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How To Keep Insulin Cold While Traveling

So, 11 Months Backpacking As A Diabetic

So, 11 Months Backpacking As A Diabetic

After (approx!)... 20 - Flights 26 - Boats 15 - Trains (No idea!) - Buses 1 - canoe 21000+ Miles around SE Asia I'm struggling with highs and lows, to guess my carb intake, resisting the temptation of high sugar and processed carb foods - I'm still Diabetic, so everything is normal. After a hospital checkup I can confirm that in a year... My HBA1C has improved from 6.2 to 5.8 (little surprised!) I have lost 5.3kg, this I'm sure is all muscle I'm the same height With my improved diet now back in the west I'm currently struggling with getting my background insulin (basal) correct, I'm sure in time this will be resolved. May even get my second-hand Dexcom 7 out! As a Diabetic what did I have to worry about when travelling? Very little really, things where normal, the challenges where the same. But, I can share some advice with the benefits of my newly found hindsight... Medication supplies With my amazing spreadsheet to calculate my medical supplies that you can get here, I was fully prepared, or so I thought. Do not underestimate how much your eating habits may change, you will need more insulin and equipment that you expected. How much? No idea! But have enough spares to last you two additional months, this should be enough to get you out of trouble if needed. — Timothy Omer (@tim_omer) February 1, 2014 Insulin - keep cool Insulin is more hardy than you expect, especially Humalog. My Frio bags did a great job at keeping my Insulin cool, but not fridge cool. When possible I did store my insulin in a fridge but this is not always possible, the majority of the time keeping in the Frio bag in the shade did the jpb. Insulin will not just stop working once it has had enough. It will degrade over time, you must keep a close eye on your blood readings and adjust over time base Continue reading >>

Travel Tips For Better Diabetes Control

Travel Tips For Better Diabetes Control

Diabetes and Travel Travel is a wonderful way to discover new places and cultures. Having diabetes shouldn't stop you from experiencing new places. With these tips from the American Diabetes Association, you can stay healthy and safe on your adventures far from home! Diabetes Travel Tip #1: See Your Doctor First Having diabetes means you should plan ahead before you travel. Be sure to see your doctor before you leave. Get a check-up and make sure your diabetes is in control. If you need immunizations for your destination get them at least one month before departure. This way, if the shots make you sick, you'll have time to recover. You'll need two important items from your doctor: a letter and prescriptions. The letter should explain in detail what you need to manage your diabetes while you're away, such as taking diabetes pills or insulin shots. It should also list insulin, syringes, and other medications or devices you used, along with allergies or food sensitivities. You may complete a TSA (Transportation Security Administration) notification card to present to the officer at the airport. This card is another way to inform the TSA officers of your condition. Your doctor should also prescribe any insulin, diabetes medications, and syringes you will need; you should have more than enough to last throughout your trip. In the Unites States, prescription rules vary, depending on the state. However, your prescription may help in case of emergency. If you are traveling abroad, research prescription laws of your destination, they may be very different than those at home. The insulin you use The syringes you use Other medications or devices you use Your allergies Your food sensitivities Diabetes Travel Tip #2: Carry-On Luggage Always take your medications and medical supplies Continue reading >>

