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How To Replace Your Own Well Pump

Install A Submersible Pump: 6 Lessons For Doing It The Right Way

Install A Submersible Pump: 6 Lessons For Doing It The Right Way

“Be sure to check out the submersible pump Q&A section at the end of this post. Real questions asked by real people looking for answers.” – Steve If you’re asking this question, then this is the post for you. Read on for all the details. As far as I’ve seen, this is the most complete set of instructions on the internet. Few people in the plumbing world will argue with the claim that submersible water pumps offer the best performance of all domestic pump options – especially in wells deeper than twenty five feet. Submersibles never need priming, they’re silent, they move the most water for a given amount of energy consumed and they develop higher household water pressures than piston or jet pumps. There is one hitch, however, and that’s installation. When it comes time to install a submersible pump, the work is more physically difficult than any other water well option because the pump, piping and wires have to be lowered into the deepest recesses of the well. And if that wasn’t enough, several obscure installation details make the difference between five years of trouble-free pump service and twenty five. Here’s everything you need to know to install a submersible pump the right way. Follow these field tested techniques and you won’t need to tackle this troublesome chore any more often than absolutely necessary. What’s a Submersible Pump? Submersible pumps are long, thin, cylindrical in shape and sit as deep as four or five feet above the bottom of a water well. Typically 1/2 hp or 3/4 hp in size for most households, submersibles push water up and into a pressure tank in the house via a 1″ or1 1/4” diameter pipe. Wires travel down from the surface to power the pump via a control box, with the water pipe itself exiting the sides of the metal w Continue reading >>

Variety Of Well Pumps At The Home Depot

Variety Of Well Pumps At The Home Depot

Pump sits above ground and draws water out through one inlet pipe Pump sits above ground and draws water out of one pipe and pushes water through another pipe May include a tailpipe to ensure well is never pumped dry A single pipe comes up from the inside of the well into the home and connects to a pressure tank Must be pulled from well casing for repairs Three-wire pumps require a separate control box Other types of pumps include manual, solar and air-driven. Pumps are rated in gallons per minute (GPM) and a typical three- or four-bedroom home requires 8 to 12 GPM. To determine the correct size pump for your home, add one GPM for every fixture you have along your line. Do not buy an oversized pump as it can increase costs due to energy inefficiencies and reduce performance. If you are replacing a pump, choose a unit with the same horsepower. Consider increasing HP if you have added a family member or a new appliance or fixture. Leaks and switch settings can cause your pump to work improperly. There are a few system components to look for to help avoid problems. If your pump starts too frequently, the pressure tank could have a leak or need recharging. If your pump does not shut off, check the pressure switch settings. Other causes could be the water level in the well is too low or there may be a leak in the drop line. Pressure switch: Turns the water on and off. Pressure tank: Maintains the water pressure. Safety rope: Used to recover the pump for maintenance. Check valve: Prevents pumped water from flowing back down into the basin. Foot valve: Keeps water from flowing back down to the well when a deep well pump is off. Continue reading >>

How To Install Your Own Off The Grid Well

How To Install Your Own Off The Grid Well

How To Install Your Own Off The Grid Well image credit energyblog.nationalgeographic.com In olden times, wells were dug with a pick and shovel, with a lot of backbreaking work. Depending upon the location, the well might have to be dug quite deep to provide enough water. That much backbreaking work wasnt something that anyone would want to do, even though it was a necessity. Today, wells are usually drilled. A well drilling rig is essentially the same thing that they use when drilling for oil, only a lot smaller. A drill bit is lowered into the well hole on the end of a pipe. The motor, which is above ground, turns the pipe, driving the drill bit. Water is pumped into the hole, in order to flush out the dirt and sand that is being cut loose by the drill bit, bringing it up to the surface for disposal. The only problem with that system is cost. If you are thinking about having a well drilled on your property, youd better have some deep pockets. I was going to have one drilled at my home, until I found out the price was going to be over $5,000. Needless to say, I wasnt happy. The laws vary from state to state, but in much of the country, you can still put in your own well. Some states may require a permit, but usually if youre doing the work yourself, there is no permit requirement. Just make sure that you arent paying a buddy to help you, or he would be considered a contractor and fined for working without a license or permit. While you can put in a well just about any place, you should stay a minimum of 50 feet (or more) away from any septic tank or field lines. Groundwater is common in much of the country, and you can contaminate any groundwater source with an improperly located well (and contaminate any other well that is tapping into the same groundwater source). No Continue reading >>

