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In ___ Diabetes No Insulin Is Produced

By The End Of The Course, The Student Will Know: A. The Definition And Types Of Diabetes B. Who Is Susceptible To Contract Diabetes C. The Scope Of Impact And Management Of Diabetes

By The End Of The Course, The Student Will Know: A. The Definition And Types Of Diabetes B. Who Is Susceptible To Contract Diabetes C. The Scope Of Impact And Management Of Diabetes

Florida Heart CPR* Diabetes Update 1 hour Almost every one of us knows someone who has diabetes. An estimated 16 million people in the United States have diabetes mellitus--a serious, lifelong condition. About half of these people do not know they have diabetes and are not under care for the disorder. Each year, about 650,000 people are diagnosed with diabetes. Although diabetes occurs most often in older adults, it is one of the most common chronic disorders in children in the United States. About 127,000 children and teenagers age 19 and younger have diabetes. What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism--the way our bodies use digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food we eat is broken down by the digestive juices into a simple sugar called glucose. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body. After digestion, the glucose passes into our bloodstream where it is available for body cells to use for growth and energy. For the glucose to get into the cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach. When we eat, the pancreas is supposed to automatically produce the right amount of insulin to move the glucose from our blood into our cells. In people with diabetes, however, the pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the body cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. As a result, glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine, and passes out of the body. Thus, the body loses its main source of fuel even though the blood contains large amounts of glucose. The three main types of diabetes are: · Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or Type I diabetes · Noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or Type II diabetes · Gestational diabetes. Continue reading >>

Animation: Blood Sugar Regulation In Diabetics

Animation: Blood Sugar Regulation In Diabetics

(See related pages) View the animation below, then complete the quiz to test your knowledge of the concept. 1 After eating a meal, blood sugar levels 2 Insulin, released after a meal is eaten by a person who does not have diabetes, will cause blood sugar levels to A) increase far above normal. B) return to about normal. C) decrease far below normal. 3 In Type I diabetes blood sugar levels remain high after a meal because A) too much insulin is released. B) protein is converted to glucose. D) muscle and liver cells do not receive a signal. 5 The treatment for Type I diabetes always includes A) oral thiazolidinedione. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care Policy

Diabetes Care Policy

A Proposed Policy Regarding the care of Children with Diabetes in Canadian Schools Created by Barbra Wagstaff, Diabetes Advocacy in consultation with Special Educators, Teachers, Principals, and parents Contents: Introduction Purpose Application Definitions Type 1 Diabetes Insulin Type 2 Diabetes Gestational Diabetes Glucagon Hyperglycaemia Hypoglycaemia Non-Emergency Situations Emergency Situations (Life Threatening) Responsibilities Principal Teacher Parent Student Accommodations Common law duty of care and related obligations Diabetes Emergency Treatment Protocol Form References Appendix Hyperglycemia Poster Hypoglycemia Poster Treatment Protocol Emergency Procedures for Severe Low Blood Glucose How to prepare and inject Glucagon® Proposed Policy Regarding the care of Children with Diabetes in Canadian Public Schools 1. Introduction Type 1 Diabetes, also known as Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus or Juvenile Diabetes is an auto-immune disease that occurs when the beta cells of the pancreas produce little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone which is essential for processing glucose in the body. When insulin is present, glucose can be used by the body for energy and unused glucose can be stored for later use. Lack of insulin causes glucose to remain in the blood. It is then filtered through the kidneys and spilt in the urine. If the body cannot get glucose, it will begin to look for an alternate method of energy by breaking down fat and muscle. This breakdown causes the release of toxins called ketones which are very dangerous to a person with diabetes. The treatment of Type 1 Diabetes requires a careful balance of diet, exercise and insulin. Since insulin cannot be produced by someone with Type 1 Diabetes, it must be injected. Daily doses of insulin either through Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes?

What Causes Diabetes?