Keeping Insulin Cold While Traveling

Keeping Insulin Cold While Traveling

Although one of my major concerns while traveling is keeping insulin cool, I have not yet resorted to carrying a fridge on my back! Meet Tony Phoenix -Morrison. As far as I know there is no insulin in that fridge. He is simply running with a fridge on his back (you can check his story HERE, that is where I borrowed this photo from). The length of our stay away from home determines the amount of insulin I pack. If it is a week or two (anything under a month) I do not worry about refrigerating the insulin. It is meant to be used within the month once it is out of the fridge anyway, so I just keep it away from direct heat and make sure I do not leave it in the car in the sun. It is a different story if we pack for 3 or 6 months away. It makes it more interesting if one of the flights we are going on is 18 hours and it takes over 28 hours, door to door. Obviously, it is essential to have a temporary cold storage for insulin that will last or the insulin will become unusable by the end of the month. I heard that "FRIO" bags are pretty COOL and keep insulin cool and safe (check the link link HERE), but the biggest FRIO bag I have seen fits only a few insulin pens or double that amount of insulin pen-fills. Not enough for the 3-6 months supply of insulin we need to carry at times. On many of the trips we have made over the years, traveling from South Africa to Europe and even further, from Australia to Europe, I have tried different things to keep insulin cool and safe. In the beginning, asking the crew nicely to put the soft cooler box I had stored the insulin in, into their fridge worked beautifully. They were happy to assist and the cool pack I had with the insulin would keep it cool enough between the flights. Then, on one long flight, they politely said NO and explained t Continue reading >>

How To Carry Insulin While Travelling?

How To Carry Insulin While Travelling?

Answered by: Dr Sujeet Jha | Director, Institute of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism, Max Healthcare, New Delhi Q: I am a type-I insulin dependent patient. How can I carry my insulin while travelling? Is there any cold case available to carry insulin and keep it for longer periods? A:In summers, higher temperatures (more than 30 degree centigrade) can affect your insulin. As a result, your insulin may not work as well as it should. Temperature can also affect product sterility. Do not use insulins that have changed in appearance (e.g., clear insulin becoming cloudy) after they have been in the heat or have been frozen. It is advisable to check how your insulin looks before you use it. If you find anything unusual or you notice your insulin requirements changing markedly, consult your doctor. There are certain packets available through insulin manufacturing companies such as Lilly, Aventis and Novo, which can help you get cool bags. You can also use other commercial cool bags to carry insulin. Storage of insulin depends upon many factors: Is it opened and in use, or unopened and refrigerated. Opened vials and cartridges are the ones in which the stopper or seal has been punctured with a needle. Opened cartridges should be stored in the pen at a temperature between 15 and 30 deg C and may be stored outside the pen in the refrigerator. In-use pens are the ones in which the stopper or seal has been punctured with a needle and should be stored at room temperature. In-use pens should not be stored in the refrigerator. Unopened and refrigerated (2° to 7°C) - until expiration date If outside / room temperature (15°C to 30°C) 10-28 days depending on the type of insulin Do not use any insulin product after the expiration date stamped on the label Do not use any insulin th Continue reading >>

Keep Insulin Cool While Traveling With Frio Cases

Keep Insulin Cool While Traveling With Frio Cases

Paddling the Amazon? Hiking Macchu Picchu? Don't let your diabetes hold you back from life's great adventures. Traveling with diabetes simply takes planning and the right supplies. FRIO Insulin Cooling Cases offer refrigeration to go, ensuring that your insulin stays at the right temperature throughout your trip. Traveling with diabetes The American Diabetes Association recommends travelers take the following precautions: Protect your insulin. If you plan to be out in the elements, protect your insulin with a cooling case. Insulin exposed to very hot or very cold temperatures can lose its effectiveness. Pack enough supplies. Pack twice as much medication and blood-testing supplies as you need, including insulin and extra syringes. Understand dosages. If you do run out of insulin during your journey, be aware of different dosage conventions abroad. You may need to purchase different syringes to adjust the dosage to your current prescription. FRIO cooling cases: Insulin cooling on the go FRIO cooling cases offer a handy alternative to the refrigerator. These small, portable cooling packs keep insulin cool for several days once activated. Simply immerse the pack in water for 5 to 10 minutes. The crystals in the wallet panel expand into a gel, which stays cold as it evaporates. Reactivate the pack again and again by submerging it in water again. FRIO wallets keep insulin cool for at least 45 hours in a warm environment of 100 degrees Fahrenheit. This is five times as long as an ice pack--long enough for you to head out on a travel adventure. The pack itself is dry to the touch, and easily stowed in a backpack or purse. For adventurers heading into cold climates, the FRIO wallet insulates too. Diabetes shouldn't keep you from living life to its fullest. FRIO wallets let you Continue reading >>