How To Replace A Submersible Well Pump

How To Replace A Submersible Well Pump

Replacing the likes of a 100-foot-deep submersible well pump might be intimidating. This article will guide you through the process, step by step. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/5\/5b\/Replace-a-Submersible-Well-Pump-Step-1.jpg\/v4-460px-Replace-a-Submersible-Well-Pump-Step-1.jpg","bigUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/5\/5b\/Replace-a-Submersible-Well-Pump-Step-1.jpg\/v4-760px-Replace-a-Submersible-Well-Pump-Step-1.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":760,"bigHeight":570} First you need to shut off the breaker to the pump. It would be best to make sure the pump is off by trying to run water. Remember that your bladder could still have water pressure in it. If water doesn't pass after 5 minutes, then you pump is off. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/8\/89\/Replace-a-Submersible-Well-Pump-Step-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Replace-a-Submersible-Well-Pump-Step-2.jpg","bigUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/8\/89\/Replace-a-Submersible-Well-Pump-Step-2.jpg\/v4-760px-Replace-a-Submersible-Well-Pump-Step-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":760,"bigHeight":570} Locate and remove the top of the well head (cap). My cap was held in place with 3 - 1/4" bolts, use 7/16" wrench to remove. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/d\/db\/Replace-a-Submersible-Well-Pump-Step-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Replace-a-Submersible-Well-Pump-Step-3.jpg","bigUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/d\/db\/Replace-a-Submersible-Well-Pump-Step-3.jpg\/v4-760px-Replace-a-Submersible-Well-Pump-Step-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":760,"bigHeight":570} Shine a bright flashlight into the well head. Here you will make some first conclusions on how to replace your pump. The first thing Continue reading >>

How To Replace A Well Pump Pressure Switch

How To Replace A Well Pump Pressure Switch

How to Replace a Well Pump Pressure Switch Home Electrical Wiring Switches How to Replace a Well Pump Pressure Switch Replace a cranky old switch in about an hour Replace a faulty well pump switch in about an hour; no special tools or skills required. By the DIY experts of The Family Handyman Magazine Photo 1: Shut off the power, then disassemble Label each wire with tape. Then unscrew the conduit locking ring and pull the wires and conduit out of the switch. Unscrew the old switch and nipple. Replace with new parts. Slap your adjustable wrench around the flats on the gauge and unscrew it. Then screw in a new one and tighten it down. Your well pump gets its marching orders from the switch mounted on the pressure tank. When the switch acts up (and they all do eventually), youll see all kinds of strange behavior (pump wont turn on, turns on erratically or wont shut off). Replacing the pressure switch is cheap and takes only about an hour. Diagnose a cranky switch by rapping on it with a screwdriver handle. If the pump runs (youll hear it click) or quits, youve nailed the problem. But even if it doesnt respond, its still worth replacing the switch. Replace it with a new one (about $24 at rural home centers and amazon.com ). Switches come in three pressure ranges: 20 to 40, 30 to 50 and 40 to 60 psi. Always replace your switch with one of the same rating (usually printed inside the plastic cover of your old switch). Also buy a new pressure gauge (less than $10) and a 1/4-in. x 6-in. galvanized nipple. Flip the breaker to the pump switch and check it with a voltage sniffer to make sure its off. Then disconnect the wiring (Photo 1). Close the valve from the pressure tank to the house. Then drain the pressure tank. Next, remove the old switch (Photo 2) and gauge (Photo 3). Wr Continue reading >>

