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How To Turn Off Medtronic Insulin Pump

Come On, Medtronic, Now You’re Just Trolling Us

Come On, Medtronic, Now You’re Just Trolling Us

Why did Medtronic choose to come out with a non-predictive pump and put it in the shell of a predictive pump? Commentary Okay, I will be the first to admit that I scan emails way too quickly, but the recent press release I got from Medtronic left me more than a bit frustrated. The email in question announced the U.S. release of the Medtronic 630G pump system. It included a few other numbers, too – namely “640G” and “530G”. I saw the “640G” and got all excited, only to later figure out that the 630G is closer to the 530G than it is to the 640G. Did you get that? If you’re not a pump geek, let me explain. In 2013, Medtronic put out the first insulin pump that could shut off insulin delivery if CGM readings got to a preset “low” point. This was the 530G, and it was revolutionary, as research showed that it would help cut the risk of nighttime hypoglycemia. Then, in 2015, Medtronic did itself one better by putting out a pump that could predict if blood sugar levels were going to trend low, and adjust insulin delivery based on that information. This was the 640G. Again, cue the fanfare and the fireworks, as this was the closest we’ve gotten to an artificial pancreas, or a pump that automatically adjusts your insulin levels for you. Only problem was that the 640G was not available in the U.S. Now, this year, Medtronic has been telling everyone and their uncle that not only was it going to be the first company with a single-chamber artificial pancreas, but that the era of the artificial pancreas was nigh. How nigh? Like “this year or next year” nigh. Like “already submitted to the FDA for approval” nigh. So all of us in the diabetes blogosphere have been waiting with extremely baited breath. It is against this backdrop that Medtronic decides to dr Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump And Aluminum Welding

Insulin Pump And Aluminum Welding

Would like to know if anyone here is welding aluminum and wearing an insulin pump. I've tried to get an answer from Miller, the manufacture of the pump, no one wants to come up with one, because of being afraid of a law suit. I offer my 2 cents worth (due to economy - worth 1 cent now). I have an art teacher/sculptor who also teaches a metal welding class in an art studio for artists/sculptors who want to make metal sculptures but who may need some instruction in the welding aspects. He teaches oxy-acetylene welding, brazing, cutting and stick welding as the art center is rather limited in it's equipment. (Their stick welder is Lincoln AC only tombstone type 220 VAC. He wears a pacemaker and he has had little interaction or felt effects while stick welding. On one occasion, he mentioned he felt a little twinge in his chest when he was doing some stick welding but that may have been my fault for buying lunch for the class at a greasy spoon restaurant before he started teaching the class. I am not familiar with insulin pumps but I am guessing, (repeat guessing) they may be a little less sensitive to magnetic fields and such from welding. 1 - pacemakers and MRI - what questions do patients ask their doctors when they are scheduled for one. ) Maybe DC would affect these things less.? But then the arc blow question comes up. 2 - Pacemakers or insulin pumps - what happens when going thru airport scanners. And now possibly full body scanners. 3 - What about metal pins, plates and surgical screws in regards to MRI, welding, wand searches. ok - enough...............sorry I digress I just hope the full body scanners can't tell if if my socks are matched. Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting b Continue reading >>

Diabetic: Connect/download Glucose Monitor Or Insulin Pump Data To Fitbit- 6 Tests A Day - How To?

Diabetic: Connect/download Glucose Monitor Or Insulin Pump Data To Fitbit- 6 Tests A Day - How To?

