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How To Write A Prescription For Lantus Solostar

Lantus Solostar 100 Unit/ml (3 Ml) Subcutaneous Insulin Pen

Lantus Solostar 100 Unit/ml (3 Ml) Subcutaneous Insulin Pen

Insulin glargine is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke.Insulin glargine is a man-made product that is similar to human insulin. It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. It acts longer than regular insulin, providing a low, steady level of insulin. It works by helping blood sugar (glucose) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. Insulin glargine may be used with a shorter-acting insulin product. It may also be used alone or with other diabetes drugs. Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist.Follow all package directions for proper use/injection/storage of the particular type of device/insulin you are using. Your health care professional will teach you how to properly inject this medication. If any of the information is unclear, consult your doctor or pharmacist.Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. The insulin container you are currently using can be kept at room temperature (see also Storage section). Wash your hands before measuring and injecting insulin. Before using, check the product visually for particles, thickening, or clumps. If any are present, discard that container. Insulin glargine should be clear and colorless. To avoid damaging the insulin, do not shake the container.The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Measure each dose carefully, and Continue reading >>

Reference Bd Needles Reference To Bd Ultra-fineâ„¢ Pen Needles

Reference Bd Needles Reference To Bd Ultra-fineâ„¢ Pen Needles

Drug Manufacturer Pen Name Drug Drug NDC Number Place Where Drug Manufacturers Sanofi-Aventis Apidra® SoloStar® Apidra® 0088-2502-05 Package Insert Patient Instructions for use Patient Toll Free Phone Number “SoloStar® is compatible with all pen needles from Becton Dickinson and Company†Lantus® SoloStar® Lantus® 0088-2219-05 Package Insert User Manual, Device Page, Website “ BD Ultra-Fine™ needles to be used in conjunction with SoloStar® and OptiClik® are sold separately and are manufactured by BD.†“ BD Ultra-Fine™ needles are compatible with SoloStar® . These are sold separately and are manufactured by BD.†Amylin Pharmaceuticals & Eli Lilly and Company Byetta® Byetta® 66780-0212-01 66780-0210-07 Amylin Pharmaceuticals SymlinPen® 60 & 120 Symlin® 66780-115-02 66780-121-02 Eli Lilly and Company HumaPen® LUXURA™ HD Humalog® 3mL 0002-7516-59 User Manual, Website “ HumaPen® LUXURA™ HD is suitable for use with Becton, Dickinson and Company pen needles.†Humalog® KwikPen™ Humalog® Humalog® Mix 75/25® Humalog® Mix 50/50 0002-8799-59 0002-8797-59 0002-8798-59 User Manual, Brochures, Prescribing Card “ When prescribing KwikPen™ prefilled with the Humalog brand of insulins you will need to write a separate prescription for BD needles.†Humulin® Pen Humulin® N Humulin® 70/30 0002-8730-59 0002-8770-59 User Manual, Website “ This device is suitable for use with Becton, Dickinson and Company’s insulin pen needles.†Novo Nordisk, Inc. Victoza® Victoza® N/A NovoLog® Mix FlexPen® NovoLog® Mix 70/30 N/A NovoPen® Junior Novo Nordisk PenFill 3ml N/A Novo Pen® 3 Novo Nordisk PenFill 3ml N/A L Continue reading >>

Lantus 100 Units/ml Solution For Injection In Solostar Pre-filled Pen

Lantus 100 Units/ml Solution For Injection In Solostar Pre-filled Pen

Lantus 100 Units/ml solution for injection in SoloStar pre-filled pen What is a Patient Information Leaflet and why is it useful? The Patient Information Leaflet (PIL) is the leaflet included in the pack with a medicine. It is written for patients and gives information about taking or using a medicine. It is possible that the leaflet in your medicine pack may differ from this version because it may have been updated since your medicine was packaged. Download Leaflet View the patient leaflet in PDF format Below is a text only representation of the Patient Information Leaflet, the original can be viewed in PDF format using the link above. The text only version may be available from RNIB in large print, Braille or audio CD. For further information call RNIB Medicine Leaflet Line on 0800 198 5000. The product code(s) for this leaflet are: EU/1/00/134/030, EU/1/00/134/037, EU/1/00/134/031, EU/1/00/134/033, EU/1/00/134/036, EU/1/00/134/034, EU/1/00/134/035, EU/1/00/134/032. Lantus 100 Units/ml solution for injection in SoloStar pre-filled pen Package leaflet: Information for the user 100 units/ml solution for injection in a pre-filled pen Read all of this leaflet carefully including the Instructions for Use of Lantus SoloStar, pre- filled pen, before you start using this medicine because it contains important information for you. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This medicine has been prescribed for you only. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their signs of illness are the same as yours. If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. See section 4. 1. What Lantus is and what it is u Continue reading >>

Find Resources To Help You With Toujeo (insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml --including Samples, Videos, Published Clinical Studies, And Faq's.

