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How To Insert Insulin Pump Needle

Infusion Sets:

Infusion Sets:

1. MiniMed® Quick-set® Comfort and ease The Quick-set® infusion set is a popular MiniMed® infusion set combining ease of use with maximum comfort. It's virtually painless insertion with the Quick-serter® device, even in hard-to-reach areas, making it a great choice for children and adults of average to large build. The Quick-serter® insertion device is spring-activated to make Quick-set® insertions virtually painless with the press of a button. Features: 90° soft cannula, consistent insertion depth for optimal insulin absorption Comfortable, virtually painless insertions with the Quick-Serter® Convenient disconnection at the infusion site Additional Benefits All MiniMed® infusion sets, tubing and reservoirs are designed with an innovative MiniMed® connection for a more secure insulin delivery. Audible 'click' for a secured connection Silicon membrane for a watertight reservoir 4 vents in the connector for less risk of blockage and unintended insulin delivery. Tips Watch our video to see how to insert Medtronic’s most popular infusion set. It is recommended that you change your Quick-set® infusion set and reservoir every 48 to 72 hours. This enables better insulin absorption, helps reduce insulin degradation and prevents infusion set obstruction. Successful pump therapy relies on proper care and protection of the infusion site. Visit the Medtronic Insertion Site Management to learn more. 2. MiniMed® mio™ All-in-one convenience MiniMed® mio™ is the newest MiniMed® all-in-one infusion set, integrating the set and the insertion device in one single unit that comes in a variety of colours. Easy to insert and carry, MiniMed® mio™ is a great choice if you’re looking for a portable infusion set. Features: Integrated inserter, for virtually painless ins Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump : How To Connect It To Your Body

Insulin Pump : How To Connect It To Your Body

When I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, all my doctors suggested that I get an insulin pump. At the time, the whole thing was new to me and just the thought of shots scared me! The thought of attaching something to me scared me much more. Especially since I had no idea how it was attached. I am not a fan of pain at all. So I told the doctors I was not interested in the pump then. I took insulin shots for about 3 years before deciding to research the insulin pump more. I was tired of the up and down blood sugar patterns I was having, and I’d heard that the pump provided a much more even range. I looked insulin pumps up online and found lots of information about how wonderful they are. I tried to find pictures of how you attached them to you, and I couldn’t find anything! I wanted to see pictures of how the process worked before I committed to it. How big was the needle? How did you get it in you? Did they just leave a needle in for the 2 – 3 days it was in before you changed it? Since I couldn’t find any photos, I took it upon myself to take pictures of myself going through the process. Maybe it will help some other scared type 1’s thinking about getting the pump and wanting to see some photos! I hope so! The first step is to gather the supplies you need. I use the minimed paradigm 722 insulin pump and they have the option of a quick-serter. It is a spring loaded gadget that you put the needle part of the infusion set into, and then just press it against your skin and push the tabs on the side and it quickly plunges the needle in. It rarely hurts. Most of the time I can’t even feel it. I know they have other options for putting the infusion set in, but this is the one I chose. Here is a photo of the quick-serter, humalog, new reservoir, new infusion set, a Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Overview

Insulin Pump Overview

As people with diabetes know, keeping blood sugar levels in a safe range is extremely important. Good blood sugar control not only makes you feel well, but also helps prevent long-term diabetes complications, such as blindness, kidney failure and heart disease. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin, a hormone that helps the body use sugar (glucose), a key source of energy that comes from carbohydrates. If you have type 1 diabetes you must make up for the lack of insulin with insulin therapy. Meanwhile, people with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but their bodies don’t use insulin properly, or they don’t produce enough insulin. Diet, exercise and medication can often work to control glucose levels. However, in certain cases, these measures aren’t enough, and insulin therapy is needed to better control blood sugar levels. While insulin can be given by self-injection, people who take multiple daily injections of insulinmay also consider using an insulin pump. An insulin pump provides continuous delivery of short acting insulin all day long. The insulin pump substitutes the need for long acting insulin. A pump also replaces the need for multiple daily injections with a continuous insulin infusion, and also helps to improve your blood sugar levels. How Do Insulin Pumps Work? Insulin pumps are small, computerized devices that mimic the way the human pancreas works by delivering small doses of short acting insulin continuously (basal rate). The device also is used to deliver variable amounts of insulin when a meal is eaten (bolus). The basal insulin rates are usually set up in your pump with your doctor, and you can have one or multiple basal settings programmed in your pump, based on your needs. You program the amount of insulin for your mealtime bolus di Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin is a hormone that helps cells use glucose (sugar) for energy. It works as a “key,” allowing the sugar to go from the blood and into the cell. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t make insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin correctly, which can lead to the pancreas not being able to produce enough — or any, depending on the progression of the disease —insulin to meet your body’s needs. Diabetes is normally managed with diet and exercise, with medications, including insulin, added as needed. If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin is required for life. This may seem difficult at first, but you can learn to successfully administer insulin with the support of your healthcare team, determination, and a little practice. There are different ways to take insulin, including syringes, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and jet injectors. Your doctor will help you decide which technique is best for you. Syringes remain a common method of insulin delivery. They’re the least expensive option, and most insurance companies cover them. Syringes Syringes vary by the amount of insulin they hold and the size of the needle. They’re made of plastic and should be discarded after one use. Traditionally, needles used in insulin therapy were 12.7 millimeters (mm) in length. Recent research shows that smaller 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm needles are just as effective, regardless of body mass. This means insulin injection is less painful than it was in the past. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, which means into the fat layer under the skin. In this type of injection, a short needle is used to inject insulin into the fatty layer between the skin and the muscle. Insulin should be injected into the fatty tissue just below your skin. If you inject the insulin deeper int Continue reading >>

