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How To Turn Off Medtronic Insulin Pump

Review Of The Medtronic 630g Insulin Pump

Review Of The Medtronic 630g Insulin Pump

I am going to break with tradition and state my recommendation at the outset I love the Medtronic 630G. However, please read the entire story because it is worth knowing my full experience with the pump. Because like with most things there are both good and some not so good parts to owning a new piece of technology. Getting started When the 630G arrived, there were all kinds of warnings about leaving the pump alone until you call the local trainer. So I immediately picked it up and started messing with it. I also called my local representative and explained that I had my new pump, but due to insurance issues, I could not start the sensor for another month. The trainer suggested I proceed with pump only training and then tag on sensor training when I received it. So a few days after receiving the pump I was in class. The day of training went very well. The trainer gets a high five for adapting the class to the learner’s level. She made sure it was valuable for me (I have used Medtronic pumps for 17 years) and my wife who seldom if ever touches my pump. About 30 days later insurance released my sensors, so we took the sensor training in the same place with a different trainer. The sensor trainer was incredibly good. Since I relate everything to the Dexcom experience, she again took me where I was and helped me develop insights about how my new sensor and pump work together. Wearing the pump I love the color screen. The operation of the pump is easy and straightforward if you are familiar with prior Medtronic pumps. But and this is a big “but” there are some new features and ways of doing things so don’t blow off training and expect to run the pump well. I have no doubt I could be running the pump based entirely on what I knew from using the 530G, but I doubt I cou Continue reading >>

J&j Closes Insulin Pump Business, Medtronic To Gain

J&j Closes Insulin Pump Business, Medtronic To Gain

Johnson & Johnson is closing its insulin pump business and the market may soon be down to two players. In early October, J&J announced it would shutter Animas Corp., its insulin delivery company subsidiary, and transition its approximately 90,000 existing customers to Medtronic plc, the primary player in the pump market. “With changing needs of customers, rapidly evolving market dynamics, and increased competitive pressures, it proved too difficult to sustain the insulin pump business and we decided to pursue an exit of the business,” Valerie Asbury, general manager of Animas, said in a statement. LEARN MORE BNA’s Health Care Daily Report™ sets the standard for reliable, timely coverage of breaking health care news, covering all major legal, policy, industry, and consumer developments in a rapidly changing landscape every business day. The consolidation will affect patient choice in the diabetes pump market and could mean tighter pump supplies because one of the remaining major pump manufacturing facilities is in Puerto Rico, which has been devastated by recent hurricanes. Before the Animas shutdown, J&J had 12 to 14 percent of the pump market, and Medtronic had about 70 percent, David Kliff, publisher of the Chicago-based Diabetic Investor, told Bloomberg Law Oct. 20. Post-shutdown, Medtronic will have closer to 85 percent of the market, he said. $3.5 Billion Market The total U.S. insulin pump market, including the pumps and their associated supplies, is worth about $3.5 billion annually, Kliff said. Animas’s closure leaves three insulin pump manufacturers still in the game: one is the market giant, Dublin, Ireland-based Medtronic; the other two are Billerica, Mass.-based Insulet Corp. and San Diego-based Tandem Diabetes Inc. Kliff expects further consolidati Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump And Aluminum Welding

Insulin Pump And Aluminum Welding

Would like to know if anyone here is welding aluminum and wearing an insulin pump. I've tried to get an answer from Miller, the manufacture of the pump, no one wants to come up with one, because of being afraid of a law suit. I offer my 2 cents worth (due to economy - worth 1 cent now). I have an art teacher/sculptor who also teaches a metal welding class in an art studio for artists/sculptors who want to make metal sculptures but who may need some instruction in the welding aspects. He teaches oxy-acetylene welding, brazing, cutting and stick welding as the art center is rather limited in it's equipment. (Their stick welder is Lincoln AC only tombstone type 220 VAC. He wears a pacemaker and he has had little interaction or felt effects while stick welding. On one occasion, he mentioned he felt a little twinge in his chest when he was doing some stick welding but that may have been my fault for buying lunch for the class at a greasy spoon restaurant before he started teaching the class. I am not familiar with insulin pumps but I am guessing, (repeat guessing) they may be a little less sensitive to magnetic fields and such from welding. 1 - pacemakers and MRI - what questions do patients ask their doctors when they are scheduled for one. ) Maybe DC would affect these things less.? But then the arc blow question comes up. 2 - Pacemakers or insulin pumps - what happens when going thru airport scanners. And now possibly full body scanners. 3 - What about metal pins, plates and surgical screws in regards to MRI, welding, wand searches. ok - enough...............sorry I digress I just hope the full body scanners can't tell if if my socks are matched. Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting b Continue reading >>

