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How To Insulin Injection Pen

Insulin Injection

Insulin Injection

Insulin injection is used to control blood sugar in people who have type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not make insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or in people who have type 2 diabetes (condition in which the blood sugar is too high because the body does not produce or use insulin normally) that cannot be controlled with oral medications alone. Insulin injection is in a class of medications called hormones. Insulin injection is used to take the place of insulin that is normally produced by the body. It works by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. All of the types of insulin that are available work in this way. The types of insulin differ only in how quickly they begin to work and how long they continue to control blood sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to be injected subcutaneousl Continue reading >>

How To Use An Insulin Pen

How To Use An Insulin Pen

Instructions Use the following instructions when injecting insulin for diabetes. Do not mix your diabetes medicine with any other medicines. Where to give shots Choose an injection area in your abdomen, upper or outer thigh, the back of your upper arms, or your buttocks. Stay two inches away from previous insulin injections or other shots. Stay two inches away from your belly button or from any scar. Do not use sites that are bruised, tender or swollen. Inject the insulin in different areas to prevent scars. The insulin will also absorb into your bloodstream better. Your insulin pen has a dial which you set to give the right amount of insulin. You can see the right amount through the dose window. 1. Collect all of your supplies. 2. Wash your hands. 3. Clean your skin with an alcohol pad. Let the area air dry. 4. Take the cover off the pen. The insulin is already in the pen. 5. If you are using cloudy insulin, gently roll the pen between your hands to mix the insulin. 6. Wipe off the end of the pen with where the needle will screw on with an alcohol pad. 7. Peel off the paper cover on the pen needle. Screw the needle onto the pen. 9. Turn the dose dial to 2 (units). 10. Hold the pen so the needle is pointing up. 11. Push in the dose button at the end of the pen to clear the air out of the pen. (See drawing, at right.) You should see a drop of insulin at the tip of the needle. You may need to repeat steps 9 through 11 until you see the drop of insulin. 12. Turn the dose dial to the number of units of insulin you will inject. 13. Lightly pinch and hold your skin at the site you will be giving your shot. Push the needle straight in. The needle should be all the way into your skin. 15. Let go of the pinch of skin. 16. Pull out the needle. 17. Unscrew the needle from the pen. Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Take Insulin

8 Ways To Take Insulin

How to take insulin Need insulin? While the drug itself may be old—nearly 90 years to be exact—there’s lots of new things happening when it comes to ways to take it. From the old-fashioned needle and syringe to injector pens to pumps, you’ve got choices to make. There’s even a plethora of devices that can help you inject if you have poor vision or mobility issues. Check out these eight options and talk with your certified diabetes educator to determine which insulin delivery system or injection aids are right for you. Needle and syringe With this type of delivery system, you insert a needle into a vial, draw up the appropriate amount of insulin, and then inject into the subcutaneous space—the tissue just under your skin. Here are 5 types of insulin and 9 factors that affect how insulin works. Even though there are other options, needles and syringes remain the most common way to take insulin. Some of the new insulin injection methods, such as the insulin pen, carry only a preset amount of insulin. Thinner needles and other advancements, such as syringe magnifiers, have made syringes easier to use. Syringe magnifier Have poor vision? You’re not alone. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20–74 years. Needle guides can help you keep the syringe or pen steady at the desired location and at the correct angle both for drawing up insulin out of the vial and injecting. Some needle guides also come with magnifiers, which help by enlarging the numbers and allowing you to read the fine print and dosages on the syringe. Syringe-filling device These devices are another example of innovations designed to help make insulin needles more palatable. Syringe-filling devices allow a person Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens

Insulin Pens

Tweet Insulin pens are common in the United Kingdom, and are generally characterised by a different shape and the fact that they use an insulin cartridge as opposed to a vial. Some insulin pens use replaceable cartridges, and others use non-replaceable cartridges and must be disposed of after being used. Most insulin pens use replaceable insulin pen needles, which have become extremely short and thin. The replaceable cartridges for insulin pens come in 3 and 1 ½ ml sizes, although 3 is more common and has become dominant. Prefilled insulin pens are disposed of when the insulin within the cartridge is used up. Prefilled pens are often marketed for type 2 diabetics who need to use insulin. Insulin Pens Browse through our list of insulin pen reviews. You can also buy the insulin pens from the Diabetes Shop. Simply click on an insulin pen name to read the guide. How do I use an insulin pen to treat my diabetes? Using a pen is a relatively easy process. Some pens require gentle shaking before use. Once the cartridge is loaded, screw on a needle and prime the pen to clear air. Then dial in the exact dose that you require to deliver the insulin to the body. What is good about insulin pens as opposed to syringes? Insulin pens are very easy to use. They are great for young diabetics who need to deliver insulin at school. Furthermore, many diabetics find insulin pens almost painless. They are also portable and discreet, as well as not being as time-consuming as syringes. An accurate dose can be pre-set on the dosage dial, which can be useful for diabetes sufferers who also have impaired vision. Why might I not like insulin pens? Insulin pens are not right for 100% of diabetes patients. Insulin in pens and cartridges is generally more expensive than bottled insulin and syringes. Continue reading >>

