diabetestalk.net

How To Insert Insulin Pump Needle

Giving Insulin To Your Child With Type 1 Diabetes

Giving Insulin To Your Child With Type 1 Diabetes

Injections and finger sticks are part of life for a child with type 1 diabetes. We've got suggestions to make the process easier. Uncomfortable little jabs are now part of your routine, if yours is one of the 15,000 American children diagnosed each year with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Our experts suggest simple ways to reduce the discomfort, and help your child adapt quickly to needles. How insulin works When a child has T1D, the immune system attacks and destroys cells in the pancreas called beta cells. Pancreatic beta cells produce insulin, the hormone we need to turn food into energy. Without enough insulin, the amount of sugar (or glucose) in the blood rises to dangerous levels. This can cause long-term complications such as kidney failure, heart disease, lower-limb amputations, and blindness in adulthood. That's why kids with T1D have blood glucose levels checked throughout the day and night to help keep the sugar levels within target range. Using a lancet, you'll likely prick your child's fingertip for a drop of blood six or more times a day, and place it on a special test strip in a blood glucose meter. Based on that reading, you'll know how much insulin your child needs to keep blood sugar levels in range. Shots and pumps: the basics You can give your child insulin in a few ways, depending on what works best for both of you. The oldest method is through multiple daily injections with a syringe or insulin pen, which is a disposable needle tip placed at the end of a marker-shaped device that contains a pre-filled insulin cartridge. An alternative to injections is an insulin pump, a beeper-sized computerized device often worn on a belt or in a pocket. It delivers an ongoing low dose of insulin through a small tube inserted into your child's body through a needle. The t Continue reading >>

Insulin Infusion Set: The Achilles Heel Of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion

Insulin Infusion Set: The Achilles Heel Of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion

Go to: Introduction Insulin therapy by means of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) is a well-established therapeutic option.1–6 Since the 1980s, insulin pumps have developed into highly sophisticated infusion devices that provide infusion of different types of insulin boli.7 The most recent versions of these pumps have also integrated information management and advice functions. The traditional insulin pump is connected to the patient via thin, soft, and flexible plastic tubing. One end of this tubing is attached to a needle that goes through the skin into the subcutaneous (SC) adipose tissue. The needle is either a steel needle or a soft Teflon catheter, which is inserted at various angles through the skin. The other end of the tubing is connected to the pump’s insulin cartridge via a Luer-lock or proprietary connector. Once the set is attached to the skin, insulin is pumped through the infusion set into the SC area to induce a metabolic effect according to the wearer’s current needs. Lower infusion rates cover the basal insulin requirements, while higher rates (boli) are given to cover prandial insulin requirements and hyperglycemia. Insulin infusion sets (IISs) are available in a variety of different lengths, diameters, connectors, materials, and designs to meet the individual patient requirements. Another type of insulin pump that has been introduced into the marketplace is the so-called patch pump. The main difference between patch pumps and traditional insulin pumps is that these new pumps—with one exception—have no visible IIS. Typically, these patch pumps have a very short IIS, but it is completely inside the pump housing or within the base part of the modular designed pump.8 The adhesive that fastens the IIS to the skin is located on the Continue reading >>

Accu-chek Infusion Sets Product Support

Accu-chek Infusion Sets Product Support

These steps can be used with all Accu-Chek infusion sets which are compatible with the Accu-Chek LinkAssist Plus insertion device. For manual insertion instructions, please find specific instructions for each infusion set below. Please wash your hands before unpacking the infusion set. Insert the headset firmly into the insertion device, with the blue part of the adhesive backing paper pointing towards the blue safety release button. Ensure that you hear an audible click on insertion, this tells you that the cannula is correctly in place. Peel both parts of the adhesive backing paper away from the adhesive plaster. Hold the slider on both sides and pull it back until it stops. The introducer needle with the soft cannula snaps out. Position the insertion device on your chosen infusion site. Press against the skin, ensuring that the blue safety release is no longer visible. Press the release button to insert the cannula. Remove the insertion device. Press the adhesive plaster firmly onto the infusion site, ensuring that it makes good contact with the skin. Holding the white ridged sides, pull the needle box away from the body to remove. The introducer needle snaps back into the needle box automatically. Connect the primed tubing to the cannula. Before resuming insulin pump therapy, fill the soft cannula with 0.7U of U-100 insulin. For storage, pull the slider back to the original position. How to use the Accu-Chek FlexLink Plus and Accu-Chek Insight Flex infusion sets - manual insertion For assisted insertion using the Accu-Chek LinkAssist Plus insertion device, please follow the instructions above. Please wash your hands before unpacking the infusion set. Peel both parts of the adhesive liner away from the adhesive plaster. Push the blue button until it stops. The introd Continue reading >>

