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How To Test Pressure Switch On Well Pump

4 Submersible Well Pump Troubleshooting

4 Submersible Well Pump Troubleshooting

Home / Flotec Resources / Troubleshooting /4 Submersible Well Pump Troubleshooting Use caution when checking anything electrical. Pumps use 230 or 115 volts AC which can injure or kill.Always shut off all power to the pump before servicing or inspecting it (except as specified).Some testing of live electrical power may be required.Hire a professional electrician if you are not comfortable with this. Voltage being fed to the pump does not match its rated voltage Confirm that the voltage you have connected to the motor is what the motor is rated for. Fuse or circuit breaker in your fuse/circuit breaker box has tripped or blown Inspect wiring, pressure switch, etc. for a problem that caused fuse/breaker to blow and repair as needed.After that is fixed, reset breaker or replace fuse. Measure voltage at motor when it is trying to run.Compare to base voltage that is being fed to it.If running voltage is 5% or more below the base voltage check wiring for poor connections or wiring that is too light in gauge for the pumps horsepower and wire length. Check power at pressure switch, and then at motor, to determine which wire(s) need to be repaired. In a 3-wire pump system, there will be a control box above ground which contains a capacitor, etc.Test components and replace as needed.In a 2-wire pump system, the starting components are in the motor and cannot be repaired.Replace pump. Pressure switch not wired properly or has failed Check voltage at pressure switch. Check if voltage on pump side of switch matches voltage on supply side.Replace switch if needed. If everything else checks out OK, the motor has failed.Replace motor if available separately, entire pump ifnot. Motor hums but little or no water is moved Follow diagnostics above for Pump wont start or run Make sure you h Continue reading >>

Troubleshooting Residential Submersible Pump Systems

Troubleshooting Residential Submersible Pump Systems

Troubleshooting Residential Submersible Pump Systems Why is it that residential deep well submersible pump system malfunctions are notoriously hard to diagnose? For one, a pump/motor assembly suspended 10 feet from the bottom of a 300-foot well brings new meaning to the word The symptoms also have a troublesome way of overlapping so that precise diagnosis can be elusive at first. Invariably, however, persistence and logic prevail for skilled electricians. Why is it that residential deep well submersible pump system malfunctions are notoriously hard to diagnose? For one, a pump/motor assembly suspended 10 feet from the bottom of a 300-foot well brings new meaning to the word inaccessible. The symptoms also have a troublesome way of overlapping so that precise diagnosis can be elusive at first. Invariably, however, persistence and logic prevail for skilled electricians. Photo 1. This type of submersible pump control box contains a capacitor, relay, and associated electronics. In this article, we'll take a look at the 3-wire 240V single-phase submersible pump system for drinking water applications, typically set between 50 feet and 300 feet below grade. The pump is fed down a steel well casing that extends through the earth until bedrock is encountered at which point the rock itself becomes the casing. A 3-wire system (actually there is a fourth equipment ground conductor that is not counted in the number of wires) implies there is a control box inside the house, containing a large electrolytic capacitor, microprocessor, and other electronics (Photo 1). In contrast, a 2-wire system omits the in-house controller so that the capacitor is inside the hermetically sealed underwater motor. Although this arrangement makes for a cheaper initial installation, when it comes to repa Continue reading >>

