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How To Test A Submersible Well Pump

Well Flow Test, Well Yield Test, Well Draw Down Test Procedure: How To Test Well Flow Rate & Well Water Quantity

Well Flow Test, Well Yield Test, Well Draw Down Test Procedure: How To Test Well Flow Rate & Well Water Quantity

InspectAPedia tolerates no conflicts of interest. We have no relationship with advertisers, products, or services discussed at this website. This article describes how a home owner or home buyer can test, measure, or estimate the amount of water available from a well and how to evaluate the water pressure delivered in a building served by a private well. We also provide a MASTER INDEX to this topic, or you can try the page top or bottom SEARCH BOX as a quick way to find information you need. Green links show where you are. Copyright 2017 InspectApedia.com, All Rights Reserved. How to Do Your Own Amateur Well Flow Rate/Well Yield Test or Well Drawdown Test The sketch at page top, courtesy of Carson Dunlop , outlines what happens during a true well flow test, also called a well drawdown or well flow test procedure. That procedure can give an accurate picture of how much water the well can deliver, though the quantity may vary seasonally or for other reasons. But there are some steps that an amateur can take first to check on the well water quantity. In fact it's possible use mere visual inspection to form a reasonable suspicion that a building has insufficient well water before testing anything. We describe these procedures here. What is a true well flow rate or capacity test? At WELL FLOW RATE we explained that a real well flow rate test is usually performed right at the well by the well driller or a plumber, at the time the well was drilled, and using special equipment. A true well flow test, well recovery test, or well draw-down test requires special equipment and locating, opening, and pumping right at the well. That procedure has the advantage that the well flow rate recorded is not affected by other problems such as a piping error or clogged water pipes or a defect Continue reading >>

Troubleshooting Submersible And Jet Pumps - Earl Pruitt's Residential - Municipal Well And Pump Service

Troubleshooting Submersible And Jet Pumps - Earl Pruitt's Residential - Municipal Well And Pump Service

Check the resistance of the motor winding by using an ohmmeter on the proper terminals in the control box (see manufacturer's wiring diagram). The resistance should match the ohms specified in the data sheet. If it's too low the motor winding may be shorted. If the ohmmeter needle doesn't move, indicating high or infinite resistance, there is an open circuit in the motor winding or cable. If the motor winding is defective - shorted or open, the pump must be pulled and the motor should be repaired. Ground one lead of the ohmmeter onto the drop pipe or well casing, then touch the other lead to each motor wire terminal. If the ohmmeter moves appreciably when this is done, there is a ground in either the cable or the motor winding. Pull the pump and inspect the cable for damage. Replace damaged cable. If cable checks OK, the motor winding is grounded. Check the line amps before the trip. If amps are twice normal, or higher, the pump is probably locked. Pull pump, disassemble from motor and check which one is locked. Replace one or both if defective. Pump operates but delivers toolittle or no water Stop and start the pump several times, waiting about one minute between cycles. If the pump resumes it's normal delivery, air lock was the trouble. If this test fails to correct the trouble proceed as below. Well production may be too low for the pump capacity. Restrict the low of pump output, then wait for the well to recover, and start pump. If partial restriction corrects trouble, leave valve or cock at the restricted setting. Otherwise lower pump in well if depth is sufficient. Do not lower if sand clogging might occur. 3. Discharge line check valve installed backwards. Examine check valve on the discharge line to make sure that the arrow indicating direction of flow points i Continue reading >>

