diabetestalk.net

How To Insulin Sensitivity

Insulin Resistance And Weight Gain

Insulin Resistance And Weight Gain

Hormones are powerful and you should not take them lightly. Several hormones may either speed-up or impede your weight loss success. Insulin is one such hormone. Resistance to insulin causes diabetes and weight gain. Escaping insulin resistance can give you control over your blood sugar and your weight too! What is Insulin? But, what is insulin? What does it do? Insulin is a hormone released by your pancreas - an organ in your abdomen. When you eat, your body senses that and signals your pancreas to release insulin. Your body releases insulin in response to glucose, amino acids and fats in your meals (1-3). But, its secretion is highest when you eat sugary foods. What Does Insulin Do? After its release, insulin assists the entry of glucose from your food into your body cells. Think of insulin as a key that unlocks the door for glucose to enter into your body cells. When your system gets loaded with glucose, it causes a shift in your metabolism. It slows down the breakdown of fat. More importantly, it starts the synthesis of new fat. Insulin redirects excess glucose into fat cells and triggers ‘adipogenesis’- synthesis of fat (4-7). No wonder sugary stuff is so fattening! Insulin Sensitivity vs. Insulin Resistance Insulin sensitivity is the term for how your body responds to insulin. If your body is ‘sensitive’ to insulin, it means everything is on the right track. The key is turning the locks just fine and there is no need to worry. But, things become different when ‘resistance’ replaces ‘sensitivity’. When you become resistant to insulin, it means the key is not turning the locks the way it is supposed to. Glucose is not entering into the cells and fat synthesis is on the rise (8). Insulin Resistance - Cause or Consequence? The link between insulin resi Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance: The Real Reason Why You Aren’t Losing Weight

Insulin Resistance: The Real Reason Why You Aren’t Losing Weight

Many people have weight loss as one of their key resolutions. Sadly, 35 percent of people also give up on that goal before the month even ends. It’s not necessarily lack of time or willpower that causes you to struggle with weight loss year after year. The real reason that you may have struggled to lose weight is insulin resistance, or a condition I call metabolism dysfunction. So you may be thinking, “Why is it so hard for me to lose weight?” I’m doing “everything right,” and yet still weight loss is difficult. Perhaps (like many of my patients) you’re already following a strict diet and working out several times a week, but to no avail. The weight still won’t come off — or, worse, you are gaining weight for seemingly no reason at all! You have become resigned to being overweight. Weight problems aren’t a permanent and immovable fixture for the rest of your life. If you’re finding that weight is easy to gain and hard to lose, it’s not your fault! Weight problems aren’t just about overeating or under exercising — they’re about metabolic changes (The MD Factor Diet, 2015) that are collectively known as insulin resistance. Lab tests conducted in my practice have confirmed that over 89 percent of my patients have this real and often undiagnosed issue. So the good news is that the right combination of diet, exercise, and will to succeed you can reverse your MD factor and finally find success in losing weight and keeping it off for good. In a nutshell, insulin resistance is the inability of your body to properly convert the food that you eat into energy to fuel your cells. People with the MD Factor have difficulty regulating their blood sugar, which is often due to insulin resistance or even diabetes. In both instances, their bodies are unable t Continue reading >>

How Can A Ketogenic/low-carb Diet Improve Insulin Sensitivity?

How Can A Ketogenic/low-carb Diet Improve Insulin Sensitivity?

The quickest and easiest way is by lowering insulin in the body. A study found that even one day on the ketogenic diet can lower insulin resistance. A more subtle and not as quick way is the issue of fat in the liver and pancreas. First of all, when compared against other diets the ketogenic diet results in more weight loss. So, people start to lose weight faster and begin to clear fat in and around abdominal organs. This also works through reducing things like fructose in the diet. Fructose must be metabolized in the liver and a certain percent of it ends up being made into fat in the liver. Since the liver is not creating fat, it starts to clear. Fat in the liver leads to insulin resistance in the liver. In many ways the liver is “ground zero” for insulin resistance. This is why the epidemic of fatty liver disease is a real problem. Now if you really want to knock out insulin resistance then use a combination of the ketogenic diet and exercise. That is a powerful combination to knock out insulin resistance in the body. Continue reading >>