How To Tell If Your Well Pump Is Bad - Mr. Rooter Plumbing

How To Tell If Your Well Pump Is Bad - Mr. Rooter Plumbing

Need more information or assistance? Call the professionals at Mr. Rooter Plumbing! Chances are youll need to call in a plumber to make a thorough check, but there are a few simple checks you can do to determine if a minor problem is stopping your water supply. Some people immediately think their well pump has stopped working, but with a few different components that get your well water into your home, how do you know if your well pump is broken? The pump will certainly stop working at some point, but lets go over some of the other issues you should also focus on. There are three possibilities that could be stopping your water: Well failure (low supply of water in the ground) Equipment failure (of the well water equipment or from a power failure affecting the equipment) Plumbing breakdown (clogged or broken pipes) When you discover you dont have any water, the first thing to check is your electrical panel. See if the circuit for your well pump and pressure tank is in the on position. If not, flip it to on and see if that gets your system running. If this seemed to solve your problem, it could have been a one-time glitch and you may not have any other issues at least for a while. But if the breaker goes out again, call in a professional to diagnose the problem, as they will know how to tell if your well pump is bad. Your next check, if needed, is your pressure tank. Look at the pressure gauge and see if its showing a reading above 20 psi. Depending on the type of pressure tank, it could be indicating a higher psi, but if your tank is showing pressure, then your problem is likely within your house and not a problem with the well pump or well. No pressure? Then your problem is the well pump, well, pressure tank or switch. Call a service provider with the information youve Continue reading >>

Jet Pump Troubleshooting

Jet Pump Troubleshooting

Jet pumps can be used for several different types of applications. Whether you are using a jet pump to supply water to your home from a water well or irrigate a garden, crops, or landscaping, you will need to know some common jet pump issues and identify ways to troubleshoot to keep your pump in top working condition. Here are some common symptoms, possible causes, and corrective actions for maintaining a jet pump. If your jet pump will not start, there are a few possible causes: System pressure has not dropped to switch's "On" or "Cut-in" pressure. Fuse or circuit breaker in your fuse box or breaker box has blown or tripped. The pump's motor is set to incorrect voltage, or, voltage being fed to motor does not match the motor's rated voltage. The hose from the pump body to the pressure switch is blocked, clogged, or frozen or has come off one end. The pressure switch contacts are dirty or burned. The power wires are loose or disconnected. The starting component of the pump's motor has failed. Go down the list of possible causes to determine the problem with the pump. The zone valve may not be opening to allow water to move. Try checking or repairing the zone valve. Check all wiring, pressure switch, and motor to make sure there aren't any loose wires or connections. Relieve pressure from system by removing the hose from the pump body and pressure switch and see if you can blow through it. If you cannot, it's clogged. Remove whatever is clogging it and reinstall the hose. Are the Pressure Switch Contacts Dirty or Damaged? Measure the voltage on the motor side of the switch to see if the proper voltage is getting through. If not, replace the pressure switch. Check the voltage at motor (and/or pressure switch) to determine which wire(s) are loose and repair as needed. Has Continue reading >>

Stan Harrison: Make A Habit Of Switching Water/well Pump Pressure Switch

Stan Harrison: Make A Habit Of Switching Water/well Pump Pressure Switch

Stan Harrison: Make a habit of switching water/well pump pressure switch Being a new homeowner is like being a parent. More often than not, you learn as you go. When we moved to our home outside the city limits, we knew little about water wells, let alone something called a water pump pressure switch or well pump switch. The device, which connects to the plumbing, regulates the home's water supply. When the water pressure drops to a certain level, the switch senses more water is needed, and spring-loaded electrical parts make contact, turning on the well pump. When the pressure returns to a preset level and the well tank is filled, the electrical contacts separate, and the well pump turns off. Without a properly functioning water pump pressure switch, there is no water. Thirsty? Ready to boil water for pasta? The tap will be dry. Load of dirty dishes or laundry to do? They'll have to wait. Need to flush? You'll likely be able to if the toilet tank is full -- but only once. And because we have geothermal heating , which relies on a steady supply of water, our house would have no heat. So we'd be firing up the wood stove, plugging in some electric space heaters or wearing layers of warm clothing. Over time, the electrical contacts in the water pressure switch deteriorate and no longer make contact. As a result, the well pump doesn't turn on, and you're left high and dry. C. Early on a weekday morning, before anyone has had a shower. This time of year, most people are changing the batteries in their smoke detectors -- or should be. To make sure the water keeps flowing, we'll be changing the water pressure switch on our well, too. If you attempt to replace the switch, don't forget to first warn your family -- unless you get some warped sense of pleasure in hearing their an Continue reading >>

