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Humalog Kwikpen Sliding Scale Chart

Understanding The Sliding Scale In Diabetes Care

Understanding The Sliding Scale In Diabetes Care

One of the tools physicians use to help people who take insulin keep their blood glucose in control is a sliding scale. There are many reasons your health care provider may prescribe this type of insulin regimen for you but foremost it has to do with how much involvement you are able to have and want to have in figuring out your insulin needs. Some people want to spend as little time and effort as possible with their insulin and are willing to follow a structured, time-bound meal plan. For these folks a fixed dose (taking the same amount of insulin at each meal regardless of their blood glucose level or the type or amount of food they are eating) is a good choice. On the other end of the spectrum is matching insulin to carbohydrate. This requires a strong commitment to carb counting and following a mathematical algorithm at meals. The sliding scale falls smack in the middle. No math to do, meal timing isn’t as important but carbohydrate content at meals does need to be standardized. When people hear the term “sliding scale,” they might picture a balance scale with weights tumbling off one end. Now there is no physical object to slide; rather it is a chart that tells you how much insulin to give yourself at meals based on your blood glucose levels The chart is divided into a series of columns. The column farthest to the left lists blood glucose ranges starting from below 70mg/dl to 400mg/dl or more, increasing in increments of anywhere from 20 mg to 50 mg/dl. The other columns correspond to breakfast, lunch and dinner, and, if necessary, bedtime. The columns may have you take different amounts of insulin at different times of the day at the same blood glucose level. This may be because your sensitivity to insulin changes throughout the day or because your meals ten Continue reading >>

Helpful Hints For Humalog:

Helpful Hints For Humalog:

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW by John Walsh, P.A., C.D.E., and Ruth Roberts, M.A. Copyright--1996 by Diabetes Services, Inc. The new, fast insulin Humalog, is finally here. Since the introduction of Lilly's new insulin, many people have been switching over. This is the first insulin produced since 1921 that can really cover most meals, and its speed of action offers users more flexibility and control. This article provides helpful hints for safety and success when starting this new product. Almost everyone who is switching to Humalog is doing so to replace their Regular insulin. Regular is often thought of as "meal" Regular or "high blood sugar" Regular, but its action time of five to eight hours more closely resembles a long-acting insulin. After switching from Regular to Humalog, many people have found that fewer units of Humalog are needed to cover the same food. Fewer units may also be needed to lower high blood sugars. Others have discovered that as meal doses are lowered, they need to raise their long-acting insulin to replace some of the lost meal dose. The Regular insulin most people take for breakfast has, in effect, been lowering their after-lunch blood sugars as well. This prolonged action is no longer seen with Humalog. Several of my (John's) patients and several diabetes colleagues have found they need extra long-acting insulin in the morning after switching in order to keep the afternoon and pre-dinner readings down. Another alternative is to use extra Humalog to cover lunch. When given before most meals, Humalog will cover these meals only during the time they are raising the blood sugar. Its action is gone before the next meal begins, and most importantly for many, before going to bed. This eliminates many nighttime lows. But with the loss of the longer action o Continue reading >>

Humalog Side Effects

Humalog Side Effects

Generic Name: insulin lispro (IN soo lin LISS pro) Brand Names: HumaLOG, HumaLOG Cartridge, HumaLOG KwikPen, HumaLOG KwikPen (Concentrated) What is Humalog? Humalog (insulin lispro) is a fast-acting insulin that starts to work about 15 minutes after injection, peaks in about 1 hour, and keeps working for 2 to 4 hours. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Humalog is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Humalog is used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. Humalog is also used to treat type 1 diabetes in adults and children who are at least 3 years old. Important information Humalog is a fast-acting insulin that begins to work very quickly. If you use this medication with meal, use it within 15 minutes before or just after you eat. Never share an injection pen, cartridge, or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. You should not use Humalog if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Humalog is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels. Before taking this medicine You should not use Humalog if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Humalog should not be given to a child younger than 3 years old. Humalog should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure Humalog is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if Continue reading >>

