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I Am Insulin Resistant What Should I Eat

A Practical Guide To Carb Tolerance And Insulin Sensitivity

A Practical Guide To Carb Tolerance And Insulin Sensitivity

One of the biggest reasons why people go Paleo is the metabolic benefits. Most people find Paleo to be very therapeutic for a whole cluster of carb-related problems: high blood sugar (or the rollercoaster of highs and lows), insulin resistance, and all the related issues. These issues can make weight loss difficult or impossible, but on the flip side, addressing them through diet can make it easier and more pleasant than you ever thought could happen! On the other hand, though, there are a lot of myths and half-truths floating around about diet, exercise, and carb metabolism. So here’s a quick review of what it all means, and the evidence supporting various different complementary strategies for improving your carb tolerance (preview: it’s so much more than dietary carbs). Note: This article is not written for diabetics. Diabetes is a very complicated disease and strategies that are right for other people might not be appropriate. If you have diabetes, see a doctor! What Is “Carb Tolerance”/Insulin Sensitivity? (If you already know how insulin and glucose work, this section has nothing new for you; just skip down to the next one) Very simply put, insulin sensitivity (or “carb tolerance” in everyday language) is a healthy hormonal state that allows your body to digest and store carbohydrates without a problem. In healthy people, here’s how it works: You eat something with carbs (let’s say a potato, but it could be anything). Your digestive system breaks down the starch in that potato into glucose. Glucose is a simple sugar – this is the form of carbohydrate that you’ll either use for energy or store as fat. Your blood sugar temporarily rises as the glucose enters the bloodstream. This is not a big problem, because… Insulin (produced in the pancreas) Continue reading >>

Losing Weight With Insulin Resistance: Why Is It So Hard?

Losing Weight With Insulin Resistance: Why Is It So Hard?

Home / Type 2 Diabetes / How To Lose Weight With Insulin Resistance? How To Lose Weight With Insulin Resistance? If you are noticing that its become rather easy for you to gain weight and almost impossible to lose that extra weight with your usual diet changes, chances are that you may have insulin resistance. Often an undiagnosed issue, insulin resistance causes metabolic changes in your body, making it very hard to shed those excess pounds.Whats worse, insulin resistance is the precursor to various other health issues like the metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes, type 2-diabetes, PCOS and even cardiovascular disease. Lets look at why losing weight with insulin resistance is so difficult and how to win this battle. Losing Weight With Insulin Resistance: Why Is It So Hard? All carbohydrates break down into simple sugars upon digestion. Insulin is necessary to push sugars we ingest through diet into our cells to be used up for energy. When the body is unable to use this insulin efficiently, as is the case with insulin resistance, blood sugar levels spike. With nowhere to go, the body converts these extra sugars into fat and stores it to be used up later. Most of this fat is concentrated around the abdomen. In a nutshell, losing weight with insulin resistance is difficult because cells are starved of fuel when theyre unable to absorb sugar and nutrients from the blood. This leads to metabolic changes and disturbed appetite regulation, which only adds to your weight loss woes. Ghrelin is a hunger hormone that stimulates appetite, increases food intake and promotes fat storage. Research has found that insulin resistance is linked to decreased plasma levels of active ghrelin and increased belly fat. Scientists from University of Pittsburgh found that insulin resistance causes Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance: The Real Reason Why You Aren’t Losing Weight

Insulin Resistance: The Real Reason Why You Aren’t Losing Weight

Many people have weight loss as one of their key resolutions. Sadly, 35 percent of people also give up on that goal before the month even ends. It’s not necessarily lack of time or willpower that causes you to struggle with weight loss year after year. The real reason that you may have struggled to lose weight is insulin resistance, or a condition I call metabolism dysfunction. So you may be thinking, “Why is it so hard for me to lose weight?” I’m doing “everything right,” and yet still weight loss is difficult. Perhaps (like many of my patients) you’re already following a strict diet and working out several times a week, but to no avail. The weight still won’t come off — or, worse, you are gaining weight for seemingly no reason at all! You have become resigned to being overweight. Weight problems aren’t a permanent and immovable fixture for the rest of your life. If you’re finding that weight is easy to gain and hard to lose, it’s not your fault! Weight problems aren’t just about overeating or under exercising — they’re about metabolic changes (The MD Factor Diet, 2015) that are collectively known as insulin resistance. Lab tests conducted in my practice have confirmed that over 89 percent of my patients have this real and often undiagnosed issue. So the good news is that the right combination of diet, exercise, and will to succeed you can reverse your MD factor and finally find success in losing weight and keeping it off for good. In a nutshell, insulin resistance is the inability of your body to properly convert the food that you eat into energy to fuel your cells. People with the MD Factor have difficulty regulating their blood sugar, which is often due to insulin resistance or even diabetes. In both instances, their bodies are unable t Continue reading >>