Reverse Insulin Resistance With These 8 Foods

Reverse Insulin Resistance With These 8 Foods

Research indicates that you don't need drugs to control blood sugar. Food, herbs, and spices are the future of medicine. Over 80 million Americans have insulin resistance that can lead to diabetes. And you could be on the road to diabetes for 10 years or more and never even know it. Here's what happens. The hormone insulin directs your cells to open up and take in glucose from the blood. With insulin resistance, your cells become desensitized to insulin. They ignore the instructions to open up and take in glucose. Your body keeps producing more insulin to try to get the message heard. But it doesn't work. And your insulin levels rise higher and higher. Those chronically high insulin levels cause rapid weight gain, premature aging, high blood pressure, heart disease, and higher cancer risks. Eventually they lead to type 2 diabetes. Herbs, spices and foods are your first line of defense. Here are eight that can help restore and maintain your cells' sensitivity to insulin. 1. Turmeric: 100% Effective In Preventing Diabetes A 2009 study found curcumin, an active compound found in turmeric, was 500 to 100,000 times more effective than the prescription drug Metformin at activating glucose uptake.[i] In another study of 240 pre-diabetic adults, patients were given either 250 milligrams of curcumin or a placebo every day. After nine months, NONE of those taking curcumin developed diabetes but 16.4% of the placebo group did. In other words, the curcumin was 100% effective at preventing Type 2 diabetes. 2. Ginger: Lowers Fasting Blood Glucose by 10.5% In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial 88 diabetics were divided into two groups. Every day one group received a placebo while the other received 3 one-gram capsules of ginger powder. After eight weeks, the ginger g Continue reading >>

Optimizing Insulin Sensitivity For Muscle Gain And Fat Loss

Optimizing Insulin Sensitivity For Muscle Gain And Fat Loss

There's more to insulin sensitivity than eating 6 meals per day. Learn how to fully optimize insulin sensitivity to build muscle and lose fat. Bodybuilding is one of the toughest sports there is to train for. It's not for the casual trainee. It’s a constant and grueling uphill battle filled with dedication and determination. Training, nutrition, supplementation, rest, and recovery must be planned out seven days a week, 365 days a year. The only goal is to maximize muscle while stripping bodyfat to single-digits; bodybuilders have chosen to pursue an extremely difficult and testing lifestyle. One of the toughest parts of bodybuilding is finding the balance between shredding and building at the same time. So how do you find that perfect balance between massive and cut? Fortunately there are a few often-overlooked, but simple tricks; they are unquestionably the most important things any serious lifter must to do – the surprisingly simple steps to radically improving your insulin sensitivity! Developing a lean, muscular physique without first taking into account the many ways insulin sensitivity can be improved is like trying to run a marathon with no aerobic conditioning: you will fail. Insulin sensitivity is one of the crucial parts of bodybuilding to go the distance and developing a head-turning appearance. Insulin Sensitivity The regulation of blood sugar is one of the most important bodily processes for both general health and wellbeing, and muscle-building. Blood sugar is regulated through the pancreas, which secretes insulin whenever a certain amount of sugar is detected in the blood. Once released, insulin stimulates the absorption of sugar into muscle and fat cells; think of insulin like a key that opens the door for glucose. Decent insulin sensitivity encourag Continue reading >>

Why Does Physical Exercise Improve Insulin Sensitivity, The Role Of Adipose Tissue?

Why Does Physical Exercise Improve Insulin Sensitivity, The Role Of Adipose Tissue?

Modern lifestyle diminished significantly the need of everyday exercise, which is probably one of the major factors leading to the development of several metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes, hypertension and atherosclerosis with its deadly consequences. Epidemiological studies proved that higher levels of cardio-respiratory fitness are associated with lower mortality irrespective of fat stores. Physical activity reduces all-cause, cardiovascular as well as cancer associated mortality. Beneficial effects of exercise on insulin sensitivity have been demonstrated in a short term as well as following a longer periods of physical activity. Short-term effects are detectable even after a single bout of exercise and are mediated mostly by the metabolic changes in insulin signalling and substrate fluxes inside the muscle tissue. Especially modifications in fatty acid metabolism related to decreased intracellular accumulation of intermediary metabolites interfering with insulin signalling have strong impact on improved muscle insulin sensitivity. In a longer perspective, physical activity modifies gene expression of key proteins involved in a regulation of insulin signalling, glucose transport and substrate metabolism in muscle (GLUT4, glycogen synthesis) leading to an improved glucose tolerance. Moreover, regular physical activity has been shown to change the metabolism of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue is potent endocrine organ producing several proteins collectively called ‘adipokines’, several of which regulate insulin sensitivity in a negative while others in a positive way. Modification of gene expression and production of adipokines represents another possibility, how exercise improves insulin sensitivity, decrease pro-inflammatory state and mediate its wide s Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

