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Hyperinsulinemia Breakfast

Hyperinsulinemia

Hyperinsulinemia

Tweet Hyperinsulinemia is often associated with type 2 diabetes, but it isn’t diabetes as such. Hyperinsulinemia means that the amount of insulin in the blood is higher than considered normal amongst non-diabetics. When a person has hyperinsulinemia they have a problem controlling blood sugar, meaning that the pancreas has to secrete larger amounts of insulin to keep blood sugar at a normal level. How is hyperinsulinemia caused? Insulin resistance is the primary cause of hyperinsulinemia, with the pancreas compensating by producing more insulin. Insulin resistance of this type can lead to the development of type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the pancreas cannot secrete the insulin required to maintain normal blood glucose levels. In more rare cases, hyperinsulinemia may be caused by a tumour of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (insulinoma). It may also be caused by excessive numbers of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas (nesidioblastosis). What are the risks of having hyperinsulinemia? There are a number of risks involved in having hyperinsulinemia which include: Higher triglyceride levels High uric acid Hardening of the arteries (artherosclerosis) Weight gain Hypertension Type 2 diabetes The sooner hyperinsulinemia is diagnosed, which may be in the form of pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes, the sooner the risks or extent of the above can be reduced. What are the symptoms of hyperinsulinemia? Although hyperinsulinemia often has little clear indicator, hyperinsulinemia symptoms may include: Weight gain Cravings for sugar Intense hunger Feeling frequently hungry Difficulty concentrating Feeling anxious or panicky Lacking focus or motivation Fatigue How is hyperinsulinemia treated? Medical treatment, in the form of diabetes medication, may help to relieve t Continue reading >>

Insulin (2)

Insulin (2)

Weight Loss: Insulin (2) Video class with Jon Gabriel Join Jon Gabriel as he talks about: Insulin, blood sugar and Type-2 diabetes What happens when your body becomes insulin resistant How to balance your blood sugar levels OR Read The Lecture Transcripts Here So that eventually if your body pumps out enough insulin your cells will listen to it and your sugar levels will go back down. So when your fat programs are on and you get this condition called insulin resistance and the cells in your body stop listening to insulin, it takes much more insulin to get the job done. So your insulin levels go up; you become what’s called hyperinsulinemia, you have what’s called hyperinsulinemia. Hyper means high, insulin is insulin, emia is a condition, so it’s a condition in which your insulin levels are too high, and they have to be too high to manage your blood sugar. But, insulin is also the fat storage hormone. So when there’s insulin in your bloodstream your body goes into a kind of fat storage mode where it activates all the different enzymes in your body that make fat, and so your body goes into fat making mode. The sugar goes into the fat cells, your body starts making fat. Now when you have hyperinsulinemia then your insulin levels are too high, your body is always in this fat storage mode when your insulin levels are too high, when you have this hyperinsulinemia. As long as your insulin levels are high, you lose the ability to burn fat, and the reason you lose the ability to burn fat is because insulin stops your body from producing the hormones that burn fat, like glucagon and the enzymes that burn fat. When your insulin levels are high, if you think about it your body is going to say if we’re in fat storage mode we don’t want to burn fat; it doesn’t make any Continue reading >>

