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How To Reverse Insulin Resistance And Lose Weight

The Glycemic-load Diet: A Powerful New Program For Losing Weight And Reversing Insulin Resistance

The Glycemic-load Diet: A Powerful New Program For Losing Weight And Reversing Insulin Resistance

A cardiologist's revolutionary weight-loss plan that allows dieters to enjoy good carbs while still losing weight The glycemic index has been the basis of many popular diets. But it doesn't take into account the serving sizes people actually eat and eliminates too many foods for dieters to stick with it. Now Dr. Robert Thompson's breakthrough program uses the glycemic loa ...more Continue reading >>

The Wonder Workout

The Wonder Workout

This expert-designed training plan will put you on the fast track to getting toned all over and shrinking your dress size—no matter how healthy you are. And if you're one of the nearly 80 million Americans with prediabetes, it also has the power to actually reverse your diagnosis. Diabetes has spread across the nation with the persistence of a glacier and the devastation of a wildfire. About 10% of American adults have type 2 diabetes, and one in three has its precursor, prediabetes. Diet clearly plays a role. When glucose (sugar) floods the bloodstream from sodas, pies, ice cream, or even white bread, the pancreas has to pump out enough insulin to drive that glucose into cells. The more glucose, the more resistant your tissues eventually become to the effects of insulin—so the pancreas has to secrete even more, until eventually it tires out. But managing your diet is only one way to control glucose. A major Finnish study found that subjects who exercised regularly reduced their risk of developing diabetes by up to 70%, compared with subjects who were less active. Aerobic exercise is a good start. But a growing stack of studies suggests that interval training—which alternates a relaxed pace with bursts of high-intensity movement—generates better glucose control than steady-state cardio. Why? The intense contractions that fatigue muscles also break down carbohydrate stores in muscle. The muscles then become much more responsive to insulin as they attempt to replenish these stores. Get the exercise solution for diabetics here. [header=Real Results in Just 8 Weeks] THE GOAL: Blast belly fat, improve insulin resistance, and regulate blood sugar in 8 weeks. This workout and diet plan was designed to fight prediabetes, but it's great for anyone. THE RESULTS: The six p Continue reading >>

Free Diet Meal Plan And Foods For Insulin Resistance

Free Diet Meal Plan And Foods For Insulin Resistance

Source Insulin resistance is a health condition that occurs when your body makes insulin but doesn't effectively use it to absorb glucose from your bloodstream, which results in high blood sugar levels. If left untreated, insulin resistance can lead to prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Making lifestyle changes and adopting healthy eating patterns can reverse insulin resistance and prevent diabetes. Reversing Insulin Resistance While there aren't diets specifically designed for insulin resistance, the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (NDIC) reports that healthy eating, losing weight, and boosting physical activity help reverse insulin resistance. NDIC suggests referring to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 for healthy eating advice when you have insulin resistance. Meal plans containing 1,200 to 1,500 calories daily help most women safely lose weight, and weight-loss plans providing 1,500 to 1,800 calories are often effective for men and active women, notes the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. If you need help downloading the printable version of the meal plans and food list, check out these helpful tips. 1,500 Calorie Meal Plan A healthy reduced calorie meal plan provided by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 includes: 1.75 cups of veggies 1.5 cups of fruits 5 ounces of grains 4.5 ounces of protein foods 2.75 cups of dairy foods 4 teaspoons of oils 121 extra calories from healthy foods of your choice Based on calorie information obtained from ChooseMyPlate.gov Food Tracker, a sample 1,500-calorie menu may include: Breakfast (332 calories) 1 cup cooked oatmeal 4 egg whites 1/2 cup of sliced strawberries 1/2 ounce of sliced almonds Snack (202 calories) 1 cup of sliced apples 1 cup of plain non-fat Greek yogurt Lunch (333 calories) 2 ounce Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Pcos Safely And Naturally