So You’re Ready

So You’re Ready

Indication BASAGLAR is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. Limitation of Use Important Safety Information Do not take BASAGLAR during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin glargine or any of the ingredients in BASAGLAR. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle has been changed. Before starting BASAGLAR, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. BASAGLAR should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. The most common side effect of insulin, including BASAGLAR, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life threatening. Signs and symptoms may include dizziness or light-headedness, sweating, confusion, headache, blurred vision, slurred speech, shakiness, fast heartbeat, anxiety, irritability, mood change, or hunger. Do NOT dilute or mix BASAGLAR with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. BASAGLAR must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. BASAGLAR may cause serious side effects that can lead to death, such as severe allergic reactions. Get emergency help if you have: Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together w Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen

Insulin Pen

Two types of modern, pre-filled insulin syringes. An insulin pen is used to inject insulin for the treatment of diabetes. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas. It is composed of an insulin cartridge (integrated or bought separately) and a dial to measure the dose, and is used with disposable pen needles to deliver the dose. It was introduced and marketed as NovoPen by the Danish company Novo Nordisk in 1985. Types of pens[edit] A number of companies make insulin pens including Novo Nordisk, Aventis, Eli Lilly and Biocon. These companies produce pens for most of their insulins, including NovoLog/NovoRapid, Humalog, Levemir and Lantus. There are two pen systems: durable and prefilled: A durable pen uses a replaceable insulin cartridge. When the insulin cartridge is empty, the empty cartridge is disposed of and a new one is inserted in the pen. A prefilled pen is entirely disposable. The pen comes pre-filled with insulin, and when the insulin cartridge or reservoir is empty, the entire unit is discarded. Most brands of insulin are now available for use in pens, these include: NovoMix, NovoRapid and Levemir by Novo Nordisk Lantus and Apidra by Sanofi-Aventis Humulin and Humalog by Eli Lilly and Company INSUGEN and BASALOG by Biocon Global Patient Uptake[edit] Insulin pens are used by 95% of insulin-treated patients in Europe, Asia, Australia and Scandinavia with excellent results.[1] They are currently underutilized but growing in use in the United States. Insulin pens offer several significant advantages over insulin syringes: ease of handling, accuracy, and they are more discreet to use and easier to transport. To use an insulin pen[edit] How to prime an insulin pen. Screw or click on a new pen needle. If necessary, prime the pen to remove any air from the needle Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin is a hormone that helps cells use glucose (sugar) for energy. It works as a “key,” allowing the sugar to go from the blood and into the cell. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t make insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin correctly, which can lead to the pancreas not being able to produce enough — or any, depending on the progression of the disease —insulin to meet your body’s needs. Diabetes is normally managed with diet and exercise, with medications, including insulin, added as needed. If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin is required for life. This may seem difficult at first, but you can learn to successfully administer insulin with the support of your healthcare team, determination, and a little practice. There are different ways to take insulin, including syringes, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and jet injectors. Your doctor will help you decide which technique is best for you. Syringes remain a common method of insulin delivery. They’re the least expensive option, and most insurance companies cover them. Syringes Syringes vary by the amount of insulin they hold and the size of the needle. They’re made of plastic and should be discarded after one use. Traditionally, needles used in insulin therapy were 12.7 millimeters (mm) in length. Recent research shows that smaller 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm needles are just as effective, regardless of body mass. This means insulin injection is less painful than it was in the past. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, which means into the fat layer under the skin. In this type of injection, a short needle is used to inject insulin into the fatty layer between the skin and the muscle. Insulin should be injected into the fatty tissue just below your skin. If you inject the insulin deeper int Continue reading >>

Using Novolog® Flexpen®

Using Novolog® Flexpen®

Here is a quick guide to NovoLog® dosing using NovoLog® FlexPen®. Please read the full Instructions For Use that came with your FlexPen® carefully before using it. To see FlexPen® in action, watch the video below. FlexPen® Demo Video (7:05 min) This video shows you how to use your NovoLog® FlexPen®. NovoLog® FlexPen® should not be used by people who are blind or have severe visual problems without the help of a person who has good eyesight and who is trained to use NovoLog® FlexPen® the right way. Wash your hands. Check the label to make sure that you are using the right type of insulin. This is especially important if you take more than 1 type of insulin Pull off the pen cap. Wipe the rubber stopper with an alcohol swab Remove the protective tab from the needle and screw it onto your FlexPen® tightly. It is important that the needle is placed on straight Never place a disposable needle on your FlexPen® until you are ready to take your injection Pull off the big outer needle cap and then pull off the inner needle cap. Throw away the inner needle cap right away Always use a new needle for each injection Be careful not to bend or damage the needle before use To reduce the risk of needle stick, never put the inner needle cap back on the needle Small amounts of air may collect in the cartridge during normal use. To avoid injecting air and ensure proper dosing: Turn the dose selector to 2 units Hold your FlexPen® with the needle pointing up, and tap the cartridge gently a few times, which moves the air bubbles to the top Press the push-button all the way in until the dose selector is back to 0. A drop of insulin should appear at the tip of the needle If no drop appears, change the needle and repeat. If you still do not see a drop of insulin after 6 tries, do n Continue reading >>

