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Choosing A Needle To Inject Insulin: What’s The Difference?

Choosing A Needle To Inject Insulin: What’s The Difference?

For a person with diabetes who is beginning insulin therapy, the range of products can be overwhelming. The options are often limited by the patient’s healthcare plan, however, and the initial selection of a product is frequently influenced by the healthcare provider. With diabetes education tailored to the individual patient, the delivery of insulin through a particular device is achieved by teaching proper injection technique and selecting an appropriate needle. Because people using insulin to manage their diabetes prefer a painless, easy-to-use, and affordable device, manufacturers have worked to improve the injection experience. Over the past 25 years, needle size has evolved from a 16-mm (length), 27-gauge (thickness) needle in 1985, to a 4-mm, 32-gauge needle in 2010. A shorter, thinner needle reduces pain and anxiety during insulin injection. But does this type of needle work as well as a bigger needle, especially in people with more body fat? One concern when using a thin, short needle is whether or not the tip of the needle actually gets through the skin to deliver the full dose of insulin into the fat layer. For a long time, skin thickness has been a factor in product selection. The tendency has been to choose a larger needle for larger patients, using the skin-pinch method of injection to prevent intramuscular administration and subsequent pain and variable glycemic control. Recently, a study was conducted using ultrasound to measure the skin thickness at four injection sites in 338 patients with diabetes. Patients ranged in age from 18 to 85 years, and their BMIs ranged from 19.4 to 64.5 kg/m2. Investigators found minimal variation in skin thickness according to age, gender, race, and body mass. Most patients had a skin thickness of less than 2.8 mm, with Continue reading >>

Pen Needles

Pen Needles

If you or someone you know has diabetes, you’re not alone. Millions of Americans are living with it. And of those, about 15% use medicine that’s injected. Vials and syringes used to be the most common way to inject. But today, many injectable diabetes medicines come in prescription pens, also called prefilled pens. Here, we will focus on the needles that are used with those pens. Choosing a pen needle Today's pen needles are designed to fit most prefilled pens. But, there are other things to consider when choosing a pen needle. Talk with your health care provider; together you can decide which needle works best for you. To learn more about Novo Nordisk’s line of needles and to find the pen needle that’s right for you, click here. Today’s needles are shorter and thinner People who have never self-injected may have concerns about doing so and that’s understandable. But pen needles have come a long way from the ones first launched in 1985. Since then, injection comfort has driven needle technology, making the needles used today shorter and thinner than the ones used in the past. Understanding needle size Pen needles come in all different sizes. The size of a needle is indicated by 2 factors—length and gauge (G): Needle length is measured in millimeters. Lengths range anywhere from 12.7 mm to 4 mm, the shortest insulin pen needle currently available Understanding gauge can be a little tricky. The gauge of a needle refers to its thickness. You would think the higher the number, the thicker the needle, but it’s actually the opposite. The higher the number, the thinner the needle is. For example, a 32G needle is thinner than a 27G needle Always use a new needle for each injection You run the risk of infection from reusing needles. The more you reuse a needle, t Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen Needles

Insulin Pen Needles

Tweet Insulin pen needles and disposable syringes come in a variety of lengths and widths to suit all body types. Needles used to be long and sharp, but due to evolutions in technology, needles are now small, thin and quite often pain-free. From 12mm to 4mm, the needle length you choose is likely to be dictated by your size. Children will likely benefit from the shorter 6mm size. Your healthcare team should be able to advise you on which is best your body shape. When it comes to injecting, it is essential to get the right kit and use the right technique to reduce any pain. Hence, be careful not to fall into sloppy habits, such as failing to rotate your insulin injection sites as this might lead to irritation and soreness. Insulin needle guides Read product guides from Sue Marshall with user reviews for insulin needles and accessories. You can buy pens, needles and accessories from the Diabetes Shop. Use needles correctly Make sure that along with rotating injection sites, you follow these rules for using needles correctly. Use new needles either for every injection or at least change them once a day. Do not inject through clothing (or only very rarely). If you’re an ‘old hand’ at injecting, you might benefit from a quick refresher on how to inject to make sure you’re doing it correctly. Needles ranges fit on most insulin pens Most needle ranges fit on most insulin injection pens, including all Novo Nordisk and Eli Lilly pens (Novopens and Humapens) as well as the Autopen range from Owen Mumford. All of these needles are available on prescription. Gauges and needle length The measurements of needles relate to how long the needle is. When a needles measurement is 31G, the G (or g) refers to the gauge of the needle. This donates the thickness, size, or capacity. Th Continue reading >>