In Par Tner Ship With Primary Children’s Hosp I Ta L

In Par Tner Ship With Primary Children’s Hosp I Ta L

Diabetes: Starting an insulin pump What is an insulin pump? An insulin pump is a small device that gives rapid- acting insulin. The insulin is given in small, steady amounts over the course of the day and night. This covers your basal insulin needs. It can also give a bolus dose of insulin to cover meals and correction doses. How does an insulin pump work? • Insulin is stored inside the pump. • The pump sends insulin to the body through a thin, flexible tube and a cannula. • The cannula is inserted into the skin with a needle. Once the cannula is in place, the needle is removed and the cannula is taped to the skin. The most common places to insert the cannula are the belly, upper arm, and upper butt cheek (buttock). To prevent infection, the pump site and cannula should be changed at home every 2 to 3 days. • The pump is worn in a pocket or Velcro pouch, on a belt, or on your waistband. • The insulin dose can be adjusted to cover exercise, carbs (carbohydrates), and sick days, as needed. An insulin pump only delivers insulin. It can’t check blood glucose (BG), and most pumps can’t adjust insulin doses on their own. You and your child will need to do this, and it takes some work to get it right. Why have an insulin pump? • Smaller insulin doses. • Improved blood glucose control during sleep or after exercise. • More flexibility managing meals and blood glucose. • Fewer injections. Is pump therapy right for me or my child? Pump therapy is not for everyone. Pumps work best for: • Children and families who know how to manage diabetes well. They will need to: – Test BG at least 4 times a day – Keep records of all BG readings – Show that they know h Continue reading >>

Infusion Site Management And The Accu-chekâ® Ultraflex Infusion Set

Infusion Site Management And The Accu-chekâ® Ultraflex Infusion Set

The ACCU-CHEK Ultraflex infusion set offers multiple cannula lengths to optimize fit for various infusion sites and body types, including a 6-mm cannula length for children and lean adults. Using your infusion set correctly helps you get the best results from your insulin pump therapy. Soft cannula Length: Priming volume: 6 mm ~1.0 U1 8 mm ~1.0 U1 10 mm ~1.0 U1 Tubing Length: Priming volume: 30 cm2 12 inches ~11 U1 60 cm 24 inches ~11 U1 80 cm 31 inches ~14 U1 110 cm3 43 inches ~18 U1 1 U 100 insulin 2 Only available with 6–mm cannula length 3 Not available with 6–mm cannula length Benefits of site rotation • Lower infection risk • Optimized insulin absorption • Reduced potential for fatty tissue overgrowth, scarring and variability in blood sugar levels Site-rotation frequency • When using soft cannula, rotate your site every 48–72 hours • If you are pregnant, rotate your site every 24-48 hours Rotate immediately if: • Your blood sugar level is unexplainably high or your pump sounds an occlusion alarm • You experience pain, irritation or bleeding at the infusion site • Ketones are present in your blood or urine • Blood appears in the infusion set tubing or around the cannula Unexplained highs1 • If you have two unexplained high blood glucose readings in a row: (A) Check for ketones (B) Take a correction dose of insulin via injection (C) Troubleshoot pump • Disconnect infusion set • Check luer-lock connection • Check for wetness along the infusion set • Check for insulin odor Change the infusion site and reservoir using a new bottle of insulin if problem is found 7/20 Curve PatternHorizontal Pattern Zigzag Pattern Crisscross Pattern Rotating your infusion site is ess Continue reading >>

