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How To Turn Off Medtronic 630g

Setting Your Dual Wave Bolus | Medtronic Diabetes

Setting Your Dual Wave Bolus | Medtronic Diabetes

MiniMed 630G System Support > Setting Your Dual Wave Bolus Device: MiniMed 630G insulin pump (MMT-1715K) A Dual Wave Bolus delivers a combination of an immediate Normal bolus followed by a Square Wave bolus. You might use a Dual Wave bolus when you eat meals that are high in both carbs and fat which may delay digestion, or when your meal bolus is combined with a correction bolus for a high BG. The Dual Wave bolus delivery option is available only after you turn on the Dual Wave feature. 4. Select Dual Wave to turn the feature on or off. To deliver a Dual Wave bolus with the Bolus Wizard feature: 3. If you are not using a wireless connected compatible meter, you can select BG to manually enter your BG meter reading. 4. For a food bolus, select Carbs to enter the carb count of your meal. 5. Review your calculated Bolus amount. If you want to change the amount select Bolus and make your desired change. 6. Select Next to review your bolus information. 7. Select Dual. The Bolus Wizard screen appears, with the food amount split evenly between the Now and Square portions. 8. To change the amounts, if needed, select the Now value and press up or down to the desired amount. When you adjust the Now amount, the Square amount adjusts automatically. 9. Adjust the Duration for the delivery of the Square Wave portion to be delivered. The duration can be from 30 minutes to 8 hours. 10. Select Deliver Bolus to start your bolus. During a Dual Wave delivery, the Home screen shows the progress of the Now portion of your delivery. When the Now portion is complete, the pump will return to the Home screen and the Bolus button on your Home screen appears as Bolus (D). You can select Bolus (D) to stop the bolus, to see details on the amount of bolus insulin delivered, or to access the Bolus me Continue reading >>

Review: Medtronic’s Minimed 630g Insulin Pump

Review: Medtronic’s Minimed 630g Insulin Pump

I have used the Minimed 630G Insulin Pump System by Medtronic for the past 30 days. This review is my opinion of the pump, both positive and negative. I have used insulin pumps since I got my first Disetronic H-Tron V-100 in 1994. I got a Minimed 506 pump in 1998 and have been a fan of the Minimed/Medtronic pumps since. Until now. Minimed 630G Insulin Pump System The Minimed 630G Insulin Pump System comes with the pump, the CGM transmitter, and a Contour Next Link 2.4 blood glucose meter. The three devices work well together, once set up right. Medtronic also has an early access program. This lets you buy the Minimed 630G now, and upgrade to the upcoming Minimed 670G in spring of 2017. Receiving the Pump The 630G Pump comes in several boxes. The pump comes in an 8″x10″x2.25″ box that has the pump and several small items like clips, batteries, a manual, and a quick start guide. Another box of the same size has the Contour Next Link 2.4 meter. A second box arrived a few days later with the infusion sets and reservoirs, followed by another box a few days later with the CGM sensors. I got another box a week later with the CGM transmitter. In the past, the local Medtronic trainer would call me to train me on using the pump, with a request not to use it before the training. I normally ignore this request, since I have used Minimed pumps for so long. I do go to these trainings every once in a while, but I was never contact this time. Unusual, considering how new this version of the pump is. Even so, the pump was fairly easy to set up. I also got a pile of 8.5″x11″ manuals. One was a “previous pump users manual” and one was a “pump users manual’. There was a large manual in the box that had everything in it. And another “how to use the CGM” manual. Quite d Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Medtronic’s Minimed 630g System, Ships In September