Insulin-resistance Diet For Diabetes

Insulin-resistance Diet For Diabetes

When it comes to preventing diabetes, your diet can make a big difference. And if you already have it, a diet change may help you manage it better. The right mix of foods keeps your insulin and blood sugar in check. When you have insulin resistance, that balance gets out of whack. It’s harder for your body to burn foods for energy. And when too much sugar builds up in your bloodstream, you may be on the path to type 2 prediabetes or diabetes. And that might lead you to an insulin-resistance diet. You don’t need special foods for the insulin-resistance diet. In a nutshell, you’ll eat less unhealthy fat, sugar, meats, and processed starches, and more vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fish, and lean poultry. But it can be hard to change habits. So keep some simple tips in mind before you start. Adopt healthy habits. A crash diet won’t help you. This is about changing your approach to food. Go slowly and build new habits that can become permanent. Maybe you can drink less sugary sodas. Or quit altogether. Make it work for you. You may enjoy different foods than what others like to eat. A diet needs to fit your taste buds and your lifestyle for you to stick with it. Most people need support along the way, so a good dietitian can be a big ally. Don’t skip meals. You might think missing a meal means fewer calories and more weight loss. That just makes your insulin and blood sugar levels swing up and down. And that can lead to more belly fat, which makes your body more likely to resist insulin. Focus on calories and quality. The debate over the best mix of carbs, proteins, and fats has no clear answers. Your best bet is to watch your total calories and to really make them count. So skip the white rice and go whole grain instead. Mix it up. There’s no magic food that Continue reading >>

Therapeutic Diet For Insulin Resistance

Therapeutic Diet For Insulin Resistance

Home Dr. Rachelle S. Bradley Solutions Counseling Naturopathic Medicine Homeopathy Self-care Nutrition Prevention & Healing Policies/Fees/Contact Links Events/Lectures Return to the Nutrition main page Therapeutic Diet for Insulin Resistance This moderate-carbohydrate, moderate-protein and moderate-fat diet is focused on real foods as the solution to Insulin Resistance Syndrome (IR), sometimes called Metabolic Syndrome, Syndrome X, or pre-diabetes. It is mainly refined foods, especially sweets and refined flour products, combined with deficient exercise that gets people into trouble. A program based on whole foods, not more refined food products, is the best long-term solution in IR, and a host of other health problems as well. It is also recommended to take a good multiple vitamin/mineral. Based on human evolutionary history and physiology this should be your most natural and optimal diet. It reflects what our Paleolithic ancestors (i.e., before agriculture) evolved eating over a million years and, as such, has the highest potential of supporting healing and preventing disease. In addition, this diet is naturally alkalizing, which is considered by some people to be healthier than the typical American acidifying diet. If you need more recipe support than this handout provides, a popular diet that is close to this IR diet is The South Beach Diet by Arthur Agatston, M.D. We also recommended reading The Paleo Diet by Loren Cordain, Ph.D. It gives a good background on the problems of the modern diet and the advantages of the Paleolithic diet. However, use this handout as your main reference and refer to these books only for background and recipes. It will take at least 2 to 3 months to reestablish normal insulin sensitivity. If there is severe IR or obesity it could take mu Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Diet Guide For Beginners + Advanced Weight Loss Tips

Insulin Resistance Diet Guide For Beginners + Advanced Weight Loss Tips

Is insulin resistance, diabetes or pre diabetes making it difficult or impossible for you to lose weight? If you fall into this category you probably understand that for the most part insulin resistance is a DIETARY disease. Meaning you most likely have this condition because of the food you've eaten (or are currently eating). Understanding this concept is very important because if you understand that insulin resistance can be caused (and worsened) by diet it is also true that diet can actually help to lower insulin levels and reverse insulin resistance. But hold on. I have some good news for you and some bad news... First the bad news: Most Doctors and patients approach insulin resistance all wrong which leads to higher insulin levels and more weight gain over time. But, here's the good news: I'm going to walk you through how to approach insulin resistance through diet, medications and supplements. Because the best way to treat and reverse insulin resistance is with a comprehensive approach: Let's talk about what foods to eat, what foods to avoid, how much food you should be eating, what type of macromolecules you should consume on a daily basis and much more...​ Understanding Insulin Resistance Before we talk about diet and interventions for insulin resistance you really need to have a basic understand of what insulin resistance is and WHY you would even want to treat it. This is the beginners guide to understanding insulin resistance, diabetes and pre diabetes: Insulin is a hormone that is secreted from your pancreas in response to two macromolecules: glucose (sugar) and protein. It's primary job is to move that sugar inside your cells so your body can burn them for energy. It can put this glucose (energy) into all cells including your fat cells. Why? Because your Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance At Midlife