The Newest Infusion Set: Medtronic/bd Minimed Pro-set With Flowsmart

The Newest Infusion Set: Medtronic/bd Minimed Pro-set With Flowsmart

By Adam Brown and Kelly Close Much less painful insertion, great needle retraction, and better disconnection We recently received an order of Medtronic/BD’s new MiniMed Pro-Set with FlowSmart technology, a little over a week after the initial limited launch began in the US (At this time, Medtronic is no longer accepting new participation in the limited launch; a full rollout is expected in early 2017, according to BD's recent company update). Talk of the new insulin pump infusion set has focused on the novel catheter (cannula), which includes two holes for insulin to flow through. BD’s data suggests the additional side hole helps reduce flow interruptions and silent occlusions (blockages). Hopefully that will translate into fewer unexplained highs! This test drive shares a less-talked-about and exciting part of the new set: what it’s like to insert and wear it. We’ve experienced meaningfully less pain relative to using current sets (very noticeable and welcome!); an excellent needle retraction after insertion; a terrific eight-position tubing connector and two squeeze tabs that make it far easier to disconnect and reconnect; and very secure adhesive. The MiniMed Pro-set is also the same price as current infusion sets – nice to see no extra charge for new innovation. Adam ran into some hiccups in his initial trial of the set, stemming from incorrect insertion and not reading the instructions. After a couple manual insertions (without using an inserter device), Adam experienced potential kinking and some high blood sugars. Using the Quick-serter device fixed the problem, as it brought more reliable 90-degree insertion – we would highly encourage using this! In talking with BD, Adam learned that he was inserting the set incorrectly: manually inserting MiniMed P Continue reading >>

Guide To Infusion Site Management Infusion Set Basics And Site Management Dvd Inside!

Guide To Infusion Site Management Infusion Set Basics And Site Management Dvd Inside!

1 Table of Contents Disclaimer While every reasonable precaution has been taken in the preparation of this guide, no author, editor or publisher shall have any responsibility for errors or omissions, nor for the uses made of the materials herein and the decisions based on such use. This document does not contain all the information for proper care and treatment of people who manage their diabetes with an insulin pump. Individuals should check with their physician or diabetes healthcare team before implementing any changes to their diabetes treatment plan. No warranties are made, expressed or implied, with regard to the contents of this work or to its applicability to specific patients or circumstances. No author, editor or publisher shall be liable for direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential damages arising out of the use or inability to use the contents of this guide. This book is not meant to be a substitution for professional medical care. Always consult the healthcare team for treatment plans and recommendations. Guide to Infusion Site Management This guide is designed as a reference for healthcare Table of Contents Introduction.................................................................................................................. 3 Infusion Set Selection .............................................................................................. 5 Infusion Site Selection .............................................................................................15 Site Preparation ..........................................................................................................17 Infusion Set Insertion ...............................................................................................21 Disconnecting ................. Continue reading >>

Infusion Sets:

Infusion Sets:

1. MiniMed® Quick-set® Comfort and ease The Quick-set® infusion set is a popular MiniMed® infusion set combining ease of use with maximum comfort. It's virtually painless insertion with the Quick-serter® device, even in hard-to-reach areas, making it a great choice for children and adults of average to large build. The Quick-serter® insertion device is spring-activated to make Quick-set® insertions virtually painless with the press of a button. Features: 90° soft cannula, consistent insertion depth for optimal insulin absorption Comfortable, virtually painless insertions with the Quick-Serter® Convenient disconnection at the infusion site Additional Benefits All MiniMed® infusion sets, tubing and reservoirs are designed with an innovative MiniMed® connection for a more secure insulin delivery. Audible 'click' for a secured connection Silicon membrane for a watertight reservoir 4 vents in the connector for less risk of blockage and unintended insulin delivery. Tips Watch our video to see how to insert Medtronic’s most popular infusion set. It is recommended that you change your Quick-set® infusion set and reservoir every 48 to 72 hours. This enables better insulin absorption, helps reduce insulin degradation and prevents infusion set obstruction. Successful pump therapy relies on proper care and protection of the infusion site. Visit the Medtronic Insertion Site Management to learn more. 2. MiniMed® mio™ All-in-one convenience MiniMed® mio™ is the newest MiniMed® all-in-one infusion set, integrating the set and the insertion device in one single unit that comes in a variety of colours. Easy to insert and carry, MiniMed® mio™ is a great choice if you’re looking for a portable infusion set. Features: Integrated inserter, for virtually painless ins Continue reading >>