Tips For Injecting Insulin

Tips For Injecting Insulin

Stomach: Stay at least two inches away from the bellybutton or any scars you may already have when using the abdomen for injections. Thigh: Inject at least 4 inches or about one hand’s width above the knee and at least 4 inches down from the top of the leg. The best area on the leg is the top and outer area of the thigh. Do not inject insulin into your inner thigh because of the number of blood vessels and nerves in this area. Arm: Inject into fatty tissue in the back of the arm between the shoulder and the elbow. Buttock: Inject into the hip or “wallet area” and not into the lower buttock area. When rotating sites within one injection area, keep injections about an inch (or two finger widths) apart. Do not inject into scar tissue or areas with broken vessels or varicose veins. Scar tissue may interfere with absorption. Massage or exercise that occurs immediately after the injection may speed up absorption because of the increased circulation to the injection site. If you plan on strenuous physical activity shortly after injecting insulin, don’t inject in an area affected by the exercise. For example, if you plan to play tennis, don’t inject into your racquet arm. If you plan to jog or run, don’t inject into your thighs. When injecting with an insulin pen, inject straight in and be sure to hold the pen in place for a few seconds after the insulin is delivered to ensure that no insulin leaks out. Continue reading >>

Autopen®

Autopen®

Autopen®: Makes the experience of injecting insulin as easy as possible, even for younger users or users with reduced dexterity. A reusable insulin cartridge delivery pen that is compatible with all pen needles, Autopen® has unique side firing mechanisms for easier injecting and handling. Its automatic insulin delivery means minimal force is required to deliver treatment, regardless of insulin volume, which makes it suitable for patients with low finger strength. Autopen® features a dose selector with audible clicks and visual indicators to ensure correct dosage is set. Assistive accessories are also available for Autopen® to provide an even easier injection experience for people with limited hand movement or grip and for greater control over dosage settings. Autopen® adaptive accessories include a release button extension and larger size dose selector adaptor. Autopen® is compatible with all major brands of pen needle and comes in two models, Autopen®24 for use with SANOFI insulin cartridges and Autopen® Classic for use with Lilly¹ and Wockhardt insulin cartridges. Benefits Simplifies the delivery of insulin injections Low force to inject and usability features make it effective even for users with reduced dexterity Suitable for all types of users 1. AC522/V10/1TF/01 (1998) Continue reading >>

Giving An Insulin Injection Into The Belly Using An Insulin Pen

Giving An Insulin Injection Into The Belly Using An Insulin Pen

Giving an Insulin Injection Into the Belly Using an Insulin Pen Attach needle to insulin pen Insulin pens are either reusable or disposable. You must put a cartridge of insulin in a reusable pen. Disposable pens come filled with insulin. After you are sure the pen has insulin, screw on a new needle. Get ready Remove the outer cap from the needle. Keep this outer cap. You will use it later to safely dispose of the needle. Remove needle cover Remove the inner cover from the needle. Be careful not to prick yourself. Prime your insulin pen following the manufacturer's instructions. Clean If you use alcohol to clean the skin before you give the injection, let it dry. Pinch up If you covered the needle with the outer cap, remove it now. Check to make sure that you have the right dose. Then, using the hand not holding the insulin pen, slightly pinch a fold of skin between your fingers and thumb. Stick it Push the needle all the way into the pinched-up area. Inject and wait Let go of the pinched-up area, and push the plunger of the pen all the way in. Count to 10 (or to the number that the manufacturer recommends) before taking the needle out. Recap Put only the outer cap back over the needle. The thin, inner cover is harder to put back on and you may stick yourself. Needle safety After covering the needle with the outer cap, unscrew the needle and throw it away in a sharps container or other solid plastic container. You can get a sharps container at your pharmacy. Don't share insulin pens with anyone else who uses insulin. Even when the needle is changed, an insulin pen can carry bacteria or blood that can make another person sick. This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this inf Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen Safety