Find Resources To Help You With Toujeo (insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml --including Samples, Videos, Published Clinical Studies, And Faq's.

This site is intended for U.S. Healthcare Professionals only. PLEASE NOTE: This reprint includes information that is not contained within the full prescribing information (PI) for Toujeo (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL and is not intended to offer recommendations about Toujeo that are inconsistent with the PI. Please read the full indication, the Important Safety Information and the full Prescribing Information . Sanofi US does not review the information contained in this website and/or database for content, accuracy, or completeness. Use of and access to this information is subject to the terms, limitations, and conditions set by the website and/or database producer. Sanofi US makes no representation as to the accuracy or any other aspect of the information contained on such website and/or database, nor does Sanofi US necessarily endorse such website and/or database. You are about to leave sanofi site for U.S. Sanofi US does not review the informationcontained on this website and/or databasefor content, accuracy or completeness. Useof and access to this information is subject tothe terms, limitations and conditions set by thewebsite and/or database producer. This site might not comply with the regulatory requirements of US You are about to move to an Unbranded site Toujeo is a long-acting human insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use: Toujeo is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis. Important Safety Information for Toujeo (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL Toujeo is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or any of its excipients. Toujeo contains the same active ingredient, insulin glargine, as Lantus. The concentra Continue reading >>

Get To Know The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

Get To Know The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Bd Ultrafine Iii Mini-pen Needles

Bd Ultrafine Iii Mini-pen Needles

Writing Prescriptions for Diabetes Supplies in AIM Clinic (with links to charts from DiabetesHealth.com) Each insulin vial holds 1000 units of insulin; specify # U/dose on RX if possible, to calculate # vials needed Syringe size 3/10 cc (holds up to 30 Units) 1/2 cc (holds up to 50 Units) 1 cc** (holds up to 100 Units) **AIM preferred syringes: BD U-100 Insulin Syringes (easy to read, have ultrafine needle, can keep using as dose rises; #100/box) DISPOSABLE PENS Novolog, NovoLog® Mix 70/30, Levemir® Flexpen Dispense: 5x3 mL (box of 5 pens, Total: 1500 units) Humalog®, Humalog® Mix 75/25, NPH (Humulin N®) Pen Dispense: 5x3 mL (box of 5 pens, Total: 1500 units) Lantus SoloStar® Pen (new) Dispense: 5x3 mL (box of 5 pens, Total: 1500 units) Apidra® Pen (coming soon) REFILLABLE PENS Lantus® Refillable Pens Dispense: 5x3 ml (box of 5 pens, Total: 1500 units) Humalog® Humapen® Memoir *Insulin pens DO NOT come with needles. Need separate RX* **AIM preferred BLOOD GLUCOSE MONITORING DISPENSE: *One Touch Ultra 2 Meter Fast; good for frequent testers; in English and Spanish One Touch Ultra Mini Meter Simple; lightweight; portable; no memory - One Touch Ultra Teststrips Test ___ times/day; disp 50 or 100 strips - Microfine lancets Dispense: 100 lancets Ascensia Contour Meter Simple to use; self-coding; good for slow learners, elderly, low tech - Ascensia Contour Teststrips Test ___ times/day; disp 50 or 100 strips - Ascensia Contour lancets Dispense: 100 lancets Continue reading >>

