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Insulin Allergy Symptoms

Insulin Side Effects

Insulin Side Effects

Tweet If you have recently been prescribed insulin, or have switched to a new type of insulin, you may be concerned about the side effects. You might also be experiencing side effects and not know where they are coming from. Similarly, you may be looking for information for a friend or family member. What are the side effects of insulin? Insulin side effects amongst diabetics are rare, but when they do occur, allergic reactions can be severe and can pose a significant risk to health. What do I do if I have an adverse reaction to my insulin? If you experience mild allergic reactions such as swelling, itching or redness around the injection site, experts advise diabetics to consult their GPs. Similarly, sustained nausea and vomiting are signs of insulin allergy. How do I know if my insulin is working? When taking insulin, diabetics are advised by experts to regularly check blood glucose levels using testing kits. If blood glucose tests show fluctuating or above-average blood sugar levels, diabetes is not being properly controlled and insulin is not working. Avoiding infection when taking insulin When taking insulin, try to avoid infection by using disposable needles and syringes, and sterilising any reusable equipment. Do some drugs interact with insulin? Some drugs are known to interact with insulin, and diabetics should be aware of this list. Your GP or physician should provide detailed information of how any extra drug affects insulin. Some medications that are known to influence insulin are shown below, but diabetics should consult their GP for further information: Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insuli Continue reading >>

What Are The Signs Of An Allergic Reaction To Insulin?

What Are The Signs Of An Allergic Reaction To Insulin?

The most common signs of an allergic reaction to insulin will appear at the injection site soon after the insulin shot is administered. Symptoms of an allergic reaction include swelling, redness, itching and a burning sensation. In people who have an allergic reaction, the insulin usually does not work as well as it should. Less than 1% of people are allergic to insulin. If you suspect that you are allergic to your insulin, talk to your doctor. Most likely you’re having a reaction to a preservative in the insulin and not the insulin itself, so trying another brand of insulin may relieve your symptoms. In some cases, you may need to take an oral antihistamine or have a steroid added to your insulin injection. Signs of a local allergic reaction to insulin are: • dents under the skin at injection sites • redness at injection sites, either persistent or temporary • groups of small bumps, similar to hives • swelling at injection sites If you think you may be experiencing an allergic reaction to your insulin preparation, talk to your provider. Continue Learning about Insulin Videos Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs. Continue reading >>

The Side Effects Of Insulin In Dogs

The Side Effects Of Insulin In Dogs

Diabetes mellitus develops when your dog's body loses its ability to produce insulin on its own. Insulin therapy, administered through injections underneath your dog's skin, is widely used to help your diabetic dog regulate its blood glucose. As essential as insulin is to a diabetic dog, it carries with it a number of side effects. These side effects are potentially life-threatening and should be reported to a veterinarian immediately. Food is broken down by your dog's body into separate organic compounds; glucose is one of these. Glucose, an energy source for movement, growth and other functions, needs the hormone insulin to transfer from the bloodstream into individual cells. The pancreas produces insulin and, in a healthy dog, produces and releases enough insulin to match the amount of glucose in the bloodstream. However, when a dog develops diabetes mellitus, his owner must administer insulin to him through subcutaneous (underneath the skin) injections to maintain the body's proper blood glucose/insulin balance. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is the most common side effect associated with insulin. It is an extremely serious medical condition that comes on suddenly, requiring immediate attention. Before taking your dog to your veterinarian, it is critical that you immediately feed her approximately 1 tbsp. of a fast-acting glucose, such as corn syrup or honey, first by rubbing a small amount on your dog's gums and then feeding her by mouth when she regains her swallowing functions. An insulin overdose, missed morning meal or overexertion can trigger low blood sugar. Symptoms include hunger, lethargy and sleepiness in the early stages, followed by staggering gait, then twitching, convulsions, coma and death. Certain medications, such as corticosteroids, propranolol, t Continue reading >>