Signs Of A Bad Well Pump Pressure Switch

Signs Of A Bad Well Pump Pressure Switch

Whether you are a first-time homeowner, or an experienced one, its possible youve never had to deal with a well pressure switch. You might not even be aware of its existence until one early morning, on Christmas Eve or right when youve exhausted your underwear supply the switch fails. Its always the worst possible time, isnt it? While you are waiting for your Maryland emergency well pump repair tech to arrive (did you know that we have an emergency hot-line?), here is some information on what you could be dealing with and what it means. A pressure switch is a switch that signals to the well pump to start or stop pumping depending on the pressure in the water system. Pressure switches are designed to have two pressure settings: cut-in and cut-off pressure. These are the numbers you may find on the switch itself and they typically are 40-60, 30-50 or 20-40 measured in psi. The lower number is the pressure at witch the pump will kick in and start filling up your pressure tank. The higher number is the pressure at which the pump will stop. Both numbers can be adjusted as needed depending on your unique water supply needs. A pressure switch can be located either outside or in your basement, garage or pool housing, depending on how your well system is set up. If you have a submersible pump, the switch is in a different location than the pumptypically set on a pipe entering the pressure tank. If you have a jet pump, the pressure switch could be attached directly to it on the side. The mechanism of a pressure switch contains springs to set the pressure, as well as electrical wiring to signal the pump to turn off or on. Over time, the springs may loosen and the wire ports may become exposed and corroded. Something as simple as a bug stuck between electrical contacts can prevent Continue reading >>

Cushing & Sons Dependable Water Wells And Pump Systems | Keene, Nh

Cushing & Sons Dependable Water Wells And Pump Systems | Keene, Nh

Before Cushing & Sons recommends a pump, we will factor in: How much water will be needed at peak demand The well's yield potential in gallons per minute Diameter of the well at the pumping level Distance and elevation of the home above the well Because Cushing and Sons provides well-to-faucet water systems by licensed, certified and experienced technicians, we can guarantee the performance of the system and its components. We have believed for years that the best items to recommend to our customers are products that are time proven and are commonly available to the trade. We recommend items such as Franklin motors and control boxes, Square D pressure switches, Flomatic check valves, and top pump brands that are locally available in New England. We do this for two reasons, the first is that the parts are not proprietary, so in the event we are not available to work on your system, many others can. The second is that these top performing products allow us to offer long warrantee periods on our installations because of the demonstrated long service life. Cushing & Sons installs complete systems. We use only high quality components - not the parts you can buy at your local "big box" discount retailer. The difference is that a pumping system installed by Cushing & Sons is dependable, fully guaranteed and installed by our installation and repair staff. A submersible water pump is comprised of a series (usually 10) of small impellers, stacked horizontally on top of each other. When activated, the impellers rotate at approximately 3,450 RPM moving the well water up the drop line and into the pressure tank. Because the water pump operates electrically, wires must run down into the well and be connected to the pump. All wiring connections are permanently sealed to avoid voltage Continue reading >>

Troubleshooting Submersisble Well Pumps 101: Pump Won't Shut Off / Low Water Pressure

Troubleshooting Submersisble Well Pumps 101: Pump Won't Shut Off / Low Water Pressure