Lantus Insulin / Humalog Insulin

Lantus Insulin / Humalog Insulin

I bought five of the Star Solo Pens of the Lantus insulin today; the cost was $227.30, but my insurance co-pay was only $45.00, saving me $182.30. I also bought five of the Humalog Kwik-Pens for a total cost of $346.99, with an insurance co-pay also of $45.00, thus saving me $301.99. I am retired and I live on a fixed income. What do people do who do not have insurance or help from family members? My blood glucose levels run in the 200 range and I test five times a day. I take 50 units of the Lantus insulin in the morning; and then I take the Humalog insulin on a sliding scale depending on my blood sugar levels. My biggest complaint is the constant, never-ending pain in both my feet from the diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Ive wondered the same thing. Those of us with good healthcare are so fortunate. I, for one, cannot imagine dealing with the costs of diabetes on my own - I would be broke. But there are non-profit charity care programs that qualifying diabetics can access. Also, some clinics will give out free insulin samples from the pharmaceutical (sp?) reps. Are there any meds you can take to help with the peripheral neuropathy in your feet? I am taking Gabapentin (the generic of Neurontin); I take six (6) 600-mg. tablets per day; two tablets at a time, three times a day; and I also take 1000 Units of vitamin E and 1000 units of vitamin D. It helps a little, but not very much. I was on Cymbalta at one time and then the doctor prescribed Ultracet; and the pharmacist caught the error - that combination can cause death as a side effect. I have also been on Hydrocodone but that did not help at all. I have tried topical ointments but nothing helps. I was on Lyrica at one time and that did not help. I am thinking of looking into electrical appliances as an alternative. Continue reading >>

Sliding Scale: Sliding Scale For Humalog

Sliding Scale: Sliding Scale For Humalog

Insulin Action Reference Chart - Different Medications Humalog: Insulin Lispro <15 minutes: 1-2 hours: 3-4 hours: Novolog: Insulin Aspart <15 minutes: 1-2 hours: 3-4 hours: REGULAR: Humulin R: Regular: 1/2 - 1 hour: 2-3 hours: 3-6 hours: Novolin R: Regular: 1/2 - 1 hour: 2-3 hours: 3-6 hours: INTERMEDIATE ACTING: Humulin N: NPH: 2-4 hours: 4-10 ... Read Article Types Of Fast- And Short-Acting Insulins - About.com Health A handy chart is provided for each of the fast- and short-acting insulins along with how quickly they take effect, the length to reach full potency and the duration of the insulin to lower blood sugar. About.com. Food; Humalog (generic name: lispro): Onset: 5-15 minutes ; Peak action: 30 ... Read Article I never enjoy saying it, but sometimes I have to: Youre going to have to take insulin. Theres nothing else I can do to help your diabetes. I hate doing this because I know insulin can cause swelling, weight gain, and actually slightly accelerates hardening of the arteries ... View Video PHYSICIANS ORDERS - CSHP Saskatchewan Branch Sections 1 & 2 must be completed if scheduled insulin plus sliding scale is required. ___ Insulin Dose: 30 minutes before meals *Not more than 15 minutes before meals for rapid acting insulin (i.e. Humalog )* BREAKFAST LUNCH SUPPER BEDTIME ____units Humalog ____units Humulin R ... Fetch Here Sliding scale Fees - Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia Sliding scale fees are variable prices for products, services, or taxes based on a customer's ability to pay. Such fees are thereby reduced for those who have lower incomes, or alternatively, less money to spare after their personal expenses, ... Read Article Continue reading >>