Diabetic: Connect/download glucose monitor or insu... Diabetic: Connect/download glucose monitor or insu... Diabetic: Connect/download glucose monitor or insulin pump data to Fitbit- 6 tests a day - How to? Anyone find a way to download glucose test data from a one-touch ultra (or other glucometer) or an insulin Pump (e.g. Medtronic Paradigm) to fitbit? ...and regular Fitbit only allows 3 glucose tests and I usually do 6 a day. Any experience, suggestions, or creative ideas would be appreciated, On my diabetic nutritionist's advice I have purchased a FitBit one. I want to track my blood glucose readings which currently fluctuate quite a bit - and I have trouble identifying any patterns that might help me change my behavior or insulin values to keep my glucose levels more consistent. I was disappointed to learn that I can only enter 3 blood glucose levels in the web based software. I do not particularly like data entry - which is one reason I purchased the fitbit one - Data entry is not high on my priority list. Sadly I have not found any indication that it is possible for me to download my onetouch glucometer data or the glucose data I enter into my medtronic paradigm pump to Fitbit I know that I can download data from my glucose monitor (one-touch Ultra) and my Insuline Pump (mini-med paradigm) - using software that the companies (one-touch and minimed) provide. What I would like to be able to do is download my glucose level data (6 tests a day) to Fitbit. Is that possible? Or, if there is no current way to download glucometer or pump data to fitbit - might there be a way to download the data via the device manufactures program and somehow transfer it to FitBit?Or some other creative solution? As said any help or suggestions you can provide would be appreciated. Continue reading >>

Medtronic Minimed 640g And Smartguard Technology

Medtronic Minimed 640g And Smartguard Technology

Yesterday I went off to Medtronic’s UK head office expecting to continue with our usual blogger and patient advocacy meetings. What I didn’t know was that I was actually going to be given an exclusive preview and test run of the new Medtronic MiniMed 640G insulin pump and CGM system with new SmartGuard technology! Now that's what I call a good day! As a Medtronic patient advocate I have been working alongside them, with a group of other patients and carers, to help them move into the world of social media and digital health care, and to offer an insight into what patients really want from diabetes technology. This in itself bought me the opportunity to travel to Amsterdam last year to blog about their Diabetes Junior World Cup, and here I was again, with yet another opportunity! I should explain something else… I’m not currently a Medtronic user, but what I really like about the company is that this doesn’t matter to them. I have diabetes, I live with it day in day out and I have views about it – the products that I do or don’t use (often this is out of my control anyway) doesn’t matter to them. This, of course, doesn’t mean that I won’t be a Medtronic user in the future and with the new and exciting MiniMed 640G technology, I could be easily persuaded. So… enough about me… the 640G is what you need to know about! The MiniMed 640G is a sensor augmented insulin pump. Medtronic has a vision and that is to create an artificial pancreas and their 640G is the next step towards achieving that vision. Their aim is to create technology that gives people more freedom, improved safety and better health when it comes to diabetes. We know that many companies have this same aim but this product (from what I saw) really does deliver those aims. The 640G uses a Continue reading >>

Tips & Tricks For Vacations

Tips & Tricks For Vacations

in Tips & Tricks , Lifestyle tagged with Diabetes management , Travel , Insulin pump I travel safe! The holiday season is getting closer for some of us, with just a few tips you can enjoy a relaxing time in the company of your 640G. Summer sun? Some small precautions will be sufficient. INSULIN PUMP AND HIGH TEMPERATURES During the hot season, dont forget to: apply the adhesive strip of the infusion set or sensor in the morning, when the skin is cooler; disinfect the area with an oil/free disinfectant and allow it dry for a few minutes; apply the adhesive strip while standing, in order to avoid folds and possibly use extra strips. For example, the very thin IV3000 and Tegaderm can be applied as the basis of the adhesive strip of the infusion set; the same can also be applied over the set, in order to cover the whole area and protect it from sweat and from possible set detachments as a result of skin perspiration during the hot season. Ask your doctor for advice about the most suitable solution for your body. Extreme temperatures can affect the storage of insulin. We have already given some advice on conservation at low temperatures, but even with the heat it is necessary to protect the insulin and the infusion set. Avoid prolonged exposure to direct sunlight and remember to check the tank more frequently, in order to prevent the formation of air bubbles in its interior. Consider changing the reservoir and the infusion set more often if you expose yourself to repeated temperature changes. And if you want to take a bath? WATER RESISTANCE Here is some good news: you can finally swim in the sea with your 640G (3.6 metres for up to 24 hours)! When you go out remember to remove the residual salt or chlorine, by rinsing with fresh water and drying gently. During long baths co Continue reading >>

