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How To Take Lantus

Lantus Side Effects

Lantus Side Effects

Generic Name: insulin glargine (IN su lin GLAR gine) Brand Names: Basaglar KwikPen, Lantus, Lantus Solostar Pen, Toujeo SoloStar What is Lantus? Lantus (insulin glargine) is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin that starts to work several hours after injection and keeps working evenly for 24 hours. Lantus is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Lantus is used to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes in adults, and type 1 diabetes children who are at least 6 years old. Some brands of insulin glargine are for use only in adults. Carefully follow all instructions for the brand of insulin glargine you are using. Important information You should not use Lantus if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis. Never share a Lantus injection pen or cartridge with another person. Sharing injection pens or cartridges can allow disease such as hepatitis or HIV to pass from one person to another. Lantus is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels. Before taking this medicine You should not use Lantus if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Lantus is not approved for use by anyone younger than 6 years old, and should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure Lantus is safe for you, tell your docto Continue reading >>

What Is The Most Important Information I Should Know About Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

What Is The Most Important Information I Should Know About Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

A A A Medications and Drugs Brand Names: Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen Generic Name: insulin glargine (Pronunciation: IN su lin AS part, IN su lin AS part PRO ta meen) What is the most important information I should know about insulin glargine (Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)? What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using insulin glargine (Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)? What is insulin glargine (Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)? Insulin glargine is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin glargine is a long-acting form of insulin that is slightly different from other forms of insulin that are not man-made. Insulin glargine is used to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Insulin glargine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of insulin glargine (Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of insulin allergy: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of insulin glargine. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, fainting, or seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Tell your doctor if you have itching, swelling, redness, or thickening of the skin where you inject insulin glargine. This is not a complete list of side effect Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

What Is Lantus (Insulin Glargine)? Lantus is the brand name of insulin glargine, a long-acting insulin used to treat adults and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus to control high blood sugar. Lantus replaces the insulin that your body no longer produces. Insulin is a natural substance that allows your body to convert dietary sugar into energy and helps store energy for later use. In type 2 diabetes mellitus, your body does not produce enough insulin, or the insulin produced is not used properly, causing a rise in blood sugar. Like other types of insulin, Lantus is used to normalize blood sugar levels. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual dysfunction. Proper control of diabetes has also been shown to reduce your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Lantus is meant to be used alongside a proper diet and exercise program recommended by your doctor. Lantus is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. It was approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000 as the first long-acting human insulin administered once a day with a 24-hour sugar-lowering effect. Lantus Warnings You will be taught how to properly inject this medication since that is the only way to use it. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. Always wash your hands before measuring and injecting insulin. Lantus is always clear and colorless; look for cloudy solution or clumps in the container before injecting it. Do not use Lantus to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. A short-acting insulin is used to treat this condition. It is recommended that you take a diabetes education program to learn more about diabetes and how to manage it. Other medical problems may affect the use of this Continue reading >>

High-alert Medications - Lantus (insulin Glargine)

High-alert Medications - Lantus (insulin Glargine)

The leaflets are FREELY available for download and can be reproduced for free distribution to consumers. Or, if you are a facility or organization, you can order professional pre-printed leaflets shipped directly to you. Extra care is needed because Lantus is a high-alert medicine. High-alert medicines have been proven to be safe and effective. But these medicines can cause serious injury if a mistake happens while taking them. This means that it is very important for you to know about this medicine and take it exactly as directed. Top 10 List of Safety Tips for Lantus When taking your medicine 1. Know your insulin. Lantus is a long-acting insulin that should be injected below the skin once daily as directed by your doctor. On rare occasions, your physician may direct you to take Lantus two times daily. Take Lantus the same time every day. 2. Prepare your insulin. A rapid- or short-acting insulin is often prescribed with Lantus. However, Lantus should never be mixed in the same syringe with other insulins before injection. Do not vigorously shake insulin before use. 3. Don't reuse or recycle. Dispose of used syringes/needles, pens, and lancets in a sealable hard plastic or metal container (e.g., empty detergent bottle, sharps container from your pharmacy). When the container is full, seal the lid before placing it in the trash. Do not reuse or recycle syringes/needles or lancets. 4. Don't share. Even if you change the needle, sharing an insulin pen or syringe may spread diseases carried in the blood, including hepatitis and HIV. To avoid serious side effects 5. Avoid mix-ups. List If you use more than one type of insulin, make sure each vial or pen looks different to avoid mix-ups. Lantus is a long-acting insulin that may look like a rapid- or short-acting insulin. For Continue reading >>