10 Tips For A Fear Of Needles With Diabetes (+1 Bonus!)

10 Tips For A Fear Of Needles With Diabetes (+1 Bonus!)

back to Overview Tips & Tricks Type 1 It is what it is, right? When living with type 1 diabetes there's no getting around the jab of a needle. Whether it's from an insulin pen, a syringe or a pump infusion set, you have to do it. Ilka asked our team for tips on dealing with a fear of shots and needles, and here's what she found... For some, needles are no big deal. For others, each injection is a challenge to overcome – even after many years. The reasons are usually different, and no matter how necessary it is (we all know it, logically) who can criticize? Is there anything normal about stabbing yourself with a sharp metal object? I think not! We have a lot of diabetes experience here at mySugr, collectively more than 150 years under our belts. And who better to ask for tips and tricks for overcoming a fear of needles/needle phobia than a bunch of people living well with diabetes? 1. Injectors Clara: I didn’t do my own injections right away. The day where everything changed was when I watched another girl my age in the hospital do her own injection. I thought, “if she can do it, so can I!” But some time later I developed an “injection-crisis” again and used an injection device, which hides the needle completely, to help me get through it. 2. Build Confidence Marlis: I’ve been helping children with diabetes for a long time, and fear of needles is very common. It can really help if mom or dad offers to let the child inject them, or even put in a pump infusion set. When those little ones see that you trust them to poke you and that it doesn’t hurt when they put the needle in it builds a lot of confidence and trust. Another step is to watch mom or dad do an injection and see that it’s fine. I have often let the kids inject me and they were so incredibly pr Continue reading >>

Giving Insulin To Your Child With Type 1 Diabetes

Giving Insulin To Your Child With Type 1 Diabetes

Injections and finger sticks are part of life for a child with type 1 diabetes. We've got suggestions to make the process easier. Uncomfortable little jabs are now part of your routine, if yours is one of the 15,000 American children diagnosed each year with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Our experts suggest simple ways to reduce the discomfort, and help your child adapt quickly to needles. How insulin works When a child has T1D, the immune system attacks and destroys cells in the pancreas called beta cells. Pancreatic beta cells produce insulin, the hormone we need to turn food into energy. Without enough insulin, the amount of sugar (or glucose) in the blood rises to dangerous levels. This can cause long-term complications such as kidney failure, heart disease, lower-limb amputations, and blindness in adulthood. That's why kids with T1D have blood glucose levels checked throughout the day and night to help keep the sugar levels within target range. Using a lancet, you'll likely prick your child's fingertip for a drop of blood six or more times a day, and place it on a special test strip in a blood glucose meter. Based on that reading, you'll know how much insulin your child needs to keep blood sugar levels in range. Shots and pumps: the basics You can give your child insulin in a few ways, depending on what works best for both of you. The oldest method is through multiple daily injections with a syringe or insulin pen, which is a disposable needle tip placed at the end of a marker-shaped device that contains a pre-filled insulin cartridge. An alternative to injections is an insulin pump, a beeper-sized computerized device often worn on a belt or in a pocket. It delivers an ongoing low dose of insulin through a small tube inserted into your child's body through a needle. The t Continue reading >>

Insulin Delivery

Insulin Delivery

When people eat sugars and starches, the body breaks them down into glucose with the help of insulin, the hormone that gets glucose from the bloodstream into the cells of the body to be used as energy. However, for people with Type 1 diabetes and in some cases those with Type 2 diabetes, this process cannot happen without manually giving insulin subcutaneously, since the pancreas, (the organ that produces insulin) stops doing so. Insulin must be injected and infused into the layers of fat under the skin. There are quite a few different ways to deliver insulin, each with pros and cons, and it is up to the person with Type 1 and his or her doctor to decide what will work best. Syringes How it works: Before anything, it is important to wash your hands and clean the skin with alcohol. You’ll first need to uncap the needle of the syringe. Pull the plunger to fill the syringe with air. Insert the needle of the syringe into the vial of insulin. Draw the plunger until the appropriate dose of insulin is inside the syringe barrel. Holding the syringe upright, tap the syringe to release any air bubbles that may have collected in the barrel. Next, insert the needle into the skin using your index finger or thumb and push the plunger down until all the insulin has emptied from the barrel. Re-cap needle and dispose of in a secure sharps container. How to Give Yourself an Insulin Shot (with an animated video) How to Give Someone an Insulin Shot (with an animated video) How long it lasts: For one-time use and should be disposed of immediately following use into a sharps container Cost: $10-15 per box of 100. Price may vary based on insurance coverage. Pros: You don’t have the burden of a device attached to you. Cons: You have to carry syringe supplies and vials of insulin with you, Continue reading >>

Infusion Sets.