Bd Insulin Syringe With Bd Ultra-fine™ 6mm Needle

Bd Insulin Syringe With Bd Ultra-fine™ 6mm Needle

Choose the syringe that makes a difference they can feel The BD insulin syringe with the BD Ultra-Fine™ 6mm needle features our shortest insulin syringe needle, at 53% shorter than the 12.7-mm needle. This length is supported by the latest recommendations published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings that advocate using the shortest needle first-line for all patient categories.1* In fact, in a 2010 study, 80% of patients preferred shorter needles compared to 8-mm and 12.7-mm needles.2 They also deliver insulin into the subcutaneous tissue, reducing the risk of painful intramuscular (IM) injection.3 Testimonial Videos How to Inject With Insulin Syringes Videos Continue reading >>

Giving An Insulin Injection

Giving An Insulin Injection

Your health care provider or a certified diabetes educator (CDE) will teach you all of these steps, watch you practice, and answer your questions. You may take notes to remember the details. Know the name and dose of each medicine to give. The type of insulin should match the type of syringe: Standard insulin contains 100 units in 1 mL. This is also called U-100 insulin. Most insulin syringes are marked for giving you U-100 insulin. Every notch on a standard 1 mL insulin syringe is 1 unit of insulin. More concentrated insulins are now available. These include U-500 and U-300. Because U-500 syringes may be difficult to find, your provider may give you instructions for using U-500 insulin with U-100 syringes. Insulin syringes or concentrated insulin are now widely available. DO NOT mix or dilute their concentrated insulin with any other insulin. Some types of insulin can be mixed with each other in one syringe, but many cannot be mixed. Check with your provider or pharmacist about this. Other general tips: Always use the same brands and types of supplies. DO NOT use expired insulin. Insulin should be given at room temperature. If you had it in the refrigerator or cooler bag, take it out 30 minutes before the injection. Once you have started using a vial of insulin, it can be kept at room temperature for a month. Gather your supplies: insulin, needles, syringes, alcohol wipes, and a container for used needles and syringes. To fill a syringe with one type of insulin: Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry them well. Check the insulin bottle label. Make sure it is the right insulin. Make sure it is not expired. The insulin should not have any clumps on the sides of the bottle. If it does, throw it out and get another bottle. Intermediate-acting insulin (N or NPH) is cloudy Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Take Insulin

8 Ways To Take Insulin

How to take insulin Need insulin? While the drug itself may be old—nearly 90 years to be exact—there’s lots of new things happening when it comes to ways to take it. From the old-fashioned needle and syringe to injector pens to pumps, you’ve got choices to make. There’s even a plethora of devices that can help you inject if you have poor vision or mobility issues. Check out these eight options and talk with your certified diabetes educator to determine which insulin delivery system or injection aids are right for you. Needle and syringe With this type of delivery system, you insert a needle into a vial, draw up the appropriate amount of insulin, and then inject into the subcutaneous space—the tissue just under your skin. Here are 5 types of insulin and 9 factors that affect how insulin works. Even though there are other options, needles and syringes remain the most common way to take insulin. Some of the new insulin injection methods, such as the insulin pen, carry only a preset amount of insulin. Thinner needles and other advancements, such as syringe magnifiers, have made syringes easier to use. Syringe magnifier Have poor vision? You’re not alone. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20–74 years. Needle guides can help you keep the syringe or pen steady at the desired location and at the correct angle both for drawing up insulin out of the vial and injecting. Some needle guides also come with magnifiers, which help by enlarging the numbers and allowing you to read the fine print and dosages on the syringe. Syringe-filling device These devices are another example of innovations designed to help make insulin needles more palatable. Syringe-filling devices allow a person Continue reading >>