Help Needed- Info On Lantus Solostar Pens Needed For Vet To Write Script Today

Help Needed- Info On Lantus Solostar Pens Needed For Vet To Write Script Today

Hi, I'm trying to get my vet to give me a script for Lantus solostar pens for Ozzy today. His vestulin is past its expiration date and I want to get him a new insulin for his dose tonight. We want to switch to lantus pens. I talked to the vets office this am and she said the vet wanted to do some research on it first, especially using the solostar pens. I called back 4 hours later and he hasn't had time but she said if I could send him some info on it, I might be able to speed up his review process. Anyone have some links on lantus and solostar pens that I can send quickly to my vet so he can make a determination to go ahead and give me a script? Are you going to order from marks marine pharmacy in Canada? If so, you can just get the script for the vial and tell the pharmacy you want the pens. That is what I did and there was no issue. I want to start him tonight so will get it from local pharmacy and then from Canada for future orders. Is there some thing in the Stcky Note on syringe and insulin handling that might help? You can point the vet to that. Here's one, scroll down to the info for using the pen with syringes. And some reasoning is less costly all at once, and easy to handle, and less chance of the insulin "going bad" before you use it all. As far as the difference in using this type of insulin vs. the vetsulin, I don't know. Maybe that is what your vet is reluctant about? Here's one, scroll down to the info for using the pen with syringes. And some reasoning is less costly all at once, and easy to handle, and less chance of the insulin "going bad" before you use it all. As far as the difference in using this type of insulin vs. the vetsulin, I don't know. Maybe that is what your vet is reluctant about? Thank you so much for your response. I am in the long be Continue reading >>

Tips For Prescribing Insulin Therapy And Diabetes Supplies

Tips For Prescribing Insulin Therapy And Diabetes Supplies

There are many different insulin preparations and supplies available in order to create individualized regimens for patients. Here are some tips and a checklist to help avoid getting future calls from pharmacies. · Standard concentration is 100 units/mL (there’s also a 500 units/mL but rarely used) § Before a pen or vial is opened, it won’t expire until the labeled expiration (could be a year) § After a pen or vial is opened, it expires in 28 days o Dispensed as 5 pens (3mL or 300 units each so 1500 units per box). The pharmacy won’t split a box so you can’t prescribe <5 pens. If you do, the pharmacist will round up to one box anyway. Insulin syringe prescribing: Insulin syringes availability: Capacity For doses up to: Gauge Needle length 3/10 mL 30 units 28 1/2" 29 1/2" 31 5/16” 1/2 mL 50 units 28 1/2" 29 1/2" 31 5/16” 1 mL 100 units 27 5/8” 28 1/2" 29 1/2" 31 5/16” Example: You want to prescribe 14 units three times a day. Select 3/10 mL because it holds up to 30 units. If you select a larger than necessary size, accuracy decreases and it becomes harder to read the markings on the barrel. Select the 31 gauge as this is generally more comfortable than thicker gauges. *Note: If someone’s insulin is around 30 units and they’ll be adjusting their dose in the future, give them the 1/2 mL (50 units maximum) since they won’t be able to use the 3/10 mL once they get to 31 units per injection. Insulin pen needles availability Needle Length Gauge Nano 4 mm (5/32”) 32 Mini 5 mm (3/16”) 31 Short 8 mm (5/16”) 31 Original 12.7 mm (1/2”) 29 · Don’t write “Use as directed” on any diabetes supply prescriptions (except glucometer) o Write out the whole directions on each of the prescriptions. Sometimes people go to different pharmacies so if the Continue reading >>

Missingrxpadreports

Missingrxpadreports

Description Of Incident: On 9/15/16 I was informed by Ms Leanne Bluumfield,(OIG) (410-767-9741) that in Fall 2014 a staffer from the Pascal Clinic in Severna Park had "authorized" a refill for Klonopin 0.5 mg for a Donna Carter(dob 6/5/56). The original script was by me. I did not work at the Pascal clinic after August 22, 2014. Any refill "authorized" after that in my name was done without my knowledge or approval. Michael Shere Description Of Incident: Script pad was stolen by staff member who wrote multiple prescriptions for himself over many months. Was caught by the pharmacist who reported it to me. I reported then to hospital administration and police. Description Of Incident: Humana insurance's Pharmacy Solutions faxed a narcotic utilization form to one of our providers to verify multiple narcotic prescriptions filled by CVS pharmacy using his DEA#. The patient for whom the prescriptions were filled is not a patient of the physician (Elham Bayat, MD) nor is she ever been seen by any of our providers here at George Washington Medical Faculty Associates, Inc. We have had other instances in recent months with the illegal use of this providers DEA# to obtain controlled substances, each of which has been reported to both the DEA and local authorities. Description Of Incident: Since November/December 2015, Jose Chavez, who has never been a patient of mine, has been producing and forging fraudulent prescriptions for controlled medications. Affidavits had been filled out for court date 3/24/16 and have been informed he was not convicted. I was recently informed by a detective that Mr. Chavez has been continuing to produce fraudulent prescriptions under my name. I would like to alert all pharmacies in Maryland to not allow any of these fraudulent prescriptions to be fill Continue reading >>

