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How To Reverse Insulin Resistance And Lose Weight

How To Lose Weight With Hypothyroidism

How To Lose Weight With Hypothyroidism

​Sometimes we can be doing everything we know should lead to weight loss, including watching our diet and exercising, but still the weight will not come off – and can even continue to pile on. Many people discover that in this case there is an underlying issue preventing them from reaching their weight loss goals, and in a lot of these instances hypothyroidism can be the culprit. The good news is that if you have hypothyroidism it does not mean that it will be impossible for you to lose weight, it just means that you will have to go about it differently than someone with normal thyroid function. ​Common Mistakes when Trying to Lose Weight with Hypothyroidism So you’ve been trying to lose weight and restricting your calories, but every time you just end up more fatigued than normal. So far you have been able to lose 5-10 pounds by dieting this way, this but the minute you begin eating normally again your weight goes RIGHT back to what it was before dieting. Does any of this sound familiar to you? If you have hypothyroidism, it probably does. This is because calorie restricted diets are actually harmful to patients with Hypothyroidism, and can make your thyroid function even worse. ​When you limit the calories you consume you are telling your body that you are lacking the calories that you need to survive, so it tries to protect itself by lowering your metabolism. The way that it does this is by reducing the active amount of Thyroid hormone, or reducing Free T3 levels, as well as by increasing your Reverse T3 levels. Unfortunately, the majority of doctors do not even look into either of these. Balancing your Hormones for Weight Loss Losing weight isn’t just about burning more calories than you consume. If it were that easy for everyone to lose weight then the Continue reading >>

Diet Tips Of How To Reverse Insulin Resistance And Metabolic Syndrome

Diet Tips Of How To Reverse Insulin Resistance And Metabolic Syndrome

What is insulin resistance (IR)? Insulin resistance is a condition where the body cells do not respond properly to the effects of insulin. Insulin is the hormone that helps your body cells absorbs glucose from the bloodstream for fuel. Because their body cells cannot utilize insulin effectively, patients with insulin experience high levels of glucose. This may lead to prediabetes, type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes. Prediabetes is a condition where the level of blood glucose is above normal but not high enough to be seen as type 2 diabetes. On the other hand, type 2 diabetes is a metabolic problem that results in high levels of blood sugar because the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin or the body cells becomes resistance to the insulin it produces. Although type 2 diabetes has no cure, most patients with this condition can control their blood glucose levels through healthy diet and regular exercise. Gestational diabetes is a medical condition where pregnant women have high levels of blood glucose, which normally disappears after pregnancy. It is not yet known why some patients develop IR while others don’t. However, studies shows that insulin resistance usually occurs as a result of obesity. Signs of IR Some patients who have insulin resistance do not experience any warning signs and symptoms. In case you do not check your blood sugar levels regularly, you can have IR for a long period without noticing. Some patients with IR may have a skin problem known as acanthosis nigricans, which results in dark patches behind the neck, under the armpit, and groin. When IR leads to high levels of blood sugar, patients may start to experience symptoms such as: Hunger Tiredness High blood pressure High triglycerides levels Increase in weight Problem concentrating Causes o Continue reading >>

Increasing Insulin Sensitivity

Increasing Insulin Sensitivity

Insulin is a hormone that is normally released by the beta cells of the pancreas. When a person’s pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to sustain good health, insulin can be injected into the body with a needle, inhaled with an inhaler, or infused with a pump. One of the main functions of insulin is to lower blood glucose levels by enabling glucose to enter the cells of the body, where it is used for energy or stored for future use. A person who is insulin-sensitive needs only a relatively small amount of insulin to keep blood glucose levels in the normal range and to keep the body’s cells supplied with the glucose they need. A person who is insulin-resistant, on the other hand, needs a lot more insulin to get the same blood-glucose-lowering effects. Insulin resistance is associated with numerous health risks. For one thing, it causes hyperinsulinemia, or high circulating insulin levels, which may be directly damaging to blood vessels. Hyperinsulinemia is also associated with high blood pressure, heart disease and heart failure, obesity (particularly abdominal obesity), osteoporosis (thinning bones), and certain types of cancer, such as colon, breast, and prostate cancer. In contrast, having low circulating insulin levels is associated with greater longevity; most centenarians without diabetes have low circulating insulin levels. Insulin resistance is a hallmark of Type 2 diabetes, but it can occur in Type 1 diabetes as well. In fact, there is a growing number of people who are said to have “double diabetes” because, in addition to having Type 1 diabetes, they also have the insulin resistance characteristic of Type 2. The good news is that you can lower your level of insulin resistance — and raise your level of insulin sensitivity — by modifying your lifes Continue reading >>