Our epidemics of dietary disease have prompted a great deal of research into what humans are meant to eat for optimal health. In 1985, an influential article was published proposing that our chronic diseases stem from a disconnect between what our bodies evolved eating during the Stone Age during the last 2 million years and what we’re stuffing our face with today, advocating for a return towards a hunter-gatherer type diet of lean meat, fruits, vegetables, and nuts. Though it may be reasonable to assume our nutritional requirements were established in the prehistoric past, the question of which prehistoric past remains. Why just the last 2 million? We’ve been evolving for 25 million years since our common great ape ancestor during which our nutrient requirements and digestive physiology were set down, and therefore probably little affected by our hunter-gatherer days at the tail end. So what were we eating for the first 90% of our evolution? What the rest of the great apes ended up eating – 95 plus percent plants. This may explain why we’re so susceptible to heart disease. For most of human evolution, cholesterol may have been virtually absent from the diet. No bacon, butter, trans fats and massive amounts of fiber, which pulls cholesterol from the body. Now this could be a problem since our body needs a certain amount of cholesterol, so our bodies didn’t just evolve to make cholesterol, but to preserve it, recycle it; our bodies evolved to hold on to cholesterol. And so if you think of the human body as a cholesterol conserving machine and plop it into the modern world of bacon/eggs/cheese/chicken/pork/pastry, well then no wonder artery-clogging heart disease is our #1 cause of death. What used to be so adaptive for 90% of our evolution, holding on to choles Continue reading >>

Diabetes New

Diabetes New

Sort transports and metabolizes glucose for energy, stimulates the storage of glucose in the liver and muscles in the form of glucagon, signals the liver to stop release of glucose, enhances the storage of dietary fat in adipose tissue, accelerates transport of amino acids into cells, In the muscle, liver and fat cells insulin does four things 1) the placenta produces hormones that antagonize the insulin actions, 2) production of coritsol, a hormones that promotes hyperglycemia increases during pregnancy, 3) glucose can pass from the mom to the fetus circulation, hyperglycemia in mom will stimulate insulin secretion from fetus=adverse effects, three reasons why elevated BG in gestational diabetes Continue reading >>

Shared Flashcard Set

Shared Flashcard Set

Details Title Chapter 17 Questions Description Emergency Care and Transportation of the Sick and Injured Total Cards 86 Subject Health Care Level Undergraduate 1 Created 03/12/2014 Click here to study/print these flashcards. Create your own flash cards! Sign up here. Additional Health Care Flashcards Cards Term Common signs and symptoms of diabetic coma include all of the following EXCEPT: A. warm, dry skin B. rapid, thready pulse C. cool, clammy skin D. acetone breath odor Definition C. cool, clammy skin Term Diabetes is MOST accurately defined as a/an: A. abnormally high blood glucose level B. disorder of carbohydrates metabolism C. lack of insulin production in the pancreas D. mass excretion of glucose by the kidneys Definition B. disorder of carbohydrates metabolism Term A 28-year old female patient is found to be responsive to verbal stimuli only. her roomate states that she was recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and has had difficulty controlling her blood sugar level. She further tells you that the patient has been urinating excessively and has progressively worsened over the last 24 to 36 hours. On the basis of this patient's clinical presentation, you should suspect that she: A.has a urinary tract infection B. has low blood glucose level C. has overdosed on her insulin D. is signically hyperglycemic Definition D. is signically hyperglycemic Term The signs and symptoms of insulin shock are the result of: A. prolonged and severe dehydration B. fat metabolism within cells C. increased blood glucose levels D. decreased blood glucose levels Definition D. decreased blood glucose levels Term Kussmaul respirations are an indication that the body is: A. trying to generate energy by breathing deeply B. attempting to eliminate acids from the blood C. compensating for Continue reading >>

Mastering

Mastering

Sort The primary function of hormones is to alter cell activity by altering plasma membrane permeability or membrane potential, stimulating synthesis of enzymes or regulating molecules, activating or deactivating enzymes, inducing secretory activity, or stimulating mitosis. True Continue reading >>

Nurs 171 Exam Iii (diabetes)

Nurs 171 Exam Iii (diabetes)

Home > Preview classic symptoms -polyuria -polydipsia -polyphagia -weight loss -weakness -fatigue Author: JChristie20 ID: 73371 Filename: Nurs 171 Exam III (Diabetes) Updated: March 3, 5877521 Tags: Nurs Exam III Diabetes Folders: Description: Nurs 171 Exam III (Diabetes) Show Answers: Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetes And Insulin