How To Tell If Your Well Pump Is Bad - Mr. Rooter Plumbing

How To Tell If Your Well Pump Is Bad - Mr. Rooter Plumbing

Need more information or assistance? Call the professionals at Mr. Rooter Plumbing! Chances are youll need to call in a plumber to make a thorough check, but there are a few simple checks you can do to determine if a minor problem is stopping your water supply. Some people immediately think their well pump has stopped working, but with a few different components that get your well water into your home, how do you know if your well pump is broken? The pump will certainly stop working at some point, but lets go over some of the other issues you should also focus on. There are three possibilities that could be stopping your water: Well failure (low supply of water in the ground) Equipment failure (of the well water equipment or from a power failure affecting the equipment) Plumbing breakdown (clogged or broken pipes) When you discover you dont have any water, the first thing to check is your electrical panel. See if the circuit for your well pump and pressure tank is in the on position. If not, flip it to on and see if that gets your system running. If this seemed to solve your problem, it could have been a one-time glitch and you may not have any other issues at least for a while. But if the breaker goes out again, call in a professional to diagnose the problem, as they will know how to tell if your well pump is bad. Your next check, if needed, is your pressure tank. Look at the pressure gauge and see if its showing a reading above 20 psi. Depending on the type of pressure tank, it could be indicating a higher psi, but if your tank is showing pressure, then your problem is likely within your house and not a problem with the well pump or well. No pressure? Then your problem is the well pump, well, pressure tank or switch. Call a service provider with the information youve Continue reading >>

Troubleshooting Residential Submersible Pump Systems

Troubleshooting Residential Submersible Pump Systems

Troubleshooting Residential Submersible Pump Systems Why is it that residential deep well submersible pump system malfunctions are notoriously hard to diagnose? For one, a pump/motor assembly suspended 10 feet from the bottom of a 300-foot well brings new meaning to the word The symptoms also have a troublesome way of overlapping so that precise diagnosis can be elusive at first. Invariably, however, persistence and logic prevail for skilled electricians. Why is it that residential deep well submersible pump system malfunctions are notoriously hard to diagnose? For one, a pump/motor assembly suspended 10 feet from the bottom of a 300-foot well brings new meaning to the word inaccessible. The symptoms also have a troublesome way of overlapping so that precise diagnosis can be elusive at first. Invariably, however, persistence and logic prevail for skilled electricians. Photo 1. This type of submersible pump control box contains a capacitor, relay, and associated electronics. In this article, we'll take a look at the 3-wire 240V single-phase submersible pump system for drinking water applications, typically set between 50 feet and 300 feet below grade. The pump is fed down a steel well casing that extends through the earth until bedrock is encountered at which point the rock itself becomes the casing. A 3-wire system (actually there is a fourth equipment ground conductor that is not counted in the number of wires) implies there is a control box inside the house, containing a large electrolytic capacitor, microprocessor, and other electronics (Photo 1). In contrast, a 2-wire system omits the in-house controller so that the capacitor is inside the hermetically sealed underwater motor. Although this arrangement makes for a cheaper initial installation, when it comes to repa Continue reading >>

Testing A Well Pump

Testing A Well Pump

Greetings, My question is in regards to how to check the motor on the pump, which is several hundred feet below the Gounod. First some info. Its a submersible pump with a franklin control box like this Franklin Electric submersible pump motor controls. The pump will be turned on and there is power to this control box from the pressure controller.(verified with volt light).There is a clicking in the Franklin box like the relay is trying to make the motor start but doesn't.. I should be able to use an ohm meter on the incoming three wires from the pump to check if it itself is OK?If so would they have to be disconnected from the control box terminal block?And what type of ohm reading should there be? Id much rather start and check here before opening the cap on the well casing itself. It hasn't been much colder her than usual years , but I think its possible that it tried to pump but the line could be frozen (although highly unlikely). Thanks in advance for any help.I will go melt snow to flush. oh here is a picture of the box . bottom of page. The pump should run with a frozen discharge unless the pump itself is frozen. It would also draw mini mun amps pumping in this condition. Perhaps check the capacitor in your control box? Worn out skin bag filled with rattlin bones I went through this late last year. I verified voltage to the control box but didn't know how to check that box. It comes off very easily, and I ended up simply taking it to a local pump dealer. He put it on a test machine and gave me the bad news: "the controller is good". When his crew pulled the pump (a couple of weeks later) the problem was obvious. The half of the pump that contains the impellers had separated from the part that has the motor and the shaft between them was broken. The motor was stil Continue reading >>

Any Way To Test A Deep Well Pump?