Signs You May Need A New Well Pump

Signs You May Need A New Well Pump

The above-ground portion of a water well pump. (Angie's List/Summer Galyan) Anything that puts a strain on your well pump may cause it to fail prematurely. Here are some of the situations that can lead to a malfunctioning well pump. Dear Angie: How do we determine if we need a new well pump ? Our water pressure was decreasing over several months. Then, the other night, we came home to no running water at all. The pumps circuit breaker seems OK. Sue M., Westerville, Ohio Dear Sue: The first thing to do when you have no water is to shut off electrical power to the pump and to your water heater. That will prevent possible additional damage. Then, its time to discover the source of the problem. Your best bet is to contact a reputable, experienced well contractor. Your well pump may be the most likely suspect, but there could be other reasons for your dry spell. You mentioned that you experienced decreased water pressure. Thats one sign of a possible problem with a well pump or water tank. Here are others: Unusually high electric bills (which may indicate a pump having to run continuously to maintain water pressure) Meanwhile, anything that puts a strain on the well pump can cause it to fail prematurely. Among situations that can lead to pump failure: The tank is a closed container for the pump to fill with water. As water fills the tank, the air within becomes compressed, usually through an air-filled vinyl bladder, until pressure is high enough to trip the pressure switch. When someone opens a faucet, air pressure in the tank will squeeze the bladder and force water out. When enough water is used to lower the pressure, the switch turns the pump back on and the cycle repeats. If the tank loses its pressure (its pre-charge, which comes with the tank from the factory), the p Continue reading >>

How Long Does A Well Pump Last Water Well Pump Replacement

How Long Does A Well Pump Last Water Well Pump Replacement

A Properly Sized Well Pump Should Last 8 to 10 Years A modern well pump installed by certified professionals should last for many years, but many homeowners find they do not have enough information when it comes to the age and condition of their well pump to know if it needs replacing. A well pump is a mechanism that drives water from the ground into a home. The pump is usually paired with a pressure tank, which evens the water pressure throughout the home and reduces the number of times the pump needs to turn on and off. If there seems to be a problem with your water pump, it could mean the pump is old and needs replacing. It could also mean the pump is undersized, or there are other problems with your water system. Calling professional water system specialists, like Skillings & Sons, will help you determine the source of the problem. Different Kinds of Well Pumps Knowing what kind of pump your home water system uses is the first step in determining the source of any pump problems. Jet Well Pumps Jet pumps come in two varieties, shallow and deep, and are often combined with a pressure tank. The shallow well pumps use a single pipe to draw water from about 25 feet. Deep well jet pumps can draw water from more than 100 feet and use a two-pipe system to draw water from the ground. Centrifugal Well Pumps Centrifugal pumps consist of one pipe inserted into the water column at a shallow depth, usually no more than 25 feet. The pump then sucks water from the ground and into the home. Submersible Well Pumps Submersible pumps are installed inside a home well and pumps water into the home only when needed. These are the most common type of well pump and can be used in deep wells. How Long Do Water Well Pumps Last? Submersible pumps, which are located in the well last 8 to 10 yea Continue reading >>