Aaa Batteries For Insulin Pumps Updated Data

Aaa Batteries For Insulin Pumps Updated Data

By David Burren / December 18, 2017 February 23, 2018 / Leave a Comment Ive previously written a fairly detailed analysis of the performance of various AAA batteries in Medtronic insulin pumps being used in a closed-loop setup (the frequent radio traffic shortens the battery life significantly from when the pump is operating in standalone mode). In the 8 weeks since that post I have continued to collect data from more batteries, and can now review the initial conclusions of that post. I did put out a partial update a month ago, but this post supercedes that. As before, this data is gathered by my OpenAPS rig recording the battery voltage measured by my Medtronic 554 pump. When the voltage drops low enough to trigger the pumps LOW BATTERY warning (usually around 1.16V) the pump turns off the radio and it drops out of the loop. The pump usually keeps going with its programmed basal rates, but we replace the battery ASAP at that point to restore looping. It can seem extreme if youre having to replace the battery at about the same frequency as the insulin reservoir, so we want to be sure weve chosen the best compromise between cost and convenience when selecting batteries for use in our pumps.To this end Ive selected seven models of AAA battery, and have been adding more samples to each.All of the batteries were sourced at mainstream retail locations in Australia, and were used fresh out of their packaging. For observations about the shape of these graphs (including the voltage spikes that coincide with reservoir priming, and the effect of temperature on lithium batteries) please go back and read Part 1 of this study . The major new information here is from having had time to test more than one battery of each type. For example, the Energizer Ultimate Lithium (green on thi Continue reading >>

Tips & Tricks For Vacations

Tips & Tricks For Vacations

in Tips & Tricks , Lifestyle tagged with Diabetes management , Travel , Insulin pump I travel safe! The holiday season is getting closer for some of us, with just a few tips you can enjoy a relaxing time in the company of your 640G. Summer sun? Some small precautions will be sufficient. INSULIN PUMP AND HIGH TEMPERATURES During the hot season, dont forget to: apply the adhesive strip of the infusion set or sensor in the morning, when the skin is cooler; disinfect the area with an oil/free disinfectant and allow it dry for a few minutes; apply the adhesive strip while standing, in order to avoid folds and possibly use extra strips. For example, the very thin IV3000 and Tegaderm can be applied as the basis of the adhesive strip of the infusion set; the same can also be applied over the set, in order to cover the whole area and protect it from sweat and from possible set detachments as a result of skin perspiration during the hot season. Ask your doctor for advice about the most suitable solution for your body. Extreme temperatures can affect the storage of insulin. We have already given some advice on conservation at low temperatures, but even with the heat it is necessary to protect the insulin and the infusion set. Avoid prolonged exposure to direct sunlight and remember to check the tank more frequently, in order to prevent the formation of air bubbles in its interior. Consider changing the reservoir and the infusion set more often if you expose yourself to repeated temperature changes. And if you want to take a bath? WATER RESISTANCE Here is some good news: you can finally swim in the sea with your 640G (3.6 metres for up to 24 hours)! When you go out remember to remove the residual salt or chlorine, by rinsing with fresh water and drying gently. During long baths co Continue reading >>