Syringe

Syringe

Disposable syringe with needle, with parts labelled: plunger, barrel, needle adaptor, needle hub, needle bevel, needle shaft. A typical plastic medical syringe, fitted with a detachable stainless steel needle. According to the World Health Organisation, about 90% of the medical syringes are used to administer drugs, 5% for vaccinations and 5% for other uses such as blood transfusions.[1] A syringe is a simple reciprocating pump consisting of a plunger (though in modern syringes it's actually a piston) that fits tightly within a cylindrical tube called a barrel[2]. The plunger can be linearly pulled and pushed along the inside of the tube, allowing the syringe to take in and expel liquid or gas through a discharge orifice at the front (open) end of the tube. The open end of the syringe may be fitted with a hypodermic needle, a nozzle or a tubing to help direct the flow into and out of the barrel. Syringes are frequently used in clinical medicine to administer injections, infuse intravenous therapy into the bloodstream, apply compounds such as glue or lubricant, and draw/measure liquids. The word "syringe" is derived from the Greek σύριγξ (syrinx, meaning "tube") via back-formation of a new singular from its Greek-type plural "syringes" (σύριγγες). Medical syringes[edit] See also: Hypodermic needle The threads of the Luer lock tip of this 12mL disposable syringe keep it securely connected to a tube or other apparatus. An old glass syringe. Sectors in the syringe and needle market include disposable and safety syringes, injection pens, needleless injectors, insulin pumps, and specialty needles.[3] Hypodermic syringes are used with hypodermic needles to inject liquid or gases into body tissues, or to remove from the body. Injecting of air into a blood vessel i Continue reading >>

How To Take Insulin And Needles On A Plane

How To Take Insulin And Needles On A Plane

Step 1 Visit your physician four to six weeks before taking your trip. Show your physician your flight itinerary to show time zone changes, arrival and departure times, and flight durations to determine whether you need a change in your pill or insulin regimen. Ask your physician for extra prescriptions in case you lose your medication on the plane or during your trip. Step 2 Tell the TSA security officer that you have diabetes and are carrying needles and insulin in your carry-on bag. If you are wearing an insulin pump, notify the security officer that you have an insulin pump and you will need a visual inspection of your pump and pat-down instead of going through the walk-through metal detector. Explain to the officer that you cannot remove the insulin pump as it is under your skin with a needle. Step 3 Show proof that a physician prescribed your insulin and needles. Provide a professional, preprinted pharmaceutical label identifying the medication. Travel with your original insulin box and glucose meter that shows the pharmaceutical label. Step 4 Protect your medication by packing your diabetes supplies and medication in a carry-on bag to keep you from losing your items. Ask if you can refrigerate your insulin while on the plane or store it in a thermos to keep it at a safe temperature. Keep any pills in a dry place to avoid moisture damage and never freeze the insulin vials. Keep all supplies and medication together for easy access in case you need it. Be sure and pack enough sharps disposal containers for storing used syringes. Pack more than enough insulin in case of an additional layover or unexpected trip extension. Wear a diabetes Medic-Alert bracelet in case of an emergency. Advise flight personnel or security officers if you are in need of medical assistance Continue reading >>

How To Read An Insulin Syringe

How To Read An Insulin Syringe

As with all medicine, it is important to take the right dose each time ​ ​​Injecting yourself with the right dose of insulin is very important. This is why you need to know how to read a syringe. ​ Parts of an Insulin Syringe An insulin syringe has three parts: a needle, a barrel and a plunger. The needle is short and thin. It is made of a special material that allows the needle to slide through the skin easily with less pain. It comes with a cap to cover and protect it before it is used. The barrel is the plastic chamber that holds the insulin. It is marked with lines (calibrations) on the side. The lines show you how many units of insulin you are injecting. The plunger is the long thin rod that slides up and down the inside of the barrel. Its function is to either draw the insulin into the barrel or push the insulin out of the barrel through the needle. It has a rubber seal at the lower end to prevent insulin from leaking out. The rubber seal is fitted in such a way that it matches the line on the barrel. Syringes are meant for one-time use. Once used, they must be thrown away in special puncture-proof containers. How to Know What Syringe Size to Choose Insulin syringes come in different sizes. Syringe Size Number of Units the Syringe Holds 0.25 ml 25 0.30 ml 30 0.50 ml 50 1.00 ml 100 The larger the syringe size, the more insulin it can hold. When choosing the size of a syringe, consider: the number of units of insulin you need, and how well you can see the line markings on the barrel. Go for the smallest syringe size you can for the dose of insulin you need. This is because the lines on the barrel of small syringes are further apart and easier to see. How to Read a Syringe When measuring the amount of insulin, read from the top ring (needle side), and not the Continue reading >>