How To Replace A Well Pump

How To Replace A Well Pump

Three Parts: Preparation Replace a Jet Pump Replace a Submersible Pump Community Q&A If you live outside city limits, you may get your water supply from a well. The heart of your well system is the well pump. If the water is close to the surface, you may have a shallow well driven by a jet pump, and if your water is over 25 feet (7.63 m) deep, you may have a submersible pump system. If the pump breaks, you may have to install a new pump. Follow these guidelines to replace your well pump. Make sure you know that the pump is actually your problem. Before embarking on any of the following, ensure you have determined the pump to be at issue, by properly troubleshooting and checking the other components in your well system first, based on the presenting symptoms. No water does not always equal no pump. When in doubt, always consult a professional. Be sure to follow any and all applicable laws and codes. Determine what type of pump you need. Submersible pumps are used in deeper wells and will be beneath the ground in a well casing, while a jet pump is used in shallow wells that are less than 25 feet (7.63 m) deep and will be above ground. Find out the power ratings, the gallons (l) per minute pumped and the well size before you install a new pump. Locate well pumps at a water supply retail store, hardware store or online. When replacing well pumps, be sure to purchase the correct type of pump. Turn off the power to your pump at the main circuit breaker. A circuit breaker controls the flow of electricity to your house, and the well should be on a separate switch. Pay attention to the voltage assigned to the breaker (110/120,240v) as you will need this information to troubleshoot your pump issues, and correctly set up your new pump. Turn on a hose or faucet to release all the Continue reading >>

How To Remove A Submersible Well Pump

How To Remove A Submersible Well Pump

Home / Flotec Resources / Quick Start Guides /How to Remove a Submersible Well Pump Read your manual for installation, operation, and safety information. This guide neither supplements nor replaces the Owners Manual. Replacing a submersible well pump is not a complicated task if you understand the basics about a well system such as the placement of the pump, how the submersible pump operates and how it is installed in a well casing. An advanced do-it-yourselfer with knowledge of electrical wiring and some basic plumbing skills is capable of replacing a submersible well pump. This is not a step by step installation guide but rather a general overview to help you decide whether to do it yourself or to hire a contractor. The savings on the cost of labor, if you do it yourself, will be about 50 - 60% of the total price of a contractor doing the job. Winch and derrick (for well deeper than 100 feet) Non-slip gloves and protective clothing Perform all the above-ground tests described in Troubleshooting to determine if the pump must be replaced. If it must be replaced, clear a 6 to 8 diameter area of shrubs and plants around the well casing so you have enough room to work. Knowing the well depth, do you have a large enough lay down area to layout the pipe once you start pulling it out of the casing? You must be physically capable of continuously lifting the entire pipe and pump weight during the complete removal of pump to keep it from dropping back into the well. The combined weight of the submersible pump, the pump wire and the water-filled pipe is often more than 120 pounds for a 100 foot depth and more than 300 pounds for a 500 foot depth. It is likely the water piping and wire will be very slippery due to iron or mineral deposits on those surfaces. You will need non-slip Continue reading >>

2018 Well Pump Replacement Costs | New Well Water Pump Prices - Homeadvisor

2018 Well Pump Replacement Costs | New Well Water Pump Prices - Homeadvisor

Jet pumps come in cast iron, stainless steel, carbon ceramic and thermoplastic. Most jet pump motors range from between one-half and two horsepower. You can expect to pay around $269 for shallow well pumps (25-feet or less) with smaller motors and cheaper materials like thermoplastic. Deep-well motors (up to 150 feet) with higher quality materials like cast iron will have a rough cost of between $675 - $745. Jet pumps are generally considered an older style of well pump, and deliver less volume and pressure compared to submersible pumps. Sometimes jet pumps stop working due to a loss of prime, while submersible pumps are always self-priming. Motor replacement costs will vary based on the size of your pump. In many cases, motor repairs cost as much as installing a new pump. Submersible pumps come in cast iron and stainless steel and range from three-quarters to five horsepower. Submersible pumps have the same criteria in terms of cost to replace as jet pumps, however, similar sizes of submersible pumps are still typically more expensive than jet pumps. Despite the higher price, submersible pumps are considered more reliable than jet pumps and are less noisy. The cost of installing submersible pumps will vary based on the size of the well, material and motor size. Lower horse power pumps have a rough cost of around $475, while more powerful units can range from $700 to $1,200. Many submersible pumps also require the installation of additional piping, which will increase overall installation costs. Adding extra piping can cost an additional $250 - $2,500, depending on the scope of work. Solar pumps come in both plastic and stainless-steel housing. Stainless models will command a higher price, but have a longer lifespan. Basic pump configurations will cost around $2,000 an Continue reading >>