Hyperinsulinemia | The Summer Local

Hyperinsulinemia | The Summer Local

5. No processed grains especially wheat. 6. Add Low glycemic foods AKA complex carbs. *Why low glycemic foods? Because grains, sugars and underground veggies cause the pancreas to increase/release insulin. Low glycemic foods include: artichoke, asparagus, avocado, broccoli, cauliflower, celery, cucumber, eggplant, green beans, lettuce (all varieties), Greek yogurt, peppers (all varieties), snow peas, spinach, young summer squash, zucchini, tomatoes, cherries, peas (dried), plum, grapefruit, pearled barley, peaches, dried apricots, baby lima beans, apple, pear, quinoa, brown rice, wild rice, tomato soup, carrots (cooked), chickpeas, custard, grapes, oranges, lentil soup, pinto beans, bulgur, baked beans, green peas, old-fashioned oatmeal, sprouted foods and fermented foods. You have been fasting all night so blood sugar levels are low and the pancreas has a rest from making insulin. The liver may make glucose if needed (it usually is) in the middle of the night/early morning. Breakfast is breaking that fast so you do not want to put sugar or high glycemic/refined carbs into it. Poor breakfasts lead to high blood sugar levels and high blood insulin levels. The insulin causes the body to store carbohydrates in the liver and fat cells, in addition to creating inflammation. The body lowers the blood sugar levels then it craves more sugar, carbs and caffeine. Vicious cycle! 8. Good Proteins: Pea protein, eggs, organic grass-fed poultry and beef, wild game, fish/seafood, seeds and more! Step 1 (90 Days) Metabolic Age Support System Kit: Join my 90 Day In.Form Holistic Weight Loss Class online, utilizing the metabolic support supplements - Pea Protein Shakes with phytosterols and inulin fiber, Probiotics, Berberine, Multiple Vitamin/Mineral, Omega 3s and CardioxLDL. Combining Continue reading >>

14 Ways To Lower Your Insulin Levels

14 Ways To Lower Your Insulin Levels

Insulin is an extremely important hormone that's produced by your pancreas. It has many functions, such as allowing your cells to take in sugar from your blood for energy. However, too much insulin can lead to serious health problems. Having high levels, also known as hyperinsulinemia, has been linked to obesity, heart disease and cancer (1, 2, 3). High blood insulin levels also cause your cells to become resistant to the hormone's effects. When you become insulin resistant, your pancreas produces even more insulin, creating a vicious cycle (4). Here are 14 things you can do to lower your insulin levels. Of the three macronutrients — carbs, protein and fat — carbs raise blood sugar and insulin levels the most. For this and other reasons, low-carb diets can be very effective for losing weight and controlling diabetes. Many studies have confirmed their ability to lower insulin levels and increase insulin sensitivity, compared to other diets (5, 6, 7, 8, 9). People with health conditions characterized by insulin resistance, such as metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), may experience a dramatic lowering of insulin with carb restriction. In one study, individuals with metabolic syndrome were randomized to receive either a low-fat or low-carb diet containing 1,500 calories. Insulin levels dropped by an average of 50% in the low-carb group, compared to 19% in the low-fat group (10). In another study, when women with PCOS ate a lower-carb diet containing enough calories to maintain their weight, they experienced greater reductions in insulin levels than when they ate a higher-carb diet (11). Low-carb diets have been shown to increase insulin sensitivity and reduce insulin levels in people with obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and PCOS. Apple cider v Continue reading >>

Category: Hyperinsulinemia - Low Carb Dietitian

Category: Hyperinsulinemia - Low Carb Dietitian

As a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, I'm required to complete 75 hours of continuing education (CE) every five years. Fortunately, there are manyways to fulfill this requirement, including watching webinars, attending conferences, and completing exams on nutrition-related books. Although my recertification date is more than a year away, I've been trying to complete as many CE units as I can ahead of time, including a short course on nutritional management of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Although the author of the course gave a good overview of the disease and recommended avoiding refined carbohydrates, I found that several of the dietary suggestions were notparticularly helpful for many women who struggle with PCOS, such as: Eat plenty of whole grains, starchy vegetables, and beans 130 grams of carbohydrate per day is the bare minimum that should be consumed, and meals should preferably contain 45-60 grams of carbohydrate each Snacks should include approximately 15 grams of carbohydrate combined with a protein food (i.e., peanut butter on crackers) PCOS is one of the most common endocrine disorders among reproductive-aged women, as well as the leading cause of infertility. Instead of an egg being released from one of the follicles in the ovaries on a monthly basis as occurs in normal ovulation, a hormonal imbalance (too much luteinizing hormone and not enoughfollicle stimulating hormone) results in the egg failing to mature; instead, the follicle forms a small cyst. This process is repeated, and eventually the ovaries contain dozens of these cysts. Although theclinicalpresentation varies from person to person and some women have few symptoms, its hallmarks are insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. Other common features include: acanthosis Continue reading >>