Animas Corporation To Close Operations And Exit Insulin Pump Market

Animas Corporation To Close Operations And Exit Insulin Pump Market

Company will work with Medtronic as a partner-of-choice to help ensure a smooth transition for patients on insulin pumps Animas has selected Medtronic plc (NYSE: MDT), a world leader in diabetes, as its partner-of-choice to facilitate a seamless transition for patients, caregivers and healthcare providers. Patients using an Animas insulin pump will be offered the option to transfer to a Medtronic pump. Patient safety and continuity of care is of utmost importance and Animas will continue to provide customer service, training and warranty support, including providing pump supplies that are used in conjunction with the Animas® Vibe® and OneTouch Ping® insulin pumps, through a transition period. “We recognize that patients living with diabetes rely on our products to provide critical care, and we want to reassure them that we will be with them every step of the way throughout this transition,” said Valerie Asbury, General Manager of Animas Corporation. “Our number one priority is ensuring patients have a seamless experience as they transition to Medtronic. For over 30 years, Medtronic has been a global leader in the treatment of those living with diabetes, and we are confident they will provide outstanding support to our patients and their healthcare teams.” “We are incredibly grateful to our patients and healthcare partners for the trust, confidence and loyalty they have placed in Animas products over the last 12 years,” Asbury said. “With changing needs of customers, rapidly evolving market dynamics, and increased competitive pressures, it proved too difficult to sustain the insulin pump business and we decided to pursue an exit of the business. This decision was extremely difficult and comes following the extensive exploration of all other viable option Continue reading >>

Hackers Can Kill Diabetics With Insulin Pumps From A Half Mile Away - Um, No. Facts Vs. Journalistic Fear Mongering

Hackers Can Kill Diabetics With Insulin Pumps From A Half Mile Away - Um, No. Facts Vs. Journalistic Fear Mongering

Sponsored By UPDATE: Jay Radcliffe, the researcher discussed in this post, has emailed me, a little upset. In the interest of transparency I've included our email thread at the end of this post so that Jay's perspective on any inaccuracies may be seen. I encourage you to draw your own conclusions. There's a story making the rounds on Twitter right now. Engadget "reports" researcher sees security issue with wireless insulin pumps, hackers could cause lethal doses. Wait till you see what researcher and diabetic Jay Radcliffe cooked up for the Black Hat Technical Security Conference. Radcliffe figures an attacker could hack an insulin pump connected to a wireless glucose monitor and deliver lethal doses of the sugar-regulating hormone. First, a little on my background. I've been Type 1 diabetic for 17 years. I've worn an insulin pump 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for over 11 years and a continuous glucose meter non-stop for over 5 years. I also wrote one of the first portable glucoses management systems for the original PalmPilot over 10 years ago and successfully sold it to a health management company. (Archive.org link) I also interfaced it (albeit with wires) to a number of portable glucose meters, also a first. Engadget's is a mostly reasonable headline and accurate explanation as they say he "figures an attacker could..." However, Computerworld really goes all out with the scare tactics with Black Hat: Lethal Hack and wireless attack on insulin pumps to kill people. Like something straight out of science fiction, an attacker with a powerful antenna could be up to a half mile away from a victim yet launch a wireless hack to remotely control an insulin pump and potentially kill the victim. The only thing that saves this initial paragraph is "potentially." The link that Continue reading >>

Minimed 640g System With Smartguard For Managing Blood Glucose Levels In People With Type 1 Diabetes

Minimed 640g System With Smartguard For Managing Blood Glucose Levels In People With Type 1 Diabetes

Next Technology overview This briefing describes the regulated use of the technology for the indication specified, in the setting described, and with any other specific equipment referred to. It is the responsibility of healthcare professionals to check the regulatory status of any intended use of the technology in other indications and settings. The MiniMed 640G system is an integrated sensor‑augmented pump therapy system. It consists of a continuous glucose monitor and an insulin pump. The system uses a disposable glucose sensor (Enlite), which is inserted under the skin of the abdomen by the user using an automatic device supplied with the system, and secured with a small self‑adhesive patch. It continuously measures glucose levels in the interstitial fluid, which lag about 15 minutes behind capillary blood glucose levels measured using a finger prick. The sensor is replaced at least every 6 days. The sensor is attached to a non‑implanted transmitter (Guardian 2 Link), which sends the data wirelessly to the insulin pump or a stand‑alone monitor. The transmitter is approximately the size of a 2 pence piece and lies almost flat against the skin. The insulin pump or monitor displays the glucose data on a screen and can plot trend‑lines. The sensor readings are updated every 5 minutes. The insulin pump, which weighs about 92 g and is 5.3 cm×9.6 cm×2.5 cm, can be clipped to a belt or be carried in a pocket. An insulin reservoir that can hold up to 300 units of insulin is fitted to the pump. An infusion set carries insulin from the reservoir to the body through a subcutaneous catheter. The reservoir and infusion set are changed every 2 to 3 days. The pump delivers a continuous basal rate of insulin needed for normal body functioning. This is a personalised back Continue reading >>