How To Replace Your Own Submersible Well Pump : Diy

How To Replace Your Own Submersible Well Pump : Diy

These are not the subreddit rules. Please see the guidelines link above. If you are posting a help request, please include as many details as possible. Please consider adding photos and doing some basic research into your question. /r/DIY should not be your first stop for your question. All help request must go in "self posts" or the stickied thread at the top of the subreddit. If you are sharing your finished DIY project, please explain how it was done. Consider putting the finished photo first, however this is not a requirement. Comments regarding finished photo location will be removed. Projects without adequate detail will be removed. Please keep all comments on topic. Moderators will remove off-topic comments at their discretion. All images must be hosted on imgur. Non-imgur links will be considered on a case by case basis. Please message the moderators with a link to your post for approval. All video submissions are considered on a case by case basis. Please message the moderators with a link to your post for approval. Civility is a requirement for participating on /r/DIY . We try to stick to a "3-strike" policy for rule infractions - however moderators reserve the right to bypass this policy any time. A temporary ban constitutes a "strike". Finished DIY project submissions without adequate details / photos will be removed. Consider submitting these photos to /r/somethingimade instead. /r/DIY is about the process rather than the result. A good rule of thumb is somebody who sees your post should be able to relatively get close to being able to replicate the project with the information you've provided Continue reading >>

How To Replace A Submersible Well Pump

How To Replace A Submersible Well Pump

Introduction: How to Replace a Submersible Well Pump Ok! This is not an easy task, and I recommend that anyone thinking about doing it AT LEAST consider having the well pump identified as the failed component by a professional prior to undertaking it. In my case, the water in my house stopped working (on a Friday night, of course). I know my system pretty well and was able to determine that the fault in my system COULD NOT BE ANYTHING BUT my well pump motor before I took any action. Guess what? I called the plumber anyway. If nothing else, you'll pay $60 to have your diagnosis confirmed and maybe even get an estimate that will provide you with the motivation to do the job on your own. (My estimate to pull and replace the well was $2400... By following these steps I was able to do the job myself for less than $400!) Step 1: Start With Understanding What Your Well Looks Like, and How It Works. So this is what we start with. The drawing is not to scale, but essentially most wells look a bit like this. There are several different variations on what ends up being pretty much the same thing. In my case, the casing (which is the steel pipe that everything fits into and goes into the ground) has a 6" diameter. Some casings can be as narrow as 4". If you're doing something like this on your own, wider is better! A 6" well casing gives you plenty of room to work on your own. Narrower casings can make things... complicated. The well used in this example is relatively shallow. It only runs about 100'-120' deep. Some wells can run to depths of hundreds (or thousands!) of feet. In the case of anything deeper than about 250' I would recommend that you have it pulled by a pro. Why? Because it's HEAVY! And there are special tools that contractors have to lift the pump from that kind of Continue reading >>