High-protein Or High-carbohydrate Diet In Adults With Hyperinsulinemia

High-protein Or High-carbohydrate Diet In Adults With Hyperinsulinemia

An estimated 50% of women and 33% of men in the United States consider themselves to be on a diet at any given time.[ 1 ] Americans spend more than $30 billion annually on weight-loss products and programs.[ 2 ] This interest in dieting and weight-loss products and programs is no coincidence, as nearly 65% of all American adults are overweight or obese.[ 3 ] Many health guidelines and organizations[ 4 , 5 ] tout the weight-loss benefits of a high-carbohydrate, low-fat (HCLF) diet. However, the recent rebirth of high-protein diets (eg, the Atkins diet) encourages Americans to consume meats and cheeses which may be high in saturated fat. More beneficial may be a high-protein diet low in fat, which promotes healthy weight loss without risking the potential adverse effects on lipoproteins.[ 6 , 7 ] A high-protein, low-fat (HPLF) diet has also been shown to reduce total and truncal adiposity,[ 6 , 7 ] spare lean body mass,[ 8 ] and increase satiety[ 9 ] and thermogenesis.[ 10 ] Conversely, some researchers speculate that high-carbohydrate diets may negatively affect insulin sensitivity (IS)[ 8 , 11 , 12 , 13 ] and, therefore, would not be the most appropriate diet for individuals with diminished IS or insulin resistance (IR). It is estimated that 25% to 50% of overweight adults have IR.[ 14 ] A 5% to 10% loss in body weight has been shown to improve insulin levels and thereby reduce the risk of developing certain chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus[ 15 ] and heart disease.[ 14 ] However, many adults have difficulty in achieving -- let alone maintaining -- any amount of weight loss. And in light of the rapidly expanding waistlines of American adults and the increasing number of adults with type 2 diabetes, there exists a need for an effective and tailored diet Continue reading >>

Hi! New To Hyperinsulinemia....

Hi! New To Hyperinsulinemia....

New Member Diabetes with GAD 65 mildly positive 1.I am newly diagnosed hyperinsulinemic. I do apologize in advance for any mistake I will make, as English is not my mother language Im 40 and I have been suffering for frequent migraines for the last 4 years (one every 2/3 weeks), more or less after I had my only daughter. The last neurologist I saw made me run some blood tests, as she said that frequently migraines are associated to a sort of glucose intolerance. Last week it came out I am hyperinsulinemic. 7.19-90 (high)-115 (high)-90 (high)-80 (high)mU/L Resistence to activated C-Reactive Protein 3.Last August I had a migraine once a week, so I decided to try cutting on carbs. I previously had a high-carb, medium-protein, low-fat diet (pasta at lunch, lots of sugar in my coffy, nutella, not much dairy). I think I had a sort of addiction to sugar, as I had always to increase the number of teaspoons and I was never satisfied. In September I switched to a low-carb, high-protein, low-fat diet (no grains, no starch, no fruit, some veggies, lot of low-fat dairy and eggs, some meat and fish) (more or less 150 gr CHO, 150 gr proteins and 70 gr fat, for about 1600 Kcal). The neurologist in December suggested a similar diet. After the blood tests, mid-December, I switched to a low-carb-medium-protein-high fat diet (20 gr CHO, 50 gr P, 100 F, for about 1200 Kcal), after more research on the benefits of this diet (a sort of Atkins, with no dairy, as I want to find if I have an intolerance to lactose), as suggested by my dietitian. I also integrate with D3 and Omega 3. I use some diet TIC (ciclammated sodium, saccarinated sodium and acesulfame potassium). I am 160 cm tall for 47 kg, now. I was 54 in Semptember and I always used to be around 52/53 kg since I was 11. Cutting on suga Continue reading >>

Hyperinsulinemia And Insulin Resistance: World's Biggest Killers?

Hyperinsulinemia And Insulin Resistance: World's Biggest Killers?