Lantus U-100 Insulin Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Lantus U-100 Insulin Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Insulin glargine is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes . Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke . Insulin glargine is a man-made product that is similar to human insulin . It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. It acts longer than regular insulin, providing a low, steady level of insulin. It works by helping blood sugar ( glucose ) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. Insulin glargine may be used with a shorter-acting insulin product. It may also be used alone or with other diabetes drugs. Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist. Follow all package directions for proper use/injection/storage of the particular type of device/ insulin you are using. Your health care professional will teach you how to properly inject this medication. If any of the information is unclear, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. The insulin container you are currently using can be kept at room temperature (see also Storage section). Wash your hands before measuring and injecting insulin . Before using, check the product visually for particles, thickening, or clumps. If any are present, discard that container. Insulin glargine should be clear and colorless. To avoid damaging the insulin, do not shake the container. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Measure each dose car Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin glargine is used to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to treat people with type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control their diabetes. In people with type 1 diabetes, insulin glargine must be used with another type of insulin (a short-acting insulin). In people with type 2 diabetes, insulin glargine also may be used with another type of insulin or with oral medication(s) for diabetes. Insulin glargine is a long-acting, manmade version of human insulin. Insulin glargine works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin glargine comes as a solution (liquid) to inject subcutaneously (under the Continue reading >>

Lantus Dosing

Lantus Dosing

Well, I never thought I’d say this, but it’s a great week to be a person with Type 1 diabetes. With all of the bad news surrounding the Type 2 drug Avandia (rosiglitazone), it’s a relief to know I don’t have to worry about it. I recommended you read my colleague Tara’s blog entry (“Type 2 Drug Avandia Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Attacks”) for the full story. That’s one of the first times in my life I’ve referred to someone as a colleague. What can I say? It’s just not a word in my describe-a-friend/coworker vocabulary. While all of the controversy surrounds Avandia, I’m way over in Type 1 land contemplating whether or not to lower my daily dose of Lantus (insulin glargine). I’ve just started a brand new bottle of Lantus and I’ve been taking my normal 15 units in the morning and then eating a rather normal breakfast and lunch, but I’m still going low in the midmorning and early afternoon. This happened Monday after eating Brussels sprouts and whole-wheat pasta for lunch and only taking one unit of rapid-acting NovoLog (insulin aspart) to help out the Lantus. I’ve known for a while that my body is sensitive to insulin, but lately it’s been a little more sensitive than usual. I took 13 units of Lantus yesterday and my blood glucose was 86 mg/dl before lunch. I often wonder how much of an adjustment two units of Lantus is. While I’m very much locked in on an insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio with my NovoLog, it’s a bit tricky to judge how much the longer-lasting insulins affect your blood glucose. Is there a chart for your Lantus dose? I seem to remember something from when I was diagnosed. I wonder what Google will tell me to do. I realize that Lantus doesn’t have a true peak the way some of the other insulins do, but sometimes it su Continue reading >>

Is There A Maximum Insulin Glargine (lantus) Dose?

Is There A Maximum Insulin Glargine (lantus) Dose?

Is there a maximum insulin glargine (Lantus) single-injection dose? Anecdotally, I have heard that patients receiving more than 50 units should split the dose from daily dosing to twice-daily. What’s the evidence? The question of a maximum insulin glargine dose is not straightforward because it encompasses several issues: How long does insulin glargine last? Does it ever need to be given twice-daily? Is there a difference in efficacy between daily and twice-daily insulin glargine dosing? Can you administer more than 50 units of insulin glargine as one single injection? Pharmacodynamics and Duration of Insulin Glargine In theory, insulin glargine should last a full 24 hours without a significant peak effect. Glargine forms a depot effect because it is only soluble at an acidic pH.1 In the vial (pH 4), the drug is completely soluble. Once injected, the solution is neutralized to biologic pH (7.4), which causes the insulin molecules to precipitate. These microprecipitates slowly dissolve over a 24-hour period. This slow dissolution results in a slower onset and a lack of a peak effect compared to other insulins, as shown below: Efficacy of Daily versus Twice-Daily Lantus Administration Although insulin glargine should last a full 24 hours, there is some evidence that its duration of action may be reduced to 20-23 hours, particularly following injection due to its delayed onset of activity of about 3-5 hours.2 Currently, the best estimate is that 15-30% of type-I diabetics will have pre-injection hyperglycemia and may benefit from twice-daily dosing. The idea of twice-daily dosing was explored in an 8-week, open-label crossover trial of 20 patients with type-I diabetes.2 Patients received either 100% of a pre-determined dose daily (dinner) or 50% twice-daily (breakfast an Continue reading >>