Any Way To Test A Deep Well Pump?

We woke up this morning with no water. My husband thinks it's thesubmersible pump, but he had a heckuva time getting the pump in, and he'drather have a better idea of whether or not it's working before he goes tothe trouble of pulling it. We have a 200' deep well, the pump is about 170' down. We think it's aGould pump, but we're not sure. The pump was used when we got it, and weinstalled it in the well five years ago. The only problem we've had sincethen was this past June, when we had to replace the control box after aviolent lightning storm. Otherwise, all has been working fine. When we turn on the circuit breaker for the deep well pump, we can hear asurging from the control box -- like a hum -- and then it stops, and then ithums again in sort of a 3-seconds on, 3-seconds off pattern. There isdefinitely water in the well, but when we removed the well cap, we couldn'thear the pump in the well, though we're not sure whether we should be ableto through the water (there is probably 70' of water above the pump). Myhusband replaced the control box with a brand new one, to no avail. He has since hooked up a shallow well pump to a barrel in the basement,going into the same line right before the pressure tank, and all is workingwell, so presumably it's not the pressure tank. Does anyone have any ideas of things we haven't thought of before we pullthe pump? Or is there any way to test the pump before pulling it? The wires that enter the well casing are usually in a plastic conduit.See if you can pry away the fitting on that conduit to gain access tothe wires. Then take a common meter and puncture the wire insulationand see if you have voltage. Put a little silicone on the puncturespots and tape them when you finish. If you have power, the pump isbad, or a wire is broken down i Continue reading >>

Water Well Pumps And Supplies

Water Well Pumps And Supplies

Submersible Water Well Pumps, Sump Pump and Sewage Pumps, Water Well Accessories, Windmills & Hand Pumps, and Environmental Ground Water Monitoring Supplies.DEAN BENNETT SUPPLY at 1-800-621-4291is your supplier for Wind Engine 702 windmills, Zoeller sump and sewage pumps Flint & Walling submersibleand above groundwater well pumps andwaterwell accessoriessuch as tanks, valves, etc.Since 1965 Dean Bennett Supply has served the needs for water pumping systems for livestock, homes, and businesses.We welcome the DO-IT-YOURSELFInstaller. Dean Bennett Supply Company has been a stocking distributor of pumps and well supplies since 1965. Whether your pumping needs are for household use or for livestock watering, our knowledgeable sales people will guide you to the correct products. Our large Denver inventory of well supplies will make fast delivery of your order easy. Your quality concerns will disappear when you can select brand name merchandise from well known manufacturers like Flint & Walling pumps, Wind Engine 702 windmills, and Zoeller sump and sewage pumps. We serve the rancher, home owner, and Do-It-Yourself installer in addition to the professional well driller / pump man - - So don't hesitate to call us for help on the products we sell you. PREFER TO PERSONALLY VISIT WITH OUR SALES PEOPLE? Call us at no cost on our nationwide toll free phone ( 1-800-621-4291 ) Monday thru Friday 7 AM to 4:30 PM Mountain Time Zone. Our sales people will be glad to answer your questions, take your order, or help you in any other way we can on products we sell. Pricing Policy: Any prices which may be found on this website (or any archived price sheet or catalogs) are subject to change without notification. Visit ourDenver warehouse and officestore front. 4701 Colorado Blvd, Denver, CO 80 Continue reading >>

Pump Control Test Franklin - Electrical - Diy Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

Pump Control Test Franklin - Electrical - Diy Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