The Abcs Of Insulin

The Abcs Of Insulin

Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin is required to move sugar from the blood into the body’s cells, where it can be used for energy. For the symptoms of high blood sugar and low blood sugar, see Tables 1 and 2. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Only 5% of patients with diabetes have this form of the disease, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is much more common; the risk factors are listed in online table 3. Individuals with T2D make insulin, but their bodies don’t respond well to it, a condition known as insulin resistance. Treatment of T2D usually begins with dietary and lifestyle changes, as well as oral medications. Over time, as the pancreas struggles to make an adequate amount of insulin to overcome insulin resistance, patients may require insulin supplementation. Insulin therapy must be individualized and balanced with meal planning and exercise. When a patient begins using insulin to manage diabetes, the initial dose is just a starting point. Over time, insulin requirements are affected by factors such as weight gain or loss, changes in eating habits, and the addition of other medications. The need for insulin often increases, and the dose must be readjusted to meet the new requirements. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, meaning not very deep under the skin. Common injection sites include the stomach, buttocks, thighs, and upper arms. By rotating the site of injection, patients can avoid lipohypertrophy, a slight increase in the growth or size of fat cells under the skin. When lipohypertrophy occurs, a soft pillowy growth may form at the repeated-use injection site. Therefore, for reliable absorption rates and cosmetic Continue reading >>

Managing Blood Sugar

Managing Blood Sugar

Everyone’s experience with mealtime insulin is different, but there are some things you can look out for. Your Humalog dose will probably change over time. Your doctor gave you a starting dose, but most people need to increase their Humalog dose over time. When you track your blood sugar every day, you will probably see different numbers all the time. These variations in your blood sugar from day to day are normal. Your blood sugar varies based on stress, what you eat, other medications, exercise, and other factors. Don't be discouraged by changes in your blood sugar. With your doctor’s input, these variations may provide learning opportunities. Testing your blood sugar When using mealtime insulin like Humalog, you must test your blood sugar (glucose) regularly. For example, you may need to test before and after meals and at bedtime. Your doctor will tell you when and how often you should test. Why keep track? Keeping track of your blood sugar levels will help you and your doctor: Know if you’re meeting your blood sugar goals Learn how different foods affect your blood sugar levels Figure out how much insulin you should be taking Your doctor will tell you what to do if your blood sugar is high or low. If you take too much Humalog, your blood sugar may fall too low (hypoglycemia). If you forget to take your dose of Humalog, your blood sugar may go too high (hyperglycemia). Your blood sugar goals The American Diabetes Association recommends blood sugar goals for people with diabetes. These don’t apply to everyone, however, so work with your doctor to set the right goals for you. These goals are not applicable to pregnant women or children. These goals should be individualized. About high blood sugar One of the goals of your diabetes treatment is to keep blood suga Continue reading >>

Sliding Scale Therapy

Sliding Scale Therapy

Sliding scale therapy approximates daily insulin requirements. The term "sliding scale" refers to the progressive increase in pre-meal or nighttime insulin doses. The term “sliding scale” refers to the progressive increase in the pre-meal or nighttime insulin dose, based on pre-defined blood glucose ranges. Sliding scale insulin regimens approximate daily insulin requirements. Common sliding scale regimens: Long-acting insulin (glargine/detemir or NPH), once or twice a day with short acting insulin (aspart, glulisine, lispro, Regular) before meals and at bedtime Long-acting insulin (glargine/detemir or NPH), given once a day Regular and NPH, given twice a day Pre-mixed, or short-acting insulin analogs or Regular and NPH, given twice a day The general principles of sliding scale therapy are: The amount of carbohydrate to be eaten at each meal is pre-set. The basal (background) insulin dose doesn’t change. You take the same long-acting insulin dose no matter what the blood glucose level. The bolus insulin is based on the blood sugar level before the meal or at bedtime Pre-mixed insulin doses are based on the blood sugar level before the meal The sliding scale method does not accommodate changes in insulin needs related to snacks or to stress and activity. You still need to count carbohydrates. Sliding scales are less effective in covering a pre-meal high blood sugar, because the high blood glucose correction and food bolus cannot be split. Points To Remember! Sliding scale regimens may include a bedtime high blood sugar correction. As the nighttime scale only considers the amount of insulin required to drop your blood sugar level back into the target range, it should not be used to cover a bedtime snack. When using a sliding scale, eat the same amount of carbohydrat Continue reading >>