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance At Midlife

Insulin resistance has become a huge problem in our culture and it can lead to many of the chronic health problems we see today, including obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. It is also linked to high blood pressure, high cholesterol, thyroid problems, muscle loss, fat gain, fatty liver, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, and other cancers as well. And, insulin resistance has even been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, did you know that insulin resistance can also cause many of the symptoms most women attribute to menopause? It’s true. Insulin has a cascading effect on all of your hormones, including estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. When insulin isn’t doing its job, it’s nearly impossible to reduce the symptoms of menopause, including hot flashes and night sweats. It also makes weight loss very difficult. Jason Fung, M.D. – who you can listen to on my radio show, Flourish – has done much research in the area of insulin control. His work shows that getting insulin in balance can be the key to getting your hormones and your health back in balance. What is Insulin and How Does It Work? Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. Its main job is to manage how your body uses glucose for energy. When blood sugar levels rise after a meal, your pancreas releases insulin to help your body’s cells — especially cells in the liver and muscles — absorb glucose. Your liver converts stored glucose to glycogen for future use. When blood sugar levels are too low, your pancreas releases a hormone called glucagon. Glucagon forces the liver to convert glycogen back to glucose, which causes your blood sugar to rise. You always have low levels of insulin circulating in your body. When insulin is out of balance, the result is abnormal blood sugar Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance: An Actionable Guide

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance: An Actionable Guide

If you’ve been in the space of alternative health and wellness for a while, then you’ve likely heard the term ‘insulin resistance’ floating around. But if not, I’m going to do that right now so your brain can stop screeching to a halt every time it reads that word. What Does Insulin Do? Insulin is a hormone. To put it quite simply, you can think of hormones as “body messengers” that communicate and respond to everything from hunger signals to reproduction, to emotions and a heck of a lot more. Because we are an intelligent and integrated feedback loop, some hormones have more than one, and/or, overlapping functions. Insulin is produced in the pancreas (which is part of the endocrine system). Its major responsibility (which is uber important) is to help regulate blood sugar. When you eat foods that contain any form of sugar, that sugar gets broken down into glucose. By the way, when I say that foods containing sugar I’m not just talking about sweet foods. I’m also talking about any carbohydrate (both simple and complex) containing foods. In this case, flavor is secondary to chemical make-up because that’s what ultimately determines how it’s going to be digested. Let me give some examples of foods that will get broken down into glucose: Desserts: ice cream, cookies, cakes, pies, candy, dried fruit… Sweet drinks: gatorade, creamers, soda, koolaid, juices… Simple carbs: bread, pasta, crackers, cereals… Complex carbs: quinoa, oats, brown & wild rice, corn, sprouted wheats, plantains, cassava, turnips, squashes… Fiber-rich: most fruits, most vegetables, peas, beans, legumes Those foods, the ones above and the others I didn’t have space to include, once simplified into glucose molecules (this is what we mean when we say blood sugar) are then esc Continue reading >>

Weight Loss With Insulin Resistance: Diet Tips And Strategies

Weight Loss With Insulin Resistance: Diet Tips And Strategies

According to the World Health Organization, the prevalence of diabetes has risen significantly over the last 30-plus years. In 1980, just 4.7 percent of the world's population had diabetes, but by 2014 this figure had soared to 8.5 percent. This means approximately 422 million people were living with diabetes in 2014. These astounding statistics do not take into account the additional number of people with prediabetes or insulin resistance. In this article, we take a look at what insulin resistance is and what its relationship with body weight is. How might being overweight lead to insulin resistance and what can be done to lose weight? What is insulin resistance? Insulin resistance leads to a condition known as prediabetes, which means that a person's blood sugar level is high, but not high enough to qualify as diabetes. Having insulin resistance is a warning that, without intervention and effective lifestyle changes, someone with prediabetes may go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Sugar (glucose) is the body's main source of food energy. People obtain it from the food they eat. After food is broken down in the body, the sugar enters the bloodstream. In order to use it as energy, the body's cells need to "pick up" the sugar. Insulin, which is a hormone produced by the pancreas, helps this happen by moving the sugar out of the blood and enables it to enter the body's cells. Insulin maintains blood sugar levels, ensuring they are not too high or too low. However, when blood sugar levels are persistently high, the body's cells stop responding to insulin as effectively. This is known as insulin resistance. When insulin resistance occurs, sugar is unable to enter the cells as successfully, and too much remains in the bloodstream. Higher levels of sugar in the blood place a de Continue reading >>