How To Reverse Pcos Safely And Naturally

PCOS is characterized by sex hormone imbalances and symptoms such as menstrual irregularity, excessive body and/or facial hair, acne, infertility, ovarian cysts, depression, anxiety, and obesity. If improperly managed, PCOS can lead to several serious health issues including diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis, and endometrial cancer. The drugs often prescribed for the management of PCOS can cause harmful side-effects, and primarily work to manage the symptoms, while ignoring the root cause. Fortunately, you can reverse your PCOS symptoms both safely and naturally, by combing the following three steps with the power of herbal therapy. 3 Steps for Reversing PCOS Symptoms Step #1: Lose Weight Weight loss is one of the most effective interventions for PCOS; it can help reduce the severity of symptoms and also reduce the risk for developing health complications associated with PCOS. In order to lose weight you should focus on consuming a wholefoods, plant-based diet, and vastly reduce your intake of sugar, oil, animal products, and processed foods. You should also try to engage in at least one hour of physical activity everyday and make sure to include strength building and cardiovascular exercises, as well as stress-reducing exercises such as yoga. Step #2: Balance Blood Sugar Levels More than half of PCOS sufferers struggle with insulin resistance, which is a condition where the body is insensitive to the blood-sugar regulating hormone-insulin. This leads to wildly fluctuating blood sugar levels and the body responds by pumping out more insulin. The excess circulating insulin increases the risk for type-2 diabetes and causes the ovaries to make more testosterone, which worsens PCOS symptoms such as body hair, acne, and menstrual irregularity. Insulin resistance can also Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Insulin Resistance

Symptoms Of Insulin Resistance

The concept of "insulin resistance" is continuously thrown around largely related to the rise of diabetes. But delving into its relation to the chronic disease and strengthening its understanding is valuable for diabetes prevention. So what truly is insulin resistance, the potential signs and symptoms, and how may it be reversed? What Is Insulin Resistance? When carbohydrate sources are ingested, they are broken down and reduced into sugar (glucose) to provide the body's cells with usable energy. Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, can be thought of as a key, opening cell doors and allowing glucose to enter. But when the cells are resistant to insulin, glucose has difficulty moving into the cells, consecutively remaining in the blood - hence "high blood sugar." If left uncontrolled, insulin resistance can result to prediabetes or type 2 diabetes overtime, with potential to lead to additional health consequences if also unmanaged. While the exact cause is primarily unknown, health experts commonly point to an overweight or obese status, often related to poor diet intake and a sedentary lifestyle. Insulin Resistance Symptoms It should go without saying individuals may experience more severe symptoms than others, while many commonly go without. Nonetheless, the following indicators are mentionable and noteworthy, particularly in the absence of diagnosable lab work. • Craving Sugar or Starches The body may start to crave sugars and starches when they cannot be utilized properly. If glucose never makes it into the cells and stays in the blood, it may feel deprived and accelerate a feeling of sugar deprivation. • Heightened Hunger Following Breakfast Commonly, the American breakfast consists of a quick slice of toast, a simple bowl of oatmeal or cereal, or a plat Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance At Midlife

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance At Midlife

Insulin resistance has become a huge problem in our culture and it can lead to many of the chronic health problems we see today, including obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. It is also linked to high blood pressure, high cholesterol, thyroid problems, muscle loss, fat gain, fatty liver, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, and other cancers as well. And, insulin resistance has even been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, did you know that insulin resistance can also cause many of the symptoms most women attribute to menopause? It’s true. Insulin has a cascading effect on all of your hormones, including estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. When insulin isn’t doing its job, it’s nearly impossible to reduce the symptoms of menopause, including hot flashes and night sweats. It also makes weight loss very difficult. Jason Fung, M.D. – who you can listen to on my radio show, Flourish – has done much research in the area of insulin control. His work shows that getting insulin in balance can be the key to getting your hormones and your health back in balance. What is Insulin and How Does It Work? Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. Its main job is to manage how your body uses glucose for energy. When blood sugar levels rise after a meal, your pancreas releases insulin to help your body’s cells — especially cells in the liver and muscles — absorb glucose. Your liver converts stored glucose to glycogen for future use. When blood sugar levels are too low, your pancreas releases a hormone called glucagon. Glucagon forces the liver to convert glycogen back to glucose, which causes your blood sugar to rise. You always have low levels of insulin circulating in your body. When insulin is out of balance, the result is abnormal blood sugar Continue reading >>

Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance

Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance

What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas, an organ located behind the stomach. The pancreas contains clusters of cells called islets. Beta cells within the islets make insulin and release it into the blood. Insulin plays a major role in metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for energy. The digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates—sugars and starches found in many foods—into glucose. Glucose is a form of sugar that enters the bloodstream. With the help of insulin, cells throughout the body absorb glucose and use it for energy. Insulin's Role in Blood Glucose Control When blood glucose levels rise after a meal, the pancreas releases insulin into the blood. Insulin and glucose then travel in the blood to cells throughout the body. Insulin helps muscle, fat, and liver cells absorb glucose from the bloodstream, lowering blood glucose levels. Insulin stimulates the liver and muscle tissue to store excess glucose. The stored form of glucose is called glycogen. Insulin also lowers blood glucose levels by reducing glucose production in the liver. In a healthy person, these functions allow blood glucose and insulin levels to remain in the normal range. What happens with insulin resistance? In insulin resistance, muscle, fat, and liver cells do not respond properly to insulin and thus cannot easily absorb glucose from the bloodstream. As a result, the body needs higher levels of insulin to help glucose enter cells. The beta cells in the pancreas try to keep up with this increased demand for insulin by producing more. As long as the beta cells are able to produce enough insulin to overcome the insulin resistance, blood glucose levels stay in the healthy range. Over time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes and prediabetes because the bet Continue reading >>

The Glycemic-load Diet : A Powerful New Program For Losing Weight And Reversing Insulin Resistance Ebook Download

The Glycemic-load Diet : A Powerful New Program For Losing Weight And Reversing Insulin Resistance Ebook Download

A cardiologist's revolutionary weight-loss plan that allows dieters to enjoy good carbs while still losing weight The glycemic index has been the basis of many popular diets. But it doesn't take into account the serving sizes people actually eat and eliminates too many foods for dieters to stick with it. Now Dr. Robert Thompson's breakthrough program uses the glycemic load--the glycemic index adjusted for serving size--to take the GI a step forward. The glycemic load is a more accurate and effective tool in controlling weight and insulin resistance, allowing dieters to eat more foods while still burning fat, cutting cravings, and speeding up their metabolism. Safe, simple, and scientifically proven, it's the smartest weight-loss plan yet. Continue reading >>

The 2-day Diabetes Diet: What To Eat To Lose Weight

The 2-day Diabetes Diet: What To Eat To Lose Weight

For folks with diabetes, weight loss is a natural form of “medication.” Reams of research prove that losing even just a few pounds is an effective way to control blood sugar or reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the first place. But in an ironic twist, losing weight may be more difficult if you have type 2 diabetes. And the reason isn’t just a lack of willpower. Too often, diet plans don’t work for people with diabetes because the metabolism changes associated with blood sugar problems may increase appetite, slow down fat burning, and encourage fat storage. Now breakthrough research has revealed a better way for people to lose weight and reduce insulin resistance. The secret is a concept called intermittent fasting. British researchers created this revolutionary new diet, which strictly limits caloric intake for two days of the week but permits larger portions for the remainder. Women who followed the plan lost almost twice as much fat as those who restricted calories every day. Within three months, participants reduced insulin resistance by 25 percent more on nonfast days and inflammation by 8 percent more than people who dieted continuously. Why Does this Particular Diabetes Diet Plan Work? It counteracts the effects of “diabesity,” where blood sugar problems and excess body fat meet. Just a small amount of excess weight and a genetic tendency for metabolism problems can trigger a cascade of health issues, including high cholesterol, high blood pressure, immune system problems, and hormonal imbalances. This constellation of health problems is caused by a modern lifestyle that is out of sync with our genetic inheritance. Researchers theorize that because humans evolved during alternating periods of feast and famine, many of us inherited variou Continue reading >>

Why Insulin Resistance Diabetes Can Affect Fat Loss And How To Fix It

Why Insulin Resistance Diabetes Can Affect Fat Loss And How To Fix It

If you are having trouble losing weight, then you may have insulin resistance diabetes or IR. This is a form of diabetes where the body fails to respond to the hormone insulin. Failure to obtain an accurate diagnosis of this condition will result in an inability to lose weight by normal attempts of diet and exercise. If left untreated, the patient can become a significant risk for obesity and many serious medical conditions including diabetes mellitus type 2, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), heart attack and/or stroke. Insulin acts like a vacuum cleaner and removes sugar from the blood stream and places it into the cells to be used as energy. When the condition of IR is present the insulin vacuum cleaner isn’t working and the sugar is not removed from the blood stream. The failure of sugar removal from the blood results in damage to the blood vessel walls. High blood sugar levels prevent the body from using fat storage as a primary energy source during longer duration exercises. A typical exercise pattern noted by most people will allow the burning of fats after approximately 5 minutes of constant exercise. Anyone suffering with IR will not burn fats normally. Their body is constantly drawing energy from the excessive blood sugars floating around. Causes for Insulin Resistance The main causes of IR are diet, genetic factors, disease, some medications and a sedentary lifestyle. Diet is the main cause of IR and commonly associated with the ingestion of HFCS (high fructose corn syrup), saturated fats, trans fats, polysaturated fats, high starch diets (high gluten or potato) and foods that are high glycemic index foods. High starch diets result in an excessive production of insulin, which over a period of time causes the body to become resistant. A simple cand Continue reading >>