Starting On An Insulin Pump

Starting On An Insulin Pump

Tweet Starting insulin pump therapy can feel like stepping into a new world but many have found going onto an insulin pump well worth the initial effort. This is a guide to starting insulin pump therapy, the equipment you'll require, looking after your pump and adjustments to your routine. Starting insulin therapy When you first go on a pump you should have an induction day at your local clinic. For this you are likely to be in with a group of others also going on an insulin pump for the first time and you are also likely to be going on the same pump, as healthcare clinics tend to have contracts with one supplier. This is an advantage as it means you’re all in the same boat. In the presence of a nurse or other healthcare professional you’ll take the pumps out of their boxes and start to get familiar with all the equipment involved as well as how the pump works. Pump equipment The amount and variety of kit is different for each pump modal, but they all run along the same lines. Initially, this is the part that is the most baffling. Medical kit can often seem intimidating, not least because if often involves needles. Becoming familiar with your pump You will quickly become familiar with it when you start using it and you will have plenty of literature to refer to should you need a reminder of how to use a certain piece of the kit. You should also be given the number of someone to ring at the clinic as well as a number of the supplier, so if you really do run into trouble you can get advice 24-hours a day, and 7 days a week. Don't forget your needles If you’re going on a pump you may think you are leaving needles behind - which to a great extent you are. However, in order to get an infusion set put under your skin, you will need to use an inserter which will have a n Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Overview

Insulin Pump Overview

As people with diabetes know, keeping blood sugar levels in a safe range is extremely important. Good blood sugar control not only makes you feel well, but also helps prevent long-term diabetes complications, such as blindness, kidney failure and heart disease. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin, a hormone that helps the body use sugar (glucose), a key source of energy that comes from carbohydrates. If you have type 1 diabetes you must make up for the lack of insulin with insulin therapy. Meanwhile, people with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but their bodies don’t use insulin properly, or they don’t produce enough insulin. Diet, exercise and medication can often work to control glucose levels. However, in certain cases, these measures aren’t enough, and insulin therapy is needed to better control blood sugar levels. While insulin can be given by self-injection, people who take multiple daily injections of insulinmay also consider using an insulin pump. An insulin pump provides continuous delivery of short acting insulin all day long. The insulin pump substitutes the need for long acting insulin. A pump also replaces the need for multiple daily injections with a continuous insulin infusion, and also helps to improve your blood sugar levels. How Do Insulin Pumps Work? Insulin pumps are small, computerized devices that mimic the way the human pancreas works by delivering small doses of short acting insulin continuously (basal rate). The device also is used to deliver variable amounts of insulin when a meal is eaten (bolus). The basal insulin rates are usually set up in your pump with your doctor, and you can have one or multiple basal settings programmed in your pump, based on your needs. You program the amount of insulin for your mealtime bolus di Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Refill: In A Pinch.

Insulin Pump Refill: In A Pinch.

Usually, I am a thorough diabetes packer. Extra test strips? Yep. Back-up insulin pen? Yes, again. Glucose tabs? I have a WHOLE JAR and will share them with the plane. But today, I effed up my routine. I’m currently en route to Seattle for work and there are 59 units left in my insulin pump. To last me until Saturday night. This may not be quite enough. In my carry-on bag (no checked luggage because I tie my clothes into intricate, teeny pretzel-esque knots before shoving them into my suitcase), I have all of the aforementioned diabetes supplies but I forgot my vial of insulin. HOW? I’m usually so fastidious! Ish! Normally, I open a bottle of insulin and work my way through it over the course of however many weeks. While I’m using it, it sits in a makeup bag in my bathroom, along with some infusion sets and insulin cartridges. (One stop shopping – just reach my hand in and I come out with everything I need to do a site change. Convenient, especially if Birdzone is waiting [im]patiently for me.) Once the bottle is kicked, I throw it away and crack open a new one. (Not literally, though it has happened.) Whoops on that last part because I forgot to grab a new bottle and add it to the bag when I last filled up my pump. And in the wee early morning hours today as I left for the airport, I totally forgot to get a new bottle. So now I’m flying across the country with a half-filled insulin pump and only an insulin pen in my bag. Stupid forgetting things brain. Thankfully, there are some MacGyver‘ing options available to me. I do have a bottle of Levemir and a few syringes that I could use, alongside the pen of Humalog, and I could go off-pumping until I get back home. But I can also refill the insulin reservoir by pushing the refill needle into the top of the insul Continue reading >>