5 Steps To Reversing Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

5 Steps To Reversing Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

Breaking news! Some newly discovered compounds have just been found to turn off all of the genes that cause diabetes. Are these compounds found in a pill bottle? No! Instead, you’ll find them on your dinner plate — in rye bread and pasta. (As I recently wrote in one of my blogs, rye contains special phytonutrients that turn off all the genes responsible for diabetes — in just a few weeks.) Last week, I explained how to find out if you are pre-diabetic or diabetic. Half of the 24 million people with diabetes don’t know they have it and nearly all the 60 million people with pre-diabetes don’t know they have it. Today, I want to share with you more information about what you can do NOW to prevent and reverse diabetes and pre-diabetes. And rye bread isn’t the only answer — I’ve got a lot more good advice, too. But first I want to emphasize new research that should be headlines news but never saw the light of day. Do our current drugs treatments for diabetes actually work to prevent heart attacks and death? Surely lowering blood sugar in diabetics is an effective strategy for reducing the risk of death and heart disease. It would seem obvious that if diabetes is a disease of high blood sugar, then reducing blood sugar would be beneficial. However elevated sugar is only a symptom, not the cause of the problem. The real problem is elevated insulin unchecked over decades from a highly refined carbohydrate diet, a sedentary lifestyle and environmental toxins. Most medications and insulin therapy are aimed at lowering blood sugar through increasing insulin. In the randomized ACCORD trial of over 10,000 patients, this turns out to be a bad idea. In the intensive glucose-lowering group, there were no fewer heart attacks, and more patients died. Yet we continue to pa Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

What is insulin resistance? Insulin is a hormone that facilitates the transport of blood sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream into cells throughout the body for use as fuel. In response to the normal increase in blood sugar after a meal, the pancreas secretes insulin into the bloodstream. With insulin resistance, the normal amount of insulin secreted is not sufficient to move glucose into the cells – thus the cells are said to be “resistant” to the action of insulin. To compensate, the pancreas secretes insulin in ever-increasing amounts to maintain fairly adequate blood-sugar movement into cells and a normal blood-sugar level. What are some insulin resistance symptoms? There are usually no obvious, outward signs of insulin resistance. However, when you are severely insulin resistant, dark patches of skin called acanthosis nigricans can develop on the back of the neck. Sometimes a dark ring forms around the neck. These dark patches can also occur on the elbows, knees, knuckles and armpits. More importantly, insulin has less visible effects on metabolic reactions throughout the body, including converting calories into fat. Insulin resistance influences the liver enzymes that produce cholesterol and acts on the kidneys (which can contribute to high blood pressure). High insulin levels also have a role in the process that regulates inflammation. In time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes, itself a risk factor for heart disease. Insulin resistance can be diagnosed with blood tests that show low levels of HDL cholesterol (the “good” cholesterol), a high triglyceride level, a high fasting insulin level or a high uric acid level. What are the causes of insulin resistance? There are genetic factors that can contribute to the development of insulin resista Continue reading >>

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

Understanding the cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance helps us choose more effective therapeutic interventions for the treatment and prevention of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is present in individuals who are obese and those with diabetes mellitus. Several studies have found that an insulin resistance diet protocol and exercise can alter insulin signaling pathways and delay the onset of insulin resistance. It’s estimated that the number of diabetes sufferers in the world will double from about 190 million to 325 million during the next 25 years. (1) It’s obvious that we need to pay more attention to our lifestyle habits and make some changes. An insulin resistance diet, similar to a diabetic diet plan, helps you lose excess weight and regulate your insulin and blood glucose levels in order to reduce your risk of developing prediabetes and diabetes. Insulin Resistance Diet Research suggests that the primary cause of insulin resistance is excess weight, especially excess fat around the waist. Fortunately, weight loss can help the body respond better to insulin. The Diabetes Prevention Program and other large studies indicate that people with insulin resistance and prediabetes can often prevent or delay developing diabetes by changing their diets to follow an insulin resistance diet, along with losing weight. Here are seven ways to start eating an insulin resistance diet. 1. Limit Carbohydrates Research published in Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity suggests that monitoring carbohydrate intake, whether by carbohydrate counting or experience-based estimation, remains a key strategy in achieving glycemic control. Although all carbohydrates can be incorporated into carbohydrate counting, for good health, carbohydrates from vegetables, Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

