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Insulin And Weight Loss Or Weight Gain

Hormones, Weight Gain, And Infertility

Hormones, Weight Gain, And Infertility

Dr. Laura Lefkowitz received her M.D. with honors in OBGYN, Psychiatry, Internal Medicine, and Radiology, before switching gears and transitioning into nutritional science. “The long hours of medical school and residency, limited time for exercise, and hospital food led me to gain 30 pounds in my 20’s,” she explains. “One day when my pants split open while examining a patient I realized I was an unhealthy doctor—doctors are supposed to be role models for our patients and I was ashamed.” Lefkowitz opened her own practice in downtown Manhattan in 2007, where she developed individualized nutritional therapy protocols for everyone from new moms, to supermodels, to those on the brink of devastating health effects from poor eating habits. “I believed it was my calling to prevent and reverse disease progression by teaching patients how to eat properly in conjunction with lifestyle modifications such as exercise and sleep hygiene,” she explains. In the process, she’s helped many people who simply can’t lose weight through traditional means—and has come up with highly specific eating plans for treating little-known conditions like Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS). We heard about her results, and had to learn more. Now living in Florida, Lefkowitz treats patients via Skype. Q What do you help people with the most? A I like to call myself the “nutrition chameleon” because I work in a lot of different areas of adult, prenatal, and infant nutrition, but I have a niche in treating women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS), a hormonal imbalance. Q As we age, it seems like our thyroids and hormone levels can cause pretty dramatic shifts in weight—is that something that you see and treat a lot? A Yes. Hormones don’t work individually; they work as a c Continue reading >>

Chen Ben Asher – Functional Nutrition – Silicon Valley – Insulin Resistance And Your Weight Gain

Chen Ben Asher – Functional Nutrition – Silicon Valley – Insulin Resistance And Your Weight Gain

There can be different reasons why people gain weight. Sometimes it is a natural process, but sometimes it is a part of more serious processes. Nowadays more and more people develop insulin resistance that is a cause of diabetes and other health and metabolism problems. People should be aware of the seriousness of it and ways how to avoid it. There can be different signs that can indicate that you might be insulin resistant. One of the most noticeable is additional fat around the waist. An obesity medicine physician specializing in the medical management of obesity and insulin resistance and other specialists might be helpful to determine and treat the cause. Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas. Its main function is to control the blood sugars and fat cell metabolism.[1] Get expert advice about insulin connection to a weight gain from a functional nutritionist by clicking HERE! Insulin resistance itself is “a condition wherein cellular receptors become less sensitive to insulin, causing an inability for glucose to enter the cell and glucose buildup in the bloodstream.”[2] It can lead to prediabetic elevation of glucose that is in the blood and at the end to type 2 diabetes. In the US now it is the 7th leading cause of death.[3] The excess glucose is stored as fat. Fat tissue as endocrine organ promotes insulin resistance through releasing hormones and cytokines. This can also lead to different heart and intestinal problems. Lifestyle modifications primary focus on weight loss and reduction in serum lipids. To achieve that, one should avoid fat. Previously in medicine and people’s opinions, there have been different myths like the one that dietary fat promotes weight gain and cardiovascular risk. Due to this reason, a lot of people choose to use “low-fa Continue reading >>

​in Study, Skipping Meals Is Linked To Abdominal Weight Gain

​in Study, Skipping Meals Is Linked To Abdominal Weight Gain

COLUMBUS, Ohio – A new study in animals suggests that skipping meals sets off a series of metabolic miscues that can result in abdominal weight gain. In the study, mice that ate all of their food as a single meal and fasted the rest of the day developed insulin resistance in their livers – which scientists consider a telltale sign of prediabetes. When the liver doesn’t respond to insulin signals telling it to stop producing glucose, that extra sugar in the blood is stored as fat. These mice initially were put on a restricted diet and lost weight compared to controls that had unlimited access to food. The restricted-diet mice regained weight as calories were added back into their diets and nearly caught up to controls by the study’s end. But fat around their middles – the equivalent to human belly fat – weighed more in the restricted-diet mice than in mice that were free to nibble all day long. An excess of that kind of fat is associated with insulin resistance and risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. “This does support the notion that small meals throughout the day can be helpful for weight loss, though that may not be practical for many people,” said Martha Belury, professor of human nutrition at The Ohio State University and senior author of the study. “But you definitely don’t want to skip meals to save calories because it sets your body up for larger fluctuations in insulin and glucose and could be setting you up for more fat gain instead of fat loss.” The research is published online in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. Belury and colleagues were able to tie these findings to the human tendency to skip meals because of the behavior they expected to see – based on previous work – in the mice on restricted diets. For three days Continue reading >>