Infusion Sets.

The right infusion set can make all the difference. There are many types of infusion sets, so you can choose the one that best fits your body. The Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump can use virtually any insulin infusion set with a Luer-lock connection. Not every pump gives you this flexibility. inset™ II infusion set. 90 degree infusion set (90 degree angle of insertion) An all-in-one infusion set + insertion device combines the inserter and infusion set in a single, portable unit, so they are a snap to change anytime, anywhere. It has a friendly packaging to carry in a pocket or purse with a convenient, built-in-needle cover for after use. The introducer needle is removed so only the flexible cannula stays in place. The single- handed insertion placement and insertion for both inset™ II and inset™ 30 can be done one-handed. When removing the introducer needle, inset™ 30 requires holding the set in place with the other hand. allows for flexibility in site rotation, and the reversible grippers make it easy to disconnect and reconnect. You’ll feel safe knowing you are securely reconnected when you hear the audible “click”. Includes a disconnect feature at site and clear window to view site. inset™ II is compatible with all insulin pumps featuring a standard Luer-lock connection. Fill volume is 0.3 units for 6mm cannula and 0.5 units for 9mm cannula. Needlephobic patients, those with dexterity problems, patients with low vision or those inserting sets in areas that are harder to reach may prefer infusion sets with a mechanical insertion. inset™ 30 infusion set. Angled infusion set (30 degree angle of insertion) The world’s first angled all-in-one infusion set + insertion device in one single sterile unit. The introducer needle is removed so only the flexible Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health: Infusion Confusion For Insulin Pumps

Diabetes Health: Infusion Confusion For Insulin Pumps

I have noticed in online discussions about insulin pump therapy that prospective pumpers tend to be much more curious about pumps than they are about infusion sets. But once they start pumping, reality sets in: Getting a pump may be like climbing into the driver’s seat of your diabetes management, but finding the right infusion set for your body and your lifestyle is like putting the key in the ignition. You’re getting somewhere with insulin pump therapy only if the insulin is getting into you reliably and comfortably. What Is an Infusion Set? Infusion sets—small, thin hollow needles or plastic tubes that function like catheters to deliver insulin into the fat below the skin—are disposable. I’m on my fourth model of insulin pump, but I’ve gone through at least 1,100 infusion sets. Infusion sets can be divided into two main types: needle-cannula and plastic-cannula sets. Plastic cannulas are usually coated with Teflon, which keeps body tissue from adhering to the cannula and potentially obstructing the flow of insulin into the body. A cannula is a foreign object inserted into the body, so healthcare professionals and infusion set suppliers recommend inserting a new set every 72 hours to avoid infection and maintain optimal delivery of insulin. Most pump users insert into the abdomen, but the arms, thighs, buttocks and breasts can also be used as infusion sites. Not All Sets Are Created Equal Although insulin pumpers have many options when it comes to choosing an infusion set, some practical limitations exist. First, an infusion set needs a length of plastic tubing to connect the set to the insulin cartridge or reservoir that resides inside the pump. This tubing is usually included in the small package containing the set. A pump’s cartridge or reservoir can Continue reading >>

Infusion Set Comparison

Infusion Set Comparison

Although patch pumps applied directly to the skin are more available, most pumps infuse insulin from a pump reservoir through an infusion set. No single set works well for everyone, so choosing an infusion set can be difficult. The type of set shipped with a new pump is usually one manufactured by the pump company and this set may or may not be the best choice. Fortunately, there are many alternatives to choose from. Metal or Teflon: Today's straight-in metal sets offer fine gauge needles that are comfortable, reliable, and the easiest to insert. Teflon sets use a metal needle inserter that is removed after insertion, leaving only the Teflon tubing under the skin. Generally, the longer the Teflon, the more reliable the set. Slanted Teflon sets tend to be more reliable for many pumpers than straight-in Teflon Sets, but are generally best inserted by hand rather than with an automatic inserter. Length: Infusion sets come in different line lengths and different needle lengths. Typical needle lengths for straight-in sets are 6 mm for infants, 8 mm for a child, 10 mm for an adult, and 12 mm for larger adults while 13 mm and 17 mm serve similar functions for the slanted Teflon sets. Most infusion lines are 24, 31, or 42 inches in length. Shorter lines work better for small children and those who prefer a short line, while longer lines work well for those who are taller. Needle Gauge: Gauge is a standard way to measure diameter of a needle. A lower gauge means a larger needle. For example, 25 gauge is larger than 27 gauge. Connection Compatibility: Most infusion sets have a standard threaded luer lock connection that can be used on most pumps. The Medtronic Paradigm and the Sooil Diabecare pumps use their own proprietary connections, so these pumps work with only a limited num Continue reading >>

