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Humalog Losing Effectiveness

Humalog Side Effects

Humalog Side Effects

Generic Name: insulin lispro (IN soo lin LISS pro) Brand Names: HumaLOG, HumaLOG Cartridge, HumaLOG KwikPen, HumaLOG KwikPen (Concentrated) What is Humalog? Humalog (insulin lispro) is a fast-acting insulin that starts to work about 15 minutes after injection, peaks in about 1 hour, and keeps working for 2 to 4 hours. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Humalog is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Humalog is used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. Humalog is also used to treat type 1 diabetes in adults and children who are at least 3 years old. Important information Humalog is a fast-acting insulin that begins to work very quickly. If you use this medication with meal, use it within 15 minutes before or just after you eat. Never share an injection pen, cartridge, or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. You should not use Humalog if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Humalog is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels. Before taking this medicine You should not use Humalog if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Humalog should not be given to a child younger than 3 years old. Humalog should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure Humalog is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if Continue reading >>

How Long Does Insulin Last Once It's Been Opened?

How Long Does Insulin Last Once It's Been Opened?

A fellow caregiver asked... My mother has type 2 diabetes and needs help with her insulin injections. After I open a new bottle, how long does insulin last for, how should I store it, and how do I know whether it's gone bad? Expert Answers As a general rule, most bottles of insulin are good for 28 days once they're opened. Of course, how quickly a person goes through a vial is highly individual. Some may go through a bottle in a week or two. Others, on a lower dosage, may not use all the insulin within four weeks. But the drug's stability and potency is only guaranteed for 28 days. Opened insulin pens typically last 14 days, though some last only 10 days. If you're uncertain, check with your mother's pharmacist to find out how long her insulin should last. When either of you opens a new vial or pen, make a note on the calendar -- and note the date when you'll need to throw out any remaining insulin. It's best to store an opened bottle of insulin at room temperature, even though manufacturers often recommend refrigeration for opened containers. It's usually less painful to inject insulin when it's at room temperature than when it's cold. Store unopened insulin vials and pen cartridges in the fridge, though, where they should last until their expiration date. Insulin shouldn't be exposed to extreme temperatures, so don't leave it in the car, next to the stove, in the freezer, or in the bathroom. If the bottle freezes, it must be discarded. Two typical signs that insulin has gone bad: poor performance and unusual appearance. If your mother is following her treatment plan and her glucose levels stay stubbornly, inexplicably high, her insulin may have lost its potency. Insulin that's cloudy when it's supposed to be clear or that contains particles, crystals, or small clumps Continue reading >>

Insulin Lispro: A Fast-acting Insulin Analog

Insulin Lispro: A Fast-acting Insulin Analog

Research has established the importance of maintaining blood glucose levels near normal in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Short-acting insulin analogs are designed to overcome the limitations of regular short-acting insulins. Compared with regular human insulin, the analog insulin lispro offers faster subcutaneous absorption, an earlier and greater insulin peak and a more rapid post-peak decrease. Insulin lispro begins to exert its effects within 15 minutes of subcutaneous administration, and peak levels occur 30 to 90 minutes after administration. Duration of activity is less than five hours. Rates of insulin allergy, lipodystrophy, hypoglycemia and abnormal laboratory test results are essentially the same in patients using insulin lispro and in those using regular human insulin. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)1 established the importance of maintaining near-normal blood glucose levels in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. In these patients, intensive therapeutic regimens have been found to delay the onset and reduce the progression of microvascular complications by 50 to 75 percent as compared with conventional regimens. Although no large-scale investigations have been completed, smaller studies have reported similar benefits for intensive therapeutic regimens in patients with type 2 (non–insulin-dependent) diabetes.2 Primary care physicians provide medical care for 75 percent of children and 90 to 95 percent of adults with diabetes.3 Regardless of the type of diabetes, improved glycemic control often can be achieved with individualized tools for patient self-management, carefully formulated nutrition plans and the use of alternative insulin regimens.4 Overview of Insulin Insulin is necessary Continue reading >>

Information Regarding Insulin Storage And Switching Between Products In An Emergency