Hypothyroidism And Insulin Resistance [4 Steps To Reverse It And Finally Lose Weight]

Hypothyroidism And Insulin Resistance [4 Steps To Reverse It And Finally Lose Weight]

Do you feel like it's impossible to lose weight with Hypothyroidism? ​It actually isn't impossible and I will explain how later, but first I need to share a story with you. ​I had a patient who came to see me in the office recently. She was 43, on levothyroxine (for years), about 60 pounds overweight, and wanted my help in balancing her hormones and help her lose some of that weight. ​ Like most other people, she had tried to lose weight following every diet you can think of, but nothing seemed to work for her. So I got to testing her labs. Know what I found? ​ Insulin resistance. ​ And THAT was her primary problem. Her thyroid wasn't all that bad, she ultimately did better on Armour thyroid - but her main problem was the insulin. Once we got her on the right regimen, cleaned up her diet, fixed her adrenals, replaced nutrient deficiencies and put her on a fasting program her weight started to shed off. And that's what we are going to talk about today. ​Hypothyroidism and Insulin Resistance. And why it's impossible to lose weight unless you address BOTH issues. What is Insulin Resistance? ​Insulin is the hormone that increases after you eat a lot of sugar. It puts sugar inside your cells and protects your body from high levels of sugar in the blood. That's what it's supposed to do - when everything is working correctly. When insulin levels remain chronically elevated (like when we eat a lot of sugar in our diet), your body becomes resistant to insulin. And that's where all the problems start. High levels of insulin cause you to store the calories you eat from your diet as fat in your belly. ​So high levels of insulin = you gain weight (even if you eat fewer calories). I've put together a list of some symptoms I see in my patients that have insulin resista Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Plateau

Weight Loss Plateau

When a low carbohydrate diet is started, weight loss usually occurs rapidly and easily. Although the initial loss is partly water weight, with consistency, body-fat loss continues until ideal body weight is reached. This usually happens without much discomfort. There are occasionally exceptions to this experience. I previously recommended staying well hydrated, not being afraid to eat fat, and adding a little extra salt to improve the transition to a low carbohydrate diet. Metabolically, your body is designed to switch over to fat burning when carbohydrates are restricted, and this transition occurs over a matter of weeks. But some people have a difficult time sticking to this plan. Hunger doesn't always diminish. Eventually willpower is exhausted. What is going on? This happens most often in people that have struggled with weight for a long time. This could be long-standing obesity or yo-yo dieting. INSULIN CAUSES OBESITY I previously discussed the importance of insulin in weight loss/gain. Gary Taubes in "Why We Get Fat And What To Do About It," makes a very well supported argument that elevated insulin causes us to gain weight, and makes it difficult to reduce weight, even with calorie restriction. Recall that carbohydrates are the primary driver of insulin. A low carbohydrate diet reduces insulin levels and thus allows weight loss. INSULIN RESISTANCE ​ Jason Fung in "The Obesity Code" discusses the importance of insulin resistance. This is a common problem and often underlies difficulty with weight loss. Our bodies maintain homeostasis. That means they adjust to the situation to maintain consistency. Let's see how this works with insulin. When a person eats a meal containing carbohydrates, their blood glucose level will rise. To maintain homeostasis (consistent bl Continue reading >>