Troubleshooting Submersisble Well Pumps 101: Pump Won't Shut Off / Low Water Pressure Is your submersible well pump not shutting off? Has the system operating pressure dropped in your submersible well pump system? If you answered yes to either of these questions it is important to do some troubleshooting before your well pump wears out or you burn out the motor. I have outlined some steps to follow below. Caution! Electricity can be very dangerous, especially if you are inexperienced. Always use caution working with electricity and turn off power supply breakers when testing components within the electrical system. If you are not 100% confident you can perform any of these tests safely call a professional. Check for a closed valve. If a valve between the pump and the pressure switch has been closed the pressure switch will call for water and the pump will run continuously. Check the Pressure Switch. Look for any obvious signs of wear. You are looking for contacts that are stuck open or close, burnt contacts, or a melted wire. Ensure that all the wire connections are tight. Keep in mind that the pressure switch is a key element to a properly working system and they are relatively inexpensive. I recommend replacing them rather than trying to repair them. Check the nipple or tube leading to the switch for sediment or debris (the power must be disconnected and all system pressure relieved prior to checking). Check that the contacts are opening are closing properly by turning on the system. For example, the contacts will close at 40 PSI and open at 60 PSI on a 40/60 switch. Check for Leaks. If you have any valves, you can shut them one at a time and check for pressure loss in either direction which may indicate a leak. Check Water Supply for low or no water in the well. If Continue reading >>

How To Test And Troubleshoot Gas Furnace Pressure Switches.

How To Test And Troubleshoot Gas Furnace Pressure Switches.

Question: How can I test to see if a pressure switch is operating properly? Set your meter to volts AC, turn your furnace on so it is calling for heat. The draft inducer should start. There should be either two or three wires going into your pressure switch. Probe one lead of the pressure with one lead of your meter while touching the other lead of your meter to ground. Ground would be any bare metal part of your furnace. This must be bare metal. I always try to touch the other lead of my meter to the furnaces switch box. If you have a two wire pressure switch you should be getting 24 or more volts between both leads to ground. By this I mean if you touch one terminal of the pressure switch with one lead of your meter, and touch the other lead of your meter to a ground, bare metal part of your furnace, you should get 24 or more volts (24 to 28 volts). If you do not get 24 or more volts with the furnace running then you have a pressure switch problem. A gas furnacepressure switch problem could be caused by the following: Your vent could be stopped up with a birds nest, wasp nest or debris. You could have a bad, dragging, dirty or slow running draft inducer. The tube that runs from your pressure switch to the draft inducer could be plugged up. Many times the tube is plugged up with water. If the pressure switch tube has water in it then this is a sign that you condensate drain line could be stopped up or not draining properly. You can disconnect the pressure switch tube and run a wet vac to hopefully clear the stopped up furnace condensate drain line. The draft inducer hole could be plugged up. I have seen the draft inducer holes get stopped up so bad that I had to use a small drill bit and drill to open the hole back up. On high efficiency condensing furnaces the water Continue reading >>

Troubleshooting A Bladder Pressure Tank

Troubleshooting A Bladder Pressure Tank

A few simple steps help you check this vital system component. A bladder pressure tank contains pressurized air and water separated by a flexible membrane (bladder). These tanks are typically precharged with air at the factory. As water pressure changes, the volume of air in a bladder tank contracts and expands. Periodically, the amount of air in the tank should be measured and the tank recharged if the air is too low. Although a bladder tank for a typical home or smaller commercial water system will not have a very large storage capacity, it will perform several important functions: It maintains a desired range of water pressure in the distribution system. It minimizes pump cycling, preventing frequent starts and stops and protecting pumps from motor burnout or other water system components from damage. If it appears that a bladder tank is not operating correctly, check the tanks air charge: Drain the tank by opening the closest faucet. Check the tanks pressure by placing an air pressure gauge on the air charging valve on the top of the tank. Add air if the pressure is more than 2 psi below the pump cut-in pressure. Use caution when using an air compressor or air pump. Release air if the pressure is 2 psi above the pump cut-in pressure (lowest pressure in the operating range). Check for leaks in the air charging system by dripping a soap solution on the air charging valve. Restart the pump and run through a normal cycle to verify the setting. If tank pressure drops abnormally, the bladder inside the tank may have a tear or hole in it. You should also check a bladder tank to determine if its waterlogged. A tank is waterlogged if it is completely filled with water or has too much water to function correctly. Waterlogged bladder pressure tanks contribute to the following Continue reading >>