Fda Approves Medtronic’s Minimed 630g System, Ships In September

By Brian Levine and Adam Brown Adds waterproof, color screen, and remote meter bolus. Will it speed FDA review of the 670G hybrid closed loop? Earlier this month, Medtronic unexpectedly announced FDA approval of the MiniMed 630G. This pump offers the same threshold (low glucose) suspend algorithm as the MiniMed 530G with Enlite, but on the company’s next-gen pump platform – adding a color screen, waterproofing, remote bolusing from the Contour Next Link glucose meter, more alarm customization, insulin on board displayed on the home screen, and other key improvements listed in the table below. The pump is approved for people 16 years and up and will begin shipping in September. Medtronic has more information posted on its website. There was a lot of confusion in the diabetes community about this product and why it is launching, so some common questions are answered below. Can current Medtronic pumpers upgrade to the 630G? Yes, but it is pricey and not covered by insurance if the pump being upgraded is less than four years old. The out of pocket cost to upgrade to the 630G is $599 for Medtronic pumps purchased after May 1, 2016 and $3,100 for pumps purchased before May 1, 2016 (assuming the old pump is sent in to Medtronic). Current MiniMed 530G/Enlite users who want the 630G’s Enlite CGM integration will also need to buy a new transmitter for $511. How does this compare to the 640G (predictive low glucose suspend) available in Europe and the MiniMed 670G (hybrid closed loop) under FDA review? The MiniMed 630G is the same pump platform as the 640G and 670G, meaning it has the same overall pump body design, waterproofing, screen, buttons, etc. However, the 630G has the simplest control algorithm in it: suspending basal insulin delivery when the low threshold is cross Continue reading >>

Setting Up And Changing Your Easy Bolus

Setting Up And Changing Your Easy Bolus

MiniMed 630G System Support > Setting Up and Changing your Easy Bolus Device: MiniMed 630G insulin pump (MMT-1715K) The Easy Bolus feature allows you to quickly deliver a Normal bolus using only the up button. Your pump must be in sleep mode to use the Easy Bolus feature. You must turn on the feature and set up the step size before you can use Easy Bolus to deliver a Normal bolus. To help you count your Easy Bolus steps, each time you press the up button, your pump makes a different tone. 3. Select Easy Bolus to turn on the feature. 4. Set the Step Size amount (in units). You can set the step size from 0.1 to 2.0 units. Your step size cannot be higher than your Max Bolus. 1. If your pump is not in sleep mode, press and hold the Menu button for about two seconds. 2. While your pump screen is in sleep mode, press and hold up from about one second. After your pump beeps or vibrates, release the up button. You can now start programming your Easy Bolus. 3. Press up the number of times needed to set your bolus amount. Each time you press up, your pump sounds a tone or vibrates, and your bolus amount increases by the number of units set for the step size. 4. When you have reached the desired bolus amount, press and hold up to confirm the amount. You should hear a confirmation tone or feel a vibration for each button press. Count to ensure the amount is correct. If the amount is not correct, press and hold down until you hear a tone, and then start again from step 3. 5. When the bolus amount is confirmed, press and hold up for about one second to deliver your bolus. Your pump beeps or vibrates. Your bolus starts immediately after the confirmation. Continue reading >>

Come On, Medtronic, Now You’re Just Trolling Us

Come On, Medtronic, Now You’re Just Trolling Us

Why did Medtronic choose to come out with a non-predictive pump and put it in the shell of a predictive pump? Commentary Okay, I will be the first to admit that I scan emails way too quickly, but the recent press release I got from Medtronic left me more than a bit frustrated. The email in question announced the U.S. release of the Medtronic 630G pump system. It included a few other numbers, too – namely “640G” and “530G”. I saw the “640G” and got all excited, only to later figure out that the 630G is closer to the 530G than it is to the 640G. Did you get that? If you’re not a pump geek, let me explain. In 2013, Medtronic put out the first insulin pump that could shut off insulin delivery if CGM readings got to a preset “low” point. This was the 530G, and it was revolutionary, as research showed that it would help cut the risk of nighttime hypoglycemia. Then, in 2015, Medtronic did itself one better by putting out a pump that could predict if blood sugar levels were going to trend low, and adjust insulin delivery based on that information. This was the 640G. Again, cue the fanfare and the fireworks, as this was the closest we’ve gotten to an artificial pancreas, or a pump that automatically adjusts your insulin levels for you. Only problem was that the 640G was not available in the U.S. Now, this year, Medtronic has been telling everyone and their uncle that not only was it going to be the first company with a single-chamber artificial pancreas, but that the era of the artificial pancreas was nigh. How nigh? Like “this year or next year” nigh. Like “already submitted to the FDA for approval” nigh. So all of us in the diabetes blogosphere have been waiting with extremely baited breath. It is against this backdrop that Medtronic decides to dr Continue reading >>