Travelling With Insulin

Travelling With Insulin

To listen to this resource just click the play button below: Flash version 10,1 or greater is required You have no flash plugin installed Click here to download latest version Insulin and blood sugar testing equipment can be affected by temperature and humidity. Before you walk across Death Valley or Antarctica read on... Insulin Carry plenty - to be on the safe side carry double what you think you need! If you are travelling for a long time, you may need to get supplies when away. Remember your usual daily amounts may change - the type of food, lack or increase in exercise, change in temperature can all affect your blood sugar control. Find out the availability of insulin where you are going. Different countries often have different names and strengths and may not use insulin pens. See Contact Addresses take with you contact phone numbers for suppliers in some main cities you plan to visit. If your type of insulin is not available, discuss with the company and they can often arrange for a supply to be sent to a certain chemist / collection point. If you are travelling for a while and are not based anywhere with use of a refrigerator, you may need to get a new supply when away. Insulin strength Most countries now use U-100 strength insulin, but you may come across U-40 and 80 strength. If you are unable to get U100 and need to use another strength of insulin you need different syringes to match the insulin strength, otherwise you will take the wrong insulin dose. (If you use U-100 syringes with U-40/80 insulin you will take take much less insulin, or if you use U-100 insulin with U-40/80 syringe you will take much more insulin.) Temperature Extremes of temperature may cause your insulin to be less effective. Insulin companies state that insulin kept out of the fridge at Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Traveling With Diabetes

Everything You Need To Know About Traveling With Diabetes

Having diabetes does not mean you should be within the confines of your home. By doing some smart planning and thorough preparation, you can go anywhere whether it is a camping excursion, a cross-country train adventure, a relaxing cruise, or a trip to various countries. Although vacations can be fun and rewarding, you have to be aware that traveling can be stressful to your body as you stray away from your daily routine and diet plan. At the same time, foreign surrounding may also put your psychological well-being into an anxious state. All these changes can contribute to a fluctuation in your blood glucose level. To help you prepare for your upcoming trip, whether by car, air or boat, we have compiled an ultimate guide of useful information to educate you better on various topics concerning traveling with diabetes: Is it Safe to Travel as a Person with Diabetes? “Is it safe to travel?” is the first question you should ask yourself and your doctor before you start to think of planning a trip. To avoid unexpected health issues that could possibly arise during your journey, you should consider going for a medical examination to ensure your diabetes is in stable condition and you are physically well to travel. It is important for you to ask your doctor whether you are fit to travel in your current condition as it can play a crucial role when purchasing your itinerary as well as your travel and health insurance. You should always request that your doctor put his professional opinion in writing so that if you need to cancel your trip as a result of sudden health emergency situation, you have the doctor’s letter as a proof of evidence and get compensation for any incurred loss from your insurance company. For more diabetes related information: Aside from the profession Continue reading >>