When we think about the world’s biggest killer, different things come to mind. Or possibly heart disease, cancer, or maybe even dementia? Well, those three chronic diseases are all good bets. But what if they are just the result of something else, and they all have a common cause? In that case, that common cause could be the world’s biggest killer – and it goes by the name of hyperinsulinemia. This article takes a look at the rapidly growing problem of hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance, and how they affect our health . Insulin resistance is a term to describe when our body develops a resistance to the effects of the hormone insulin ( 1 ). As a result, we experience increasing blood sugar levels and higher levels of circulating insulin ( 2 , 3 ). Hyperinsulinemia refers to the situation where we have a constant elevation of insulin levels ( 4 ). The literal definition is simply an excess amount of insulin in the blood. Insulin resistance is the usual cause of hyperinsulinemia, and the resulting high insulin levels can be very damaging to our body ( 5 ). There is a strong connection between hyperinsulinemia and type 2 diabetes, but they are not the same thing. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin to maintain normal blood sugar levels ( 6 ). However, hyperinsulinemia refers to when the body is producing too much insulin to keep high blood sugar levels in check ( 7 ). Without adequate intervention, chronic hyperinsulinemia can lead to type 2 diabetes ( 8 ). But it must be remembered: hyperinsulinemia is associated with metabolic syndrome, and it’s harmful independently of diabetes. Key Point: Insulin resistance leads to hyperinsulinemia – excess amounts of circulating insulin in the body. As shown above, insulin resist Continue reading >>

Syndrome X Liver Doctor

Syndrome X Liver Doctor

Do you find it impossible to lose weight? Do you find low-fat, low-calorie diets dont work? Are you hungry all the time, even shortly after eating? Do you crave carbohydrates and sugary foods? Do you tend to put on weight around your abdomen? Do you have problems with blood sugar levels? Do you have a family history of diabetes? If you answer YES to 3 or more of these questions, you need the 12-week Syndrome X Eating Plan Cant Lose Weight? Unlock the Secrets that Keep you Fat book which includes the diet and recipes to help with this syndrome. Syndrome X is the most common cause of inability to lose weight. Syndrome X occurs in those with abdominal obesity or excess abdominal fat. Other features of Syndrome X also known as Metabolic Syndrome include insulin resistance, obesity, hypertension and high triglycerides. Syndrome X is a metabolic imbalance characterized by a collection of symptoms and signs including: Excess Weight You most likely have excess weight in the abdominal area so that you may have a pot belly and a roll of fat around the upper abdomen. This is called a liver roll. You may also have excess fat in other parts of your body. Hyperinsulinemia (high insulin levels) Syndrome X is a metabolic disorder associated with high blood levels of the hormone insulin. Fatigue Obesity and insulin resistance can cause fatigue, so it is important to combat this symptom with diet and supplements to increase energy levels. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas gland. Its action is to put blood sugar (glucose) into the muscle and fat cells where it is used to make energy. What is insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia? Insulin resistance leads to the high levels of insulin which cause Syndrome X. Many people in todays society are resistant to the action of the in Continue reading >>

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

Understanding the cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance helps us choose more effective therapeutic interventions for the treatment and prevention of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is present in individuals who are obese and those with diabetes mellitus. Several studies have found that an insulin resistance diet protocol and exercise can alter insulin signaling pathways and delay the onset of insulin resistance. It’s estimated that the number of diabetes sufferers in the world will double from about 190 million to 325 million during the next 25 years. (1) It’s obvious that we need to pay more attention to our lifestyle habits and make some changes. An insulin resistance diet, similar to a diabetic diet plan, helps you lose excess weight and regulate your insulin and blood glucose levels in order to reduce your risk of developing prediabetes and diabetes. Insulin Resistance Diet Research suggests that the primary cause of insulin resistance is excess weight, especially excess fat around the waist. Fortunately, weight loss can help the body respond better to insulin. The Diabetes Prevention Program and other large studies indicate that people with insulin resistance and prediabetes can often prevent or delay developing diabetes by changing their diets to follow an insulin resistance diet, along with losing weight. Here are seven ways to start eating an insulin resistance diet. 1. Limit Carbohydrates Research published in Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity suggests that monitoring carbohydrate intake, whether by carbohydrate counting or experience-based estimation, remains a key strategy in achieving glycemic control. Although all carbohydrates can be incorporated into carbohydrate counting, for good health, carbohydrates from vegetables, Continue reading >>

Breakfast Frequency And Quality May Affect Glycemia And Appetite In Adults And Children1,2,3,4