How To Adjust & Inspect Your Well Pump Pressure Switch

How To Adjust & Inspect Your Well Pump Pressure Switch

How to Adjust & Inspect your Well Pump Pressure Switch We have been getting a lot of customer calls concerned with adjusting their well pump pressure switch and making sure the pressure switch is in good condition. First off, I would just like to start with what a pressure switch does. A pressure switch is the mechanism that will turn on and turn off the well pump based on the pressure in the water system. Most switches we use are 40-60 switches, meaning that the switch will activate your pump to turn on when the water pressure lowers to 40 lbs. and will kill power to your pump when the water pressure reaches 60 lbs. These switches can be bought in a number of different factory settings such as 20-40, 30-50, and can also be easily adjusted. The most common manufacturer is Square D. You will notice in the below pictures a main or larger center spring and a smaller spring to the left. The larger center spring will adjust both the cut in and cut off pressure. If you turn the spring clockwise it will raise the cut in and cut off pressure. If you turn the spring counter clockwise you will decrease both the cut in and cut off pressure. For example if you have a 30-50 switch and you turn the larger spring clockwise you will have a 35-55 switch. First, always make sure you have the power turned off. Make sure that the switch is clean and that the wire ports are sealed. You would be amazed how many times we find a bug or spider crawled into the points preventing the pump to get power. Make sure the wiring connections are good and tight. With age and use the wires may become loose or even broken. The biggest thing to look for is the points. These look like small watch batteries or discs the color of silver and brass. Make sure they look clean and shiny. If the pump has been rapi Continue reading >>

How To Replace A Well Pump Pressure Switch

How To Replace A Well Pump Pressure Switch

How to Replace a Well Pump Pressure Switch Home Electrical Wiring Switches How to Replace a Well Pump Pressure Switch Replace a cranky old switch in about an hour Replace a faulty well pump switch in about an hour; no special tools or skills required. By the DIY experts of The Family Handyman Magazine Photo 1: Shut off the power, then disassemble Label each wire with tape. Then unscrew the conduit locking ring and pull the wires and conduit out of the switch. Unscrew the old switch and nipple. Replace with new parts. Slap your adjustable wrench around the flats on the gauge and unscrew it. Then screw in a new one and tighten it down. Your well pump gets its marching orders from the switch mounted on the pressure tank. When the switch acts up (and they all do eventually), youll see all kinds of strange behavior (pump wont turn on, turns on erratically or wont shut off). Replacing the pressure switch is cheap and takes only about an hour. Diagnose a cranky switch by rapping on it with a screwdriver handle. If the pump runs (youll hear it click) or quits, youve nailed the problem. But even if it doesnt respond, its still worth replacing the switch. Replace it with a new one (about $24 at rural home centers and amazon.com ). Switches come in three pressure ranges: 20 to 40, 30 to 50 and 40 to 60 psi. Always replace your switch with one of the same rating (usually printed inside the plastic cover of your old switch). Also buy a new pressure gauge (less than $10) and a 1/4-in. x 6-in. galvanized nipple. Flip the breaker to the pump switch and check it with a voltage sniffer to make sure its off. Then disconnect the wiring (Photo 1). Close the valve from the pressure tank to the house. Then drain the pressure tank. Next, remove the old switch (Photo 2) and gauge (Photo 3). Wr Continue reading >>

Pressure Switch Bad?

Pressure Switch Bad?