Allergic Reactions To Insulin

Allergic Reactions To Insulin

Home » About Diabetes » GM Vs Animal Insulin » Allergic Reactions to Insulin GM Vs animal insulin Choices – The Evidence Evidence from people with diabetes A little bit of history Facts Action and duration times of animal and GM ‘human’ insulins Hypoglycaemia and loss of warnings ‘Dead in Bed Syndrome’ The concerns of patients are justified Availability of animal insulins in the UK Changing your insulin What to do if your consultant refuses to change your insulin Availability of animal insulin if admitted to hospital Frequently asked questions Allergic reactions to insulin Allergic reactions to insulin A bit of history Allergic reactions to insulin have been around since it was discovered in 1922. It was estimated that around half of people using these impure insulins had allergic reactions – thought to be caused by the insulin molecule as well as the preservatives or the agents used to slow down the action of insulin, such as zinc. Until the 1970s only bovine insulin was available and this differs from the insulin our bodies produce by 3 amino acids and therefore is more allergenic than pork which differs by only one amino acid. Localised allergic reactions are those that affect a specific area, such as rashes at the injection site, and the introduction of highly purified insulins reduced these localised allergic reactions to about 2-3% of people treated with pork or ‘human’ insulin. Systemic reactions are those that affect the whole body and these are classed as very rare and can occur at the start of insulin treatment or many years after. In these cases the allergy is usually due to the insulin molecule itself rather than additives such as the preservatives. Types of allergic reactions to ‘human’ insulin There appears to be 3 types of allergic Continue reading >>

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) or type 2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes. The most common side effects of Lantus is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Symptoms include: hunger, sweating, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Other common side effects of Lantus include pain, redness, swelling, itching, or thickening of the skin at the injection site. These side effects usually go away after a few days or weeks. Lantus should be administered subcutaneously (under the skin) once a day at the same time every day. Dose is determined by the individual and the desired blood glucose levels. Lantus may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, or beta-blockers. Many other medicines can increase or decrease the effects of insulin glargine on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Lantus. Discuss a plan to manage blood sugar with your doctor before becoming pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Insulin needs may change while breastfeeding. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding. Our Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Continue reading >>

Long-acting Insulin Allergy In A Diabetic Child.

Long-acting Insulin Allergy In A Diabetic Child.

Abstract Insulin allergy has been uncommon since the introduction of human recombinant insulin preparations; the prevalence is 2.4%. Insulin injection could elicit immediate reactions, which are usually induced by an IgE-mediated mechanism, within the first hour after drug administration. In the present study, we describe the case of a child who experienced immediate urticaria after long-acting insulin injection. A 9-year-old girl affected by type I diabetes mellitus referred a history of three episodes of urticaria 30 min after insulin subcutaneous injection. During the first week of insulin therapy, she developed generalized immediate urticaria twice after long-acting insulin glargine first and then once after insulin degludec administration. Symptoms resolved within a few hours after treatment with oral antihistamine. She tolerated rapid insulin lispro. Her personal allergological history was negative. Skin prick tests with degludec, glargine and detemir were performed, showing negative results. Intradermal 1:100000-diluted tests were immediately positive for both degludec and glargine but not for detemir. In light of these findings, detemir was administered without any reaction. Our results show that detemir is tolerated by patients with clinical hypersensitivity reactions to degludec and glargine. Although reactions could be attributable to additives allergy, such as zinc or metacresol, this was excluded since all three preparations contain the same components. So, insulin itself acted as offending allergen. Detemir differs from degludec and glargine in a few aminoacids. Therefore, it is possible that the conformational rather than the linear epitope may be responsible for the reaction. This result suggests integrating intradermal tests in the diagnostic flowchart Continue reading >>

Identifying And Treating An Insulin Reaction

Identifying And Treating An Insulin Reaction

Too much insulin can cause your blood sugar levels to drop. Learn how to identify symptoms of hypoglycemia and treat an insulin reaction at the first sign of trouble. Your body needs insulin to keep glucose from building up in your blood and to help convert it to energy instead. Too much insulin, however, can cause your blood sugar level to plummet — a condition called hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. This insulin reaction usually occurs when you inject too large of a dose of insulin. But hypoglycemia can also occur as a result of taking oral diabetes medications that are intended to increase insulin production or with certain combination pills Hypoglycemia can develop quickly. It's usually mild and can be treated by eating or drinking carbohydrate-rich food. But when you have diabetes, your body isn't as able to respond to sudden shifts in blood sugar levels. If not treated quickly, hypoglycemia can become serious. With severe hypoglycemia, you may become dazed and it can put you at an increased risk for accidents and injuries. For example, you could have a seizure or slip into a diabetic coma. In extreme cases, hypoglycemia can be fatal. Identifying an Insulin Reaction The first symptoms of an insulin reaction occur as the body's regulatory system senses an emergency and releases a rush of adrenaline into the bloodstream, says Robert Ratner, MD, chief scientific and medical officer for the American Diabetes Association. "You have a classic adrenaline rush," Dr. Ratner says. "You become sweaty and clammy. Your heart races. You start to tremble. Those are the classic signs of hypoglycemia." You might also feel nervous, anxious, or irritable. The next wave of symptoms occurs as the insulin reaction reaches the brain. "The brain requires glucose to function. When gluco Continue reading >>