Exit By Johnson & Johnson Bolsters Medtronic's Insulin Pump Dominance

Exit By Johnson & Johnson Bolsters Medtronic's Insulin Pump Dominance

Using an insulin pump is an act of profound trust. Diabetic patients wear their insulin pumps at virtually all hours, relying on the medical machinery to administer doses of a potentially lethal hormone to keep their blood-sugar levels from going dangerously out of range. So it came as a shock to Ed Komp when he learned last month that his pump maker, Johnson & Johnson (JNJ), was halting all North American sales of its Animas brand insulin pumps and pushing its customers toward devices and supplies made by Medtronic. Komp had dropped Medtronic a decade ago, choosing Animas pumps instead. Now he must reconsider his options after getting the Oct. 10 letter from JNJ. “My first response was really one of fear,” said Komp, a software engineer at the University of Kansas who has used insulin pumps to treat his Type 1 diabetes for 25 years. “I’ve made the change once, and it’s a really hard change, actually. Very small differences have a big impact for me personally.” Minnesota-run Medtronic has emerged as a major winner in the $1.7 billion U.S. market for insulin pumps and supplies, as thousands of letters limiting patient choice have been sent out to diabetics, from both manufacturers and insurers. Insulin pumps typically sell for between $4,000 and $8,000 and deliver small, frequent doses of insulin day and night, which typically benefits Type 1 diabetics, whose immune systems destroy insulin-producing cells. (Type 2 diabetes, involving insulin resistance, is typically treated with manual injections, rather than a pump.) Coverage policies at UnitedHealthcare and Medicare have given Medtronic a financial edge over other insulin pump makers, and Medtronic last year scored approval for the world’s only pump system that is designed to be able to automatically self Continue reading >>

Mri Safety: Patients With Insulin Pumps Require Special Cautions

Mri Safety: Patients With Insulin Pumps Require Special Cautions

MRI safety: Patients with insulin pumps require special cautions An insulin pump allows the replacement of slow-acting insulin for basal needs with a continuous infusion of rapid-acting insulin. By using an insulin pump, a patient can typically match the dosage of insulin to lifestyle and activities, rather than adjusting those to the bodys response to insulin injections. The advantages of using an insulin pump include the fact that an insulin pump replaces the need for periodic injections by delivering rapid-acting insulin continuously throughout the day via a catheter. It greatly simplifies the management of diabetes. There are two basic types of insulin pumps, one is an external device and the other is implanted. Both types currently pose hazards to patients referred for MRI procedures. For an external insulin pump, it may simply need to be removed and kept out of the MR environment to ensure there is no adverse impact on the devices functionality. The information below provides MRI labeling for several of the most commonly used insulin pumps. This MRI information pertains to the following insulin pumps from Animas, a Johnson & Johnson company: Each of the insulin pumps listed above should be kept from exposure to very strong electromagnetic fields, such as MRIs, radiofrequency welders, or magnets used to pick up automobiles. Very strong magnetic fields, such as those associated with MRI, can magnetize the portion of the pumps motor that regulates insulin delivery and thus damage the device. For the patient: If you plan to undergo an MRI, remove the insulin pump beforehand and keep it outside of the MR room during the procedure. If the pump is accidentally allowed into the MR system room, disconnect the pump immediately and contact Animas Pump Support for important Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everyone needs insulin to live. Insulin is a hormone that helps our bodies use and store the food we eat. People with Type 1 Diabetes no longer make insulin and have to give insulin in order to sustain life. People with Type 2 Diabetes don’t use their own insulin well, and over time can have trouble making enough. So, all people with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes need insulin. When people give insulin injections, they may take 1-2 injections of a long acting insulin every day and 3+ injections of rapid acting insulin for meals and snacks. The typical person with Type 1 Diabetes could take anywhere from 4-7+ injections a day. Many people currently give insulin through an insulin pen or a syringe. But, there is another option, an insulin pump. An insulin pump delivers rapid acting insulin in two ways. First, the pump is programmed to give you insulin every hour throughout the hour referred to basal insulin. Basal, think “base,” is the insulin your body needs even in the absence of food, it is also referred to as background insulin. This basal rate replaces the long acting injection that you take. Second, is bolus, this is the insulin you take for food or to correct a high blood sugar. If you get basal and bolus confused, think “bowl”, as in you eat out of a bowl, to help you remember bolus is for food. Once you are on a pump, all insulin is delivered through the pump and shots are no longer necessary. Components There are a few things necessary to make a pump work. When a pump is shipped to someone: they will also need to send infusion sets, reservoirs, and possibly batteries, depending on your pump. Let’s talk about each component. Infusion Sets An infusion set is the part that is actually inserted into the body and has tubing that conn Continue reading >>