Insulin Sliding Scale

Insulin Sliding Scale

Use this sliding scale as an example only Adjust per patient weight and activity or Disability Delays Insulin until Hyperglycemia appears Cover as units per Glucose 50 mg/dl over 150 mg/dl Renal Failure ( Insulin 50% renal excreted) V. Protocol 1: Based on Insulin sensitivity Estimate sensitivity using "rule of 1800" BG change per unit Insulin = 1800/total Insulin daily Example of 60 units/day: 1 unit drops BG 30 mg/dl Protocol (uses rapid acting Insulin , e.g. Lispro ) Using sensitivity, how many units to drop 50 mg/dl For example above, ~1 unit to drop BG 50 mg/dl BG 150-199: 1 unit Bolus Insulin (regular or RA) Based on per carbohydrate when Glucose >60 mg/dl Use for Type I Diabetes , consider for Type II Example: For 3 carbohydrate meal, add 3 units VI. Protocols: Sliding Scales (contact provider if maximum Glucose is exceeded) BG 150-199: 0.5 unit Bolus Insulin (regular or rapid-acting) Schnipper (2009) J Hosp Med 4(1): 16-27 [PubMed] Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Insulin Sliding Scale." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Search Bing for all related images Related Studies (from Trip Database) Open in New Window Therapeutic or Preventive Procedure (T061) esquema de insulina con escala variable (rgimen/tratamiento), esquema de insulina con escala variable (rgimen/terapia), Sliding scale insulin regime, Sliding scale insulin regime (regime/therapy), esquema de insulina con escala variable Derived from the NIH UMLS ( Unified Medical Language System ) FPnotebook.com is a rapid access, point-of-care medical reference for primary care and emergency clinicians. Started in 1995, this collection now contains 6546 interlinked topic pag Continue reading >>

Humalog Sliding Scale Chart

Humalog Sliding Scale Chart

I am looking for a chart of the sliding scle forhumalog insulin. 69 years old.245lbs diabetic ... to increase the humalog as the numers increase. ... My husband has diabetes he is insulin dependant he takes lantus and humalog usually he takes 20 of lantus and 10 to 12 humalog sliding scale . I wasnt aware that he had already took his lantus today ... Can intake of Humulin N and Humalog insulin be changed to Novlin N insulin? I m currently injecting Humulin N and Humalog insulin using a sliding scale. I was diagnosed at age of 14 and I m 52 now. I m currently in fare health with the insulin I m using. My insurance blue cross ... What is the dosage Humalog pens for diabetes? and received a few Humalog pens while there. I need to find a chart that tells how many units he needs, based ... a humalog pen to control his insulin. He was released on Saturday and has kept an eye on his blood sugar ... HI, HOPEFULLY YOU CAN HELP-MY HUSBAND HAS TYPE 2 HE IS CURRENTLY ON HUMALOG AND LEVEMIR FLEX PEN. WE ARE HAVING TROUBLE FINDING A SLIDING SCALE FOR LEVERMIR THAT WE CAN UNDERSTAND. THE DOCTOR GAVE US ... I started insulin about a week ago. Humalog 10 units at each meal. Readings were inconsistent. I was then switched to a sliding scale. Readings were only better for a very short time. Yesterday I was changed ... Is Istamet 50 Mg is substitute of Insulin and what are its constiuent. I am taking Insulin Humalog14 Units in a day, along with Glucovit 50Mg/500Mg. If I substitute Insulin with this oral medicine ... units of Humalog a day by using a pump. We are going to the beach and we use can use Lantus insulin ... for the amount of Humalog insulin he takes to cover him for 8 hours? ... I lost my job and my insurance.I have type 2 diabetes.I cannot afford my Humalog insulin right now. Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs Novolog