Insulin Antibodies

Insulin Antibodies

Antibodies to exogenously delivered insulin are common with insulin treatment but are not often clinically significant. IgG antibodies are the most common while IgE antibodies are the cause of insulin allergy[10]. At high titers, IgG antibodies may limit insulin action which could delay or diminish insulin action. Rarely, antibodies can be agonists to the insulin receptor and cause hypoglycemia (usually postprandial hypoglycemia)[11]. The development of antibodies depends on the purity, molecular structure, and storage conditions of the insulin administered as well as patient factors such as age, HLA type, and delivery route[10]. Most common when patients are exposed to beef or pork insulin, rather than only to human or analog insulins[9]. Insulin auto-antibodies, in people not previously treated with insulin, are an indication of developing type 1 diabetes (See Insulin Initiation in Type 1 Diabetes and to LADA for more information). React equally to analog insulin and unmodified human insulins. Radioligand binding (RLB) assays are the most common assay used for measurement of insulin antibodies[10]. Standard immunoprecipitation and agglutination analytic methods cannot measure insulin antibodies since insulin antibody immune complexes do not precipitate[10]. High sensitivity is required for evaluating autoantibodies, which are in much lower concentration than antibodies to exogenous insulin[13]. Gel filtration chromatography can identify insulin immunocomplexes with addition of exogeneous insulin to diagnose insulin autoimmune syndrome without necessarily using radiolabelled reagants[1]. The presence of insulin antibodies does not prove that they are causing insulin resistance or hypoglycemia. More soluble insulins, such as regular and semilente are less allergenic tha Continue reading >>

Hypersensitivity Reaction To Insulin Glargine And Insulin Detemir In A Pediatric Patient: A Case Report

Hypersensitivity Reaction To Insulin Glargine And Insulin Detemir In A Pediatric Patient: A Case Report

Go to: Abstract Allergy to human insulin or its analogs is rare, but it is still a significant issue in current diabetes care. Allergic reactions can range from localized injection site reactions to generalized anaphylaxis, and they can be caused by excipients or the insulin molecules themselves. We presented a case of a 14-year-old male patient with generalized allergic reactions to insulin glargine and insulin detemir. The patient was successfully managed by being switched to a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion with insulin aspart. Allergic reactions to insulin detemir and insulin glargine have both been well described, with insulin detemir allergy appearing to be more common. There are several potential mechanisms for insulin allergy, and immunologic characteristics vary among different insulin analogs. After confirming insulin allergy in practice, management involves treating symptoms and switching insulin preparations. This is the first documented case of allergies to both insulin glargine and insulin detemir in a pediatric patient. Exact mechanism of insulin allergy is unknown, and management strategies must be individualized for each patient. INDEX TERMS: hypersensitivity, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, pediatrics, type 1 diabetes mellitus Go to: INTRODUCTION Allergy to human insulin or its analogs is rare, with an estimated incidence of <1% to 2.4% in insulin-treated diabetic patients.1,2 However, cases of insulin allergy continue to be reported and range from local injection site reactions to generalized life-threatening anaphylaxis.3–5 Individuals may be allergic to the insulin molecule itself or to pharmaceutical excipients, such as protamine, zinc, or metacresol.6–8 Immediate, immunoglobulin E (IgE)–mediated allergic reactions (type I) are m Continue reading >>

Insulin And Other Allergic Reactions Does Diabetes Make A Difference?

Insulin And Other Allergic Reactions Does Diabetes Make A Difference?

There are various types of allergic reactions that we will examine, some of which can have a very profound effect on blood glucose control. The one that can be considered to be part of the normal pathogenesis of diabetes, although not common due to the uses of human DNA insulin, is an allergy to injected insulin.[i] These occurrences have been declining as beef and pork insulins are being replaced.[ii] [iii] Nevertheless this can be a serious problem to those that develop this allergy. Difficulties in blood sugar control and increasing insulin dosages, which progress far more rapidly than the normal pathology of the disease, may be the first symptoms. This may also be accompanied by local injection site irritation with the development of wheals.[iv] Even with some or all of these symptoms present, this condition may still be dismissed by doctors as an expected part of the disease process. While all these suspicions can easily be verified by blood testing for an increase in anti-insulin antibodies, it may take several detours before you arrive at that point. Some of the clues that will lead to this conclusion might be revealed in more common blood testing. A typical complete blood count (CBC) would likely show a definite increase in eosinophil cells, which could denote an allergic response. This result would probably be followed by another blood test for immunoglobulin E (IgE). There are five basic classes of immunoglobulins (IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG and IgM), and a number of different subclasses. They function as specific systemic antibodies in the blood and other body fluids. An elevated IgE value would be a very significant, but not necessarily an inclusive indication of an allergic condition even though it can coincide with an insulin allergy.[v] [vi] Nevertheless, a high Continue reading >>