Information Regarding Insulin Storage And Switching Between Products In An Emergency

en Español Insulin Storage and Effectiveness Insulin for Injection Insulin from various manufacturers is often made available to patients in an emergency and may be different from a patient's usual insulin. After a disaster, patients in the affected area may not have access to refrigeration. According to the product labels from all three U.S. insulin manufacturers, it is recommended that insulin be stored in a refrigerator at approximately 36°F to 46°F. Unopened and stored in this manner, these products maintain potency until the expiration date on the package. Insulin products contained in vials or cartridges supplied by the manufacturers (opened or unopened) may be left unrefrigerated at a temperature between 59°F and 86°F for up to 28 days and continue to work. However, an insulin product that has been altered for the purpose of dilution or by removal from the manufacturer’s original vial should be discarded within two weeks. Note: Insulin loses some effectiveness when exposed to extreme temperatures. The longer the exposure to extreme temperatures, the less effective the insulin becomes. This can result in loss of blood glucose control over time. Under emergency conditions, you might still need to use insulin that has been stored above 86°F. You should try to keep insulin as cool as possible. If you are using ice, avoid freezing the insulin. Do not use insulin that has been frozen. Keep insulin away from direct heat and out of direct sunlight. When properly stored insulin becomes available again, the insulin vials that have been exposed to these extreme conditions should be discarded and replaced as soon as possible. If patients or healthcare providers have specific questions about the suitability of their insulin, they may call the respective manufacturer a Continue reading >>

Insulin Lispro - Injection, Humalog

Insulin Lispro - Injection, Humalog

The display and use of drug information on this site is subject to express terms of use. By continuing to view the drug information, you agree to abide by such terms of use. insulin lispro - injection, Humalog GENERIC NAME: INSULIN LISPRO - INJECTION (IN-su-lin LIS-proe) USES: Insulin lispro is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke.Insulin lispro is a man-made product that is similar to human insulin. It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. Insulin lispro starts working faster and lasts for a shorter time than regular insulin. It works by helping blood sugar (glucose) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. This medication is usually used with a medium- or long-acting insulin product. Insulin lispro may also be used with other oral diabetes medications (such as sulfonylureas like glyburide or glipizide). Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication HOW TO USE: Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist.Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package.Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin. Insulin lispro should be clear and colorless.Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the s Continue reading >>

Humulin R Versus Humalog: A Side-by-side Comparison

Humulin R Versus Humalog: A Side-by-side Comparison

Diabetes is a disease that causes high blood sugar levels. Left untreated, high blood sugar levels can cause many problems, such as heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney failure, and blindness. Humulin R and Humalog are two different types of insulin that can help lower your blood sugar level. These drugs work in slightly different ways. In general, insulin lowers your blood sugar level by signaling to your muscle and fat cells to use sugar from your blood. It also signals your liver to stop making sugar. Depending on the type and severity of your diabetes, you may need to take insulin. We’ll compare and contrast Humulin R and Humalog to help you decide if one may be a good choice to treat your diabetes. Humulin R is a brand name for regular insulin. It is a short-acting insulin. That means that it takes about 30 minutes to reach your bloodstream and works for about three to six hours. Humalog is a brand name for insulin lispro, which is a fast-acting insulin. It takes about 15 minutes to start working, but it only lasts two to four hours. The following table compares more features of these two drugs. Humulin R Humalog What drug is it? Regular insulin (short-acting insulin) Insulin lispro (fast-acting insulin) What’s it used for? Blood sugar control in people with diabetes Blood sugar control in people with diabetes Do I need a prescription to buy this drug? No Yes Is a generic version available? No No What forms does it come in? Injectable solution, available in a vial for use with a syringe Injectable solution, available in a vial for use with a syringe. Injectable solution, available in a cartridge that you use in a device called a KwikPen How much do I take? Your doctor will tell you what dose to inject. This depends on your blood sugar readings and the Continue reading >>