Hypodermic Needle

Hypodermic Needle

For the theory on mass media effects, see Hypodermic needle model. "Hypodermic" redirects here. For the song by The Offspring, see Ignition (The Offspring album). Different bevels on hypodermic needles Syringe on left, hypodermic needle with attached colour coded Luer-Lok connector on right Hypodermic needle features A hypodermic needle (from Greek ὑπο- (under-), and δέρμα (skin)), one of a category of medical tools which enter the skin, called sharps,[1] is a very thin, hollow tube with a sharp tip that contains a small opening at the pointed end. It is commonly used with a syringe, a hand-operated device with a plunger, to inject substances into the body (e.g., saline solution, solutions containing various drugs or liquid medicines) or extract fluids from the body (e.g., blood). They are used to take liquid samples from the body, for example taking blood from a vein in venipuncture. Large bore hypodermic intervention is especially useful in catastrophic blood loss or treating shock. A hypodermic needle is used for rapid delivery of liquids, or when the injected substance cannot be ingested, either because it would not be absorbed (as with insulin), or because it would harm the liver. There are many possible routes for an injection, with the arm being a common location. The hypodermic needle also serves an important role in research environments where sterile conditions are required. The hypodermic needle significantly reduces contamination during inoculation of a sterile substrate. The hypodermic needle reduces contamination for two reasons: First, its surface is extremely smooth, which prevents airborne pathogens from becoming trapped between irregularities on the needle's surface, which would subsequently be transferred into the media (e.g. agar) as contami Continue reading >>

How To Sterilize An Insulin Needle

How To Sterilize An Insulin Needle

Many people on insulin for the treatment of diabetes try to save money on supplies, as daily injections of insulin, blood glucose testing strips, the glucose monitor and needles and syringes can be quite costly. Reusing insulin needles isn't recommended, as they are very fine and can blunt quite easily, making injections a bit more painful. While you can sterilize needles, consumers at home should know that doing so does not provide truly anti-bacterial protection, can dull the needle and destroy the internal integrity of the needle. Video of the Day Flame has long been believed to provide some protection against bacteria when it comes to sterilizing needles and other tools used in surgery over the centuries. While doing so may kill some of the bacteria found on the surface of a needle, it may not kill all of it, depending on your source of heat. However, if you hold the needle with tweezers, scissors or other tool over an open flame for approximately 15 to 30 seconds, you may kill some bacteria. Flame can be from a stove or a cigarette lighter, which will create a blackening of the needle due to chemical reactions of the metal to heat. Sterilize the needle with alcohol or bleach. Using a swab of cotton drenched in alcohol or bleach, swipe the needle through the cotton several times, taking care not to touch the tip of the needle and thereby destroying the sterile field before using. Or pour a small amount of alcohol or bleach into a clean, sterile glass and then drop the needle into the alcohol and allow to sit for about 15 seconds. You may also use alcohol wipes to sterilize the needle, taking care not to touch the pointed end of the needle prior to use. Boiling needles may provide better protection against bacteria, especially if the water reaches approximately 100 d Continue reading >>

Insulin: The Holy Grail Of Diabetes Treatment

Insulin: The Holy Grail Of Diabetes Treatment

Insulin is a hormone made by beta cells in the pancreas. When we eat, insulin is released into the blood stream where it helps to move glucose from the food we have eaten into cells to be used as energy. In people with type 1 diabetes, the body produces little or no insulin as the cells that produce insulin have been destroyed by an autoimmune reaction in the body. Insulin replacement by daily injections is required. In people with type 2 diabetes the body produces insulin but the insulin does not work as well as it should. This is often referred to as insulin resistance. To compensate the body makes more but eventually cannot make enough to keep the balance right. Lifestyle changes can delay the need for tablets and/or insulin to stabilise blood glucose levels. When insulin is required, it is important to understand that this is just the natural progression of the condition. RMIT University have produced a short overview of insulin, a drug that keeps in excess of one million Australians alive. Watch the video to understand why insulin is important and why so many Australians rely on it to stay alive. Copyright © 2015 RMIT University, Prepared by the School of Applied Sciences (Discipline of Chemistry). At this stage, insulin can only be injected. Insulin cannot be given in tablet form as it would be destroyed in the stomach, meaning it would not be available to convert glucose into energy. Insulin is injected through the skin into the fatty tissue known as the subcutaneous layer. You do not inject it into muscle or directly into the blood. Absorption of insulin varies depending on the part of the body into which you inject. The tummy (abdomen) absorbs insulin the fastest and is the site used by most people. The buttocks and thighs are also used by some people. While i Continue reading >>