What medical conditions are associated with insulin resistance? While the metabolic syndrome links insulin resistance with abdominal obesity, elevated cholesterol, and high blood pressure; several other medical other conditions are specifically associated with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance may contribute to the following conditions: Type 2 Diabetes: Overt diabetes may be the first sign insulin resistance is present. Insulin resistance can be noted long before type 2 diabetes develops. Individuals reluctant or unable to see a health-care professional often seek medical attention when they have already developed type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Fatty liver: Fatty liver is strongly associated with insulin resistance. Accumulation of fat in the liver is a manifestation of the disordered control of lipids that occurs with insulin resistance. Fatty liver associated with insulin resistance may be mild or severe. Newer evidence suggests fatty liver may even lead to cirrhosis of the liver and, possibly, liver cancer. Arteriosclerosis: Arteriosclerosis (also known as atherosclerosis) is a process of progressive thickening and hardening of the walls of medium-sized and large arteries. Arteriosclerosis is responsible for: Other risk factors for arteriosclerosis include: High levels of "bad" (LDL) cholesterol Diabetes mellitus from any cause Family history of arteriosclerosis Skin Lesions: Skin lesions include increased skin tags and a condition called acanthosis nigerians (AN). Acanthosis nigricans is a darkening and thickening of the skin, especially in folds such as the neck, under the arms, and in the groin. This condition is directly related to the insulin resistance, though the exact mechanism is not clear. Acanthosis nigricans is a cosmetic condition strongly Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Decrease Insulin Resistance

5 Ways To Decrease Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance disrupts our ability to effectively regulate our sugar intake. This can lead to health problems such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Read on to discover 5 ways you can decrease insulin resistance. A significant genetic contribution has been identified for insulin resistance [R]. Go to SelfDecode to learn how you can have your own genetic makeup investigated for insulin-related mutations. The problem isn’t insulin, but rather insulin resistance. If you are insulin resistant your brain will not get the message that insulin is trying hard to convey (that you have high levels of sugar in your blood stream). In this way, insulin resistance promotes hunger. You eat and insulin is released, but your body tells you to eat some more despite the ability of insulin to act as a satiety hormone. Hence why obesity is linked to brain insulin resistance (R). When rats had their brain insulin receptors removed, they ate more, developed insulin resistance, and became obese [R]. There is a correlation between insulin resistance and fat accumulation in the liver [R]. Insulin resistance was shown to be directly correlated to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in a literature review [R]. Elevated blood free fatty acids (FFA) were shown to cause insulin resistance [R]. In diabetics, insulin resistance was shown to severely inhibit a marker for muscular performance (glycogen synthesis and uptake) [R]. Also, waist and thigh circumference (predictors of insulin resistance) were negatively correlated with the percentage of type 1 muscle fibers [R]. When rats were fed a high-fat diet insulin resistance occurred first in fat and liver tissue than in muscle tissue [R]. In prediabetic subjects, insulin resistance was linked to atherogenic changes [R]. TNF-a levels we Continue reading >>

Testosterone Increasing Insulin Sensitivity

Testosterone Increasing Insulin Sensitivity

A known link between low testosterone levels and decreased insulin sensitivity could lead to a treatment for men with type 2. New study shows that increasing testosterone levels can help male patients with type 2 diabetes increase their response to insulin. In individuals with insulin resistance, their body produces insulin, but does not effectively utilize their insulin. Insulin resistance leads to a build up of glucose in the blood rather than being absorbed by the cells. Ultimately, insulin resistance can lead to diabetes as well as other health issues such as heart disease. Testosterone is a hormone that regulates many functions of the body. During puberty, testosterone is responsible for muscle growth, deepening a man’s voice, and increasing the size of the genitalia. In adulthood, testosterone not only maintains a man’s muscles and bones but also his interest in sex. Testosterone levels begin to decrease after 30 years old, which is followed by a decrease in sex drive. Many men mistake the decrease in sex drive as them simply getting older. Researchers at the University of Buffalo conducted a double blind, placebo-controlled study of testosterone treatment in type two diabetic men. The study evaluated the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on insulin resistant men with type two diabetes and hypogonadism. The study recruited 94 men with type two diabetes with 50 being eugonadal, normal testosterone levels, while 44 had hypogonadism, low testosterone levels. Baseline lean body mass and body fat were taken prior to study. Subcutaneous fat samples were taken to assess insulin signaling genes. The men with hypogonadism were randomized to receive either intramuscular testosterone (250mg) injections or placebo (1mL saline) every two weeks for 24 weeks. The re Continue reading >>