I came home from vacation to find I had no water. I called well service company and they said to check connection on pressure switch to see if it needed to be cleaned. I took cover off and jiggled wires and pump came back on. All seemed well, but a while later water was barely trickling through faucet, rechecked and jiggled wires again, came back on but water still only trickles, pump seems to be running constantly and pressure on gauge reads about 30-35. Can I adjust the screws on pressure switch or is switck bad? If bad is it easy to replace. need to do whatever needs to be done today or tomorrow but will need help through step by step instructuons. thanks. It sounds as you may have multiple problems. By jiggling the wires, you either made a poor connection make its' needed connection or you jiggled the pressure switch enough to make it "make" or close. (sticking switch) The next problem is that the pump now runs constantly but it would seem the pressure is not rising enough to make the pressure switch "break" or open. The pressure switch is easy enough to change. You start with turning off the pump, draining the presssure, make sure the electricity to the pump (at the breaker panel) is turned off. Mark the wires so the can be returned to the proper position. Remove the wires. use a wrench of proper size and unscrew the switch from the pipe below it. Using 2 wraps of teflon tape on the threads of the new switch (being sure to not get any in front of the small hole of the pipe itself) you screw the switch back in until it is quite snug. Reconnect the wires, turn on the breaker, and the switch should make the pump turn on. Now if the pump still does not turn off, then you wither have a leak in the system or you have problems in the well itself. If you turn off the pump Continue reading >>

Adjusting Well Pump Pressure Switches

Adjusting Well Pump Pressure Switches

Home / Flotec Resources / Quick Start Guides /Adjusting Well Pump Pressure Switches Read your manual for installation, operation, and safety information. This guide neither supplements nor replaces the Owners Manual. The stopping and starting of jet and submersible water pumps is controlled by a pressure switch. The pressure switch is typically preset correctly for the application. If the cut-off or cut-on pressure needs to be changed, follow the procedure described here. CAUTION Hazardous voltage. Disconnect power before working on the motor or the pressure switch. It is important for safety reasons to disconnect the power to the pressure switch. Then loosen the acorn nut that fastens the switch cover to the switch. Carefully lift off the cover. A one-post pressure switch provides one adjustment for both cut-on and cut-off pressure settings. They typically provide a 20 PSI pressure differential between the start (cut-on) and stop (cut-off) pressures. A single post switch looks like this: To increase both cut-on and cut-off pressures, turn the nut clockwise. The rate of increase is 2-1/2 PSI for each complete rotation of the nut. In example, two complete clockwise turns equals a 5 psi raise in pressure setting. Counterclockwise arrow art = ccwarrow2.eps A two-post pressure switch provides adjustment for both cut-on and cut-off pressure at the same time on one post. The second post permits adjustment of the cut-off pressure independently. A double post switch looks like this: To increase both cut-on and cut-off pressures without changing the pressure differential (nominally 20 PSI), turn nut #1 clockwise. The rate of increase is 2-1/2 PSI for each complete rotation of the nut. For example, two complete counterclockwise turns equals a 5 psi lowering of the pressure setti Continue reading >>

How To Troubleshoot Residential Well Problems

How To Troubleshoot Residential Well Problems

How to Troubleshoot Residential Well Problems Written by Laurie Brenner; Updated July 19, 2017 Modern well systems have more components that can fail than their older counterparts. Submersible Well Pump Is Kicking on All the Time When your well stops pumping water, it doesn't necessarily mean you have to purchase a new well pump or dig a new well. Well pumps are designed to continue working for many years; some can last for 20 years or longer. Residential well systems include many components, any of which can cause the well to stop delivering water. Test the system for power. Before doing anything else, verify that the electrical circuit for the well pump has not tripped. Lack of power to the system is the most common residential well problem. When you live in the country or in a rural setting, power surges, power blackouts and brownouts are common in winter and summer. Increased power usage or a power surge can cause the circuit breaker to trip and shut the system off. Locate the service panel and the circuit breaker for the pump. Switch the circuit breaker off and then on again. Sometimes when a circuit breaker trips off, it might look as if it is still on when it isn't. Confirm that the pressure switch has not shut the system down. When you have a pressure tank and pressure switch attached to the water delivery system, too much draw on the system automatically trips the pressure switch to shut the system down. This is a safety measure to keep the system from continuously pumping water if a pipe breaks in the delivery system. The pressure switch sits in a gray box atop the feed line from the well pump to the pressure tank. Alongside it, you'll find a small silver bar. When it is tripped, the bar rests parallel to the ground. When operational, the trip handle sits at Continue reading >>

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