How Sleep Apnea And Weight Gain Are Related (updated)

How Sleep Apnea And Weight Gain Are Related (updated)

Dr. Doni, author of The Stress Remedy, discusses how weight gain and sleep apnea can disrupt your sleep and offers advice on how to address both issues. In the introduction to this series, I gave an overview of 12 things that can disrupt our sleep. I’ve talked about each of the first five reasons sleep can be disrupted and given tips on how to address them. To read the series from the beginning, click here. This week, it is time to consider how weight gain and sleep apnea (when you stop breathing for brief periods of time while sleeping) may be affecting your sleep, and how getting enough sleep can help you lose weight. In this article I will give you tips that can help you prevent weight gain, and plan for weight loss. Why insomnia makes us fat Studies reveal that when we don’t sleep, our hormones become imbalanced, specifically the hormones that manage hunger, appetite (leptin and ghrelin), and blood sugar (insulin) 1. This means that when you don’t get enough sleep you are more likely to feel hungry, which leads you to eat more (especially filling carbohydrates). And, because your insulin levels are also disrupted and therefore less able to manage the extra carbs and resulting sugars, you are more likely to gain weight – which, in turn, makes inflammation and diabetes more likely2,3. You can read more about blood sugar and sleep here. Cortisol is another key hormone that makes weight gain more likely when you don’t sleep. Cortisol levels are elevated at night in people who don’t sleep and that increase is associated with decreased insulin function and increased weight gain4. Read more about cortisol and sleep here. So, insomnia leads to weight gain, but at the same time weight gain makes it harder to get a good night’s sleep. Additionally, weight gain i Continue reading >>

Diabulimia: The Dangerous Way Diabetics Drop Pounds

Diabulimia: The Dangerous Way Diabetics Drop Pounds

At age 14, Erin Williams was tired of medicine. Williams was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic at age 11, and after three years of enduring a never-ending regimen of insulin shots and strict diet restrictions, she was frustrated. Embarrassed by her disease, she kept it a secret from everyone but her closest family and friends. At birthday parties, she made up excuses about why she couldn't have soda or cake. When a classmate saw her drinking juice boxes in the nurses office, she endured weeks of being called the "juice box thief" rather than just tell her classmates she had low blood sugar because of diabetes. Eventually, Williams rebelled the only way she could, she decided not take her insulin. She just didn't want to adhere to the strict diet and medical regimen even though it was vital to her health. "It wasn't this dramatic moment," recalled Williams. "It was mostly like I want to be like everybody else." The next morning when Williams woke up, she felt fine. "Well, nothing bad happened to me," Williams remembered thinking. "It creeps up on you. That's how it does it." Emboldened by her experiment, she continued to restrict her insulin. Without a regimented amount of insulin in her body to process glucose, Williams' body started to burn through fat and muscle. She lost weight very quickly even as she ate all the same foods. Classmates started commenting on her weight loss and remarked that she looked great. "You hear all these things and you're like, 'This is the greatest thing in the world,'" said Williams. "It takes a hold of your life like nothing else." After living with type 1 diabetes for three years, Williams was exhibiting the first signs of a disorder often called diabulimia. The term refers to the dual diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and an eating disorder. Man Continue reading >>

Does Insulin Cause Weight Gain?

Does Insulin Cause Weight Gain?

Q: I've had type 2 diabetes for nine years and take Novolin and Novolog insulins. Does insulin cause weight gain? If so, why? A: Some people experience weight gain when they first start taking insulin. This happens for several reasons. First, when blood glucose levels are high, your body is literally wasting the calories you eat because there's no insulin to help the body convert the food into glucose. When your blood glucose gets into better control with insulin, your body makes better use of the food you eat. Second, due high blood glucose levels, you may be a bit dehydrated. Third, and perhaps most important, insulin can make blood glucose too low if it's not adjusted correctly. If you're repeatedly treating hypoglycemia with food, this can result in excess calories and weight gain. Work with your health-care provider to adjust your insulin doses to minimize hypoglycemia. Learn to treat occasional low blood glucose levels with glucose tablets rather than food; it's easier to control the amount of calories you eat. If your weight gain is out of control, ask for a referral to a registered dietitian for assistance. Madhu Gadia, M.S., R.D., is a certified diabetes educator. Continue reading >>

Can Stevia Hurt Insulin Sensitivity And Lead To Weight Gain?