25 Ways To Improve Your Insulin Sensitivity

25 Ways To Improve Your Insulin Sensitivity

114 Comments Insulin does a lot of important things for us. It pulls glucose from the blood and fritters it away into our cells to be burned for energy or stored as glycogen. It prevents hyperglycemic toxicity to neurons, pancreatic cells, the arterial walls and the generation of excessive levels of reactive oxygen species. It even promotes muscle protein synthesis and helps augment muscular hypertrophy, especially following resistance training. Clearly, we need insulin. Without it, we’d die, as type 1 diabetics readily do without an exogenous source. But insulin has other effects, like inhibiting the breakdown of body fat into free fatty acids for energy production. Although locking fatty acids into body fat sounds terrible, it isn’t evidence of insulin being malicious. Lipolysis is temporarily blunted so that we can burn or sequester the glucose coming in. Once the glucose is handled, lipolysis resumes. We oscillate between fat burning and glucose burning, seamlessly switching fuel sources when needed. Sure, we’re not burning any fat when insulin is elevated, but once our insulin levels normalize we’ll be back on track. When you’re insulin sensitive, this is pretty much how it works. You secrete enough insulin to get the job done, but not so much that you gain weight and stop burning fat. What if a person secretes too much insulin in response to a glucose load? What if, for whatever reason (and there are dozens of possible culprits), a person’s cells are resistant to the effects of insulin? What if, to remove the same amount of glucose from the blood, a person secretes twice or thrice the amount of insulin? What happens when insulin stays elevated? Lipolysis is inhibited to an even greater degree. Body fat becomes even harder to burn. Susceptible brain, ar Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance (IR) is a pathological condition in which cells fail to respond normally to the hormone insulin. The body produces insulin when glucose starts to be released into the bloodstream from the digestion of carbohydrates in the diet. Normally this insulin response triggers glucose being taken into body cells, to be used for energy, and inhibits the body from using fat for energy. The concentration of glucose in the blood decreases as a result, staying within the normal range even when a large amount of carbohydrates is consumed. When the body produces insulin under conditions of insulin resistance, the cells are resistant to the insulin and are unable to use it as effectively, leading to high blood sugar. Beta cells in the pancreas subsequently increase their production of insulin, further contributing to a high blood insulin level. This often remains undetected and can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes or latent autoimmune diabetes of adults.[1] Although this type of chronic insulin resistance is harmful, during acute illness it is actually a well-evolved protective mechanism. Recent investigations have revealed that insulin resistance helps to conserve the brain's glucose supply by preventing muscles from taking up excessive glucose.[2] In theory, insulin resistance should even be strengthened under harsh metabolic conditions such as pregnancy, during which the expanding fetal brain demands more glucose. People who develop type 2 diabetes usually pass through earlier stages of insulin resistance and prediabetes, although those often go undiagnosed. Insulin resistance is a syndrome (a set of signs and symptoms) resulting from reduced insulin activity; it is also part of a larger constellation of symptoms called the metabolic syndrome. Insuli Continue reading >>

A Simple Trick To Improve Insulin Sensitivity And Trigger Fat Loss

A Simple Trick To Improve Insulin Sensitivity And Trigger Fat Loss

Many things contribute to insulin sensitivity: training, single nutrients, exercise, lifestyle… You just can’t be lean and healthy without being sensitive to insulin. What is insulin sensitivity? Insulin sensitivity is simply how the body reacts to the physiological effects of insulin produced after a meal. Basically to be insulin sensitive means one requires smaller amounts of insulin to lower blood glucose levels than someone who has low sensitivity. One important thing to know is that all foods will stimulate insulin, but not equally. Fats have very little impact on insulin. While proteins only have a moderate one. Actually, some proteins like whey are more insulinogenic than white sugar. But those are more the exception than the rule. The foods that trigger the most insulin release are those that contain carbohydrates in the form of sugar and starches. What does elevated insulin do to your body? Well, too much insulin, too often, over a too long period of time lead to fat gain, obesity and insulin resistance. This is the preliminary stage of type 2 diabetes. So you want to lose fat faster? Work on improving your insulin resistance. Of course, having a stable blood sugar is essential for health as well. A simple dietary intervention Science has identified one very simple and underestimated food to both reduce your insulin response to high carb meals and lose body fat. Acetic acid, otherwise known as plain old vinegar. Studies on rats (1) have recently made interesting headway into explaining the mechanism of action. In addition, human trials have proven that vinegar consumption is not just useful in the animal models. The very first study on the metabolic impact of vinegar dates as far back as 1988 (2). Since then, many studies have followed that concentrated on Continue reading >>