Medtronic Minimed® 630g Insulin Pump System

Medtronic Minimed® 630g Insulin Pump System

The MiniMed® 630G Insulin Pump System is a complete solution designed for advanced diabetes control. Waterproof design with a user-friendly color screen and simple menu Built-in CGM allows for wireless transmittal of glucose information Remote insulin dosing with the Bolus Wizard®, which helps to calculate mealtime insulin and may avoid insulin stacking Continuously delivers insulin, with a tubing change needed only every two or three days Multiple insulin delivery settings to meet unique needs Enlite Sensor® sends readings to insulin pump every 5 minutes, helping to identify trends and make adjustments CGM tracks glucose levels throughout the day, including the effects of food or exercise Predictive alerts given up to 30 minutes ahead, if trending high or low CCS Medical offers Ascensia Diabetes Care strips for use with Medtronic pumps for many insurance plans. Continue reading >>

The Amount Of Suck The 630g Exhibits Is Only Outdone By The Metric-crap-ton Of Suck That Is The Enlite Cgm. - Diabetes

The Amount Of Suck The 630g Exhibits Is Only Outdone By The Metric-crap-ton Of Suck That Is The Enlite Cgm. - Diabetes

The amount of suck the 630G exhibits is only outdone by the metric-crap-ton of suck that is the Enlite CGM. The amount of suck the 630G exhibits is only outdone by the metric-crap-ton of suck that is the Enlite CGM. I've always read on here that Dexcom beats Enlite, but had no idea of the margin of superiority. I was previously using a Medtronic Paradigm with a Dexcom G5. Since upgrading to the 630 with Enlite I've found the whole system to be a bummer. To some people, all of this may sound nit-picky, but we wear these devices 24 hrs a day for years on end, every bit of hindrance becomes a burden when something is an extension of your body. First Medtronic has completely missed the mark with its quality of life features. "Oh cool, I can bolus from my meter now." Except it's worthless because it won't work with the Bolus Wizard (for non-medtronic users, the bolus wizard is a feature that takes your bloodsugar reading and automatically does the math for carbs, active insulin, etc and inputs your dosage) and I'd need to look at the pump to see my active insulin anyway. I've used a medtronic pump for years and the number of times that I've needed to give a manual bolus instead of using the Wizard is so small that I actually can't remember ever doing it. Oh and if your pump isn't on the home screen, you're out of luck anyway because it will give you an error. I can say that it is extremely convenient that my meter sends my bg value to my pump, though that's been a feature for quite a few generations of medtronic pumps. Then medtronic decided to childproof the pump. Previous generations of medtronic pumps had an annoying amount of warnings that had to be clicked through when changing your site and reservoir; a lot of people complained about it. But that was it, everything el Continue reading >>