What medical conditions are associated with insulin resistance? While the metabolic syndrome links insulin resistance with abdominal obesity, elevated cholesterol, and high blood pressure; several other medical other conditions are specifically associated with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance may contribute to the following conditions: Type 2 Diabetes: Overt diabetes may be the first sign insulin resistance is present. Insulin resistance can be noted long before type 2 diabetes develops. Individuals reluctant or unable to see a health-care professional often seek medical attention when they have already developed type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Fatty liver: Fatty liver is strongly associated with insulin resistance. Accumulation of fat in the liver is a manifestation of the disordered control of lipids that occurs with insulin resistance. Fatty liver associated with insulin resistance may be mild or severe. Newer evidence suggests fatty liver may even lead to cirrhosis of the liver and, possibly, liver cancer. Arteriosclerosis: Arteriosclerosis (also known as atherosclerosis) is a process of progressive thickening and hardening of the walls of medium-sized and large arteries. Arteriosclerosis is responsible for: Other risk factors for arteriosclerosis include: High levels of "bad" (LDL) cholesterol Diabetes mellitus from any cause Family history of arteriosclerosis Skin Lesions: Skin lesions include increased skin tags and a condition called acanthosis nigerians (AN). Acanthosis nigricans is a darkening and thickening of the skin, especially in folds such as the neck, under the arms, and in the groin. This condition is directly related to the insulin resistance, though the exact mechanism is not clear. Acanthosis nigricans is a cosmetic condition strongly Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

The Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

We recently touched on how you can use the ketogenic diet to control symptoms of diabetes such as elevated glucose and triglycerides. In this article, we examine research showing the impact that the ketogenic diet has on levels of the hormone insulin, a key regulator of blood sugar in the body. What is Insulin’s Role in the Body? Before we look at the research, we need to know our main players. Insulin is a protein-based hormone produced by beta-cells located in the pancreas. The pancreas, which is located under the stomach, also produces enzymes that aid with digestion. Insulin’s primary purpose is to regulate the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates. The digestive system breaks down carbohydrates, such as sugars and starches, into a molecule called glucose. This compound can be used by cells to produce energy through a process called cellular respiration. Insulin allows cells in the body absorb glucose, ultimately lowering levels of glucose in the blood stream. After a meal is consumed, blood glucose levels increase and the pancreas responds by releasing insulin into the blood. Insulin assists fat, liver, and muscle cells absorb glucose from the blood, resulting in lower levels of blood glucose. Insulin stimulates liver and muscle tissues to store excess glucose as a molecule called glycogen and also reduces glucose production by the liver. When blood sugar is low, the hormone glucagon (produced by alpha-cells in the pancreas) stimulate cells to break down glycogen into glucose that is subsequently released into the blood stream. In healthy people who do not have type II diabetes, these functions allow levels of blood glucose and insulin to stay in a normal range. What Is Insulin Resistance and Why Is It a Problem? Unfortunately, for many Americans and other peopl Continue reading >>

5 Steps For Weight Loss When You Are Insulin Resistant

5 Steps For Weight Loss When You Are Insulin Resistant

A waist measurement larger than 101 cm for men and larger than 88 cm for women is a major risk factor for insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is when your body doesn’t react to insulin correctly, and your pancreas has to produce more insulin in order to keep your blood sugar levels stable. Insulin resistance can lead to various other health issues like the metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes and type 2-diabetes. Here are 5 steps for losing weight and manage your insulin resistance… Step 1: High Insulin Levels and Weight In order to manage insulin resistance and your weight, you need to first understand how it works. In almost all cases, people with insulin resistance are overweight, and this weight is usually carried around the midsection. Losing weight can help improve insulin resistance, and even reverse it completely. However, weight loss can often be difficult with insulin resistance, as the higher levels of insulin in the body means that more fat is being stored. This can often make it feel as if you are swimming upstream. Step 2: Reducing Your Insulin Levels In order to make weight-loss a bit easier, it is best to start by lowering your insulin levels. Since more insulin is released when you eat carbohydrates or sugar, it is advised that you follow a low-carb diet in order to minimise the amount of insulin being released by the pancreas. Step 3: Low-Carb Diets and Weight Loss A lot work has gone into studies about low-carb diets and type 2 diabetes, and since type 2 diabetes and insulin are caused by the same root problem, a low-carb diet may be the perfect thing to help keep your insulin resistance at bay. When you manage how many carbs you eat, it can help you manage the amount of insulin in your body, which can in turn help you lose weight. Step 4: Restrict Continue reading >>

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