Insulin Syringes

Insulin Syringes

An insulin syringe has three parts: a needle, a barrel, and a plunger. The needle is short and thin and covered with a fine layer of silicone to allow it to pass through the skin easily and lessen pain. A cap covers and protects the needle before it is used. The barrel is the long, thin chamber that holds the insulin. The barrel is marked with lines to measure the number of insulin units. The plunger is a long, thin rod that fits snugly inside the barrel of the syringe. It easily slides up and down to either draw the insulin into the barrel or push the insulin out of the barrel through the needle. The plunger has a rubber seal at the lower end to prevent leakage. The rubber seal is matched with the line on the barrel to measure the correct amount of insulin. Insulin syringes are made in several sizes. Syringe size and units Syringe size Number of units the syringe holds 1/4 mL or 0.25 mL 25 1/3 mL or 0.33 mL 30 1/2 mL or 0.50 mL 50 1 mL 100 Use the smallest syringe size you can for the dose of insulin you need. The measuring lines on the barrel of small syringes are farther apart and easier to see. When you choose the size of syringe, consider the number of units you need to give and how well you can see the markings on the barrel. A 0.25 mL or 0.33 mL syringe usually is best for children (who often need very small doses of insulin) and for people with poor eyesight. A 1 mL syringe may be best for an adult who needs to take a large amount of insulin. This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.© 1995-2015 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated. Continue reading >>

How Do Diabetic Needles And Syringes Work?

How Do Diabetic Needles And Syringes Work?

Diabetic needles and syringes allow you to administer injectable liquid insulin to yourself. If your doctor has prescribed insulin injections, a nurse or other healthcare professional will explain how to use diabetic needles and syringes properly. Diabetic needles come in various sizes and lengths. As the gauge or thickness of the needle increases the length decreases so that a needle with a higher gauge will be thinner. Gauge 31 is the thinnest insulin needle currently available. In general, thinner and shorter needles cause less pain during injection. The length of needle depends on your body shape and type. The most commonly used needle is a half-inch long, but children usually use a 3/16-inch needle. If you are overweight you may require a longer needle so that it can penetrate far enough under the skin to administer the correct amount of insulin. Syringes also come in different sizes to accommodate specific doses of insulin. The most common dosage of insulin is 100 units per milliliters of fluid (or, U-100) and is injected using a U-100 syringe. Regardless of size, the syringe will have a plunger that allows you to draw and inject the medication. If your diabetic needles and syringes can be reused, always sanitize them before using them again. Don’t reuse a disposable needle or share needles because of the risk of infection. Continue Learning about Insulin Injections Videos Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs. Continue reading >>

Using Insulin Pen Needles Up To Five Times Does Not Affect Needle Tip Shape Nor Increase Pain Intensity.

Using Insulin Pen Needles Up To Five Times Does Not Affect Needle Tip Shape Nor Increase Pain Intensity.

Abstract AIMS: Reusing insulin pen needles could help to reduce the increasing economic burden of diabetes. We tested the hypothesis that reusing insulin pen needles leads to needle tip deformity and increased pain. METHODS: Three blinded reviewers assessed 123 electron microscope pictures analyzing needle tip deformity of insulin pen needles used up to four times by diabetic subjects and up to five times by blinded non-diabetic volunteers. The estimated frequency of needle use was correlated to the actual number of needle use. Pain intensity and unpleasantness of each injection were measured by a visual analogue scale and their differences analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance. RESULTS: Unused needles could be differentiated visually from used needles. However, there was no correlation between the actual and guessed number of times a needle was used (r = 0.07, P = 0.2). Evaluating all 270 injections, neither pain intensity nor unpleasantness increased with repeated injections of the same needles in people with diabetes (P = 0.1 and 0.96) and in the volunteers (P = 0.63 and 0.92). CONCLUSIONS: Using pen needles four to five times does not lead to progressive needle tip deformity and does not increase pain intensity or unpleasantness, but could increase convenience and lead to substantial financial savings in Europe of around EUR 100 million/year. Continue reading >>

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