Facts About Diabetes And Insulin

Diabetes is a very common disease, which, if not treated, can be very dangerous. There are two types of diabetes. They were once called juvenile-onset diabetes and adult diabetes. However, today we know that all ages can get both types so they are simply called type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1, which occurs in approximately 10 percent of all cases, is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system, by mistake, attacks its own insulin-producing cells so that insufficient amounts of insulin are produced - or no insulin at all. Type 1 affects predominantly young people and usually makes its debut before the age of 30, and most frequently between the ages of 10 and 14. Type 2, which makes up the remaining 90 percent of diabetes cases, commonly affects patients during the second half of their lives. The cells of the body no longer react to insulin as they should. This is called insulin resistance. In the early 1920s, Frederick Banting, John Macleod, George Best and Bertram Collip isolated the hormone insulin and purified it so that it could be administered to humans. This was a major breakthrough in the treatment of diabetes type 1. Insulin Insulin is a hormone. Hormones are chemical substances that regulate the cells of the body and are produced by special glands. The hormone insulin is a main regulator of the glucose (sugar) levels in the blood. Insulin is produced in the pancreas. To be more specific, it's produced by the beta cells in the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. When we eat, glucose levels rise, and insulin is released into the bloodstream. The insulin acts like a key, opening up cells so they can take in the sugar and use it as an energy source. Sugar is one of the top energy sources for the body. The body gets it in many forms, but mainly as carbohydr Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes?

What Is Diabetes?

Most likely, you knew very little about diabetes before you learned that you had it. After your diagnosis, your next few doctor visits were probably a crash course in diabetes: learning how to check your blood glucose level, inject insulin or follow a schedule for taking pills, adjust your eating habits, etc. Your doctor may also have mentioned what diabetes is and what causes it in this blitz of information, but with so much to learn at once, you may not remember what he said — or remember him saying anything at all on these topics. It can be difficult to take in so much new information at one time, especially when you are just learning diabetes terminology and adjusting to the idea of having diabetes; many people find they miss a lot of the background information about the underlying causes of their diabetes. However, understanding how and why diabetes develops can help you to be an active member of your diabetes-care team. The two main types Diabetes mellitus, usually referred to as just diabetes, is characterized by a high blood glucose level. There are several different types of diabetes, each with a unique underlying cause. The most common forms are Type 1 diabetes and Type 2 diabetes. Both are considered chronic diseases, meaning that once diagnosed, they don’t go away. Blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to be diabetes are now called prediabetes. For descriptions of other types of diabetes and related conditions, see “Types of Diabetes.” Type 1 diabetes used to be called juvenile or insulin-dependent diabetes, and Type 2 diabetes was called adult-onset or non-insulin-dependent diabetes. The American Diabetes Association now favors the terms Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, which are defined based on the underlying cause of the Continue reading >>

Masteringnutrition Chapter 4

Masteringnutrition Chapter 4

Sort fasting blood gluccose levels range from 70 to 99 mg/L, insulin produced by the pancreas efficiently stimulates glucose transporters with body cells, glucose transporters efficiently prompt the uptake of glucose into body cells normal function Continue reading >>

Your Wellness Roadmap: The Hidden Risk: Diabetes

Your Wellness Roadmap: The Hidden Risk: Diabetes

This publication includes information about type 2 diabetes and who is likely to develop it, a worksheet to help estimate risk for type 2 diabetes, information about artificial sweeteners and recipes. Objectives of Lesson 2 Complete this lesson and you will be able to explain what type 2 diabetes is; list the symptoms of diabetes; estimate your personal risk of having type 2 diabetes and not knowing it; describe the different types of artificial sweeteners; decide whether you want to use artificial sweeteners. Introduction Lesson 2 looks at non-insulin-dependent diabetes, which is called type 2 diabetes. As we age, more of us will develop this disease. About 7 million people have been told they have type 2 diabetes, but experts think only half of the actual cases are identified. This means another 7 million adults are walking around with type 2 and don’t realize it. If this disease is not treated, it causes serious damage to the body. Lesson 2 describes the symptoms of type 2 diabetes and who is likely to develop it. See if you are at risk. If so, visit your doctor for a checkup. Prompt treatment can make a difference. Recipe Notes The recipes in this lesson use an artificial sweetener or a sugar substitute and support the following healthful eating rule: Choose and prepare foods and beverages with little added sugars. Some people use sugar substitutes to help them control their calorie intake. Others find these substitutes too sweet. After you have tried artificial sweeteners, you may find that foods sweetened with plain sugar taste too bland. Some sweeteners can be used in baked products, others cannot. They are a common ingredient in certain manufactured food products. Be sure to compare the number of calories in a serving of a product made with sugar substitutes t Continue reading >>

Why Do Pancreas Start Producing Less Insulin Which Leads To Diabetes?

Why Do Pancreas Start Producing Less Insulin Which Leads To Diabetes?