Your Questions Answered: The Minimed 670g System

Your Questions Answered: The Minimed 670g System

In September, the FDA approved a big leap forward in diabetes technology, the world’s first hybrid closed loop system. The MiniMed® 670G system is designed for people with type 1 diabetes who are 14 and older. Having been diagnosed with type 1 in 1989, when blood glucose meters were bigger than the current larger iPhone, this seems amazing! The Glu team recently connected with Chief Patient officer Louis Dias about the reveal of the highly anticipated MiniMed 670G product. Let’s hear what he had to say! GluAnna: Why is the MiniMed 670G system such an important innovation in today’s world? Louis: This system is important because it has the potential to dramatically change the way individuals and families deal with the highs and lows of diabetes. What we heard from so many of the people who participated in the clinical trial was how different it made them feel both physically and emotionally, giving them that peace of mind that can be so elusive in a life with diabetes. GluAnna: That’s great! So what is new about this particular model that patients can expect from either older models or users brand new to pump therapy? Louis: If you have the product in hand, you now have the opportunity to put the device in Auto Mode, where the pump automatically adjusts the delivery of your basal insulin based on readings from our most advanced CGM sensor, called the Guardian® Sensor 3. Auto Mode works to keep you at 120 mg/dl. Instead of you always making the adjustments, testing different basal rates and basal patterns to try to match the amount of insulin you need for different times of day and activities, about every 5 minutes the system determines how much insulin to give you, based on the sensor reading – taking more than a few math problems off of your plate. It also g Continue reading >>

Suspending & Resuming Your Pump

Suspending & Resuming Your Pump

Device: MiniMed® 530G (551/751), MiniMed® Paradigm RevelTM (523/723), MiniMed Paradigm® 522/722, MiniMed Paradigm ®515/715, MiniMed Paradigm ®512/712 Manually Suspending your Pump Manual Suspend stops all insulin delivery, including the current basal and any bolus or Fill Cannula deliveries in progress. While manually suspended, your pump will not deliver insulin until you manually resume your pump. When you resume your pump, the basal delivery will continue. The pump will beep or vibrate about every 15 minutes on the hour to remind you that it is not delivering insulin. When manually suspended, your pump is in Attention mode with a solid circle showing on the pump. When in manual Suspend, you can only resume your basal or view the STATUS screen. Any bolus or Fill Cannula deliveries that were in progress when you suspended will not resume. If the Sensor feature is turned on, you can also view the sensor graphs and the SENSOR STATUS screen. No other functions are available To manually suspend the pump: Select Suspend from the MAIN MENU, and press ACT. Main > Suspend SUSPEND will flash on your screen. Press ACT to stop your pump. The screen will show that the pump is suspended and the time it stopped. After less than one minute, the pump will return to the HOME screen with a solid circle. You can verify on your pump STATUS screen that your pump is manually suspended. When the pump is manually suspended, it defaults to the HOME screen with a solid circle. To resume pump delivery: From any screen, press ACT until the RESUME screen appears. Press ACT again. Your pump will beep once, then the HOME screen will appear without the solid circle. 950M13852-011 20150802 Continue reading >>

Product Review: The Minimed 630g System

Product Review: The Minimed 630g System

By Phyllis Kaplan, MiniMed Ambassador, living with type 1 diabetes After 16 years of using insulin pump therapy with Medtronic Diabetes, I was excited to see the updated design of the MiniMed® 630G system. After seeing pictures online, I thought the new insulin pump looked bigger, and I wondered if the new system was much different than my MiniMed® 530G system. I did have some doubts about upgrading, but in the end, the appeal of being able to bolus from the meter, the larger screen, and options to change the volume, won me over. Prior to receiving the new system, I assumed that it would be fairly easy to understand and almost like getting used to a new phone, but I was still anxious about it. It turns out my assumption was correct. The MiniMed 630G system has been easy for me to get used to and just makes sense to me. The day I met with my trainer, as she walked me through setting everything up, I kept thinking “Wow, this is awesome.” One thing I appreciate is the polished, current look and feel. On top of what the new MiniMed 630G system looks like, there are also so many other features that I really like. Here are a few of my favorites: 1) The home screen: I call this screen “diabetes at a glance,” as it's easy to see and find the things we tend to use most often: CGM data: I didn’t think it was hard to find the CGM information on the MiniMed 530G system, but being able to see the CGM reading and graph from this screen feels right. The CGM data now includes sensor graphs, so you don’t need to wait to upload to CareLink® software to see this representation of the data. Active insulin: It’s wonderful to see active insulin right on the main screen! No more going through several menus and multiple button clicks! Bolus and basal: With the click of a butto Continue reading >>