Diabetic Gosh Patient With Insulin Allergy Saved By New Technology

Diabetic Gosh Patient With Insulin Allergy Saved By New Technology

A patient at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) has just become the first child in the UK, and the fifth in the world, to be fitted with a second generation DiaPort System, adapted to deliver insulin directly into the abdomen, bypassing the skin. Taylor Banks was referred to GOSH in 2015, aged seven, after hospitals in charge of his care ran out of options in treating the combination of his type 1 diabetes and severe skin allergy to insulin. Taylor was first diagnosed with diabetes aged two. He was rushed to hospital unconscious and treated with insulin. The insulin treated the symptoms of his diabetes, but on receiving the treatment he had a severe allergic reaction to the drug. Mum Gema said, “Straight after taking the injections he would go into a trance-like state, he was like a zombie, unable to communicate and function. We switched Taylor to an insulin pump hoping it would help, but then he started breaking out with painful red welts all over his body. It was so upsetting because nothing we were trying to do was helping to take the pain away. These welts eventually turned into permanent areas of abnormally sunken skin, into which no insulin could be given.” Taylor’s symptoms worsened, until he was in constant pain, sleep deprived with areas of abnormally sunken skin increasing over his body. His parents were worried about his erratic sugar levels and had to check on him every two hours through the night to make sure he didn’t slip into unconsciousness. Clinicians conducted further testing and discovered Taylor’s allergy was only skin deep, and soon after was referred to GOSH. Dr Rakesh Amin, Consultant in Endicrinology at GOSH said, “Taylor’s quality of life was so poor and his prognosis so bleak that, to not find a solution to this allergy was not Continue reading >>

Insulin Allergies Are For Real

Insulin Allergies Are For Real

Modern formulas of insulin have helped curb allergy reactions, but not eliminated them. Here’s what you need to know. Basal insulin was supposed to be a help for novelist Katherine Marple, but instead it became the bane of her existence. A few years back, Marple’s doctor switched her to Lantus to help control some of the peaks and valleys of her blood glucose levels. Shortly after the switch, she soon felt pain with each Lantus injection. ”It felt like I was injecting fire,” says Marple, who has Type 1 diabetes. “I could actually feel it going up my veins.” Soon the problem moved from an annoyance to a life-threatening emergency. She had sudden and dangerous lows while she slept, and paramedics had to revive her several times. Maple had seen online discussions about insulin allergies, and she tried to talk to her doctor about the possibility, but he wasn’t convinced. “He thought I was being insubordinate and neglectful,” Maple says. ”A lot of people don’t believe 20-year-olds.” Maple persisted, and after several months her doctor finally read up on the subject. While it was never conclusively proven that she was having an allergic reaction, she was switched to a different form of insulin, and the symptoms went away. Allergies to insulin used to be commonplace when animal-sourced insulin was used as the base for the drug. Some 10% to 50% of people on insulin therapy would develop some form of an allergic reaction, according to estimates by researchers. It makes sense, since back then insulin was taken directly from cattle and pigs, and the body would react to injected insulin like it was a foreign invader. In the eighties, scientists found a way to extract the gene for making human insulin and put it into cells to grow more insulin. They also foun Continue reading >>

Desensitisation To Subcutaneous Insulin Using Csii Followed By I-port Advanceâ„¢ Robert Gregory,1 Dawn Ackroyd,1 Hamidreza Mani,1 Alexandra Croom2

Desensitisation To Subcutaneous Insulin Using Csii Followed By I-port Advanceâ„¢ Robert Gregory,1 Dawn Ackroyd,1 Hamidreza Mani,1 Alexandra Croom2