Why You Should Care About Insulin Resistance

Why You Should Care About Insulin Resistance

Now reaching epidemic proportions in the developed world, insulin resistance can lead to more than just type 2 diabetes. Now reaching epidemic proportions in the developed world, insulin resistance can lead to more than just type 2 diabetes. Learn how to spot and reverse this dangerous culprit. Insulin resistance can make it difficult to lose weight. The body, forced to do something with the excess glucose, inevitably chooses to deposit it in the gut in the form of fat. Insulin is knocking but it can’t come in. At this very moment, your pancreas is working hard to create insulin in your body. While most people have heard the word, many are not familiar with what insulin is. A hormone, insulin plays a critical role in metabolism by helping the cells of the body absorb glucose (sugar) from the carbohydrates you eat and use it for energy. Like a traveling salesman, insulin visits your body’s muscles and tissues, “knocking” on their doors. In a healthy body, the tissues respond by opening the door and letting the glucose in. “Insulin works like a key, unlocking glucose receptor cells in your muscles and tissues,” explains Brooke Green, a nurse practitioner and certified diabetes educator with Hamilton Physician Group in Dalton, Ga. In someone with insulin resistance, though, the muscles and tissues don’t hear the knocking and never open up. The result is that your pancreas continues to produce insulin even though your body does not effectively use it. “If your cells don’t respond, the pancreas will compensate by producing more and more insulin,” says Green. When No One Answers As insulin’s knock goes unanswered time after time, excess glucose builds up in the bloodstream, putting you at risk of prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, and a host of other health p Continue reading >>

14 Ways To Lower Your Insulin Levels

14 Ways To Lower Your Insulin Levels

Insulin is an extremely important hormone that's produced by your pancreas. It has many functions, such as allowing your cells to take in sugar from your blood for energy. However, too much insulin can lead to serious health problems. Having high levels, also known as hyperinsulinemia, has been linked to obesity, heart disease and cancer (1, 2, 3). High blood insulin levels also cause your cells to become resistant to the hormone's effects. When you become insulin resistant, your pancreas produces even more insulin, creating a vicious cycle (4). Here are 14 things you can do to lower your insulin levels. Of the three macronutrients — carbs, protein and fat — carbs raise blood sugar and insulin levels the most. For this and other reasons, low-carb diets can be very effective for losing weight and controlling diabetes. Many studies have confirmed their ability to lower insulin levels and increase insulin sensitivity, compared to other diets (5, 6, 7, 8, 9). People with health conditions characterized by insulin resistance, such as metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), may experience a dramatic lowering of insulin with carb restriction. In one study, individuals with metabolic syndrome were randomized to receive either a low-fat or low-carb diet containing 1,500 calories. Insulin levels dropped by an average of 50% in the low-carb group, compared to 19% in the low-fat group (10). In another study, when women with PCOS ate a lower-carb diet containing enough calories to maintain their weight, they experienced greater reductions in insulin levels than when they ate a higher-carb diet (11). Low-carb diets have been shown to increase insulin sensitivity and reduce insulin levels in people with obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and PCOS. Apple cider v Continue reading >>

Could Insulin Resistance Be The Reason Your Not Losing Weight?

Could Insulin Resistance Be The Reason Your Not Losing Weight?

When I began my body transformation I weighed in at 278lbs with 40% body fat. I finally hit rock bottom and reached a point that triggered a change in my life. I began putting great effort into my diet, making sure to hit my hours of cardio and double checking my calories were counted right. I did this for 3 months motivated to change but to my frustration, saw minimal progress. I didn’t get what I was doing wrong!! I kept researching and discovered that my body had Insulin Resistance, and this was something I needed to consider. Have you been trying to lose weight but are seeing little progress for all your efforts? Don’t worry you are not alone, I was right there myself. Let’s discuss a key factor to weight loss millions around the world have and don’t even know it. What is Insulin Resistance? I want to take a moment to explain insulin resistance and give you a better picture of its negative effects but first, we need to better understand what Insulin does. Any time you eat a meal that has higher amounts of carbohydrates will cause the levels of circulating blood sugar to raise. This will make your pancreas release a hormone called Insulin, with the job of reducing the amount of circulating blood sugar. This is very important since high amounts of blood sugar can be toxic to the body. Insulin is also given the task of shuttling nutrients into different parts of the body. A good metabolism needs Insulin to be working properly; it is one of our key hormones. But problems begin to be seen when we are constantly eating heavy carb meals on a daily basis. Examples of this would look like a breakfast consisting of orange juice, oatmeal, and bananas. A lunch of a sandwich, chips, and a soda, and a dinner of a bowl of pasta with bread rolls. This can be a typical day o Continue reading >>

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