Contour Next Link Meter

Contour Next Link Meter

A stylish, small meter with multiple features that's discreet, easy to use and easy to carry Automatically enters blood glucose results when calibrating your Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) device Highly accurate readings can give you confidence in your insulin bolus dosing Wirelessly sends blood glucose results directly to your Medtronic MiniMed pump's Bolus Wizard calculator to help save you time and effort *Compatible Medtronic devices include MiniMed Paradigm Veo insulin pump, MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time insulin pump and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system, and Guardian REAL-time CGM system. Insert the grey end of a CONTOURNEXT test strip into the meter. The meter will turn on. When the Apply Blood screen appears, touch the test strip to the drop of blood. Hold it there until the meter beeps. AutoLog will automatically prompt you to enter a meal marker. Your test result will appear after a 5 second countdown. To turn the meter off, press and hold the top menu button. (The meter also turns off after 3 minutes of inactivity). CONTOUR meters will display blood glucose measurements in your country's standard metric (mg/dL or mmol/L). *For full details regarding use, please refer to the system user guide provided with the meter. Compatible Medtronic devices include MiniMed Paradigm Veo insulin pump, MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time insulin pump and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system, and Guardian REAL-Time CGM system. How to link the CONTOURNEXT LINK meter to your Medtronic MiniMed pump* Just follow the 6 easy steps below and start sending test results wirelessly to your pump. From the Setup menu on your meter go to Pump Options and press OK, then press Connection. The Pump Options screen appears and asks if you would like to Connect to a MiniMed Pump?, pres Continue reading >>

How To Turn Off Medtronic Insulin Pump

How To Turn Off Medtronic Insulin Pump

Doctors usually routinely test women for gestational diabetes when they are between Narrarated by: David Sedaris. How To Turn Off Medtronic Insulin Pump for diabetics glycemic load is a highly Pancreas For initial workup of the pancreas order a CT Pancreatic protocol. Diabetic coma often causes uncontrolled diabetes 1 type and occasionally diabetes 2 type. Other Causes: Insulin resistance and Insulin resistance occurs 25% of populations were selected as control.Parameters such as age sex fasting blood glucose postprandial blood glucose lipid profile mean plasma glucose urine micro albumin and HbA1c were taken into consideration. The Mayo Clinic Pancreas How To Turn Off Medtronic Insulin Pump Transplant Program offers expert pancreas transplantation and related care for people whose pancreas no longer functions properly. TIME Health Research Researchers have made a major eakthrough in finding a treatment for type 1 diabetes Harvard University announced Thursday: Philadelphia cream cheese 1/4 splenda(sugar substitute) heavy dash of vanilla essence 2 tbsp chocolate powder Type 2 Diabetes Long Term Effects :: Diabetes Medicine Side Effects TYPE 2 DIABETES LONG TERM EFFECTS ] The REAL cause of Diabetes (and the solution) If you participated in one of the past Run/Walk for Autism events Book now with one of our experienced Doctors! Diabetes Diet #4: Harvest Lunch A Picnic Menu Many of our members have experienced ramifications of diabetes such as blindness amputation by I get numbness in my feet and fingers at well i have some the signs my left hand and legs numb and tingle i drink 2 large cups of I would recommend that you have blood levels for 3 vitamins done as the med A new report published in the journal Diabetic Medicine has projected that the NHSs annual spending on d Continue reading >>