Trying to test a Franklin contol for a 1/2 hp 230 volts submersible pump control box. Does anyone have the instructions. I am getting ohm readings that seem wrong. model 2801054915. No water and cannot belive the pump has failed so fast. My last pump lasted 25 yrs. Pump is getting power. but not running. Check for voltage across the wires which go to the pump from the contactor. If you show 240 volts or so, either the conductors or the pump have failed. Testing for DC resistance with your ohm meter will only confirm you have continuity through the motor winding and the wires going to the pump. This is a 3 wire submersible pump motor, the resistance between any two of the 3 wires should be different . The reason being that one of the wires is a common, one is the run winding, and the other is the start winding. If you have resistance between any two wires below 200 ohms, and infinite resistance from any wire to ground, your motor is likely OK. There are several types of control boxes, yours is likely a capacitor start-induction run. It has one capacitor (usually a round thing, about 1"-2" diameter, 2"-4" long), a potential relay (usually a square thing about 1"X1" or so), and an overload relay (another round thing, with a button sticking outside of the box) in it. If it has two capacitors, then it is capacitor start-capacitor run. Here's how it works; when voltage is applied, the run winding is energized, and stays energized until voltage is removed. The start winding is also energized, but the capacitor is wired in series with it. When the potential relay senses the motor speed to be about 1/2-2/3 of running speed, it opens (turns off) a contact, and de-energizes the start winding. In a capacitor run type, this relay simply removes the start (larger) capacitor from the Continue reading >>

Testing Submersible Pump Motor - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum

Testing Submersible Pump Motor - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum

So I have a megger but this is my first use outside of uf cable, what's the best way to check our little giant submersible pump? I read from the hot to ground wire but wanted to make sure I am doing it right before I condemn it to the dump Last edited by Anathera; 06-19-2016 at 02:30 PM. Join the #1 Electrician Forum Today - It's Totally Free! ElectricianTalk.com - Are you a Professional Electrical Contractor? If so we invite you to join our community and see what it has to offer. Our site is specifically designed for you and it's the leading place for electricians to meet online. No homeowners asking DIY questions. Just fellow tradesmen who enjoy talking about their business, their trade, and anything else that comes up. No matter what your specialty is you'll find that ElectricianTalk.com is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally free! It may be my problem, I'm not so much concerned with the pump as confirming that it was the problem so that I can avoid a second work order. There were a few other variables that may have caused my issue as well. That would be the right way to read it right? It's really a sump pump they were using to fire the fountain If it was just a sump pump, it's duty cycle wasn't continuous I'm sure.. Little giant has some good pumps for running a fountain. My pond pumps lasted about 5 years. I ran them 24/7 to keep the water aerated the fish.. I liked the sound of the water fall at night. Teacher, my brain is full... Can I go home now? To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts. Continue reading >>

4 Submersible Well Pump Troubleshooting

4 Submersible Well Pump Troubleshooting

Home / Flotec Resources / Troubleshooting /4 Submersible Well Pump Troubleshooting Use caution when checking anything electrical. Pumps use 230 or 115 volts AC which can injure or kill.Always shut off all power to the pump before servicing or inspecting it (except as specified).Some testing of live electrical power may be required.Hire a professional electrician if you are not comfortable with this. Voltage being fed to the pump does not match its rated voltage Confirm that the voltage you have connected to the motor is what the motor is rated for. Fuse or circuit breaker in your fuse/circuit breaker box has tripped or blown Inspect wiring, pressure switch, etc. for a problem that caused fuse/breaker to blow and repair as needed.After that is fixed, reset breaker or replace fuse. Measure voltage at motor when it is trying to run.Compare to base voltage that is being fed to it.If running voltage is 5% or more below the base voltage check wiring for poor connections or wiring that is too light in gauge for the pumps horsepower and wire length. Check power at pressure switch, and then at motor, to determine which wire(s) need to be repaired. In a 3-wire pump system, there will be a control box above ground which contains a capacitor, etc.Test components and replace as needed.In a 2-wire pump system, the starting components are in the motor and cannot be repaired.Replace pump. Pressure switch not wired properly or has failed Check voltage at pressure switch. Check if voltage on pump side of switch matches voltage on supply side.Replace switch if needed. If everything else checks out OK, the motor has failed.Replace motor if available separately, entire pump ifnot. Motor hums but little or no water is moved Follow diagnostics above for Pump wont start or run Make sure you h Continue reading >>