The 2-day Diabetes Diet: What To Eat To Lose Weight

The 2-day Diabetes Diet: What To Eat To Lose Weight

For folks with diabetes, weight loss is a natural form of “medication.” Reams of research prove that losing even just a few pounds is an effective way to control blood sugar or reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the first place. But in an ironic twist, losing weight may be more difficult if you have type 2 diabetes. And the reason isn’t just a lack of willpower. Too often, diet plans don’t work for people with diabetes because the metabolism changes associated with blood sugar problems may increase appetite, slow down fat burning, and encourage fat storage. Now breakthrough research has revealed a better way for people to lose weight and reduce insulin resistance. The secret is a concept called intermittent fasting. British researchers created this revolutionary new diet, which strictly limits caloric intake for two days of the week but permits larger portions for the remainder. Women who followed the plan lost almost twice as much fat as those who restricted calories every day. Within three months, participants reduced insulin resistance by 25 percent more on nonfast days and inflammation by 8 percent more than people who dieted continuously. Why Does this Particular Diabetes Diet Plan Work? It counteracts the effects of “diabesity,” where blood sugar problems and excess body fat meet. Just a small amount of excess weight and a genetic tendency for metabolism problems can trigger a cascade of health issues, including high cholesterol, high blood pressure, immune system problems, and hormonal imbalances. This constellation of health problems is caused by a modern lifestyle that is out of sync with our genetic inheritance. Researchers theorize that because humans evolved during alternating periods of feast and famine, many of us inherited variou Continue reading >>

Increasing Insulin Sensitivity Is The Key To Fat Loss

Increasing Insulin Sensitivity Is The Key To Fat Loss

When formulating a diet, one of the most important goals you should have in mind is to improve your insulin sensitivity. What is insulin sensitivity? To fully understand what it is, let’s discuss insulin and its function. Insulin is a storage hormone. After you eat a meal, your body converts the carbohydrates into glucose. This glucose circulates the bloodstream and is used by all the cells in your body. Insulin is the hormone that stores the extra glucose that your body doesn’t use. Your body has a limited capacity to store glycogen. A typical male will be able to store around 500 grams of glycogen. In case you didn’t know, glycogen is what’s formed from glucose. When your body can no longer store anymore glycogen, the excess glucose is taken up by insulin and stored as fat. Insulin sensitivity has to do with how well your cells respond to insulin. People that are highly insulin sensitive require very little insulin to store carbohydrates. By reason then, people that are insulin resistant (type II diabetics), need larger amounts of insulin to shuttle those carbohydrates around. What this means is that when you have high insulin sensitivity, you are able to eat carbohydrates without such a large rise in insulin. When insulin is kept low enough, fatty acids can still be released. However, once insulin gets too high, fat loss comes to a halt. People that have bombarded their bodies with high-glycemic carbohydrates and processed foods over their lifetimes have become somewhat resistant to the effects of insulin. Therefore, when they eat carbohydrates, it causes a larger release of insulin. This inhibits the release of fatty acids. Higher insulin levels = more fat storage Read here to find out 10 ways you can improve your insulin sensitivity for better fat loss. Red Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Pcos And Insulin Resistance

How To Reverse Pcos And Insulin Resistance

If you have acne, excess body hair, or menstrual problems, it could be PCOS. Your metabolic health and insulin sensitivity can greatly influence your reproductive health. Learn what PCOS is, how what you eat effects it, what causes and how to reverse pcos and insulin resistance, and finally, how to lose weight with PCOS. What is PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome)? PCOS is a syndrome that affects about 15% of women worldwide. Because it’s a syndrome, there are a variety of symptoms a patient might have in order to be diagnosed. These symptoms include: excess weight, especially around the middle unwanted/male pattern body and facial hair hair loss male pattern muscle gain menstrual irregularity or absence of periods ovarian cysts insulin resistance difficulty regulating or losing weight It is often accompanied by fertility issues, insulin resistance, and/or type II diabetes. High blood pressure and cholesterol are also associated symptoms of PCOS. In this article, we’ll illustrate the relationship between what you eat and your hormonal health. We’ll also explain one of the most effective ways to naturally treat insulin resistance and PCOS, how to lose weight with PCOS, and why it works. Relationship between what you eat and your hormones There are different ways to develop PCOS. Among medics and researchers, there is an ongoing chicken and egg debate. Do an imbalance of female hormones cause PCOS? Or does a metabolic problem called insulin resistance cause PCOS? Well, it depends on the patient. Let’s explore how metabolic disorders like type II diabetes and insulin resistance can cause PCOS. We live in a “metabo-toxic” environment. We are constantly surrounded by stimuli designed for us to eat, and desire to eat, no matter if we’re hungry. Sugary morning pas Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance: The Real Reason Why You Aren’t Losing Weight