Keeping Your Insulin Cool With Medactiv Travel Cases

Keeping Your Insulin Cool With Medactiv Travel Cases

One hurdle many people face is how to keep their insulin cool while out doing what they do, whether it be hiking up a mountain, relaxing on the beach, or any other time you may not be keeping your insulin on your kitchen counter. For those on multiple daily injections (MDI), keeping your insulin pens with you is essential, but how do you keep them from getting too warm — especially in the summer? Medactiv has a solution. Their travel bags have a special cooling pack on the inside that, when soaked in water, swells and keeps your insulin cool (not too cold like ice packs would). The packs work by holding on to the cool water and through the process of evaporation, cool the inside of the pouch. After soaking the special blue pack in cold water for 2 minutes, simply wipe excess water off (I did squeeze mine a bit to get a lot of the water out as well, but it still maintained it’s swollen appearance and cooling abilities), and place it in your travel bag along with your insulin pens. I received my sample bags (the Classic and the Single) just before my annual trip to the beach. I really wanted to put the packs to the test. So, as we were packing, I soaked my cool pack inserts and packed them away in my suitcase. For most of the trip, I used the small, single-pen pack to keep my fast-acting insulin with me on the beach. I did not keep my pack in the sunlight, but rather packed in amongst other beach essentials in my beach bag (towels, wipes, etc) which stays under a shaded tent. I just knew in the 90-degree heat that it wouldn’t last, but surprisingly, it worked very well for the 2 hours we would spend on the beach. For 2 days, I was able to keep my insulin pen cool in the pack. The larger pack can hold 3 insulin pens, but is also large enough to accommodate an insulin Continue reading >>

Traveling With Diabetes

Traveling With Diabetes

For many people, traveling is one of the highlights of their lives. Whether you’re spending a weekend at a bed and breakfast or flying to an exotic location, diabetes doesn’t need to keep you from traveling or having an active lifestyle. With careful planning, you can manage your diabetes just as well as you do at home. Tips for traveling with diabetes Before you leave: Make an appointment with your health care provider at least 4 weeks before you go on any trip planned to last more than a few days to make sure your diabetes is well controlled. Be sure to ask for extra prescriptions in case you need to replace or get additional medicines while you're away Discuss with your health care provider how changes in your schedule, meals, and time zone could affect your blood sugar. Also ask whether you need to change how often you check your blood sugar Take along extra syringes, prescription pens, also known as prefilled pens, meter test strips and other supplies, as well as a good supply of snacks If you use a vial and syringe and travel often, you may want to ask your diabetes care team if a prefilled pen might be right for you Pack extra medicine and think about where you will store it. Check your patient information for storage instructions Wear your Medical ID at all times. The ID can provide critical information about your health. Be sure the information is written in the language of every country you'll be visiting Don't forget your emergency glucagon medicine, antidiarrheal medication, antibiotic ointment, anti-nausea drugs, blood and urine testing supplies, and extra batteries for your glucose meter While you travel: Keep a well-wrapped, air-tight snack pack with both rapid-acting and slow-acting carbs. Smart choices are packets of nuts, cheese and crackers, fruit Continue reading >>

The Frio Insulin Cooling Wallet Keeps Your Insulin Cool Without Ice Packs!

The Frio Insulin Cooling Wallet Keeps Your Insulin Cool Without Ice Packs!

Why you might need it Traveling in the summer or winter can present challenges for maintaining medications such as insulin or EpiPens. Leaving your medication unprotected from heat in a car on a sunny day or getting lost while hiking could prove to be a disaster. Power outages that occur when outside temperatures are hot or cold can also present a challenge to maintain the viability of medications. Even worse, an extended power outage for days, weeks, or longer could occur if caused by an natural disaster or unexpected Doomsday scenario. The Frio is a cooling case that could be very beneficial in any of these situations. Just ask former Amazing Race winner Nat Strand, a Type 1 diabetic, that used a Frio on her journey around the world. Click here to read her story: Nat Strand's Amazing Race. Even if you are perfectly healthy, if you are stocking a medical kit as a prepper or survivalist, having a Frio could be helpful for others in your network who have medications and medical conditions such as diabetes, but they are unprepared. It can be a challenge keeping insulin vials or pens and other medications such as EpiPens at the correct temperature so that they are viable when needed. Extreme heat or cold will destroy the potency of these and some other medications. The Frio Insulin Cooling Wallet provides a highly effective yet low cost solution to the problem of keeping insulin at safe temperatures without the need for refrigeration. Frio cooling cases can also be used for other medications that can be stored at room temperature such as glaucoma eye drops, growth hormone, anaphylactic shock therapies, etc. Users of medication other than insulin are advised to check with their doctor or pharmacist or the manufacturer’s information leaflet for the specific medications con Continue reading >>