So You’re Ready

So You’re Ready

Indication BASAGLAR is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. Limitation of Use Important Safety Information Do not take BASAGLAR during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin glargine or any of the ingredients in BASAGLAR. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle has been changed. Before starting BASAGLAR, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. BASAGLAR should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. The most common side effect of insulin, including BASAGLAR, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life threatening. Signs and symptoms may include dizziness or light-headedness, sweating, confusion, headache, blurred vision, slurred speech, shakiness, fast heartbeat, anxiety, irritability, mood change, or hunger. Do NOT dilute or mix BASAGLAR with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. BASAGLAR must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. BASAGLAR may cause serious side effects that can lead to death, such as severe allergic reactions. Get emergency help if you have: Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together w Continue reading >>

What Is In This Leaflet

What Is In This Leaflet

PDFLARGE FONT PDF insulin glargine (in-sue-lin glar-jeen) Consumer Medicine Information This leaflet answers some common questions about Lantus. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor, pharmacist or diabetes educator. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using Lantus against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about using this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Keep this leaflet with the medicine. You may need to read it again. What Lantus is used for Lantus is used to reduce high blood sugar (glucose) levels in people with diabetes mellitus. Lantus is a modified insulin that is very similar to human insulin. It is a substitute for the insulin produced by the pancreas. Lantus is a long-acting insulin. Your doctor may tell you to use a rapid-acting human insulin or oral diabetes medication in combination with Lantus. Lantus is not addictive. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Lantus has been prescribed for you. Before you use Lantus When you must not use Lantus Do not use Lantus: - If you have an allergy to: any medicine containing insulin any of the ingredients contained in Lantus listed at the end of this leaflet Some of the symptoms of an allergic reaction may include: redness, swelling, rash and itching at the injection site rash, itching or hives on the skin shortness of breath wheezing or difficulty breathing swelling of the face, lips, tongue or other parts of the body - If you are experiencing low blood sugar levels (hypoglycaemia - a "hypo"). If you have a lot of hypos discuss appropriate treatment with your doctor. - After the expiry date printed on the pack or if the packaging is torn or shows si Continue reading >>

Should Insulin Glargine Be Dosed Once Or Twice Daily?

Should Insulin Glargine Be Dosed Once Or Twice Daily?

Should Insulin Glargine Be Dosed Once or Twice Daily? Insulin glargine (Lantus, sanofi-aventis) claims to have a 24-hour duration of action. Is there any advantage to using it twice daily? If so, what patient population might benefit from twice-daily dosing? Response from Jenny A. Van Amburgh, PharmD, CDE Associate Clinical Professor, School of Pharmacy, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts; Director of the Clinical Pharmacy Team and Residency Director, Harbor Health Services, Inc., Boston, Massachusetts Since its approval in April of 2000, insulin glargine has been used successfully in the treatment of sustained hyperglycemia in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus.[ 1 ] Long-acting insulin formulations such as glargine offer patients a steady, "peakless" 24-hour release of insulin for blood glucose control, in a convenient once-daily dosing schedule. Insulin glargine exerts its therapeutic effects by mimicking the basal secretion of pancreatic insulin to provide around-the-clock coverage for patients with elevated fasting plasma glucose levels. As with other diabetes treatments, the goal of insulin therapy is to prevent both microvascular (eg, retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy) and macrovascular (eg, stroke, myocardial infarction) outcomes. Although insulin glargine is US Food and Drug Administration-approved for once-daily dosing, the actual duration of action ranges from 10.8 to more than 24 hours in some patients.[ 1 , 2 ] This fairly wide range suggests that a second dose may be necessary to achieve optimal glycemic control, although this is considered off-label use.[ 3 , 4 ] To further investigate the variability in duration of action, an 8-week, 2-way crossover study was conducted in 20 patients with type 1 diabetes who used insulin asp Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (rx)

Insulin Glargine (rx)

Dosage Forms & Strengths injectable solution 100 units/mL (Lantus; 10mL vial) 100 units/mL (Lantus SoloSTAR; Basaglar KwikPen; 3 mL disposable prefilled pens) 300 units/mL (Toujeo; 1.5 mL SolosStar disposable prefilled pen) Note: Recent studies have suggested that glargine-300 extends blood glucose control well beyond 24 hr Type 1 or 2 Diabetes Mellitus Lantus and Toujeo are recombinant human insulin analogs indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus Dosing Considerations Indicated for once-daily SC administration; exhibits relatively constant glucose-lowering profile over 24 hr May be administered at any time during the day; should be administered SC once daily at the same time every day Dose must be individualized based on clinical response; blood glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Patients adjusting the amount or timing of dosage should do so only under medical supervision with appropriate glucose monitoring In patients with type 1 diabetes, insulin glargine must be used in regimens with short-acting insulin Should not be administered IV or via an insulin pump; IV administration of the usual SC dose could result in severe hypoglycemia As with all insulins, injection sites should be rotated within the same region (abdomen, thigh, or deltoid) from one injection to the next to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy; no clinically relevant difference in insulin glargine absorption after abdominal, deltoid, or thigh SC administration As with all insulins, the rate of absorption and, consequently, the onset and duration of action may be affected by exercise and other variables (eg, stress, intercurrent illness, changes in coadministered drugs, meal patterns) Type 1 diabetes mellitus: Starting dose sho Continue reading >>