Insulin Resistance: The Real Reason Why You Aren’t Losing Weight

Many people have weight loss as one of their key resolutions. Sadly, 35 percent of people also give up on that goal before the month even ends. It’s not necessarily lack of time or willpower that causes you to struggle with weight loss year after year. The real reason that you may have struggled to lose weight is insulin resistance, or a condition I call metabolism dysfunction. So you may be thinking, “Why is it so hard for me to lose weight?” I’m doing “everything right,” and yet still weight loss is difficult. Perhaps (like many of my patients) you’re already following a strict diet and working out several times a week, but to no avail. The weight still won’t come off — or, worse, you are gaining weight for seemingly no reason at all! You have become resigned to being overweight. Weight problems aren’t a permanent and immovable fixture for the rest of your life. If you’re finding that weight is easy to gain and hard to lose, it’s not your fault! Weight problems aren’t just about overeating or under exercising — they’re about metabolic changes (The MD Factor Diet, 2015) that are collectively known as insulin resistance. Lab tests conducted in my practice have confirmed that over 89 percent of my patients have this real and often undiagnosed issue. So the good news is that the right combination of diet, exercise, and will to succeed you can reverse your MD factor and finally find success in losing weight and keeping it off for good. In a nutshell, insulin resistance is the inability of your body to properly convert the food that you eat into energy to fuel your cells. People with the MD Factor have difficulty regulating their blood sugar, which is often due to insulin resistance or even diabetes. In both instances, their bodies are unable t Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance

What Can I Do to Improve Insulin Sensitivity, Reverse Insulin Resistance, and Lose Weight? This is the primary reason you would be proceeding with this nutritionally based medical weight management program. My focus is to reduce or eliminate insulin resistance so you can lose weight, but equally as important, maintain the weight loss. Many people may lose fifty pounds and still be insulin resistant. Why? This is because of the genetic issues, hormonal issues, nutritional deficiencies that still may be present. This condition needs to be treated and monitored for long term results. What Improves Insulin Sensitivity? First and foremost, follow an insulin-lowering diet which we utilize in this practice. The meal plan contains adequate lean protein, controlled carbohydrate levels and a balance of healthy fats. In addition, we test and pay attention to correcting nutrient deficiencies with vitamin D, magnesium, vitamin B12. Other nutriceutical treatments such as N-Acetyl Cysteine, Alpha Lipoic acid, cinnamon, and others also are helpful. We are often able to replace medications that aggravate insulin resistance with other ones that do not facilitate the development of insulin resistance. Starting a regular exercise regimen of cardiovascular exercise and some strength training is extremely helpful to improve insulin sensitivity. However, it is important to recognize that initially, the most significant benefit will be realized from dietary changes and correction of nutrient deficiencies. If I have a patient who is not yet exercising, I ask them to focus on the meal plan, as this part of a healthy lifestyle does take time. Once a patient has adjusted to the meal plan and has successfully fit it into his or her life, exercise is the next lifestyle change to address. Sometimes p Continue reading >>

How To Help Your Body Reverse Diabetes

How To Help Your Body Reverse Diabetes

Diabetes rates are rising, in fact it is now considered an “epidemic” in the medical community. The American Diabetes Association reports that: 23.6 million Americans have diabetes 57 million Americans are pre-diabetic 1.6 new cases of diabetes are reported each year For those over age 60, almost 1 in 4 have diabetes Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death Diabetes increases heart attack risk and 68% of diabetes related death certificates report heart related problems 75% of adults with diabetes will develop high blood pressure Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness, kidney failure and nervous system disorders Diabetes costs $174 billion annually Diabetes is a well-established problem and a multi-billion dollar industry. It is medically characterized by Fasting Blood Glucose higher than 126 mg/dL , which ranges between 100-125 mg/dL are considered pre-diabetic and ranges below 99 mg/dL are considered normal. Studies are finding that a fasting blood glucose below 83 mg/dL is actually a better benchmark, as risk of heart disease begins to increase at anything above that. IMPORTANT: There is a difference between Type 1 diabetes (an autoimmune condition) and Type 2 diabetes (lifestyle related). This article refers specifically to Type 2 diabetes. Some medical professionals use an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) to test for diabetes. If you’ve ever been pregnant and had to drink the sickeningly sweet sugar cocktail and then have blood drawn, you are familiar with this one. Basically, a patient is given 50-75 grams of glucose in concentrated solution and his blood sugar response is measured. I’m not a fan of this test because no one should be ingesting that much concentrated glucose, and the test is not a completely accurate measure. (Just a side note: if yo Continue reading >>

Belly Fat: Is Insulin Resistance To Blame?