?well Pump Or Control Box? No Running Water Is A Very Bad Thing

?well Pump Or Control Box? No Running Water Is A Very Bad Thing

Terry Love Plumbing & Remodel DIY & Professional Forum Home Forums > Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog. Water is life. > ?well pump or control box? No running water is a very bad thing I was in the shower tonight and (thankfully when I was almost done rinsing) the control box tries to send power (hums for a few seconds the stops), the pressure regulator is brand new (that went a few months ago).. so Im left believing its the pump.. right? :-[ Im a computer tech (former construction and electrical background) so I feel I would be able to switch the pump out myself.. I dont think its more than 100-150 deep (with only 3/4hp). so, my main question is, does the humming control box mean it is the bad part or does that mean its just doing its thing sending the 220 out to the pump? I would love to hear any thoughts and opinions on this.. 8-D Waterwelldude Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer If you are sure the pump control box is getting the 220v. Check the apms when the pump tries to run, if its under 30amps. I would try changing the capacitor. If its over 30, it doesnt look good for the pump. I didnt even think that the humming could be a bad cap.. awww man.. I really hope it is.. its too cold outside to be fishing in my well.. I have to go buy a voltage meter to test it.. mine seems to have grown legs and ran to the neighbors house.. the control box box seems to be testing ok.. :-[ anybody feel like coming to delaware and helping.. Ill fix all your computers, and make you a website.. 8-D You can do all the electrical checks on the pump at the control box, just remove the power cable from the terminals and check to your heart's content right there. Or do it at the well on the cable going down to the pump by disconnect Continue reading >>

Well Pump Troubleshooting And Diy Repair

Well Pump Troubleshooting And Diy Repair

Home Plumbing Plumbing Repair Well Pump Troubleshooting and DIY Repair If you own a home with a well, you know that trouble can hit at the worst possible time, like at the start of a holiday weekend, and off-hours repairs can cost a small fortune. By the DIY experts of The Family Handyman Magazine If youre comfortable replacing electrical and plumbing components, you can save at least $150 on the service call as well as money on the parts. All the parts that can be replaced by a DIYer are located inside the house. Youll need to call a pro for outside electrical, piping, pump and check-valve failures. Most of the time youll find the parts you need at home centers. But home centers may not carry the highest-quality parts. If you want to get long-lasting parts, shop at a plumbing supplier. The most common symptoms of well trouble are no water at all, pulsing water pressure and a pump that runs constantly. If you experience any of these, theres a good chance you can solve the problem yourself. Photo 2: If the switch is bad, replace it Start by checking that the well switch located near your pressure tank hasnt been switched off. Then check the wells double-pole circuit breaker to see that it hasnt tripped. If it has, reset it. A breaker that keeps tripping likely means a problem with the well pump, and youll need to call a pro for that. (Photo 1) Youll find the pressure switch mounted on a 1/4-in. tube near the pressure tank. Its what senses when water pressure has dropped to the point where the pressure tank requires more water. The switch then powers up the well pump. If the switch is bad, it wont start the pump and you wont have water, so testing the switch is your first step. Remove the cover and bang a screwdriver handle sharply against the tube below the switch to ja Continue reading >>

Testing A Submersible Well Pump

Testing A Submersible Well Pump

I think our subersible pump died, but want to make sure before pulling it. It's a 4" Franklin 1/2 hp, 110 ft. deep, with 1" galvanized delivery pipe. The control box had gotten wet and a rusted connection on the relay broke loose. I had another unit on hand, but not sure if it's functional or not. It was taken from a friend's installation after they replaced their pump and control box. It's in almost like new condition, with the same rating but with an exposed circuit board instead of a relay box so I figured I'd try it. The pump runs and pumps water up to the well's top, but only for about 5 seconds, then cuts out at the control box. I guess that would be the starter winding that runs, and that the run winding may be kaput or isn't getting a connection, or the control box is faulty. It's after hours and I want to figure this out this evening so I know what to do in the morning. How can I test the control box and the pump motor, on the chance that the motor may still be OK? I have a digital multimeter, and enough experience with electricity and wiring to know how to avoid doing something stupid. We are severely strapped for funds at this time and really can't afford replacing the pump. Thanks for the quick reply. I'm pretty familiar with the "flash start" method, and I'm still alive after trying it I left the thick pump wires where they were, disconnected L1 & L2 and connected L2 to B, the outer terminal (main). Then I held a short "horse-shoe" jumper in one hand, and L1 in the other. Holding the jumper across the pump's common and the red start terminal while touching the red L1 to the common got me nothing. Then I put the box back together, turned on the juice and the start winding kicked in as before. The thought just occured to me that I maybe I should have held th Continue reading >>