Breakfast Frequency And Quality May Affect Glycemia And Appetite In Adults And Children1,2,3,4

M.A.P. designed the research, analyzed data, wrote the paper, had primary responsibility for final content. E.E. contributed to data collection, data analysis, and paper writing, and approved the final manuscript. P.M. collected data, contributed to writing the paper, and approved the final manuscript. K.S. collected data, contributed to writing the paper, and approved the final manuscript. S.K.R. assisted in study design, data collection, writing the paper, and approved the final manuscript. L.A.L. assisted in study design, data collection, analysis and interpretation, writing the paper, and approved the final manuscript. A.D.P. assisted in study design, data collection, analysis, and interpretation, writing the paper, and approved the final manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript. 1Published as a supplement to The Journal of Nutrition. Presented as part of the symposium entitled Eating Patterns and Energy Balance: A Look at Eating Frequency, Snacking, and Breakfast Omission given at the Experimental Biology 2009 meeting, April 19, 2009, in New Orleans, LA. This symposium was sponsored by the American Society for Nutrition Energy and Macronutrient Metabolism RIS, and was supported by an unrestricted educational grant from the Ingestive Behavior Research Center at Purdue University. The symposium was chaired by Megan A. McCrory and Wayne W. Campbell. Guest Editor for this symposium publication was Anna Maria Siega-Riz. Guest Editor disclosure: No conflicts to disclose. 2Supported by the Minnesota Obesity Center, the Minnesota Medical Foundation, and the General Clinical Research Center supported by the NIH. 4Supplemental Table 1 is available with the online posting of this paper at jn.nutrition.org . 8Abbreviations used: AUC, area under the curve Continue reading >>

Breakfast Ideas For The Insulin Resistant

Breakfast Ideas For The Insulin Resistant

Insulin resistance is a condition in which your cells become unable to absorb glucose because they no longer respond to the presence of insulin. As a result, your blood sugar levels rise and your risk for developing Type 2 diabetes increases. If you are insulin resistant, alter your diet to prevent spikes in blood sugar that can contribute to insulin resistance. A variety of healthy and delicious breakfast options can fuel your morning without raising your blood sugar to unhealthy levels. Eggs Eggs are a classic morning food that offer a breakfast-perfect blend of nutritional value, digestibility and convenience. Their high-protein content and virtually no sugar make eggs an ideal option for anyone with insulin resistance. You can cook eggs in many ways from simple to elaborate. Boil them ahead of time for a quick and portable meal or snack, whip them up quickly for scrambled or fried eggs or for the ultimate in modern convenience, poach your eggs in a microwave egg poacher. If your cholesterol level runs high and your doctor has advised you to limit or avoid eggs, use egg whites or egg substitutes. Yogurt Plain yogurt is a smooth, creamy treat for any meal and an ideal low-sugar breakfast food. Pair your yogurt with a sprinkle of nuts or sunflower seeds for added flavor and texture. Though the process of yogurt-making eliminates much of the lactose -- the natural sugar in milk -- some lactose remains. Plain yogurt contains about 17 grams of sugar per cup, fruited yogurt contains up to 40 grams of sugar per cup and yogurt sweetened with artificial sweetener contains 19 grams of sugar per cup. Ask your doctor or nutritionist about including yogurt in your diet. If you use a blood-sugar monitor, experiment to find out how plain yogurt affects your blood sugar and how much Continue reading >>