Can Stevia Hurt Insulin Sensitivity And Lead To Weight Gain?

One staple in natural, sugar-free baking is stevia, a South American herb used as an alternative to refined sugar. Since stevia extract is free from carbohydrates, it does not raise blood sugar levels (or calories, unless fillers are added, like dextrose or maltodextrin). Stevia does, however, raise insulin levels according to some research, which can be both good and bad. A reason why I stay away from sugar is because it raises both blood sugar and insulin. Over time, spikes in blood sugar can cause chronic inflammation, a key contributor to aging, cancer, and even metabolic syndrome. High blood sugar and insulin levels also cause insulin resistance, or type 2 diabetes. While our cells prefer glucose as a prime energy source, if cell receptors are not–well, receptive–to insulin, the glucose just floats around and causes damage. Can Stevia Lead to Diabetes and Weight Gain? It seems that our bodies have a knack for responding to any sweet taste by secreting insulin. Whether the sweet taste be from pure sugar, artificial sweeteners, or natural sweeteners like stevia, the body provides similar insulin responses. This happens when a receptor on our tongue, namely T1R3, is stimulated by a sweet taste (natural or artificial), which then stimulates insulin to bring the “proposed” glucose into the cells. But if there is no measurable rise in blood glucose, like after drinking a tea sweetened with steviaor artificial sweetener, the insulin will store any excess sugar in the body as fat. This may be a reason why diet sodas have been linked to weight gain. It is proposed that our ancestors, when confronted with a carbohydrate source like berries or fruits, would consume them quickly and sometimes in one sitting because they didn’t come across these carbohydrate sources o Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Insulin-related Weight Gain

How To Avoid Insulin-related Weight Gain

Managing diabetes sometimes requires insulin treatment, which may lead to weight gain. Find out why and learn how to manage your weight while using insulin. When diet, exercise, and oral diabetes medications aren't enough to control diabetes, adding insulin can help get your blood sugar under control. Although insulin is an important part of diabetes treatment, some people may have an issue with weight gain after starting on it. If insulin has been prescribed as part of your treatment plan, you may need to pay extra attention to your weight management efforts in addition to blood sugar management. "Insulin weight gain is a well-known problem and concern for people with type 2 diabetes," says Amber L. Taylor, MD, an endocrinologist who directs the Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. "This is problematic because weight gain can make managing diabetes more difficult." Why Is Weight Gain an Insulin Side Effect? A study published in the journal Clinical Medicine Insights: Endocrinology and Diabetes focused on 102 people with type 2 diabetes who had recently started taking insulin. After the first year of insulin therapy, both men and women in the study had increased their body weight by about 2.5 percent. The science behind why this happens is clear. When you’re not managing diabetes well, your body can't use the glucose (sugar) from your food for energy. That means the sugar builds up in your blood, which can lead to diabetes complications. You may feel hungry because you’re not getting enough energy, and thirsty because your body is trying to flush all that sugar out of your bloodstream. Here’s what happens when you add insulin: Insulin helps the sugar in your blood to be absorbed by your cells, where it's used and stored for energy. Because you’r Continue reading >>

Can High Blood Pressure Make You Fat? Does Insulin Cause Weight Gain?

Can High Blood Pressure Make You Fat? Does Insulin Cause Weight Gain?

Is high blood pressure linked to not being able to lose weight? Does insulin cause weight gain? Yes, researchers say that lowering blood pressure can help you lose weight successfully. Certainly, hypertension is one of the symptoms of insulin resistance, causing insulin weight gain! But before you go to your doctor for some pills.... You will, instead, want to know about supplements and foods that lower blood pressure to help get rid of belly fat. Why? High blood pressure increases the chances of a heart attack and especially of a stroke, so your doctor will want you to lose weight and be on the meds. But there's a catch... Researchers have NOT been able to show that taking drugs for hypertension prevents heart failure: "Despite reductions in heart attacks and improved control of blood pressure, the prevalence of heart failure does not seem to be falling and may be rising." (British Medical Journal, The Lancet) To avoid serious side effects of high blood pressure medication, it is best to solve hypertension naturally. Here we've posted research to help you out with foods and supplements -- how to lower blood pressure AND lose weight naturally! We have posted lots of diet changes for the long run! And if in the short run need extra help.... For lower blood pressure and reducing the causes of insulin weight gain, consider a supplement based on a Nobel Prize winning discovery. Meet the health guardian, Dr. Harry Elwardt, whose mission is to end heart disease, stroke! His formula can help naturally bring down blood pressure by relaxing the blood vessels: See Dr. Harry's Formula: l arginine supplement with minerals & vitamins for high blood pressure Why Not Just Meds for High Blood Pressure? Nutrition experts Nikki and David Goldbeck point to a reason why reducing blood pres Continue reading >>