Travel

Travel

Whether for work or pleasure, travel can and should be fun and having diabetes doesn’t mean you can’t travel. With good planning, your trip can be safe, fun and hassle-free whether you’re going interstate or overseas. While traveling: Make sure you eat well, consider how different foods will affect you Make sure you check your blood glucose levels regularly For people with type 1 diabetes - carry the right lollies with you (overseas brands may not be as strong) If you are flying, prepare for long delays or misplaced baggage (just in case!) If traveling overseas, time zones and extreme climates may affect you and how you manage your diabetes, talk to your doctor or diabetes educator Below is information on planning your trip, travel insurance, airport regulation, what to ask your doctor, tips on what to pack and flying. Planning your travel itinerary & bookings (Three Months Prior) Plan travel itinerary and make bookings If you wear an electronic device to monitor blood glucose levels or infuse insulin, check with the airline to see if these devices can be operated in-flight Arrange travel insurance for health and belongings Check vaccination requirements When booking your flights, you may choose to tell the airline you have diabetes. This will be passed on to the cabin crew who are trained in meeting your needs during the flight. In general, ‘diabetic’ meals served in-flight can be quite bland and no longer necessary. However you may choose to order meals that are low in saturated fat and high in fibre and carbohydrate at the time you make your bookings. Be sure to make arrangements in advance so that you comply with Australian airline security regulations specifically for people with diabetes. The regulations are: You must carry all diabetes supplies includin Continue reading >>

Keeping It Cool. Literally.

Keeping It Cool. Literally.

The new year is here and that means I’m on a countdown until we leave the US for three months on January 14th (ahhhh!). This past weekend involved a trip to REI where I bought an extremely functional (and extremely expensive!) rolling suitcase that converts into a backpack. I also got a quick-drying travel towel, a power outlet converter, and a whole bunch of other little travel helpers. That’s the easy stuff. Planning for diabetes with this trip has been the main challenge. I’m all stocked up on medications, test strips, and DexCom sensors. I’ve figured out how to pack it so that it’s not too bulky. Jacob will carry half the stash in case one of us gets our luggage lost or stolen. I’m bringing back ups of everything, and translated doctor’s notes. Pretty much everything is accounted for except for one simple but frustrating problem: It’s really, REALLY hot in Asia right now. Like 93 degrees hot. Like hot enough to destroy your insulin. I’m not worried about transporting my stash. The pens I’m not using will stay in my luggage in a hotel room at a normal temperature. What I’m worried about is the active pens that I take out with me during the day. If I keep them tucked in my purse while we’re touring temples and cities in 90 degree heat, those pens will roast in no time. The obvious answer is to take along a little pouch with freezer packs in it, but A.) I won’t always have access to a freezer to refreeze them and B.) Whatever I take has to be carry-on approved, i.e. small. I’m thinking the best bet will be to take a small pack with a refreezable ice block. Then I can also take a Frio wallet. Frio wallets are fabric pouches that have crystals in them which can be made cold by soaking the pouch in cold water (which I could always get from a re Continue reading >>