Insulin Pen Safety

Insulin pens have become a popular way for diabetics to give themselves insulin. Insulin pens are available for multiple insulin types. However, as with any technology, pens can be misused leading to medication errors and inaccurate administration of insulin. Although an insulin pen is easy to use, certain precautions must be taken to assure proper use. Below is a list of safety tips to keep in mind when using an insulin pen: 1. Do not share your insulin pen with anyone: Insulin pens should never be used for more than one person. Using insulin pens on more than one person puts people at risk for infection with blood-borne pathogens such as hepatitis viruses and HIV, which causes AIDS, the agency warns. Infection can occur even if an insulin pen's needle is changed. We are aware of this happening in hospitals, where, for example, a nurse may not realize the risk. Pen needles are changed in between patients but the very same pen is used for multiple patients! This is dangerous because even if the needle is changed, it's still possible for insulin in the pen to become contaminated. Then, when subsequent patients are injected, there's a danger of passing along harmful bacterial or virus. 2. Do not withdraw insulin from an insulin pen cartridge Using insulin pens as "mini" insulin vials, by drawing up insulin into an insulin syringe, can lead to inaccurate dose measurement the next time the insulin pen is used for dose delivery. The reason for this is related to air entering the pen unintentionally, interfering with the proper mechanics of the pen. 3. Do not leave an open needle attached to an insulin pen Leaving an insulin needle attached to an insulin pen can lead to unintentional air entering into the insulin pen. If unintentional air enters into the insulin pen, it can c Continue reading >>

Levemir® Flextouch® Is Ready To Use In Just A Few Steps

Levemir® Flextouch® Is Ready To Use In Just A Few Steps

Levemir® FlexTouch®, a prefilled insulin pen with no push-button extension, requires low force to inject at all doses and is ready to use in just a few steps.a In fact, Levemir® FlexTouch® has up to 77% less injection force than Lantus® SoloSTAR®. From the makers of the world’s #1-selling prefilled insulin pen,b Levemir® FlexTouch® is: Accurate—Accurate dosing from 1 to 80 units Prefilled—Each pen is prefilled with 300 units of Levemir® Discreet—Fits in your pocket, purse, or nightstand On the go—Take it with you almost anywherec aPlease see the Patient Information for complete Instructions For Use. cOnce in use, Levemir® FlexTouch® must be kept at room temperature below 86°F for up to 42 days. Injecting with Levemir® FlexTouch® You may have concerns about using an injectable medicine for type 2 diabetes. But it’s important to realize the positive effect it may have on the management of your diabetes. And once you gain a little practice in giving injections on your own, Levemir® injections will become part of your daily routine. If you were given instructions from your health care provider on how to use Levemir® FlexTouch® and you have read the Instructions for Use in the Patient Information, you may be ready for your first injection. Your health care provider will tell you what dose of Levemir® is right for you and how many times to take it each day. Your dose may be adjusted based on your blood sugar. Please consult your health care provider prior to adjusting your dose. No compatible source was found for this video. Levemir® can be injected in the thigh, abdomen, or upper arm. It’s important to change the injection site within your injection area each time you inject and not inject into the exact same spot each time. Rotating where yo Continue reading >>

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. NovoLog® (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin therapy. The timing of hypoglycemia may reflect the time-action profile of the insulin formulation. Glucose monitoring is re Continue reading >>

Could Switching From An Insulin Pump To An Insulin Pen Injections In Anyway Improve My Control? Perhaps I Would Be Less Tempted To Just Eat Something.

Could Switching From An Insulin Pump To An Insulin Pen Injections In Anyway Improve My Control? Perhaps I Would Be Less Tempted To Just Eat Something.

You can achieve good control on a pump, by using insulin pens, or by other means of multiple daily injections (MDI). You can achieve lousy control on any of those methods of insulin delivery, as well. As others have mentioned, and as I assume you know since you’re now on a pump, being able to set variable basal rates via pump is a good way to really tailor your insulin delivery for tighter control depending on your body’s variable need for insulin throughout the day and night. I personally like the insulin pump the best out of all insulin delivery methods because of this basal rate flexibility, as well as the ability to set temporary basal rates when necessary to accommodate increased activity levels: with the ability to reduce my basal rates because I’m going to a Zumba class, or doing a long hike, or working in the garden all day—all activities that would normally result in pretty severe hypoglycemia—I’m able to skip all the heavy-duty snacking that I’d need to do to ward off that hypoglycemia. So that’s an example of how a pump actually helps to control how much I eat. But there are methods that work even better at appetite control, and they have nothing to do with how you’re delivering your insulin. I refer here to a low-carbohydrate diet that involves micro-doses of insulin to deal with a minimum number of carbohydrates. You might want to check out the work of Stephen Ponder, who invented the term sugar surfing and wrote a book about this method, wherein you dose your insulin in context of where your blood sugar is trending and why. A continuous glucose monitor comes in handy for this, given that it gives you a clear visual of where your blood sugar is headed, how quickly, and over how many hours it’s been trending in a given direction due to wh Continue reading >>

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