Enhanced Insulin Sensitivity In Successful, Long-term Weight Loss Maintainers Compared With Matched Controls With No Weight Loss History

Enhanced Insulin Sensitivity In Successful, Long-term Weight Loss Maintainers Compared With Matched Controls With No Weight Loss History

Weight gain is associated with deterioration in metabolic health, whereas weight loss improves insulin sensitivity. This study assesses the impact of long-term, successfully maintained weight loss and weight-loss relapse on measures of insulin sensitivity and identifies factors that explain variability in insulin sensitivity. Women (20–45 years) were recruited into four groups: reduced-overweight/obese (RED, n=15); body mass index (BMI)-matched controls (stable low-weight, n=19), BMI⩽27 kg m−2; relapsed-overweight/obese subjects (REL, n=11); and BMI-matched controls (obese stable weight, n=11), BMI⩾27 kg m−2. A 75 g oral glucose tolerance test determined fasting and 2 h plasma glucose and insulin. Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA-IR) and insulin sensitivity index (ISI(0,120)) assessed insulin sensitivity. Anthropometric measurements, fasting resting metabolic rate (RMR) and respiratory quotient (RQ) were measured. Questionnaires and dietary intake were recorded, and physical activity was measured using accelerometers. RED were more insulin sensitive, characterised by lower fasting (P=0.001) and 2 h insulin (P=0.003) levels compared with all other groups. There were no significant differences in dietary intake, sedentary, light and moderate activity, RMR or RQ in the RED compared with the other three groups. % Body weight (BW) lost (P<0.001), % BW regained (P<0.05), body fat %, light activity (P<0.05, only log HOMA), vigorous activity (P<0.05) and RQ (P<0.01) predicted 61.4% and 59.7% of variability in log HOMA and log ISI(0,120), respectively, in multiple linear regression models. This study showed sustained enhanced insulin sensitivity in successful weight loss maintainers compared with BMI-matched controls with no weight loss history. Weight-loss-relapsed Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

Consumption Of Clarified Grapefruit Juice Ameliorates High-fat Diet Induced Insulin Resistance And Weight Gain In Mice

Consumption Of Clarified Grapefruit Juice Ameliorates High-fat Diet Induced Insulin Resistance And Weight Gain In Mice

Abstract To determine the metabolic effects of grapefruit juice consumption we established a model in which C57Bl/6 mice drank 25–50% sweetened GFJ, clarified of larger insoluble particles by centrifugation (cGFJ), ad libitum as their sole source of liquid or isocaloric and sweetened water. cGFJ and control groups consumed similar amounts of liquids and calories. Mice fed a high-fat diet and cGFJ experienced a 18.4% decrease in weight, a 13–17% decrease in fasting blood glucose, a three-fold decrease in fasting serum insulin, and a 38% decrease in liver triacylglycerol values, compared to controls. Mice fed a low-fat diet that drank cGFJ experienced a two-fold decrease in fasting insulin, but not the other outcomes observed with the high-fat diet. cGFJ consumption decreased blood glucose to a similar extent as the commonly used anti-diabetic drug metformin. Introduction of cGFJ after onset of diet-induced obesity also reduced weight and blood glucose. A bioactive compound in cGFJ, naringin, reduced blood glucose and improved insulin tolerance, but did not ameliorate weight gain. These data from a well-controlled animal study indicate that GFJ contains more than one health-promoting neutraceutical, and warrant further studies of GFJ effects in the context of obesity and/or the western diet. Figures Citation: Chudnovskiy R, Thompson A, Tharp K, Hellerstein M, Napoli JL, Stahl A (2014) Consumption of Clarified Grapefruit Juice Ameliorates High-Fat Diet Induced Insulin Resistance and Weight Gain in Mice. PLoS ONE 9(10): e108408. Editor: Makoto Makishima, Nihon University School of Medicine, Japan Received: November 6, 2013; Accepted: August 20, 2014; Published: October 8, 2014 Copyright: © 2014 Chudnovskiy et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the ter Continue reading >>

Why Can’t I Lose Weight?

Why Can’t I Lose Weight?