Lantus Solostar

Lantus Solostar

Consumer medicine information (CMI) leaflet Please read this leaflet carefully before you start using Lantus SoloStar. Download CMI (PDF) Download large text CMI (PDF) What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about Lantus. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor, pharmacist or diabetes educator. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using Lantus against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about using this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Keep this leaflet with the medicine. You may need to read it again. What Lantus is used for Lantus is used to reduce high blood sugar (glucose) levels in people with diabetes mellitus. Lantus is a modified insulin that is very similar to human insulin. It is a substitute for the insulin produced by the pancreas. Lantus is a long-acting insulin. Your doctor may tell you to use a rapid-acting human insulin or oral diabetes medication in combination with Lantus. Lantus is not addictive. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Lantus has been prescribed for you. Before you use Lantus When you must not use Lantus Do not use Lantus: - If you have an allergy to: any medicine containing insulin any of the ingredients contained in Lantus listed at the end of this leaflet Some of the symptoms of an allergic reaction may include: redness, swelling, rash and itching at the injection site rash, itching or hives on the skin shortness of breath wheezing or difficulty breathing swelling of the face, lips, tongue or other parts of the body - If you are experiencing low blood sugar levels (hypoglycaemia - a "hypo"). If you have a lot of hypos discuss appropriate treatme Continue reading >>

Lantus

Lantus

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. (lant-us) What is in this leaflet It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor, pharmacist or diabetes educator. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using Lantus against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about using this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. What Lantus is used for Lantus is used to reduce high blood sugar (glucose) levels in people with diabetes mellitus. Lantus is a modified insulin that is very similar to human insulin. It is a substitute for the insulin produced by the pancreas. Lantus is a long-acting insulin. Your doctor may tell you to use a rapid-acting human insulin or oral diabetes medication in combination with Lantus. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Lantus has been prescribed for you. Before you use Lantus When you must not use Lantus Some of the symptoms of an allergic reaction may include: If you have a lot of hypos discuss appropriate treatment with your doctor. After the expiry date printed on the pack or if the packaging is torn or shows signs of tampering. If you use Lantus after the expiry date has passed, it may not work as well. If it has expired or is damaged, return it to your pharmacist for disposal. If the product appears cloudy, discoloured or contains particles, or if the injection pen/cartridge/vial appears damaged. If you are not sure whether you should start using this medicine, talk to your doctor. There is no experience with the use of Lantus in children less than 6 years. Before you start to use Lantus Tell your doctor if you have allergies to any other medicines, foo Continue reading >>

Giving Yourself An Insulin Injection With The Lantus Solostar Pen

Giving Yourself An Insulin Injection With The Lantus Solostar Pen

This information describes how to prepare and give yourself an insulin injection (shot) with the Lantus® SoloStar® pen. Your nurse will review these steps with you and help you practice them. Storing Your Lantus® SoloStar® Pen Keep all new, unused insulin pen devices in the refrigerator. Do not freeze them. Never put the pen you are using back in the refrigerator. Keep it at room temperature, away from heat and sunlight. Discard the Lantus® SoloStar® pen 28 days after piercing the rubber stopper. Gather Your Supplies Clear off a clean, flat tabletop to work on and gather the following supplies: Lantus® SoloStar® pen A new single-use pen needle Alcohol swabs A wastebasket A sharps container (a strong, plastic container with a tight cap). Do not store your sharps in glass bottles, soda bottles, milk jugs, aluminum cans, coffee cans, or paper or plastic bags. For more information, please read How to Store and Dispose of Your Home Medical Sharps. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Open an alcohol swab and wipe the rubber tip at the top of the pen (see Figure 1). Remove the tabbed paper from the outer case of a new single-use needle (see Figure 2). Follow the steps below to prime the pen, set your dose, and inject the insulin. You must prime the pen before you set your dose and inject the insulin. You will do this by giving an “air shot.” This removes the air bubbles and ensures the pen and needle are working properly. Dial 2 units (to the number 2) on the dose selector dial by turning it clockwise (see Figure 6). You will hear and feel a faint click for each unit as you turn the dial. The punger button on the pen will also rise. If you dial past 2 units, turn the dose selector counterclockwise to correct it. Po Continue reading >>

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