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

Toujeo® is a long-acting human insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use: Toujeo® is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Toujeo® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or any of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Toujeo® contains the same active ingredient, insulin glargine, as Lantus®. The concentration of insulin glargine in Toujeo® is 300 Units per mL. Insulin pens and needles must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimens cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Changes in insulin regimen may result in hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. Unit for unit, patients started on, or changed to, Toujeo® required a higher dose than patients controlled with Lantus®. When changing from another basal insulin to Toujeo®, patients experienced higher average fasting plasma glucose levels in the first few weeks of therapy until titrated to their individualized fasting plasma glucose targets. Higher doses were required in titrate-to-target studies to achieve glucose control similar to Lantus®. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Toujeo®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label bef Continue reading >>

Comparing Patient Assistance Programs For Insulin Medication

Comparing Patient Assistance Programs For Insulin Medication

Managing diabetes care can require a lifetime commitment. Beyond diet changes and exercise, many people with diabetes need to take insulin to help control their blood sugar. Daily doses of insulin can add up, and some people can’t cover the costs on their own. Fortunately, certain programs can help cover this expense. A patient assistance program (PAP) is a money saving program often backed by drug companies, nonprofits, and medical institutions. Most PAPs provide low- or no-cost insulin medication and supplies. Each PAP has different requirements and criteria for their programs. If you don’t meet the criteria for one program, don’t assume you won’t meet the criteria for another. The time you spend filling out applications may result in a big cost savings. Not everyone will qualify. A PAP may not cover the particular insulin you use. However, if you use insulin and need financial assistance, these websites and organizations are a great place to begin your search. Partnership for Prescription Assistance Applying for hundreds of PAPs can be time-consuming. But the Partnership for Prescription Assistance (PPA) may help you save time. You can apply for hundreds of private and public assistance programs at once through PPA, rather than applying to each individual company. PPA is designed to assist people who don’t have any prescription drug coverage. You may not qualify for any plans if you have pharmacy or prescription insurance. Process steps: Receive an initial eligibility status by filling out a simple questionnaire on the PPA website. Enter the name of the medicine you’re taking, your age, where you live, and if you qualify for any insurance coverage. PPA will supply you with a list of potential assistance programs. RxAssist RxAssist hosts a large database o Continue reading >>

Math Calculations With Lantus Insulin

Math Calculations With Lantus Insulin

www.TakeRx.com Calculate the total quantity and the total days supply for the following Rx: Lantus 100U/ML 25 units sq qam (1 month supply) ------------------------------------------------------------ The days supply is 30 days as stated by the doctor. The sig says: inject 25 units subcutaneously every morning Now, we need to convert 25 units (U) into mL The insulin ratio is 100 units per 1 mL, that is, 1 mL per 100 units x / 25 U = 1 mL / 100 U x = (25 * 1) / 100 x = 0.25 mL So, the patient will inject 0.25 mL per day. Then, the quantity will be 0.25mL * 30 days which is 7.5mL But, the pharmacist will have to dispense a 10mL vial of Lantus insulin. In other words, one bottle of Lantus insulin has 10mL So, the total quantity to be dispensed is 10 mL Calculate the total quantity and the total days supply for the following Rx: Lantus insulin 30U sq am 20 days ------------------------------------------------------------ The doctor has prescribed Lantus 100U/mL insulin injection. The total days supply is 20 days as stated by the doctor. The sig says: inject 30 units subcutaneously in the morning Now, we need to convert 30 units into mL The insulin ratio is 100 units per 1 mL, that is, 1 mL per 100 units x / 30 U = 1 mL / 100 U x = (30 * 1) / 100 x = 0.3 mL The patient will inject 0.3 mL per day. Then, the total quantity will be 0.3 mL * 20 days which is 6 mL But, one bottle of Lantus insulin has 10 mL and therefore the pharmacist will dispense a 10mL vial of Lantus insulin. So, the total quantity to be dispensed is 10 mL Calculate the total quantity and the total days supply for the following Rx: Lantus 100U/ML cartridge sig: 30 units qam ------------------------------------------------------------ The box has 5 cartridges and each cartridge has 3 mL of insulin. So, if 1 ca Continue reading >>