How To Turn Off Medtronic Insulin Pump

How To Turn Off Medtronic Insulin Pump

Doctors usually routinely test women for gestational diabetes when they are between Narrarated by: David Sedaris. How To Turn Off Medtronic Insulin Pump for diabetics glycemic load is a highly Pancreas For initial workup of the pancreas order a CT Pancreatic protocol. Diabetic coma often causes uncontrolled diabetes 1 type and occasionally diabetes 2 type. Other Causes: Insulin resistance and Insulin resistance occurs 25% of populations were selected as control.Parameters such as age sex fasting blood glucose postprandial blood glucose lipid profile mean plasma glucose urine micro albumin and HbA1c were taken into consideration. The Mayo Clinic Pancreas How To Turn Off Medtronic Insulin Pump Transplant Program offers expert pancreas transplantation and related care for people whose pancreas no longer functions properly. TIME Health Research Researchers have made a major eakthrough in finding a treatment for type 1 diabetes Harvard University announced Thursday: Philadelphia cream cheese 1/4 splenda(sugar substitute) heavy dash of vanilla essence 2 tbsp chocolate powder Type 2 Diabetes Long Term Effects :: Diabetes Medicine Side Effects TYPE 2 DIABETES LONG TERM EFFECTS ] The REAL cause of Diabetes (and the solution) If you participated in one of the past Run/Walk for Autism events Book now with one of our experienced Doctors! Diabetes Diet #4: Harvest Lunch A Picnic Menu Many of our members have experienced ramifications of diabetes such as blindness amputation by I get numbness in my feet and fingers at well i have some the signs my left hand and legs numb and tingle i drink 2 large cups of I would recommend that you have blood levels for 3 vitamins done as the med A new report published in the journal Diabetic Medicine has projected that the NHSs annual spending on d Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitor: Dexcom Vs Medtronic

Continuous Glucose Monitor: Dexcom Vs Medtronic

I have used the Medtronic 530G insulin pump with Enlite CGMsensors for 3 years. I recently tried the Dexcom G4 Platinum continuous glucose monitor for aweek. There are things I like about both, and things I dislike about both continuous glucose monitors. I will not get into technical differences, just observations. Full disclosure: I have used an insulin pump since 1994, and have used only Medtronic pumps since they released the 508 pump in 1999 .I was an early adopter of theParadigm in 2006, Medtronicsfirst integrated pump and Continuous Glucose Monitor. Here, I am only reviewing the 530G with Enlite sensor and Dexcom G4 Platinum for continuous glucose monitoring. The Medtronic 530G System is an insulin pump with integrated Continuous Glucose Monitor built-in. It uses the Enlite sensor. I use the Minimed Connect option (a separate key chain device) to send data from the pump to my iPhone. I likethe Connect application because it is brighter, and clearer, than the on-pump display. It is visible in both bright and dark lighting. I like that the 530G is one integrated device for pump and CGM. I am not using the pump for insulin delivery at this time, so I have to set my basal rates to 0, disable auto-off, and plug the reservoir hole with a cap from an infusion set with the tube cut off. I get comments from people thinking I am wearinga pager, asit is not very stylishnordiscrete clipped to my belt. The pump reads data from the sensor, but the working distancebetween them is only about 4 feet before the signal is lost. It is also a problem if you lay on theside that the sensor ison. The signal will be lost and it will generate alarms to let you know. The alarms are annoying at night, waking you and your partner. They arepersistent, which I guess is good on a medical device Continue reading >>