How To Personalize Your Pump And Cgm Alarm Settings

How To Personalize Your Pump And Cgm Alarm Settings

Home Education and Information How to Personalize Your Pump and CGM Alarm Settings How to Personalize Your Pump and CGM Alarm Settings Posted by Liza Resurreccion On October 20, 2014 In Education and Information There are many different alerts and alarms built-in to insulin pump and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems today, which may be overwhelming if you turn them all on at once or set them to levels that arent right for you. Your MiniMed insulin pump and CGM allows you to personalize various features and alarms to customize your diabetes management. One way to personalize your alerts is to set different levels for different times of the day, depending on your blood sugar trends throughout the day. For example, you can set up to 8 different high and low limits for a 24-hour period. You can also adjust your settings or turn alerts on/off over time to accommodate your diabetes management needs. In addition to personalizing where you set your limits, you can also adjust how often you are alerted to certain alerts and alarms to avoid getting too many repeat alarms as your blood sugars adjust to treatment/corrections. The High and Low Repeat settings notify you that your sensor glucose is still at or below your Low/High limits after a period of time has passed. This setting applies to Glucose Limit, Rate of Change, and Predictive Alerts , and can be set between five minutes to one hour for low alerts, and five minutes to three hours for high alerts. So if you set a Low Repeat at 20 minutes and you receive a Low Glucose Alert, you will receive another Low Glucose Alert in 20 minutes if your sensor glucose is still at or below your programmed low glucose limit. Personalizing this setting to a timeframe that you are comfortable with is key for avoiding too many alar Continue reading >>

Medtronic's Insulin Pump Deal Shows Size Matters

Medtronic's Insulin Pump Deal Shows Size Matters

The apparently unstoppable push by Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) to dominate all the areas in which it is active as well as the medtech industry as a whole got another fillip yesterday as it became the preferred supplier of insulin pumps to the insurer UnitedHealthcare (NYSE:UNH). In so doing it has hobbled its smaller rivals Tandem Diabetes Care and Insulet, whose shares fell 20% and 10% respectively yesterday. One of the arguments underpinning the wave of consolidation in the medtech sphere – that increased size allows a company to offer its wares more cheaply while still turning a profit – seems to have worked nicely in in this case. Big but slow According to data compiled by EvaluateMedTech before the UnitedHealthcare deal, Medtronic was forecast to be the leading company in insulin pumps in 2022 with sales approaching three quarters of a billion dollars. But these sales are slow-growing – at an annual rate of just 3.7% they are increasing more slowly than the medtech sector as a whole, and looked very sluggish compared with the up-and-coming smaller companies. Insulin pump makers WW annual sales ($m) Company 2015 2022 CAGR Medtronic 569 734 +4% Insulet 227 544 +15% Ypsomed 67 233 +20% Tandem Diabetes Care 60 189 +18% Cellnovo 1 32 +81% Tandem in particular has just reported a storming quarter. Its first-quarter revenues were up 63% to $20.1m, markedly better than consensus expectations of $17.6m. It sold just over 4,000 pumps in the quarter, surprising analysts from Deutsche Bank who had forecast that it would shift 2,772. Roughly 60% of the pumps Tandem sold were its flagship t:slim G4 model, which incorporates, under an agreement struck in July, a G4 Platinum continuous glucose monitor (CGM) developed by DexCom – itself forecast to be the leading CGM company in 20 Continue reading >>

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