Keeping Insulin Cool

Keeping Insulin Cool

Tweet Firstly, check if you do need to keep your insulin cool. While it’s best to be prepared, insulin can handle short trips when not refrigerated. It’s the exposure to extremes of heat that can deactivate it. Keep insulin in hand luggage if you are taking a plane - if it goes in the cargo hold with the luggage it might freeze which will deactivate it. Cool on long journeys It’s fine in the cabin where it does not need to be refrigerated. If you are going on a long, hot car journey or to a very hot country then you might want to look at ways to keep the insulin protected. Methods to protect your insulin Below is a selection of bags, wallets, fridges and travel friendly accessories that will allow you to keep your insulin cool on the move. In some kitchen shops there are clever lunch boxes with little freezer packs, often used to keep salads cool and fresh and these too would work for keeping insulin safe and cool and you can choose from different sizes as to what would work best for you. Medicool: PenPlus range Medicool has a range of bags that include insulation such as the PenPlus case which can protect valuable supplies. Useful for men, women, children, seniors, and medical personnel it can be attached to a belt, placed inside a purse or briefcase, or carried by its detachable hand strap. It can be used for either insulin pens or those who use insulin vials and injections keeping them cool for hours using a refreezable gel pack. This case can hold up to four vials of insulin or two insulin pens keeping them safely cool for up to 12 hours. Medicool carry case review Frio Wallets and Carry Cases Another brand that focuses on keeping insulin cool is Frio which has a series of simple and convenient cooling wallets. Light and very compact Light and compact, they ar Continue reading >>

Flying With Insulin

Flying With Insulin

I recently received an e-mail asking about insulin storage conditions while flying from the United Kingdom to the United States. Paraphrased, it read: _"I use pens for diabetes control, containing Humalog and Lantus, which I store in a kitchen refrigerator. In a few weeks, I will travel to Texas. I will leave home at 3:00 am, drive to Heathrow and finally reach the motel in Texas at approximately 10:00 pm (UK Local time) (travel time of 19 hours). There is a refrigerator in the hotel room. I will need to take 4 pens of Humalog and 3 pens of Lantus insulin. Unfortunately the airline will not allow the boxed pens to be stored in the on-board refrigerator. What do you recommend I do? I can identify the following four options: Carry them in my hand luggage taking no extra precautions, and leaving them at room temperature in the hotel? Carry them in my hand luggage and put them in the hotel room refrigerator on arrival? Pack them in my checked luggage. I am sure the hold temperature is much colder than cabin temperature? Pack them in a small cooler surrounded by cubes of ice, which may cause a problem with airport security? I am at a loss what to do."_ My reply was as follows: _"I fly with insulin regularly, and have my own opinions for you to consider. Be sure to carry prescriptions signed by your physician in case someone asks about your supplies (the only time this happened to me was when I was flying from Canada to the US & the Canadians asked me)._ _For USA info on flying with diabetes supplies, see the US TSA website. Also see Your Traveling Medical Record and Travel Letter. I would make the following comments about the options you presented: Yes, but there’s some risk of overheating in summer. The present pen can stay at room temp, but spares should probably be kept Continue reading >>

Traveling With Insulin

Traveling With Insulin

Getting ready to travel can be a tricky task for anyone, and as someone with diabetes, you have a few extra items on your to-do list before leaving. If you take insulin (as everyone with type 1 diabetes does and as some people with type 2 diabetes), you need to take some precautions for travelling with it. This article focuses on keeping insulin cold while travelling. If you take an insulin analog, the vial should be kept cold while travelling. Some of the insulins can stand being at room temperature for 18 to 72 hours, but then the vial is wasted. Most pharmacies carry insulated jackets that store your supplies for a few days. Unless you are flying, you don't need a special container and you don't have to have a refrigerator. But you will have to stop each day for ice—keep that in mind when you're planning your trip. Camping with Insulin You can even go camping and keep your insulin ready to go if you prepare correctly. You will need to invest in a quality insulated wide-neck thermos bottle with at least a one quart or liter capacity (for one vial, larger if more than one) and 18 to 24 hour cooking/heating duration. Getting a small necked thermos will make it difficult to fill with ice when traveling since crushed ice is not always available. Buy quality plastic sealable sandwich bags, preferably ones you do not have to fidget with to make sure they are sealed tightly. Put the vial and box into the bag. Use one bag for each vial. It will be easier to retrieve. Using the box adds another layer of protection and avoids the vial being in close contact with the ice and freezing (insulin shouldn't be in an extreme temperature—either hot or cold). Drop the vial into one of the corners of the plastic bag and wrap the rest of the plastic around it, to make sure it is insul Continue reading >>

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