Lantus Prescription Assistance

Lantus Prescription Assistance

When you have diabetes, every decision you make is colored by your condition. How much insulin should you bring on your next overnight trip? Will there be time to get a snack or take insulin between your appointments? At Simplefill, we understand the hard choices you make every day when you’re managing your diabetes. If you or someone you love is living with diabetes, it’s critical for you to have the right diabetes medication, like Lantus, by your side when you need it. Unfortunately, it’s becoming harder and harder for millions of Americans to afford the medications they desperately need. Whether it’s the Medicare donut hole or the increasing costs of insurance, it can be a real challenge to cover the costs of medications like Lantus insulin treatment when you have to pay out-of-pocket. If you or a loved one has diabetes and needs diabetes prescription assistance, including Lantus prescription treatment, continue reading to learn more about how Simplefill can help. How insulin works in your body Insulin is a master hormone that helps turn glucose (sugar) into energy. Created in the pancreas, insulin helps shuttle glucose to your cells as well as your muscles and liver. When you eat, your blood sugar typically rises. It’s this rise in blood sugar (glucose) that triggers the pancreas to produce and release insulin into your bloodstream. When you have inadequate levels of insulin, sugar can’t get to where it needs to go. It stays in your bloodstream too long, which raises your blood sugar levels. Furthermore, depending on what type of diabetes you have, you can either produce too much or too little insulin. Insulin comes in several forms, depending on your body’s need In the treatment of diabetes, choosing the right kind of insulin is important because ever Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Supplies And Teaching

Diabetes: Supplies And Teaching

Authors: Jenny Wright, MD, Diane Britt, ARNP Last updated: Testing Supplies: who needs testing? Patients with type 2 diabetes who are well controlled on metformin or diet alone may not need to test their blood sugars daily. However, checking periodically is still useful to identify changes in glycemic control prior to the next A1c test. Testing is useful when: -the patient is taking a hypoglycemic medication (eg sulfonylureas, insulin) -titrating insulin eg titrating insulin glargine to morning blood sugars – don’t have to wait for the next A1c -the patient finds the feedback useful for diabetes control: eg patients learning how foods affect their blood sugar Testing Supplies: how to order Option #1: order individually ‘Meds & Orders’ field -> Glucometer -> select first choice, ‘Blood Glucose Monitor and Supplies’ and all the supplies are pulled in in a bundle; do not specify brand Option #2: EPIC smart set Smart Sets à UWM DIABETES à ORDERS-SUPPLIES Check the ones you want: Blood Glucose Lancets Blood Glucose Monitoring Kit (Do not specify brand) Blood Glucose test strips (On Insulin) (Never specify brand unless asked to) Blood Glucose test strips (No insulin) (Never specify brand unless asked to) Insurance issues: Medicare: Can’t be e-prescribed. Give prescription to patient or have faxed Medicare/Medicaid allowed quantity of test strips: Once a day if not on insulin, 3 a day if on insulin You will ALWAYS get a fax to fill out later, even if you put all required information on your script. Insulin: how to order Glargine: Insulin glargine 100 units / mL solution (aka Lantus) Option #1: Epic smart set: Insulin syringe, ½ cc, 31g, 8mm (5/16). Insulin, typical starting prescription: Insulin glargine 10 units subcutaneous q HS, prescribe vials. Dispense: 1 Continue reading >>

Should My Insulin Dose Be Lower? Toujeo Vs Lantus

Should My Insulin Dose Be Lower? Toujeo Vs Lantus

Early in 2015 the FDA approved the first concentrated long-acting insulin known as Toujeo (insulin glargine), and it’s now available in pharmacies. While Toujeo is the first of its kind, the key word is “concentrated.” It actually contains the same active ingredient (insulin glargine) as Lantus—which is currently the #1 prescribed insulin in the US. To make things even more confusing: Toujeo comes in a 300 mg/mL dosage, while Lantus is 100 mg/mL. Knowing that Toujeo is concentrated, you might think that you can take a much smaller amount of Toujeo for a similar dose compared to Lantus. Believe it or not though, that isn’t the case. Lantus and Toujeo doses are converted 1:1. This means that if you are injecting 50 units of Lantus, you can essentially be switched over to Toujeo and instructed to inject the exact same amount, 50 units. In reality, some dose adjustments can be expected (according to clinical trial data), but it isn’t a matter of converting to a three times smaller dose. Surprisingly, patients who switch over to Toujeo are actually injecting higher doses compared to what they were using for Lantus. I see a lot of confusion around the different dosages, and a few common questions: Is it normal for my dose of Toujeo to be more than my Lantus dose? Yes. Although Toujeo has three times the concentration of insulin glargine, patients treated with Toujeo during clinical trials used more insulin than patients treated with Lantus in order to maintain the same level of blood sugar control. According to the manufacturer, Sanofi-Aventis, a higher dose can be expected with Toujeo and is completely normal. Why would Sanofi-Aventis make Toujeo if Lantus is the most-prescribed insulin? There is speculation that Sanofi-Aventis came up with Toujeo due to the upco Continue reading >>

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