Finding Your Trouble Spots You’re trying hard to lose weight. You’ve changed your eating habits, and you’ve been doing more physical activity than you used to. But a few weeks — or even a few months — have gone by, and the scale isn’t budging. “Why?!” you ask in frustration. “What am I doing wrong?!” Body weight is regulated mainly by the number of calories consumed and the number of calories burned off. But there are a number of other things that influence weight, and some of them can make it difficult to lose weight. This article explores what some of these are and how to overcome them. As you make the effort to lose weight, be sure you are aiming for a realistic body weight for you. A starting point for determining this is body-mass index (BMI), a measure of body fat based on height and weight. You can calculate your BMI easily with an online tool such as the one at www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi. (Note that there’s a separate BMI calculator for children and teens.) Generally, a BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 is considered normal, between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight, and 30 and higher is considered obese. However, BMI tends to overestimate body fat in athletes and other muscular people and to underestimate it in older people who have lost muscle mass. There is also some evidence that the negative health effects of overweight start at a lower BMI for Asian people. Keep in mind, too, that people come in different shapes and sizes. You don’t necessarily have to be “thin” to be healthy, but losing some excess fat can improve your health in a number of ways. Talk to your health-care team about your weight-loss goals and about what a healthy weight is for you. Frequent hypoglycemia Frequent episodes of hypoglycemia, or low blood glu Continue reading >>

Nutrition Journalist Gary Taubes On Weight Gain And Loss

Nutrition Journalist Gary Taubes On Weight Gain And Loss

Two weeks ago I watched the Fat Summit 2 hosted by Dr. Mark Hyman. While the online conference is over, perhaps if you register you will get notified of future conferences. I have a true thirst, or perhaps I should say, appetite, for learning how food works in our body. What causes weight gain and loss. Neither of these things is what you expect. The actual break down and metabolism of how our body uses nutrients and stores food may surprise you. Hyman and his co-host, Carrie Diulus, an orthopedic M.D. who has type 1 diabetes, interviewed about 30 M.D.s, researchers, scientists and functional doctors to stop the demonization of fat and shed light on the fact that it’s simple carbs and sugar that play a larger role in causing damage and disease. Nutrition journalist, Gary Taubes, author of Why We Get Fat and Good Calories, Bad Calories, and numerous articles, has researched this field for years. Early next year his new book, ‘The Case Against Sugar,’ will be published. It’s a look at our food industry historically, politically and economically. In a nutshell, Taubes says metabolically we gain weight from too much insulin circulating in our blood stream. (Most people with type 2 diabetes who are on insulin can affirm this. If you eat the American diet with lots of carb, you raise your blood sugar. So your body pumps out more insulin or you have to inject lots of insulin. Voila, the pounds roll on.) Insulin causes weight gain. If you remember nothing after reading this complex process I’ve tried to reconstruct from Taubes’ explanation, you can just recall what fellow nutrition journalist, Nina Teicholz, said during the conference, “That bacon you eat isn’t going to turn into fat on your body, but that bagel will!” How Fat Calories & How Sugar Calories Wor Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners Are Linked To Weight Gain—not Weight Loss

Artificial Sweeteners Are Linked To Weight Gain—not Weight Loss

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. Artificial sweeteners might seem like a low- or no-calorie way to enjoy sweet food and not gain weight. But a new study links them to the opposite. In the report, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, researchers analyzed 37 studies on artificial sweeteners to see if they were successful for weight management. The studies followed more than 400,000 people for about 10 years. Seven of the studies were randomized controlled trials, a type considered to be the gold standard in scientific research. Artificial sweeteners did not appear to help people lose weight. Instead, observational studies that looked at consumption over time suggested that people who regularly consumed them—by drinking one or more artificially-sweetened beverages a day—had a higher risk for health issues like weight gain, obesity, diabetes and heart disease. MORE: Artificial Sweeteners Aren’t the Answer to Obesity. Here’s Why “I think there’s an assumption that when there are zero calories, there is zero harm,” says study author Meghan Azad, an assistant professor in the department of pediatrics and child health at the University of Manitoba in Canada. “This research has made me appreciate that there’s more to it than calories alone.” The new study adds to a growing body of research that suggests sugar substitutes are no magic bullet. “Unfortunately, the quality of evidence that would support using sweeteners is not really strong,” says Susan Swithers, a professor in the department of psychological studies at Purdue University who has also studied artificial sweeteners (but was not involved in the new study). “I think we are at a place where we can say that they don’t help.” It’s not yet clear whether artificial sw Continue reading >>

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