Diet Tips To Improve Insulin Resistance

Diet Tips To Improve Insulin Resistance

Insulin is a hormone that helps the body absorb glucose, keeping blood sugar levels in balance. Insulin resistance makes it harder for glucose to be absorbed. This causes problems for muscles, fat, and the liver, as they need glucose (sugar). Over time, insulin resistance can cause high blood sugar levels and damage cells. Insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes. People with insulin resistance are often diagnosed with prediabetes. They may need extra checks to make sure they don't develop diabetes. Diet and other lifestyle choices can increase the risks related to insulin resistance. Making diet changes can reduce insulin insensitivity. This reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes and the health problems that go with it. Contents of this article: Understanding insulin resistance Glucose is a vital source of energy for the body. However, many of the body's cells can't absorb glucose on their own. The pancreas secretes insulin into the bloodstream. It joins up with glucose, and travels to the body's cells, where it attaches to insulin receptors. Insulin allows the cells to absorb glucose, making sure that: blood sugar levels remain at a safe level muscle, fat, liver, and other cells are able to get energy Insulin resistance makes cells less sensitive to insulin. This means the body has to produce more insulin to keep blood sugar levels healthy. If the pancreas is unable to keep up with the increased demand for insulin, blood sugar levels go up. When this happens, cells can't use all of the excess glucose in the blood. This leads to type 2 diabetes. Diet tips Following a healthful diet plan, such as the Mediterranean Diet, can improve insulin sensitivity. This diet recommends eating lots of seasonal plant-based foods, having fruit as a dessert, and olive oil as the main Continue reading >>

Increasing Insulin Sensitivity Is The Key To Fat Loss

Increasing Insulin Sensitivity Is The Key To Fat Loss

When formulating a diet, one of the most important goals you should have in mind is to improve your insulin sensitivity. What is insulin sensitivity? To fully understand what it is, let’s discuss insulin and its function. Insulin is a storage hormone. After you eat a meal, your body converts the carbohydrates into glucose. This glucose circulates the bloodstream and is used by all the cells in your body. Insulin is the hormone that stores the extra glucose that your body doesn’t use. Your body has a limited capacity to store glycogen. A typical male will be able to store around 500 grams of glycogen. In case you didn’t know, glycogen is what’s formed from glucose. When your body can no longer store anymore glycogen, the excess glucose is taken up by insulin and stored as fat. Insulin sensitivity has to do with how well your cells respond to insulin. People that are highly insulin sensitive require very little insulin to store carbohydrates. By reason then, people that are insulin resistant (type II diabetics), need larger amounts of insulin to shuttle those carbohydrates around. What this means is that when you have high insulin sensitivity, you are able to eat carbohydrates without such a large rise in insulin. When insulin is kept low enough, fatty acids can still be released. However, once insulin gets too high, fat loss comes to a halt. People that have bombarded their bodies with high-glycemic carbohydrates and processed foods over their lifetimes have become somewhat resistant to the effects of insulin. Therefore, when they eat carbohydrates, it causes a larger release of insulin. This inhibits the release of fatty acids. Higher insulin levels = more fat storage Read here to find out 10 ways you can improve your insulin sensitivity for better fat loss. Red Continue reading >>

Tip: Find Out If You're Insulin Sensitive

Tip: Find Out If You're Insulin Sensitive

Take control of this hormone to make sure you're staying lean and building only muscle. Here's how. Insulin is very anabolic. It's a hormone responsible for carb and amino acid delivery to the muscles for recovery and growth. So you need insulin, but you need to control it. Insulin sensitivity seems to be the most important factor dictating how the body will handle carbs. Chronic elevation of insulin can increase the rate of transport of fats and carbs into fat cells. Although initially insulin shuttles nutrients into muscle cells, chronic insulin elevation will cause the muscles to become insulin resistant and refuse to take up nutrients. The adipose tissues, however, are greedy little pieces of cellular machinery and continue to take up nutrients at a rapid rate. For those who have good insulin sensitivity, the body responds to carb intake with small insulin surges. Although the insulin surges are tiny, the cells are very responsive to that small amount of insulin and do a great job of becoming anabolic. Since lots of insulin can inhibit fat loss, the ideal scenario is to become very insulin sensitive so that only small amounts of insulin are required for anabolism, and so that those small amounts of insulin don't prevent fat loss. Some experts use very simplistic recommendations for testing insulin sensitivity, methods I disagree with. For example, I've heard the statement that if you have an apple-shaped physique or if you get sleepy after a carb meal then you're insulin resistant (insensitive). These are way too non-specific and tell you very little about your nutrient needs or if you're making progress. I prefer methods that, although more time consuming, are objective. Objective Testing The first is a oral glucose tolerance test. For this you need to go to your l Continue reading >>

More in insulin