The Latest And Greatest In Insulin Pumps And Sensor Technology

The Latest And Greatest In Insulin Pumps And Sensor Technology

The Latest and Greatest in Insulin Pumps and Sensor Technology As a certified diabetes educator (or as I prefer to say, type 1 coach), I have started literally hundreds of patients on insulin pumps over the last few decades. I have a disclaimer: I do not wear a pump and do not have type 1 diabetes. BUT I have worked in the field from clinics to ski and summer camps, as a dog sled driver for little munchkins with our team of sled dogs, to backpacking and canoe trips all with people who do have type 1 diabetes. Sometimes I grunt and groan when I get up to start an adventure, but then I meet up with the group and see someone taking shots! My emotions turn to glee when someone has a pump and a sensorI realize it sometimes feels like being the bionic man or woman with all this technology but hey, whats wrong with being such a diabetes stud or studdette? So what is so cool about pump and sensor technology? Well, if youre like me and you like to participate in group sports or activities, the technology is amazing. Lets say you are just starting off on an adventure (whatever that may be) with a group and you note on your sensor that your BG is 50 mg/dl. Who wants to stop the whole team from proceeding? But then you realize you can take in some carbohydrates, lower your basal rate temporarily and watch your sensor to see if you are coming up and not only good to go, but where you will be in 5, 10, 15, 20 minutesyou get the idea. What are the options available right now to help you manage your diabetes? The Omnipod insulin pump is the only full functioning patch pump, meaning it is programmable with insulin to carb ratios, target BG, correction factors, etc. so your math is done for you. At this time, the Omnipod pump does not integrate with a sensor but you can certainly use th Continue reading >>

Our Decision To Switch To Medtronic Minimed 630g Insulin Pump – Part 1

Our Decision To Switch To Medtronic Minimed 630g Insulin Pump – Part 1

A few months ago, I was at home with the kids, and didn’t feel quite right. After a quick fingerstick, I saw that I was in the 20’s. In a panic, I couldn’t get anyone on the phone to talk with me until my sugars came up. I began to “eat the kitchen”, as it were. I finally reached my sister-in-law, who came to sit with the kids until I could get back to myself again. After that day, I was scared out of my mind to go below 100 if I was at home with the kids by myself. So, I started running my numbers higher — much higher than I’m comfortable with, and I knew I would be risking damage doing so. That’s when I realized, Dexcom Share wasn’t enough. It’s great to be able to Share and have people call to check on you… but what if they can’t actually reach you? My son and daughter can’t use my iPhone just yet (he can’t remember my unlock code), and neither know how to use a glucagon kit. I looked into the Loop system, but honestly, while I love that everyone is so willing to jump on board, I’m not. I’m not confident in my own abilities to make this thing happen since it’s something done from home. I don’t mind tinkering and playing with Nightscout because it’s not directly affecting my insulin dosing, whereas the Loop system does. That’s a-okay if you’re on it – I’m not trying to down the system or anything. I’m just not comfortable with the idea of using it myself. So, we looked into Medtronic. I know. It’s known as the big evil empire of the insulin pump world. And, while I am interested in the 670G, I was more interested it the 630G since it suspends insulin if the user is low. I know this is the exact same technology as 530G, but somewhere along the way, they’ve improved the CGM technology. I kept reading about how sucky th Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Shut-off Feature Prevents Low Blood Sugar, Study Finds Webmd

Insulin Pump Shut-off Feature Prevents Low Blood Sugar, Study Finds Webmd

TUESDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A new type of insulin pump reduced the number of moderate to severe low- blood -sugar episodes experienced by people with type 1 diabetes . The pump has a special sensor that can detect dropping blood - sugar levels and then suspend insulin delivery to prevent the development of dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), according to the researchers. "Hypoglycemia is a major problem in diabetes treatment ," said study senior author Dr. Timothy Jones, of Princess Margaret Hospital for Children in Perth, Australia. "The aim of the trial was to test whether a new type of insulin pump reduces life-threatening hypoglycemic events in patients with type 1 diabetes ." "We found, in a randomized trial, that this technology was able to prevent severe hypoglycemia," he said. "We don't like to be dramatic, but this may save lives, and certainly will improve quality of life and diabetes control." The findings are published in the Sept. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the body's immune system mistakenly destroys the insulin -producing cells in the pancreas . Insulin is a hormone that helps usher blood sugar into the body's cells to be used as fuel. Without insulin, blood- sugar levels rise and eventually reach life-threatening levels. Since their bodies no longer produce insulin, people with type 1 diabetes must replace that lost insulin. To do this, they must either take multiple daily injections of insulin or use an insulin pump that has a tiny catheter inserted underneath the skin to deliver the insulin. Getting the right amount of insulin can be difficult, however. People with diabetes have to factor in the amount of food they've eaten, their activity levels an Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump: What To Know Before You Disconnect