Humalog Vs Novolog

Introduction: Diabetic patients take various forms of insulin on a regular basis. One of these forms is called rapid acting insulin. This type of insulin takes its effect within minutes. Currently, the two of the forms available on the market are Lispro (Humalog) and Aspart (NovoLog). These can be used for both Type I and Type II diabetic patients. Patients must always be aware of their need for proper diet and exercise for increased function in treatment. Also, appropriate meal times and promotions are extremely important when receiving regular insulin. Unlike oral medications, these insulins provide rapid relief of high glucose levels. They are usually prescribed on a sliding scale meaning the dosage depends on the current insulin levels. These sliding scales differ from patient to patient depending on weight, activity level, and age. Regular insulin usually lasts for 2-4 hours and reaches their peak after one hour. It is important to check glucose levels before and after administering this type of insulin. These levels, as well as the dosage, applied, should be kept in a record by the patient. (5) It is very important that the patient realizes that regular insulins will need to be used in combination with various other treatments including and not limited to Oral medication, diet, exercise, and long lasting insulin. (1-10) Difference between Humalog and Novolog Humalog (Lispro) Below is the image of a vial of Humalog insulin. Patients should pay close attention to the markings and read the insulin vial before administering to help prevent administration errors. a. Humalog was introduced in 1996 and has been proven safe for use when used correctly. It allows for mealtime injection and close regularization of glucose levels. This image shows the structure of Lispro (Hu Continue reading >>

Pre Meal Sliding Scale Humalog

Pre Meal Sliding Scale Humalog

Im a newly diagnosed LADA diabetic, less than a month. The endocrinologist cant see me until June so Im trying to figure a lot out on my own with the help of my primary care doctor. After finding myself in the ICU in ketoacidosis, I was discharged less than 48 hours later with instructions to eat ~60g of carbs a meal, to inject 9 units of lantus in the morning and 3 units before every meal. My numbers were quite high that whole first week until I saw my primary care doctor who gave me the pre meal sliding scale. Ive modified it a bit and Im having much better numbers. My biggest issue/question is that I am now testing in the no coverage range often at mealtimes, but I know if I dont take any insulin that it will spike at the next check, yet I dont want to take it if I dont need to or if it will end up lowering my BG too much, late night its been falling low enough (65-85) that I get concerned about going to sleep and I have to have a small snack. Ive started taking 2 units anyway when its in the 100-150 range, but I dont really know what Im doing, just going on instinct with a bit of an educational guess. Any advice or tips based on your experiences. Are you keeping a log? I think its the best way to learn how your glucose metabolism works. Itll help to track insulin dose size and type, when given, what you eat and blood glucose numbers with their times. I think you should make a goal to learn how to eventually adjust your insulin doses on your own. You need to be able to make many decisions every day. Doctors can help you but they are seriously limited in their availability. You wont need to keep these records forever but can accelerate your understanding of how insulin works for you. I also suggest that you start reading about how insulin works and the basics of a ba Continue reading >>

Sliding Scale Insulin Therapy

Sliding Scale Insulin Therapy

Insulin is the foundation of treatment for many people with diabetes. If you’re a diabetic, your body either can’t produce enough insulin or can’t use insulin efficiently. People with type 1 diabetes, and some with type 2 diabetes, have to take several injections of insulin per day. The insulin keeps blood sugar in a normal range and prevents high blood sugar levels. This can help prevent complications. The amount of insulin you should take can be determined in several different ways: Fixed-Dose Insulin With this method, you take a certain set amount of insulin units at each meal. For example, you may take 6 units at breakfast and 8 at dinner. The numbers don’t change based on your blood sugar readings or the amount of food you eat. While this may be easier for people just starting insulin, it doesn’t account for pre-meal blood sugar levels. It also doesn’t factor in the varying amounts of carbohydrates in a given meal. Carbohydrate to Insulin Ratio In this method, you take a certain amount of insulin for a certain amount of carbohydrates. For example, if your breakfast carb to insulin ratio is 10:1 and you eat 30 grams of carbohydrates, you would take 3 units before breakfast to cover your meal. This method also includes a “correction factor” that accounts for your pre-meal blood sugar. For example, let’s say you want your blood sugar to be under 150 mg/dL before meals, but it’s at 170. If you’ve been told to take 1 unit of insulin for every 50 you’re over, you would take 1 additional unit of insulin before your meal. While this takes a lot of practice and knowledge, people who can manage this method can keep better control of their post-meal blood sugar levels. Sliding-Scale Insulin Therapy (SSI) In the sliding-scale method, the dose is based o Continue reading >>