How To Replace A Submerged Well Pump

How To Replace A Submerged Well Pump

Terry Love Plumbing & Remodel DIY & Professional Forum I would like to replace my 1/2 hp well pump with either a 3/4 hp or a 1 hp pump in 325 ft deep well tested 10 years ago at a capacity of 20 gpm. Is this a do-it-yourself,(with help from friends)? The local well driller wants $1800 to $2000 for the replacement. I believe that I can the pump at cost iabout $500 to $700 depending on make and hp. 325' is pretty deep. If it is hanging on PVC or Poly pipe, and it is not stuck, you and a couple of friends can probably pull it out. If it is steel pipe, it's gonna be REAL heavy. If you can lift it, anyone can pull and set a pump. However, it is the little stuff that makes a pump man worth while. Knowing how to get a pump unstuck, how to splice the wires, how to attach the wire to the drop pipe, knowing that you can't attach a steel fitting to a brass or stainless one without insulation, and simply knowing something isn't right when he sees it, makes a pump man worth his salt. If all goes well you can save yourself a little money. If you drop that pump in the well, $2,000 for a pump man would have been cheap. Even charging $2,000, you won't see very many rich pump guys. We learn this stuff the hard way by having to spend 3 or 4,000 bucks to fix your $2,000 job when something doesn't go right. Some pump guys have some old rigs that are paid for but, most have to make payments on rigs that cost from $50,000 to $250,000. Then there is the insurance payments, fuel, tools, license fees, phone bills, advertisements. Then if your employees show up, you have to pay them as well. Something goes wrong under warranty, and there is another trip without compensation. It usually gives people a good appreciation for a pump man when they pull a 325' well themselves. Everybody should try it Continue reading >>

How To Tell If You Need A New Well Pump

How To Tell If You Need A New Well Pump

By Angie Hicks Angie's List/[email protected] Q. How do we determine if we need a new well pump? Our water pressure was decreasing over several months. Then, the other night, we came home to no running water at all. The pumps circuit breaker seems OK. A. The first thing to do when you have no water is to shut off electrical power to the pump and to your water heater. That will prevent possible additional damage. Then, its time to discover the source of the problem. Your best bet is to contact a reputable, experienced well contractor. Your well pump may be the most likely suspect, but there could be other reasons for your dry spell. You mentioned that you experienced decreased water pressure. Thats one sign of a possible problem with a well pump or water tank. Here are others: Unusually high electric bills (which may indicate a pump having to run continuously to maintain water pressure) Meanwhile, anything that puts a strain on the well pump can cause it to fail prematurely. Among situations that can lead to pump failure: The expansion tank losing pressure. The tank is a closed container for the pump to fill with water. As water fills the tank, the air within becomes compressed, usually through an air-filled vinyl bladder, until pressure is high enough to trip the pressure switch. When someone opens a faucet, air pressure in the tank will squeeze the bladder and force water out. When enough water is used to lower the pressure, the switch turns the pump back on and the cycle repeats. If the tank loses its pressure (its pre-charge, which comes with the tank from the factory), the pump must work overtime to keep the tank full. A power outage. Unless the well pump has a backup power supply, such as a battery or a backup generator, it will usually stop working if yo Continue reading >>

Well Pump Service - Plumb Pro South Carolina

Well Pump Service - Plumb Pro South Carolina

Your home or business requires a well pump, whether youre in the heart of the city or a few miles outside of town. The water you rely on every day needs a way to get into your house, regardless of whether that happens via a supply line or your own well. When you turn on the faucet, you expect to see water. Thats where the well pump comes into play. Well pumps use a motor to transport water to your home. There are two different types of pumps: jet and submersible. When you are looking to repair or replace your unit, the first thing youll need to determine is which type of well pump youll need. If youve been researching well pumps online you might have noticed that theres two common types of pumps the jet and the submersible pump. Whats the difference between these two options? Jet pump The jet pump is primarily used when the water table is high. Because the water is already so close to the surface, it can be collected much more easily. A jet pump is powered by an electric motor, which helps it to suction water up out of the earth. If your water table is more than 25 feet deep, a jet pump can still be used, it would just need to be configured for a deep-well system. Submersible pump If your water table is much lower, suction simply wont do the trick. A submersible pump is located right inside the well rather than above it. The motor in this style pump drives water up the pipes and into the plumbing system of the home. Submersible pumps are generally more efficient than jet pumps, and last quite a long time. However, any repairs will need to be done by a professional plumber since it requires pulling the pump from the well casing. How to Know Its Time to Replace Your Well Pump There are several signs that your well pump needs repair, some more noticeable than others. Perh Continue reading >>

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