Insulin Pump: What To Know Before You Disconnect

Many infusion sets have a “disconnect” feature that allows you to temporarily unhook the pump and tubing for situations such as bathing, sports, swimming, intimacy, and when undergoing medical tests (such as x-rays, computed tomography (CT scans), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)). Your diabetes care team will guide you on what to do when you need to disconnect from an insulin pump. You may need to check your blood sugar levels before, during, and after disconnection. When you use an insulin pump, there is only short acting insulin infused in the pump. Once you're disconnected from the pump, you need to be extra careful and monitor your blood sugars many times during that period of time. This is so that you can detect unusually high blood glucose and avoid diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA), which can happen if there is prolonged insulin infusion interruption. DKA is a serious condition caused by high levels of acids in the blood called ketones. When the body doesn’t have enough insulin, it breaks down fat to use as energy, which produces ketones. Instances when DKA can develop: you forget to reconnect the insulin pump after exercising or showering, or the catheter is pulled out without your realizing it, your pump reservoir ran out of insulin, or your pump stops working suddenly. If basal insulin delivery is interrupted for more than one hour, check your blood sugar level and if your blood glucose levels are elevated, check also ketones level (using a simple urine test strip). Also, you should check your urine ketone levels if you have one or more high glucose reading despite taking an insulin bolus to correct the high blood sugar. Call your health care provider immediately if your ketone level is high. If you are hospitalized, you may be able to continue on your ins Continue reading >>

Medtronic 530g Insulin Pump And Enlite Sensor Review

Medtronic 530g Insulin Pump And Enlite Sensor Review

Back in May I upgraded to the new Medtronic 530G insulin pump and Enlite sensor. I started the new pump right away but I waited until I used up some of my old sensors (since Medtronic wouldn’t take back the ones I had bought with the old sensor after upgrading to the new sensor) and finally switched over to the Enlite two weeks ago. Insulin pump: It’s essentially the same as my old pump. It does have the threshold suspend feature in place but I don’t have it activated because it still concerns me how it handles my blood sugars. Being pregnant, there is a fine line between “low” and “too low”. Technically, I should be starting pre-meals as low as 60mg/dl but then if I’m in the 50’s I feel really low and drop quickly to 40’s. If I were to use the threshold suspend feature, I’m not sure what I would set it to, so for the time being, I’m not using the feature. One thing I LOVE about the new pump is the pink color. In the past ten years or so I’ve basically stuck with the grey/clear insulin pump because it was more “professional” looking and I didn’t want to draw a lot of attention to it. Now that I’m older and don’t care as much and I also work from home, I thought it was time for a change so I changed the color to PINK! One negative I have noticed about the pump is the battery life. I never wrote down concrete data but I’m pretty sure my old pump would only need a new battery every month or two. My husband bought a big pack of batteries for me and I didn’t go through them very fast. Now on the new pump, I probably go through a new battery at least once per week! One time I changed my battery and 36 hours later I needed to change it again. It could have been the battery but since they were from the same pack, I’m thinking it had mor Continue reading >>