In type I diabetes, the beta cells are killed due to auto immune disease and hence pancreas stops producing insulin. In type II diabetes, there are different reasons. Due to prolonged exposure to high carbohydrate diet, the beta cells are made to produce a surge of insulin (spike) in a short span of time, which cause them to fatigue. Over a period of time and in the presence of high insulin (insulin spike), muscles become resistant to insulin. So insulin is no more effective to transport glycogen/glucose energy to muscles. As muscles don’t store the glycogen, blood glucose continues to be higher than normal. Sensing high blood glucose, Pancreas produces more insulin to carry glucose to muscles. This eventually leads to beta cells fatigue and making the muscles more resistant to insulin. Second reason is fat cells masking beta cells. A recent study found beta cells are masked by fat cells. As few beta cells are masked by fat cells, less beta cells are available to produce required insulin. It makes insulin even less effective as discussed in previous paragraph and causes more fatigue to remaining beta cells. First reason (for T2D) is why it is recommended to eat fibre rich food to slow down the release of glucose and avoid insulin spike. Second reason is why obesity is a risk factor to diabetes and it is recommended to keep optimum body weight to avoid diabetes. Second reason is making prolonged Intermittent Fasting as a solution to burn fat cells covering beta cells but no detailed scientific study is done yet. Disclaimer: I am not a doctor. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Training Pre-post Test Key

Diabetes Training Pre-post Test Key

To achieve 80% score and passage of this exam, the learner may answer no more than 15 questions incorrectly. If the learner misses all questions in one category, that section of training should be reviewed. Diabetes in Ohio Schools 1. Ohio law ensures a student with diabetes receives appropriate care at school including: a. Providing care according to prescribers orders b. Administering diabetes medication c. Provides training to employees who volunteer to provide diabetes care d. All of the above 2. The trained employee is immune from liability. a. True b. False 3. A student with diabetes must go to an area designated by the school to attend to his/her diabetes care needs. a. True b. False Diabetes Medical Management Plan 4. Another term for the Diabetes Medical Management Plan (DMMP) is medical orders. 5. The following people are responsible for developing and signing the DMMP except: a. The parent b. The prescriber c. The school nurse d. The student’s personal health care team 6. DMMP should include: a. Emergency contact information b. Blood glucose and ketone monitoring c. Insulin or medication administration d. All of the above 2 Diabetes Basics 7. “blood sugarâ€=blood glucose. 8. This type of diabetes is caused when insulin producing cells are destroyed. It is the most common type of diabetes in children. a. Type 1 b. Type 2 9. This type of diabetes is when the body does not use insulin properly or does not make enough insulin. Usually starts in adulthood. a. Type 1 b. Type 2 10. Diabetes management includes: a. monitoring glucose levels b. insulin/medication c. physical activity d. food and beverage intake e. all of the above Universal Precautions 11. The single most important way to prevent the spread of infectious disease is handwashing. 12. Use Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Sort reduces hepatic glucose production, enhances tissue response to insulin and improves glucose transport into cells, may improve blood lipid levels, withhold for procedures using contrast dye for 48 hr afterwards, excreted thru kidney and liver biguanide (popular) synthetic verision of natural hormone amylin (amylin works w/ insulin to control the low of sugar from food in the bloodstream, decr gastric emptying time) use is only in addition to insulin SUBQ, hypoglycemia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, headache, fatigue, dizziness (side effects) Amylinomimetic (mimics amylin (symlin) DO NOT WANT TO CONTAMINATE REGULAR INSULIN WITH THE INTERMEDIATE 1. GENTLY ROTATE NPH (INTERMEDIATE) 2. CLEANSE TOPS OF BOTH INSULIN VIALS W/ ALCOHOL 3 IN SYRINGE, DRAW BACK AMOUNT OF AIR TO EQUAL NPH INSULIN DOSE AND INJECT AIR INTO VIAL 4. IN SYRINGE, DRAW BACK AMT OF AIR TO EQUAL REGULAR INSULIN DOSE AND INJECT AIR INTO VIAL 5. INVERT REGULAR INSULIN VIAL AND WITHDRAW EXACT DOSE 6. PLACE NEEDLE/SYRINGE BACK IN TO THE INTERMEDIATE INSULIN AND WITHDRAW THE EXACT TOTAL AMOUNT NEEDED hypoglycemia symptoms weakness, or shaking moist skin, sweating, fast heartbeat (tachycardia) dizziness sudden hunger headache irritability nervousness confusion <70 mg/dl hyperglycemia symptoms polyphagia polydipsia polyuria dry or itchy skin feeling tired or sleepy blurred vision frequent infections slow healing of cuts or sores Continue reading >>

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