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

Editor’s comment: The commentary by Dr. Grajower has such important clinical relevance that responses were invited from the three pharmaceutical companies that supply insulin in the U.S. and the American Diabetes Association, and all of these combined in this commentary. The commenting letter and individual responses were authored separately and are completely independent of each other. Diabetic patients treated with insulin, whether for type 1 or type 2 diabetes, are prone to often unexplained swings in their blood glucose. These swings can vary from dangerously low to persistently high levels. Most diabetic patients, and most physicians, will adjust insulin regimens so as to avoid hypoglycemia at the expense of hyperglycemia. Among the “textbook” reasons for variable glucose responses to any given insulin regimen are 1) site of administration, 2) exercise, 3) bottles not adequately mixed before drawing the insulin (for NPH, Lente, or Ultralente), and 4) duration of treatment with insulin (1). A new insulin was marketed by Aventis Pharmaceuticals about 1 year ago, insulin glargine (Lantus). The manufacturer seemed to stress that patients not use a started bottle of this insulin for >28 days (2). Two patients of mine highlighted this point. L.K. is a 76-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes, diagnosed at 55 years of age, and treated with insulin since age 56. Her insulin regimen was changed to Lantus at night together with Novolog before meals. She monitors her blood glucose four times a day. She used a bottle of Lantus until it ran out; therefore, a bottle lasted for 2 months. Her recent HbA1c was 7.6%. I retrospectively analyzed her home glucose readings by averaging her fasting blood glucose levels for the first 15 days of a new bottle and the last 15 days of tha Continue reading >>

How Long Does Insulin Keep?

How Long Does Insulin Keep?

D.D. Family T1 since February 1980, new to insulin pump. Just wondering how long the newer insulins keep. I never really thought about them going bad, but I certainly wouldn't want to use insulin that is too old. Once the newer insulins are open they should be thrown away after 28 days. I know that seems like a waste, but once open it will start to loose its effect. Especially if not kept in the fridge. I keep an insulin pen in my purse in case something happens with the pump and I need it. Have to remind myself to throw it away at the end of every month. oh gosh i am so bad, I have paranoia about having my humalog and lantus in the same room, I keep the lantus upstairs and the humalog downstairs, My lantus runs out probably in 40 days anyway, but my humalog It last forever, maybe that is my problem sometimes, but who can afford that I have tons of humalog but no Lantus ugh, I am gonna go broke oh well I have been told several times, including by my wife, once the vial is opened, it has 30 days and then throw it away. Unopened they will last until the expiration date on the box. I keep mine in the fridge, and have never had any problems. My wife said in the past, who tried to stretch her insulin beyond the 30 days and it basically lost its potency. The newer insulins will go bad really quickly if you have them somewhere warm - especially Humalog and Lantus, but also Novolog. I had a vial of Novolog go bad after I was in the car and the blower was on my purse for about four hours and it wasn't even too warm. Now I use a cold pack if I'm going to be somewhere warm (but don't use something that can freeze the insulin). I know it doesn't go bad in the pump usually, but consider you only have it on for three days whereas you keep a vial for 28. When insulin starts to go bad Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: What’s The Difference?

Humalog Vs. Novolog: What’s The Difference?

The two leaders in the fast acting insulin market, Humalog and Novolog, are the most common types of fast acting insulin used by those with diabetes today. Fast Acting, mealtime insulin is a type of insulin that is injected before or right after eating. When you eat your blood glucose begins to rise. Fast acting insulin, Humalog and Novolog work to help manage these rises or spikes to keep your blood glucose levels more within range and balanced. When you use a fast acting insulin like Humalog or Novolog, you typically will continue to take a long acting insulin to help manage your levels between your meals and throughout the night. The question is though, is there really a difference between the two? Endocrinologists and other medical professionals don’t seem to really think there is, stating the two are virtually interchangeable. But that’s not really the full story. Humalog (Insulin Lispro) Insulin Lispro (Humalog) has been on the market since 1996, when it was first introduced by Eli Lily. Humalog is the first insulin analogue that was used clinically. Insulin Lispro received its name due to its structure. The difference between it and regular insulin was the switch between the lysine B28 (an amino acid) and proline B29. The formula consists of a hexametric solution available in vials and pen form. After a subcutaneous injection, the formula converts into a monomeric formula which allows it to have a fast absorption in the body. The one noted negative factor of Humalog is its short term control of glucose levels. Additionally, if it is injected and mealtime happens to be delayed, a hypoglycemic episode may occur. For Humalog to be most effective it is to be injected 15 minutes prior to the start of a meal. I recommend reading the following articles: Humalog is a Continue reading >>

Can Insulin Lose It's Effectiveness?