Diet For Hyperinsulinism

Diet For Hyperinsulinism

Based in Springfield, Mo., Jillian Ball, registered and licensed dietitian, has been writing nutrition-based content since 2004. Ball is a nutrition consultant and diabetes educator, and is certified in childhood and adolescent weight management. She holds a bachelor's degree in dietetics with cum laude honors from Missouri State University. Insulin and syringe.Photo Credit: Creatas Images/Creatas/Getty Images Hyperinsulinism occurs when the body produces too much insulin. According to Genetics Home Reference, this can happen as a result of genetics, called familial hyperinsulinism, or it can occur in response to insulin resistance, which causes the pancreas to overproduce insulin in an effort to maintain normal blood sugar levels. Insulin is a hormone that is released in response to glucose, or sugar, in the blood stream, making diet a major part of treatment. Doctors may not identify hyperinsulinism.Photo Credit: Monkey Business Images/Monkey Business/Getty Images The identification, or diagnosis, of hyperinsulinism often goes undetected by you or your doctor. Explained by the January 2013 "Gene Reveiw," hyperinsulinism does not usually present itself with signs or symptoms until low blood sugar occurs, also known as hypoglycemia. Even then, signs of hypoglycemia are somewhat generic resulting in fatigue, weakness, dizziness or irritability, which can point to a number of conditions. In infants, hyperinsulinism symptoms include poor feeding and seizures. Diet is important to keep healthy.Photo Credit: olgakr/iStock/Getty Images When combating abnormalities in glucose -- sugar -- or insulin regulation in the body, diet intake is always a concern and should be closely monitored. Sugar, especially refined sugars such as white or brown sugar, honey, jellies and syrups, w Continue reading >>

Should We Advice Diabetic And Obese Patients To Stop Eating Breakfast?

Should We Advice Diabetic And Obese Patients To Stop Eating Breakfast?

Here is a little piece I wrote up about diurnal variations, meal timing, and meal frequency in DM2. Would love to hear feedback. In the memoirs of Dr. George Cahill (32) entitled “Fuel Metabolism in Starvation”, which summarized a lifetime of medical research on starvation, fasting and diabetes, Dr. Cahill notes: “We also fasted two type 2 diabetics, who differed from the normals by better nitrogen conservation. They were slightly more efficient, in keeping with the concept of James Neel (at Michigan) that type 2 diabetes may have been an evolutionary selective advantage in a starving population”. These results were subsequently supported, in that those with DM2 produced more ketones in response to starvation, indicating that they were indeed more efficient at producing the most energy-dense and efficient fuel currency suitable for starvation (33). Fairman & Moorhouse (33) also noticed a significant diurnal rhythm under fasting conditions now commonly referred to as “The Dawn Phenomenon”, which results in a dramatic increase in fasted morning glucose levels. The Dawn Phenomenon has since been observed in studies on individuals with DM2 (34). Many researchers attribute this phenomenon to the morning increase in cortisol - unsurprisingly the administration of the cortisol inhibitor Metyrapone resulted in a decrease of plasma cortisol and blood glucose during a 12h fasted morning test in those with DM2 (35), and hyperglycemia is routinely observed in those who suffer from hypercortisolism (36). It has also been observed that lean patients with DM2 and glucose intolerance had an enhanced sensitivity to cortisol, which contributed significantly to hyperglycemia (37). Although healthy non-diabetic individuals experience a morning increase in cortisol, and young h Continue reading >>

Hyperinsulinemia And Insulin Resistance T2d 22

Hyperinsulinemia And Insulin Resistance T2d 22

Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance T2D 22 Home / Diabetes , Health and Nutrition /Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance T2D 22 Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance T2D 22 Laura was only 25 when she was diagnosed with an insulinoma, a rare tumor that secretes abnormally large amounts of insulin in the absence of any other significant disease. This forces blood glucose very low causing recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia. Laura was constantly hungry and soon began to gain weight. As insulin is a major driver of obesity, weight gain is consistent symptom of the disease. She noticed problems with concentration and coordination, as she had inadequate glucose to maintain brain function. One night, as she was driving, she lost control of her feet and narrowly avoided an accident. She had experienced a seizure related to hypoglycemia. Fortunately, the correct diagnosis was soon made and she had corrective surgery. Lauras symptoms may appear severe, but they would have been much worse, if her body had not taken protective steps. As her insulin levels increased, insulin resistance increased in lock stepa protective mechanism and a very good thing. Without insulin resistance, the high insulin levels would rapidly lead to very, very low blood sugars and death. Since the body doesnt want to die (and neither do we), it protects itself by developing insulin resistance demonstrating homeostasis. The resistance develops naturally to shield against the unusually high insulin levels. Insulin causes insulin resistance. Surgical removal is the preferred treatment and dramatically lowers the patients insulin levels. With the tumor gone, insulin resistance dramatically reverses, as do associated conditions. Reversing the high insulin levels reverses insulin resistance. Exposure crea Continue reading >>

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