CASE REPORT Introduction A patient with type 1 diabetes and severe localised insulin allergy was able to use CSII after desensitisation. When she insisted on stopping CSII, she was able to inject insulin via i-Port Advance™ with no relapse of her symptoms. Key words: insulin allergy, desensitisation, CSII, i-Port Advance™ Case report A 70-year-old Philippines woman with a history of adult-onset asthma and hypertension was referred with suspected localised insulin allergy. She had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2010 and treated initially with oral antidiabetic agents. She was started on biphasic insulin aspart (NovoMix 30®) in February 2015 as the HbA1c concentration had risen to 75 mmol/mol. After 3 months she developed red itchy blotches at her injection sites. The redness and itching occurred immediately after subcutaneous injection, and within 30 minutes a hard lump appeared which took several days to disappear. She had no generalised rash or other fea- tures of anaphylaxis. Her injection technique had been checked to exclude intradermal injection. The insulin had been changed to biphasic porcine isophane (Hypurin Porcine 30/70®) and then to insulin glargine (Lantus®) with no change in the symptoms. Her GP had prescribed an oral antihistamine and topical 1% hydrocortisone cream which had not helped. The insulin was discontinued in July 2015 and her diabetes was treated with gliclazide MR, metformin MR and saxagliptin in maximum doses. She was seen by a consultant allergist who ascertained that she had been diagnosed with asthma at the age of 40 when she moved to England, and also suffered from occasional hay fever symptoms. A local reaction to her insulin injections was diag- nosed. Specific IgE levels to human insulin (ImmunoCAP c71) and Continue reading >>

Desensitization Of Allergy To Human Insulin And Its Analogs By Administering Insulin Aspart And Insulin Glargine

Desensitization Of Allergy To Human Insulin And Its Analogs By Administering Insulin Aspart And Insulin Glargine

Allergic reaction to insulin is occasionally reported in medical literature. However, it is very rare to encounter patients allergic to human insulin and its analogs, particularly insulin glargine. Insulin allergy usually occurs within l–4weeks after starting insulin therapy. Here, we describe a patient with type 2 diabetes who required basal–bolus insulin injections because of deficient pancreatic activity. The patient experienced allergic reactions to human insulin (Novolin 50R and Scilin M30) and insulin analogs (Novomix 30, NovoRapid, and insulin glargine). These allergic reactions were resolved following progressive desensitization with subcutaneous insulin aspart and insulin glargine. To our knowledge, this is one of the first cases in China in which allergy to insulin was successfully treated by frequent subcutaneous injections of small, increasing doses of insulin aspart and insulin glargine. A 51-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the management of uncontrolled diabetes. His HbA1c on presentation was 10.7%. He was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 7years previously, and he was treated with isophane protamine biosynthetic human insulin (Novolin 50R). However, upon starting this treatment, local pruritus developed at the injection sites within a few seconds of injection and would last for several hours. One month later, he referred to rhabdion in the site, so his therapy was switched to insulin aspart 30 (Novomix 30). Despite switching insulin formulation, the local pruritus persisted. Therefore, the patient was switched to oral agents, including metformin and gliclazide, which he used until referral to our hospital. On presentation at our hospital, his HbA1c was 10.7%, fasting and postprandial C-peptide levels were 376.90 and 737.90pmol/L, respective Continue reading >>

Rituximab And Omalizumab In Severe, Refractory Insulin Allergy

Rituximab And Omalizumab In Severe, Refractory Insulin Allergy

To the Editor: We describe the sequential use of two targeted biologic agents to treat a patient with severe systemic insulin allergy accompanied by marked metabolic dysregulation and corticosteroid toxicity. In 1996, a 50-year-old woman received the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Shortly after insulin therapy was initiated, a generalized urticarial rash (resulting in excoriation, bleeding, and disrupted sleep) developed. Insulin allergy was diagnosed on the basis of positive skin-prick tests and a level of insulin-specific IgE of 5.75 kU per liter (normal value, <0.70 kU per liter). Until 2000, she was treated with a standard stepwise approach of trying various insulin preparations, antihistamines, and prednisolone and attempting insulin desensitization.1,2 Prednisolone alone provided symptomatic relief, and from 2000 through 2003 her allergic symptoms were under control. However, by 2004, her prednisolone requirement increased from 5 mg to 15 mg daily because of worsening symptoms. Corticosteroid-related complications included a glycated hemoglobin level ranging from 9.6 to 11.3%, weight gain, memory impairment, and osteoporosis. In 2004, therapy with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion was attempted, and glycemic control initially improved, with the glycated hemoglobin level falling to 8.4%; however, the treatment did not reduce her dependence on corticosteroids. By 2005, the glycated hemoglobin level had begun to rise again. More aggressive immunologic monitoring and treatment were instituted (Figure 1). Azathioprine and methotrexate were introduced but were soon discontinued because of severe side effects. Omalizumab was considered at this stage but was contraindicated because of the highly elevated IgE level (3710 IU per milliliter). Consequently, we adopted a Continue reading >>

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