Can Insulin Lose It's Effectiveness?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I use both Humalog and Levemir. I have been having higher readings lately in my BG and was wondering if my formula needed a change. Or what was wrong. Today I opened a new batch of Humalog in the pen form. Usually I use a syringe. The new insulin really worked and put my BG at the numbers I needed. Has anyone ever found that the last of a vial of Humalog (or any other) insulin did not seem to work for them....or as well? I do leave it out til it is gone and do not refrigerate as that is what the directions say. It was good til 2013. I use both Humalog and Levemir. I have been having higher readings lately in my BG and was wondering if my formula needed a change. Or what was wrong. Today I opened a new batch of Humalog in the pen form. Usually I use a syringe. The new insulin really worked and put my BG at the numbers I needed. Has anyone ever found that the last of a vial of Humalog (or any other) insulin did not seem to work for them....or as well? I do leave it out til it is gone and do not refrigerate as that is what the directions say. It was good til 2013. If it's left out too long, it will lose it's effectiveness. How long was it left out at room temperature? Unrefridgerated it will last about a month (actually a little shorter). Refridgerated it's good until it's exparation date. All of the info you need should have been with the documentation that came in the box. What I need to do is write down the date I opened it and see if it lasts or goes over the 30 days expected for effectiveness. I just wasn't watching how long it lasted. Different amounts on different days according to the ca Continue reading >>

Can Humalog Handle The Heat?

Can Humalog Handle The Heat?

See also: Kinetic vs Dynamics and User's Reports Humalog is a terrific insulin that improves postmeal readings, reduces the frequency of lows, and generally makes people feel better. But reports from people on both pumps and injections have surfaced indicating that Humalog has trouble handling the heat. These reports began to appear just after Humalog was released. Most insulins are relatively stable in hot weather, and lose potency only with unusually high temperatures (i.e., a non-refrigerated delivery truck with a flat tire in Phoenix in August). However, Humalog has gained a reputation for wanting to stay in your refrigerator, raising concerns about how your insulin is handled in transit to your pharmacy or home. Users report random, unexpected high blood sugars that correct when a new bottle of Humalog is started. Inspection of the bad bottle reveals either 1) several very tiny particles, much smaller than those typically found in a bad bottle of Regular, 2) one or two large hazy particles, or 3) small particles attached to the insides of the bottle. Healthy Humalog will appear as pure as clear water, with no particles or haze. Insulin pumps may be especially prone to unexpected highs because they use only Humalog. Heat-related problems typically start after three to four days use in a pump, or, when a bad bottle is encountered, immediately after first use of that bottle. On injections, the problem typically shows up as unexpected high readings after meals. Research studies undertaken so far have indicated no problem with use of Humalog in pumps. Prior to Humalog's release, Lilly conducted extensive heat and stability testing, and believed that it was as stable as Regular insulin which has an excellent history. But in the larger lab of the world, a loss of activit Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Summer: How To Beat The Heat

Diabetes And Summer: How To Beat The Heat

Diabetes and summer: How to beat the heat You're smart to be thinking ahead. If you have diabetes, you're at greater risk of heat exhaustion, which occurs when you're exposed to high temperatures for a long period of time and don't replace the fluids you lose. Follow these tips to stay safe in hot weather: Prevent dehydration. Both hot weather and high blood sugar can cause dehydration. So it's doubly important that you drink plenty of fluids throughout the day. Water is best. Avoid alcohol, sugary beverages and sports drinks. Protect yourself from the sun. The heat index can be up to 15 F (9 C) higher in full sunlight. Stay in the shade as much as possible when you're outside. Wear a hat and sunscreen too. Wear light, loose-fitting clothes. When humidity is high, your sweat can't evaporate as well. Wear clothing that allows sweat to evaporate easily. Plan outdoor activities to avoid the heat. Schedule outdoor activities during the cooler hours of the day, such as early morning or late evening. Alternatively, consider walking in a shopping mall or department store. Check your blood sugar. When you're out in the heat, consider testing your blood sugar more often. Peggy Moreland (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 11, 2018. Managing diabetes in the heat. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed April 11, 2018. Continue reading >>

Does Insulin Lose Its Punch?

Does Insulin Lose Its Punch?