Infusion Set Comparison

Infusion Set Comparison

Although patch pumps applied directly to the skin are more available, most pumps infuse insulin from a pump reservoir through an infusion set. No single set works well for everyone, so choosing an infusion set can be difficult. The type of set shipped with a new pump is usually one manufactured by the pump company and this set may or may not be the best choice. Fortunately, there are many alternatives to choose from. Metal or Teflon: Today's straight-in metal sets offer fine gauge needles that are comfortable, reliable, and the easiest to insert. Teflon sets use a metal needle inserter that is removed after insertion, leaving only the Teflon tubing under the skin. Generally, the longer the Teflon, the more reliable the set. Slanted Teflon sets tend to be more reliable for many pumpers than straight-in Teflon Sets, but are generally best inserted by hand rather than with an automatic inserter. Length: Infusion sets come in different line lengths and different needle lengths. Typical needle lengths for straight-in sets are 6 mm for infants, 8 mm for a child, 10 mm for an adult, and 12 mm for larger adults while 13 mm and 17 mm serve similar functions for the slanted Teflon sets. Most infusion lines are 24, 31, or 42 inches in length. Shorter lines work better for small children and those who prefer a short line, while longer lines work well for those who are taller. Needle Gauge: Gauge is a standard way to measure diameter of a needle. A lower gauge means a larger needle. For example, 25 gauge is larger than 27 gauge. Connection Compatibility: Most infusion sets have a standard threaded luer lock connection that can be used on most pumps. The Medtronic Paradigm and the Sooil Diabecare pumps use their own proprietary connections, so these pumps work with only a limited num Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Take Insulin

8 Ways To Take Insulin

How to take insulin Need insulin? While the drug itself may be old—nearly 90 years to be exact—there’s lots of new things happening when it comes to ways to take it. From the old-fashioned needle and syringe to injector pens to pumps, you’ve got choices to make. There’s even a plethora of devices that can help you inject if you have poor vision or mobility issues. Check out these eight options and talk with your certified diabetes educator to determine which insulin delivery system or injection aids are right for you. Needle and syringe With this type of delivery system, you insert a needle into a vial, draw up the appropriate amount of insulin, and then inject into the subcutaneous space—the tissue just under your skin. Here are 5 types of insulin and 9 factors that affect how insulin works. Even though there are other options, needles and syringes remain the most common way to take insulin. Some of the new insulin injection methods, such as the insulin pen, carry only a preset amount of insulin. Thinner needles and other advancements, such as syringe magnifiers, have made syringes easier to use. Syringe magnifier Have poor vision? You’re not alone. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20–74 years. Needle guides can help you keep the syringe or pen steady at the desired location and at the correct angle both for drawing up insulin out of the vial and injecting. Some needle guides also come with magnifiers, which help by enlarging the numbers and allowing you to read the fine print and dosages on the syringe. Syringe-filling device These devices are another example of innovations designed to help make insulin needles more palatable. Syringe-filling devices allow a person Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump : How To Connect It To Your Body

Insulin Pump : How To Connect It To Your Body

When I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, all my doctors suggested that I get an insulin pump. At the time, the whole thing was new to me and just the thought of shots scared me! The thought of attaching something to me scared me much more. Especially since I had no idea how it was attached. I am not a fan of pain at all. So I told the doctors I was not interested in the pump then. I took insulin shots for about 3 years before deciding to research the insulin pump more. I was tired of the up and down blood sugar patterns I was having, and I’d heard that the pump provided a much more even range. I looked insulin pumps up online and found lots of information about how wonderful they are. I tried to find pictures of how you attached them to you, and I couldn’t find anything! I wanted to see pictures of how the process worked before I committed to it. How big was the needle? How did you get it in you? Did they just leave a needle in for the 2 – 3 days it was in before you changed it? Since I couldn’t find any photos, I took it upon myself to take pictures of myself going through the process. Maybe it will help some other scared type 1’s thinking about getting the pump and wanting to see some photos! I hope so! The first step is to gather the supplies you need. I use the minimed paradigm 722 insulin pump and they have the option of a quick-serter. It is a spring loaded gadget that you put the needle part of the infusion set into, and then just press it against your skin and push the tabs on the side and it quickly plunges the needle in. It rarely hurts. Most of the time I can’t even feel it. I know they have other options for putting the infusion set in, but this is the one I chose. Here is a photo of the quick-serter, humalog, new reservoir, new infusion set, a Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everyone needs insulin to live. Insulin is a hormone that helps our bodies use and store the food we eat. People with Type 1 Diabetes no longer make insulin and have to give insulin in order to sustain life. People with Type 2 Diabetes don’t use their own insulin well, and over time can have trouble making enough. So, all people with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes need insulin. When people give insulin injections, they may take 1-2 injections of a long acting insulin every day and 3+ injections of rapid acting insulin for meals and snacks. The typical person with Type 1 Diabetes could take anywhere from 4-7+ injections a day. Many people currently give insulin through an insulin pen or a syringe. But, there is another option, an insulin pump. An insulin pump delivers rapid acting insulin in two ways. First, the pump is programmed to give you insulin every hour throughout the hour referred to basal insulin. Basal, think “base,” is the insulin your body needs even in the absence of food, it is also referred to as background insulin. This basal rate replaces the long acting injection that you take. Second, is bolus, this is the insulin you take for food or to correct a high blood sugar. If you get basal and bolus confused, think “bowl”, as in you eat out of a bowl, to help you remember bolus is for food. Once you are on a pump, all insulin is delivered through the pump and shots are no longer necessary. Components There are a few things necessary to make a pump work. When a pump is shipped to someone: they will also need to send infusion sets, reservoirs, and possibly batteries, depending on your pump. Let’s talk about each component. Infusion Sets An infusion set is the part that is actually inserted into the body and has tubing that conn Continue reading >>