Choosing An Insulin Pump Infusion Set

Choosing An Insulin Pump Infusion Set

Choosing an infusion set can be just as demanding and time consuming as selecting your insulin pump. The right set can mean the difference between 72 hours of carefree pumping and hours of frustrating high blood glucose levels and numerous “needle sticks.” Many people never select their sets at all. Instead, not knowing they have a choice, they accept whichever set is included in the package when their pump is first shipped to them. Although all the sets perform the same function—delivering insulin into the fatty tissue below the skin—crucial differences can make one set preferable over another for different patients. Before you automatically accept the set in the box, consider the following: Type of needle There are two basic options: steel needle or plastic cannula. Although steel may not sound as comfortable as plastic, these needles do have certain advantages over Teflon caterers. They are small, easy to insert and do not require an insertion device. They also don’t bend or kink, which makes them an option for people who have a history of repeated kinked or bent catheters. Their ability to hold firm despite being jostled makes them a good choice for muscular, active people. Plastic catheters give you the option of 90 degree or angled insertion may produce less tissue trauma to the surrounding tissue when they enter the skin, are the catheters of choice for people with nickel allergies, and are widely available. Since many plastic catheter options come with an inserter, they work well for patents who are not comfortable viewing the needle Angle of Insertion Steel needles can only be inserted from a 90 degree angle but plastic catheters can be placed at either 90 degrees or 30-45 degrees. Using a plastic catheter angled infusion set usually ensures a firmer Continue reading >>

Starting On An Insulin Pump

Starting On An Insulin Pump

Tweet Starting insulin pump therapy can feel like stepping into a new world but many have found going onto an insulin pump well worth the initial effort. This is a guide to starting insulin pump therapy, the equipment you'll require, looking after your pump and adjustments to your routine. Starting insulin therapy When you first go on a pump you should have an induction day at your local clinic. For this you are likely to be in with a group of others also going on an insulin pump for the first time and you are also likely to be going on the same pump, as healthcare clinics tend to have contracts with one supplier. This is an advantage as it means you’re all in the same boat. In the presence of a nurse or other healthcare professional you’ll take the pumps out of their boxes and start to get familiar with all the equipment involved as well as how the pump works. Pump equipment The amount and variety of kit is different for each pump modal, but they all run along the same lines. Initially, this is the part that is the most baffling. Medical kit can often seem intimidating, not least because if often involves needles. Becoming familiar with your pump You will quickly become familiar with it when you start using it and you will have plenty of literature to refer to should you need a reminder of how to use a certain piece of the kit. You should also be given the number of someone to ring at the clinic as well as a number of the supplier, so if you really do run into trouble you can get advice 24-hours a day, and 7 days a week. Don't forget your needles If you’re going on a pump you may think you are leaving needles behind - which to a great extent you are. However, in order to get an infusion set put under your skin, you will need to use an inserter which will have a n Continue reading >>

Infusion Set

Infusion Set

An insulin pump and infusion set. The infusion set is shown loaded into a spring-loaded insertion device (the blue object). A reservoir of insulin is shown attached to the set, awaiting insertion into the pump. An infusion set, showing the insertion needle. The needle is withdrawn after the infusion set is inserted, leaving just the cannula (currently within the needle) inside the body. The infusion set loaded into an insertion device. The upper side of the above infusion set, showing the quick release. The outer collar is rotated to the blue arrow and removed, leaving just the cannula within the body and the plastic connector stuck to the skin. The connector seals when the outer collar is removed. An infusion set is used with an insulin pump as part of intensive insulin therapy. The purpose of an infusion set is to deliver insulin under the skin. It is a complete tubing system to connect an insulin pump to the pump user: it includes a subcutaneous cannula, adhesive mount, quick-disconnect, and a pump cartridge connector. Using an infusion set[edit] Firstly, the user must attach a reservoir of insulin to the set and connect it to the pump. The set is then "primed" - the pump pushes insulin quickly through the tubing and the cannula to ensure no air is in the system before insertion. Note that it is vital that the infusion set is not inserted into the skin when the set is being primed (as this could result in the accidental delivery of a large dose of insulin). The user then peels off the paper protecting the adhesive pad and carefully inserts the needle beneath the skin. The cannula is usually made of flexible plastic, which allows it to move without causing discomfort to the patient. The needle is pushed into the layer of fat below the skin, taking the plastic cannula Continue reading >>

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