Belly Fat: Is Insulin Resistance To Blame?

Can’t shift stubborn belly fat? Insulin resistance could be to blame. Take action now to reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes in the future. Craving sugar, constantly feeling tired and really struggling to lose weight, you put yourself on a strict diet. But despite exercising regularly and keeping junk food in check, you simply can’t lose that spare tyre. Why? Because your body’s natural food-into-fuel process is failing to function properly. When you eat carbohydrate-rich foods, such as fruit, bread, starchy veg and sugary snacks, they break down into glucose to fuel your body. Of course, you want to use this fuel for energy, not store it as fat, but this all depends on your body’s response to the hormone insulin. Q. What is insulin resistance? Insulin moves glucose from the blood into the cells so that the body can either burn it as fuel or store it as fat. Insulin resistance occurs when the body’s cells fail to respond properly to insulin. For some of us, insulin’s effectiveness wanes as we age, so the body begins to need more and more to help glucose enter the cells. Over time, often years, this resistance escalates, as the body continues to pump out ever-increasing amounts of insulin. When the body starts struggling to make enough insulin to overcome the resistance, blood-glucose levels rise. Initially, these levels are mildly elevated, causing impaired glucose tolerance, a condition we call prediabetes; however, levels can eventually rise even further, causing the onset of type 2 diabetes. Q. What are the symptoms? “The main symptoms of insulin resistance are extra weight around the midriff and difficulty in losing weight, particularly if you have a family history of diabetes,” explains Kate Marsh, PhD, an Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitian an Continue reading >>

Is It Harder For Women With Pcos To Diet And Lose Weight?

Is It Harder For Women With Pcos To Diet And Lose Weight?

Women who have Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, or PCOS, may find that they have to try twice as hard to lose half the weight. While losing weight is always going to be an uphill battle, no matter what an individual’s health, women who have this condition face a particularly difficult challenge. Unfortunately, weight gain is a common symptom of this disorder.1 The Vicious Cycle PCOS is often sparked by Insulin Resistance, a condition that makes it hard for the body to regulate blood sugar levels and causes excess insulin and glucose to enter the bloodstream. When this occurs, women tend to gain weight. Further resistance of insulin is then experienced because of this weight gain.2 This vicious cycle of Insulin Resistance and excess weight can result in a variety of dangerous health issues, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Infertility, which is emotionally devastating for many women, can also result.2 What Makes Weight Loss Easier? A lower body mass index, or BMI, is the goal of many women who aim to lose weight. For women who have PCOS, the more weight they lose the easier it becomes, thanks to the vicious cycle described above. But a lower BMI does more than facilitate weight loss—it improves health. As weight loss is achieved, so is a higher degree of sensitivity to insulin, meaning that a woman’s body becomes less resistant to this hormone. As a result, glucose levels become more stable and women find it easier to manage both their blood sugar and their weight; however, the task of maintaining a healthy weight may always seem a bit more difficult for women who have this condition.2 Eating Right and Staying Active Sticking to a regular exercise routine and PCOS diet is crucial in losing weight. Women who adhere to a diet plan for PCOS should eat foods Continue reading >>

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

Understanding the cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance helps us choose more effective therapeutic interventions for the treatment and prevention of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is present in individuals who are obese and those with diabetes mellitus. Several studies have found that an insulin resistance diet protocol and exercise can alter insulin signaling pathways and delay the onset of insulin resistance. It’s estimated that the number of diabetes sufferers in the world will double from about 190 million to 325 million during the next 25 years. (1) It’s obvious that we need to pay more attention to our lifestyle habits and make some changes. An insulin resistance diet, similar to a diabetic diet plan, helps you lose excess weight and regulate your insulin and blood glucose levels in order to reduce your risk of developing prediabetes and diabetes. Insulin Resistance Diet Research suggests that the primary cause of insulin resistance is excess weight, especially excess fat around the waist. Fortunately, weight loss can help the body respond better to insulin. The Diabetes Prevention Program and other large studies indicate that people with insulin resistance and prediabetes can often prevent or delay developing diabetes by changing their diets to follow an insulin resistance diet, along with losing weight. Here are seven ways to start eating an insulin resistance diet. 1. Limit Carbohydrates Research published in Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity suggests that monitoring carbohydrate intake, whether by carbohydrate counting or experience-based estimation, remains a key strategy in achieving glycemic control. Although all carbohydrates can be incorporated into carbohydrate counting, for good health, carbohydrates from vegetables, Continue reading >>