Insulin Delivery

Insulin Delivery

When people eat sugars and starches, the body breaks them down into glucose with the help of insulin, the hormone that gets glucose from the bloodstream into the cells of the body to be used as energy. However, for people with Type 1 diabetes and in some cases those with Type 2 diabetes, this process cannot happen without manually giving insulin subcutaneously, since the pancreas, (the organ that produces insulin) stops doing so. Insulin must be injected and infused into the layers of fat under the skin. There are quite a few different ways to deliver insulin, each with pros and cons, and it is up to the person with Type 1 and his or her doctor to decide what will work best. Syringes How it works: Before anything, it is important to wash your hands and clean the skin with alcohol. You’ll first need to uncap the needle of the syringe. Pull the plunger to fill the syringe with air. Insert the needle of the syringe into the vial of insulin. Draw the plunger until the appropriate dose of insulin is inside the syringe barrel. Holding the syringe upright, tap the syringe to release any air bubbles that may have collected in the barrel. Next, insert the needle into the skin using your index finger or thumb and push the plunger down until all the insulin has emptied from the barrel. Re-cap needle and dispose of in a secure sharps container. How to Give Yourself an Insulin Shot (with an animated video) How to Give Someone an Insulin Shot (with an animated video) How long it lasts: For one-time use and should be disposed of immediately following use into a sharps container Cost: $10-15 per box of 100. Price may vary based on insurance coverage. Pros: You don’t have the burden of a device attached to you. Cons: You have to carry syringe supplies and vials of insulin with you, Continue reading >>

10 Tips For A Fear Of Needles With Diabetes (+1 Bonus!)

10 Tips For A Fear Of Needles With Diabetes (+1 Bonus!)

back to Overview Tips & Tricks Type 1 It is what it is, right? When living with type 1 diabetes there's no getting around the jab of a needle. Whether it's from an insulin pen, a syringe or a pump infusion set, you have to do it. Ilka asked our team for tips on dealing with a fear of shots and needles, and here's what she found... For some, needles are no big deal. For others, each injection is a challenge to overcome – even after many years. The reasons are usually different, and no matter how necessary it is (we all know it, logically) who can criticize? Is there anything normal about stabbing yourself with a sharp metal object? I think not! We have a lot of diabetes experience here at mySugr, collectively more than 150 years under our belts. And who better to ask for tips and tricks for overcoming a fear of needles/needle phobia than a bunch of people living well with diabetes? 1. Injectors Clara: I didn’t do my own injections right away. The day where everything changed was when I watched another girl my age in the hospital do her own injection. I thought, “if she can do it, so can I!” But some time later I developed an “injection-crisis” again and used an injection device, which hides the needle completely, to help me get through it. 2. Build Confidence Marlis: I’ve been helping children with diabetes for a long time, and fear of needles is very common. It can really help if mom or dad offers to let the child inject them, or even put in a pump infusion set. When those little ones see that you trust them to poke you and that it doesn’t hurt when they put the needle in it builds a lot of confidence and trust. Another step is to watch mom or dad do an injection and see that it’s fine. I have often let the kids inject me and they were so incredibly pr Continue reading >>

More in insulin