Newsflash: Medtronic Launches New Minimed 630g System

Newsflash: Medtronic Launches New Minimed 630g System

A new Medtronic insulin pump is now available in the United States, introducing a new des ign and color-screen as part of a complete makeover to these diabetes devices that have fundamentally looked the same for 30 years! Say hello to the Minimed 630G, which Medtronic announced on Thursday after receiving the FDA's Pre-Market Approval on Aug. 10. This news caught many by surprise, as the California pump-CGM company hadn't previewed this product in advance as they typically do before launches. Instead, they've focused on their forthcoming 670G hybrid closed loop system, expected to be the first-gen commercial Artficial Pancreas system to hit market in 2017. A number of users are actually upset that they weren't warned of this interim product launch, because they've recently purchased new products or upgrades. Others were holding out for the future closed loop system. So we're all wondering: Just what is this 630G that we've heard nothing about before? Remember, Medtronic got FDA approval in September 2013 for its 530G that automatically stops insulin delivery once a user crosses a certain low glucose level. That was step one in moving toward closed loop technology. Next up is their Predictive Low Glucose Suspend (PLGS) features that can anticipate oncoming hypos in advance and shut off insulin to prevent them from happening. That's built into the Minimed 640G system that hit the market outside the U.S. in early 2015. Medtronic ultimately decided it would not pursue bringing that device to the U.S., opting instead to leapfrog that model and focus on getting the first hybrid closed loop 670G to market in 2017. So now, it seems we're getting this 630G as a sort of stop-gap device in between the two D-tech generations. Here's a quick glance at the Minimed 630G: Fresh Design: Continue reading >>

Our Decision To Switch To Medtronic Minimed 630g Insulin Pump Part 1

Our Decision To Switch To Medtronic Minimed 630g Insulin Pump Part 1

Our Decision to Switch to Medtronic Minimed 630G Insulin Pump Part 1 A few months ago, I was at home with the kids, and didnt feel quite right. After a quick fingerstick, I saw that I was in the 20s. In a panic, I couldnt get anyone on the phone to talk with me until my sugars came up. I began to eat the kitchen as it were. I finally reached my sister-in-law, who came to sit with the kids until I could get back to myself again. After that day, I was scared out of my mind to go below 100 if I was at home with the kids by myself. So, I started running my numbers highermuch higher than Im comfortable withand I knew I would be risking damage doing so. Thats when I realized, Dexcom Share wasnt enough. Its great to be able to Share and have people call to check on youbut what if they cant actuallyreachyou? My son and daughter cant use my iPhone just yet (he cant remember my unlock code), and neitherknow how to use a glucagon kit. I looked into the Loop system, but honestly, while I love that everyone is so willing to jump on board, Im not.Im not confident in my own abilities to make this thing happen since its something done from home. I dont mind tinkering and playing with Nightscout because its not directly affecting my insulin dosing, whereas the Loop system does. Thats a-okay if youre on it, Im not trying to down the system or anything. Im just not comfortable with the idea of using it myself. So, we looked into Medtronic. I know. Its known as the big evil empire of the insulin pump world. And, while I am interested in the 670G, I was more interested it the 630G since it suspends insulin if the user is low. I know this is the exact same technology as 530G, but somewhere along the way, theyve improved the CGM technology. I kept reading about how sucky the 530G was but tha Continue reading >>

