resistant, the more likely you are to get insulin resistance at a younger age, especially if they suffered from health conditions, like diabetes. Dr. Cederquist explains what insulin resistance is, and why the condition makes it so difficult for women to lose weight: As a woman, one of the best things you can Continue reading >>

How To Turn Off Your Weight Gain Hormones

How To Turn Off Your Weight Gain Hormones

From the book The Hormone Reset Diet: Balance your Hormones and Lose up to 15 pounds in just 3 weeks! by Sara Gottfried. Copyright © 2015 by Sara Gottfried. Reprinted by permission of HarperOne, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers. Here's a mind-bender: Being overweight often has nothing to do with calories or exercise. For a huge number of us, the problem is instead about misfiring hormones. Research is still catching up with this paradigm shift, which has yet to be comprehensively studied. But seeing how this revelation has helped my patients (and me) slim down and feel better gives me confidence that it's true for most women who are trying to lose weight and can't. (In as little as 30 days, you can be a whole lot slimmer, way more energetic, and so much healthier just by following the simple, groundbreaking plan in The Thyroid Cure!) You already know about some weight-affecting hormone issues, like thyroid and insulin imbalances. But other, more subtle ones could also be keeping you from the body you want. Biology class, anyone? comp-3794809-leptin-stockfood.jpg Too Much Leptin Swells Your Appetite I think of leptin as the hormone that says, "Darling, put down the fork." Under normal circumstances, it's released from your fat cells and travels in the blood to your brain, where it signals that you're full. But leptin's noble cause has been impeded by our consumption of a type of sugar called fructose, found in fruit and processed foods alike. When you eat small amounts of fructose, you're OK. But if you eat more than the recommended 5 daily servings of fruit (which in recent decades has been bred to contain more fructose than it used to) plus processed foods with added sugar, your liver can't deal with the fructose fast enough to use it as fuel. Instead, your body Continue reading >>

How Sleep Apnea And Weight Gain Are Related (updated)

How Sleep Apnea And Weight Gain Are Related (updated)

Dr. Doni, author of The Stress Remedy, discusses how weight gain and sleep apnea can disrupt your sleep and offers advice on how to address both issues. In the introduction to this series, I gave an overview of 12 things that can disrupt our sleep. I’ve talked about each of the first five reasons sleep can be disrupted and given tips on how to address them. To read the series from the beginning, click here. This week, it is time to consider how weight gain and sleep apnea (when you stop breathing for brief periods of time while sleeping) may be affecting your sleep, and how getting enough sleep can help you lose weight. In this article I will give you tips that can help you prevent weight gain, and plan for weight loss. Why insomnia makes us fat Studies reveal that when we don’t sleep, our hormones become imbalanced, specifically the hormones that manage hunger, appetite (leptin and ghrelin), and blood sugar (insulin) 1. This means that when you don’t get enough sleep you are more likely to feel hungry, which leads you to eat more (especially filling carbohydrates). And, because your insulin levels are also disrupted and therefore less able to manage the extra carbs and resulting sugars, you are more likely to gain weight – which, in turn, makes inflammation and diabetes more likely2,3. You can read more about blood sugar and sleep here. Cortisol is another key hormone that makes weight gain more likely when you don’t sleep. Cortisol levels are elevated at night in people who don’t sleep and that increase is associated with decreased insulin function and increased weight gain4. Read more about cortisol and sleep here. So, insomnia leads to weight gain, but at the same time weight gain makes it harder to get a good night’s sleep. Additionally, weight gain i Continue reading >>

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