Low Dose Sliding Scale Humalog

Low Dose Sliding Scale Humalog

Evaluation Of A Standardized Sliding Scale Insulin Preprinted ... However, sliding scale insulin (SSI) administration is regimens are offered (low, intermediate, and high intensi-ty), which differ in the quantities of SSI to be adminis-tered at given glucose thresholds. tended SSI dose. Discussion ... Doc Viewer Basal/Bolus Subcutaneous Insulin Therapy: A Hospital Practice Medical Care in Diabetes and the AACE recommend using Basal-Bolus insulin therapy in treating adult hospitalized (Humalog), Aspart (Novolog), Glulisine insulin coverage at glucose levels of 150 mg/dl on the low dose) It is not sliding scale and should not be implemented or used as such ... Document Retrieval Insulin Pump - Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia This shape provides a large dose of insulin up front, In the Minimed 640G insulin pump series, low glucose suspend mode can also be entered based on predicted hypoglycemia. These insulins are absorbed more quickly than the currently available Humalog, Novolog, ... Read Article Chapter 2 Subcutaneous Insulin: A Guide For Dosing Regimens ... From a relatively low dose to start. However, Rapid-Acting Insulin (Aspart[Novolog], Lispro[Humalog], or Glulisine Umpierrez GE, Palacio A, Smiley D. Sliding scale insulin dose: myth or insanity. Am J Med. 2007;120(7):563–567 (Review). ... Return Doc 401 Drug Card - Shelbye's CSON Notes Blog 401 Drug Card Brand Name: Humalog/Novolog . Generic Name: Rapid. Acting Insulin. Common Usual Dose: Sliding Scale Max 24 hr Dose(If applicable): Action of Drug: Lower blood sugar by stimulating glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. Indications and Uses ... Read Here Guidelines For Caring For Brittany Walker’s - Insulin Pumpers She will then take a shot of Humalog insulin right before she goes to eat. Sliding Scale FSBS checks Continue reading >>

Sliding Scale Humalog 75 25

Sliding Scale Humalog 75 25

Author: emconneo Sliding scale humalog 75 25 buy humalog buy humalog insulin generic humalog humalog 50 humalog 50 50 humalog 75 25 pen humalog 75 25 side effects humalog 75 25 sliding scale humalog 75/25 humalog buy humalog. Blood sugars very bad, lows in 20-25 range, highs up to 500-600. See nurse. Humalog sliding scale insulin "I am on Humalog mix 75/25. My MD added R insulin sliding scale When do I test to use my sliding scale? What times? Do I test right before bed ? Humalog/sliding scale? Lantus vs Humalog dosage Formula?? - Diabetes - Juvenile Type I. Mealtime Insulin for Type 2 Diabetes Treatment - Humalog (insulin. Important Safety Information for Humalog, Humalog Mix75/25, and. humalog sliding scale - MedHelp - Health community, health. 1 pv 5551 amp . humalog ® mix75/25. tm. 75% insulin lispro protamine suspension and 25% insulin lispro injection (rdna origin) 100 units per ml (u-100) >>Does anyone inject Humalog on a sliding scale? What is >>your scale? >> >>Polly. Using the Humalog 75/25, testing before meals, my scale was: 200 - 300: 4 units Humalog, Humalog Mix75/25 (75% insulin lispro protamine suspension, 25% insulin lispro injection [rDNA origin]), and Humalog Mix50/50 (50%. Humalog Mix75/25 KwikPen and Humalog Mix50/50 KwikPen >Does anyone inject Humalog on a sliding scale? What is your scale? > >Polly. Using the Humalog 75/25, testing before meals, my scale was: 200 - 300: 4 units Humalog/sliding scale? : Diabetes : Active Low-Carber Forums Humalog 75/25: Humalog Mix 75/25 75% insulin lispro protamine. PV 5551 AMP TM HUMALOG Mix75/25 Humalog, Humalog Mix75/25 (75% insulin lispro protamine suspension, 25% insulin lispro injection [rDNA origin]), and Humalog Mix50/50 (50% insulin lispro. Diabetes Q&A | Insulin | I am on Humalog mix 75/25. My MD added Continue reading >>

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