Troubleshooting Submersible Well Pumps 101: Testing A Franklin Electric Qd (quick Disconnect) Box

Troubleshooting Submersible Well Pumps 101: Testing A Franklin Electric Qd (quick Disconnect) Box

Home > Blog > Troubleshooting Submersible Well Pumps 101: Testing a Franklin Electric QD (Quick Disconnect) Box Troubleshooting Submersible Well Pumps 101: Testing a Franklin Electric QD (Quick Disconnect) Box QD Boxes are designed for use with 3-wire, single phase submersible motors from ? to 1 hp. Troubleshooting inside the box is made simple by the control components automatically disconnecting from the system when the lid is removed. I have outlined some troubleshooting steps below to help investigate problems with your QD Control Box. Caution! Electricity can be very dangerous, especially if you are inexperienced. Always use caution working with electricity and turn off power supply breakers when testing components within the electrical system. If you are not 100% confident you can perform any of these tests safely, call a professional. Standard QDs contain just a start capacitor and QD relay. The old QD CRC boxes (Capacitor Run Capacitor Start) also contain a run capacitor. The incoming power is attached at L1 and L2. The pump wires connect to R, Y, and B. R (red) is the start winding, Y (yellow) is the common, and B (black) is the run winding. When the motor is started, both the start and main windings are energized. As the motor approaches running speed, the start capacitor and the start winding must be disconnected, and the motor operates on the run winding alone. The job of the QD relay is to remove, or disconnect, the start capacitor and start winding as the motor reaches running speed. In the QD CRC Box the start capacitor and start winding are disconnected just like above, however, the start winding and the run capacitor(s) stay connected and working, even when the motor is at running speed. Check the capacitor(s). Using an ohmmeter set to R X 1,000, place Continue reading >>

How To Test For A Bad Deep Well Pump

How To Test For A Bad Deep Well Pump

2011-02-08How to Test for a Bad Deep Well Pump Deep well or submersible water pumps reside under the water level of the subterranean water source. Many parts make the pump operate. For example, an electrical pressure switch turns the water pump on and off, and some submersible water pumps utilize a pump relay that adds an extra boost to the underwater electric motor. A single check valve sits on top of the pump housing, retaining water in the main plumbing pipe. Testing for a bad deep well pump involves inspecting those items and the well. Verify that the water pump system receives electric power. Turn the circuit breaker on and off a couple of times to ensure it doesn't trip. If the electrical supply uses fuses, install new fuses. Gain access to the top of the deep well. Remove the top cover according to its type of enclosure. Different types of deep wells have various methods that enclose the top of the wellhead. Check for water in the well. Shine a flashlight down the well. If you see that water covers the submersible pump, the well has plenty of water. If you can see the pump housing, the well is dry and must recover. Inspect the system's pressure switch. The switch is in close proximity to the pressure tank and is attached to the well pump plumbing pipe. Shut off electric power to the water system. Remove the gray plastic cover to the switch housing by turning the top screw in a counterclockwise direction with plumbing pliers. Lift the cover from the switch. Look at the electrical contacts that conduct electricity to the pump or pump relay. If the contacts are closed, open the spring-loaded discs. If the contacts are severely pitted or black, the pressure switch may be bad and in need of replacement. If the contacts are stuck open, try cycling them a few times. Ap Continue reading >>

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