A Review Of The Tandem T:slim X2

A Review Of The Tandem T:slim X2

I started using the Tandem t:slim X2 insulin pump on December 13 and this review is long overdue. After 2 months, I am mostly happy with the pump. I am comfortable navigating through the menus and have learned a few shortcuts. I like the touchscreen and the “modern” look of the pump. I like knowing that I will be able to add new features to my pump with software updates. At the same time I am annoyed with almost daily alerts about one thing or another. Most significantly, I am frustrated with occlusion alarms which I never experienced with previous pumps. The Good Things I like the touchscreen and being able to enter numbers for carbs and BG levels rather than scrolling up and down. I like the looks and size of the X2. I like the ability to turn off the screen to preserve battery life. I like the ability to go backwards through menus and tap the “T” to return to the home screen. I like being able to fine tune settings. For example with Active Insulin Time, my early Medtronic pumps restricted changes to hours. 3 hours seemed too short; 4 hours seemed too long. Then with Animas, I could select 3-1/2 hours or 4 hours and neither seemed perfect. Now with Tandem, I am using 3-3/4 hours and could even select 3 hours and 39 minutes. I like the ease of setting Site Reminders on my X2. This wasn’t a feature that I particularly missed on previous pumps, but now that I have it, I use it often. I like that the reservoir icon remains red after I clear the customizable low reservoir alert. I like that I can read the pump screen in bright sunlight when hiking. Sometimes I have to take off my sunglasses to read it, but it is much better than my Animas pump screens which were totally unreadable. I like that Tandem has attempted to create a pump that is contemporary and has wor Continue reading >>

Contour Next Link 2.4 Details | Contourcare

Contour Next Link 2.4 Details | Contourcare

Using your CONTOUR NEXT LINK 2.4 meter is as easy as 1-2-3. Before you begin, you may need to charge your meters battery. To charge your battery, plug your meter into the USB port on your computer. Turn on your meter and follow the prompts to easily set up your meter including connecting to your MiniMedTM 630G insulin pump. The remote bolus function allows you to send a manual or preset bolus from your meter to your pump if your pump and meter are connected. You can send a manual or preset bolus from your CONTOUR NEXT LINK 2.4 meter test results screen or from the Main Menu. See your MiniMedTM insulin pump user guide for instructions on how to turn on/turn off remote bolus at your pump and setting up a preset bolus. NOTE: To send a bolus from your meter, you must be connected to the pump AND the remote bolus feature must be turned ON at the pump. Remote bolus is ON by default on the pump. See your MiniMedTM insulin pump user guide for more information. CONTOUR NEXT LINK 2.4 meter uses CONTOUR NEXT control solution. Click here to order CONTOUR NEXT control solution free of charge. Alternatively, you can call Ascensia Diabetes Care Customer Care Support at 1-800-268-7200. CONTOUR NEXT LINK 2.4 meter uses CONTOUR NEXT test strips, available by prescription. It is not compatible with the original CONTOUR test strips. Always keep the test strips in the original bottle and tightly close the bottle immediately after removing a test strip. The bottle is designed to keep the test strips dry. Exposure to room humidity from leaving the bottle open or not storing them in the original bottle can damage your test strips and cause inaccurate results. Do not drop blood directly on the flat surface of the test strip. Your test strip is designed to easily "sip" the blood into the sample Continue reading >>

Veo™ Insulin Pump

Veo™ Insulin Pump

Learn about travelling with diabetes Read about pump user Delphine Discover how insulin pumps can help manage glucose levels Get the technology you need for better glucose control "One important advantage [of wearing an insulin pump] is when I travel by plane. With my insulin pump, I simply adjust my basal rate to cover any time differences and I do my bolus when my meals arrive. It lets me enjoy travelling instead of worrying about my diabetes and how to handle it…and for me, that’s really great." - DELPHINE Keeping Blood Glucose levels under control In managing diabetes, it is important to take into consideration many factors, including blood glucose monitoring, carbohydrate intake, physical activities and insulin requirements to help ensure good blood glucose control and to reduce the risk of complications. By understanding the body’s needs and learning how to keep blood glucose within recommended levels, it is possible to manage diabetes effectively. It can be a challenge to reach and maintain the HbA1C goal while minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia. HbA1c: an important measure of how effectively diabetes is being managed using the average glucose levels over the previous 2-3 months to assess the level of diabetes control. So, as someone living with diabetes, how could an insulin pump make travelling easier for me? Diabetes, travelling & insulin pumps When travelling, adjusting to changes in your normal activity, such as eating and sleeping, can be easier with the use of an insulin pump. Managing delayed meals, skipped meals or different foods may be difficult. An insulin pump can help make this easier and give you more flexibility when you travel. An insulin pump allows you to: adjust boluses for meals that may come at odd hours take small boluses to cover fo Continue reading >>

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