How A Paleo Diet Can Reverse Metabolic Syndrome

How A Paleo Diet Can Reverse Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome usually precedes type 2 diabetes and heart disease, two conditions that seem nearly inevitable in our modern society. However, recent research shows that switching to a Paleo diet may reverse metabolic dysfunction. Read on to find how the Paleo diet can improve body weight, lipid panels, and insulin resistance, with positive results in as little as two weeks. Metabolic syndrome is widespread, affecting 34 percent of all U.S. adults and half of those over 60. (1) Instead of a distinct disease, metabolic syndrome is a cluster of symptoms. One is diagnosed if at least three of the following five markers are present: (2) large waist circumference high blood pressure elevated fasting glucose elevated triglycerides low HDL (“good”) cholesterol Metabolic syndrome is a red flag, warning you that your body isn’t healthy. In fact, each of the symptoms listed above is a separate risk factor for diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease, two leading causes of death in the United States. (3, 4, 5) Fortunately, adopting a Paleo diet can reverse the markers of metabolic syndrome and even help those who have already developed insulin resistance, as I will discuss in this article. Metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and heart disease – what do they all have in common? Metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and heart disease are all considered “modern” diseases because they weren’t prevalent until the 1900s after the Industrial Revolution. Drastic changes in U.S. dietary habits have occurred only in the last century or so, including increased consumption of hydrogenated oils (trans fats), vegetable oils, processed foods, and refined sugars. Even grain consumption wasn’t common until the Agricultural Revolution around 10,000 years ago, which is actuall Continue reading >>

Is Insulin Resistance The Real Reason You Can't Lose Weight?

Is Insulin Resistance The Real Reason You Can't Lose Weight?

If you're suffering extreme cravings, are tired all the time, have a bit of a belly and don't seem to be able to get rid of it no matter how much you go to the gym or cut calories, you might have insulin resistance. The medical condition occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin, which is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps the body use glucose for energy. Insulin is also responsible for fat metabolism in the body so, it makes you less efficient at producing energy. In other words, it's a bit of a crap situation if you want to stay slim and keep your energy levels up. "Insulin resistance is becoming increasingly common as weight gain increases in adults," explains Susie Burrell, author of Is Insulin Resistance Making You Fat and Helga's Lower Carb ambassador. "Our sedentary lifestyles and high-carb diets are making it easier to gain weight and leading to insulin resistance." While insulin resistance isn't immediately life-threatening — even if the lethargy, big tummy and cravings aren't exactly fun — it is a precursor to Type 2 diabetes, so it's important to get it under control. "Some individuals have a strong genetic risk, but weight control and a controlled-carb diet with plenty of exercise will help manage and even prevent [the onset of insulin resistance] for those at a high risk," Burrell says. "The condition is also closely linked to autoimmune conditions such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), coeliac disease and thyroid dysfunction." powered by plista How can you tell if you're insulin resistant? Your doctor can give you a blood test to measure blood glucose levels. "If you can't understand why you're not losing weight, it's worth a trip to the GP to make sure insulin issues or other hormonal issues are not the underlying problem," Bur Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight With Pcos

How To Lose Weight With Pcos

One in every 10 women worldwide suffers from PCOS. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome is not only the leading cause of fertility problems, but this hormonal condition can also makes losing weight extremely difficult. What Are The Symptoms of PCOS? If you are struggling with your weight and wondering if PCOS is contributing to your problems, some of the more noticeable symptoms of PCOS include weight gain and difficulty in losing weight, irregular periods, acne and excess body hair. Your doctor will be able to do the relevant tests and give a definitive PCOS diagnosis. The reason that PCOS and weight problems are inextricably linked is all to do with your body’s reaction to the insulin hormone. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome also have insulin resistance. A bit like the chicken and the egg, experts are divided as to whether Insulin resistance causes PCOS or PCOS causes insulin resistance, but the two problems go together. Insulin helps to process the carbohydrates you’ve eaten. Insulin helps the body move sugar out of the bloodstream into the muscles and organs where its needed for fuel. However, when a person is suffering from insulin resistance, this function doesn’t work efficiently. Blood sugar levels rise, the body makes more insulin to compensate and this higher level of insulin in the bloodstream causes unwanted side effects. Higher levels of insulin cause the ovaries to produce hormones called androgens. These are generally thought of as “male” hormones because they can cause body hair growth, acne, menstrual and fertility problems and weight gain. Generally, men put on weight around the stomach. As PCOS related weight gain is caused by male hormones, it also tends to layer fat around the belly giving sufferers more of an apple shape than the classic female Continue reading >>

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