I am on the Medtronic MiniMed Paradigm pump, and I've noticed that my insulin is not as effective toward the end of the MiniMed reservoir. I believe this happens in conjunction with the end of the vial of insulin I draw from as well. Is this common?I use insulin glulisine (Apidra), and I never use a vial that is more than 30 days old. I use approximately 60 to 70 units per day. I fill the MiniMed reservoir with 210 units when I replace the insulin. John Dorney, Franklin, New Jersey Belinda Childs, MN, ARNP, BC-ADM, CDE, responds: Insulin sometimes does not seem as "potent" near the end of a pump reservoir, or even near the end of a vial. The Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of insulin that is in a reservoir for up to six days, depending on the brand of insulin. The studies that determined this time frame were based on how insulin worked in a controlled setting. Insulin's effectiveness in the day-to-day life of the average person with diabetes certainly varies from the lab result, though, and it varies even more from individual to individual. This is part of what makes diabetes so complicated: Everyone is different. If you are using 210 units every three days, you would use a vial of insulin about every 12 days. Sometimes people use insulin from more than one vial, which prolongs the exposure to outside factors. If possible, use insulin out of only one vial: That way, you will use it up in a timely manner. It also may be helpful to look at how you store insulin. Do you keep it in a cool, dry place? Any insulin you have not begun using should be stored in the refrigerator. Protect insulin and other medications from sun, temperatures higher than 86 degrees, and, most of all, humidity. Keeping them in a warm, humid bathroom, or in a sunny area of the kitch Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog and Novolog are two diabetes medications. Humalog is the brand-name version of insulin lispro, and Novolog is the brand-name version of insulin aspart. These drugs both help control blood glucose (sugar) in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Humalog and Novolog are both rapid acting. That means they work more quickly than other types of insulin. There are important distinctions between Humalog and Novolog, however, and the drugs are not directly interchangeable. Check out this comparison so you can work with your doctor to choose a drug that’s right for you. Insulin is injected under your skin fat. It’s the most common type of treatment for type 1 diabetes because it works quickly. It’s also the only type of diabetes medication that’s absorbed into the bloodstream. Humalog and Novolog are both equivalent to the insulin made in your body. Unlike oral diabetes drugs, insulin provides fast relief for changes in your blood sugar. The type of insulin your doctor prescribes depends on how often and how much your blood sugar fluctuates each day. The table below provides quick facts at a glance. Brand name Humalog Novolog What is the generic drug? insulin lispro insulin aspart Is a generic version available? no no What does it treat? type 1 and type 2 diabetes type 1 and type 2 diabetes What form does it come in? solution for injection solution for injection What strengths does it come in? • 3-mL cartridges • 3-mL prefilled KwikPen • 3-mL vials • 10-mL vials • 3-mL FlexPen • 3-mL FlexTouch • 3-mL PenFill cartridges • 10-mL vials What is the typical length of treatment? long-term long-term How do I store it? Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Continue reading >>

Managing Blood Sugar

Managing Blood Sugar

Everyone’s experience with mealtime insulin is different, but there are some things you can look out for. Your Humalog dose will probably change over time. Your doctor gave you a starting dose, but most people need to increase their Humalog dose over time. When you track your blood sugar every day, you will probably see different numbers all the time. These variations in your blood sugar from day to day are normal. Your blood sugar varies based on stress, what you eat, other medications, exercise, and other factors. Don't be discouraged by changes in your blood sugar. With your doctor’s input, these variations may provide learning opportunities. Testing your blood sugar When using mealtime insulin like Humalog, you must test your blood sugar (glucose) regularly. For example, you may need to test before and after meals and at bedtime. Your doctor will tell you when and how often you should test. Why keep track? Keeping track of your blood sugar levels will help you and your doctor: Know if you’re meeting your blood sugar goals Learn how different foods affect your blood sugar levels Figure out how much insulin you should be taking Your doctor will tell you what to do if your blood sugar is high or low. If you take too much Humalog, your blood sugar may fall too low (hypoglycemia). If you forget to take your dose of Humalog, your blood sugar may go too high (hyperglycemia). Your blood sugar goals The American Diabetes Association recommends blood sugar goals for people with diabetes. These don’t apply to everyone, however, so work with your doctor to set the right goals for you. These goals are not applicable to pregnant women or children. These goals should be individualized. About high blood sugar One of the goals of your diabetes treatment is to keep blood suga Continue reading >>

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