Extending 630g Enlite Sensor Past 6 Days

Extending 630g Enlite Sensor Past 6 Days

First time poster here. Im brand new to CGM, using the Minimed 630g with Enlite sensors. Ive been scouring the forums for advice and everyone says you can re-connect a sensor once its expired to extend the life past 6 days. I have a good site in, but every time I go to reconnect it, it says Sensor Expired. What am I missing? For example, the sensor expired this morning. I turned off the sensor connection on the pump for 20 minutes, then turned it back on so it could look for the sensor again. However, when it connects I just get the Sensor Expired message again. If I choose Start New Sensor from the Sensor Connection menu, it also gives me the Sensor Expired message. Do I have to do something differently to trick the pump into thinking its new? Sorry for the rookie question, and thanks in advance! Ive had luck taking the transmitter off of the sensor, waiting 15ish minutes, plugging it back in and telling the pump to look for a new sensor. BUT, I havent had any luck getting more than one or two more days out of the sensor before it craps out. Id be interested to see what others do as well This is what I do with my 630G with Enlite sensors (YMMV): 1, Turn off the sensor from the pump a few minutes to hour or so before the sensor expires (not sure if its necessary to do this before sensor end but thats what I do). 2. Carefully disconnect the transmitter from the sensor and recharge the transmitter. Be sure to do this with as little movement of the sensor as possible. You might need help with this step if your sensor is in an atypical place like back of arm (thats where Ive been putting my sensor with great results). 3. Reconnect the transmitter to the sensor after it fully charges. Put your choice of overlay tape over the transmitter (I use IV3000). 4. Start the sensor f Continue reading >>

Remote Bolus | Medtronic Diabetes

Remote Bolus | Medtronic Diabetes

Device: MiniMed 630G insulin pump (MMT-1715K) Remote Bolus allows you to send a Normal Bolus or Preset Bolus remotely from your meter. When the MiniMed 630G insulin pump is connected to the ContourNEXT LINK 2.4 meter, it allows you to deliver a remote bolus from the pump. The Remote Bolus option on your pump must be turned on. 2. Press down to Utilities and press select. 4. Select On when the Remote Bolus screen appears. Do not calculate a bolus using a blood glucose meter results taken from an Alternative Site (palm) or from a control solution test. Follow these steps to deliver a bolus from your meter: 1. If you have tested, press Bolus on the meter while the test result is displayed 2. Select Manual Bolus. If you have a Preset Bolus set in your pump, it can also be delivered from the meter.* 3. Use the UP button on the meter to set the bolus amount. 4. Press Yes to send the bolus from the meter to your pump. 5. A confirmation screen will appear on the meter. 6. The bolus delivery appears on the pump as it is delivering. Continue reading >>

Our Decision To Switch To Medtronic Minimed 630g Insulin Pump – Part 1

Our Decision To Switch To Medtronic Minimed 630g Insulin Pump – Part 1

A few months ago, I was at home with the kids, and didn’t feel quite right. After a quick fingerstick, I saw that I was in the 20’s. In a panic, I couldn’t get anyone on the phone to talk with me until my sugars came up. I began to “eat the kitchen”, as it were. I finally reached my sister-in-law, who came to sit with the kids until I could get back to myself again. After that day, I was scared out of my mind to go below 100 if I was at home with the kids by myself. So, I started running my numbers higher — much higher than I’m comfortable with, and I knew I would be risking damage doing so. That’s when I realized, Dexcom Share wasn’t enough. It’s great to be able to Share and have people call to check on you… but what if they can’t actually reach you? My son and daughter can’t use my iPhone just yet (he can’t remember my unlock code), and neither know how to use a glucagon kit. I looked into the Loop system, but honestly, while I love that everyone is so willing to jump on board, I’m not. I’m not confident in my own abilities to make this thing happen since it’s something done from home. I don’t mind tinkering and playing with Nightscout because it’s not directly affecting my insulin dosing, whereas the Loop system does. That’s a-okay if you’re on it – I’m not trying to down the system or anything. I’m just not comfortable with the idea of using it myself. So, we looked into Medtronic. I know. It’s known as the big evil empire of the insulin pump world. And, while I am interested in the 670G, I was more interested it the 630G since it suspends insulin if the user is low. I know this is the exact same technology as 530G, but somewhere along the way, they’ve improved the CGM technology. I kept reading about how sucky th Continue reading >>

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