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How To Inject Insulin In Arm

How To Give Yourself Insulin

How To Give Yourself Insulin

Expert Reviewed Six Methods:Monitoring Your Blood Glucose LevelsGiving Yourself Insulin Using a SyringeUsing a Pen Device to Inject InsulinRotating Your Injection SitesUsing Other Methods to Administer InsulinFollowing Recommended Safety PrecautionsCommunity Q&A Nearly three million people in the United States use insulin to treat either type 1 or type 2 diabetes.[1]. In people with diabetes, the pancreas does not produce enough insulin to manage the carbohydrates, sugars, fats, and proteins in your diet. The use of insulin in people that suffer from type 1 diabetes is an absolute necessity in order to sustain life. Many people with type 2 diabetes often reach a point where medication, diet, and exercise, are not enough to control blood sugar levels, and begin a regimen that includes insulin administration. The correct administration of insulin takes a solid understanding of the type of insulin you are using, your method of administration, and a commitment to follow recommended safety precautions to prevent harm or injury. Consult with your doctor for a thorough demonstration before attempting to administer insulin. Continue reading >>

How To Give A Painless Injection

How To Give A Painless Injection

If you have Type 2 diabetes, sooner or later you may require insulin injections, either temporarily (as during infections) or permanently. This is nothing to be afraid of, even though many people with long-standing Type 2 diabetes literally spend years worrying about it. I usually teach all my patients how to inject themselves at our first or second meeting, before there’s any urgency. Once they give themselves a sample injection of sterile saline (salt water), they find out how easy and painless it can be, and they are spared years of anxiety. If you’re anxious about injections, after you read this section, please ask your physician or diabetes educator to allow you to try a self-administered injection. Insulin is usually injected subcutaneously This means Into a layer of fat under the skin The regions of the body that usually contain appropriate deposits of fat are illustrated in Figure 1 Examine your body to see if you have enough fat at the illustrated sites to comfortably grab a big hunk between your thumb and first finger. Fig 1 Potential sites for subcutaneous injections. To show you how painless a shot can be, your teacher should give himself or herself a shot and leave the syringe dangling in place, illustrating that no pain is felt Your teacher should next give you a shot of saline to prove the point. Now it’s time for you to give yourself an injection, using a syringe that’s been partly filled for you with about 5 “units” of saline. 1. With your “nonshooting” hand, grab as big a chunk of skin plus underlying fat as you can hold comfortably. If you have a nice roll of fat around your waist, use this site. If not, select another site from those illustrated in Figure 1 Nearly everyone has enough subcutaneous buttocks fat to inject there without g Continue reading >>

How To Use An Insulin Pen

How To Use An Insulin Pen

Instructions Use the following instructions when injecting insulin for diabetes. Do not mix your diabetes medicine with any other medicines. Where to give shots Choose an injection area in your abdomen, upper or outer thigh, the back of your upper arms, or your buttocks. Stay two inches away from previous insulin injections or other shots. Stay two inches away from your belly button or from any scar. Do not use sites that are bruised, tender or swollen. Inject the insulin in different areas to prevent scars. The insulin will also absorb into your bloodstream better. Your insulin pen has a dial which you set to give the right amount of insulin. You can see the right amount through the dose window. 1. Collect all of your supplies. 2. Wash your hands. 3. Clean your skin with an alcohol pad. Let the area air dry. 4. Take the cover off the pen. The insulin is already in the pen. 5. If you are using cloudy insulin, gently roll the pen between your hands to mix the insulin. 6. Wipe off the end of the pen with where the needle will screw on with an alcohol pad. 7. Peel off the paper cover on the pen needle. Screw the needle onto the pen. 9. Turn the dose dial to 2 (units). 10. Hold the pen so the needle is pointing up. 11. Push in the dose button at the end of the pen to clear the air out of the pen. (See drawing, at right.) You should see a drop of insulin at the tip of the needle. You may need to repeat steps 9 through 11 until you see the drop of insulin. 12. Turn the dose dial to the number of units of insulin you will inject. 13. Lightly pinch and hold your skin at the site you will be giving your shot. Push the needle straight in. The needle should be all the way into your skin. 15. Let go of the pinch of skin. 16. Pull out the needle. 17. Unscrew the needle from the pen. Continue reading >>

Choosing An Injection Site

Choosing An Injection Site

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Where Is The Best Place To Give Yourself Insulin Shots?

Where Is The Best Place To Give Yourself Insulin Shots?

A: Insulin must be given into subcutaneous fatty tissue in order to absorb correctly. The preferred sites are the fatty tissue in the back of the upper arm, the abdomen (avoiding the belly button), the area on the top, middle outer aspect of the thigh, and the top of the buttock. Of these sites none is better than the others; it really depends on what is most convenient for you and the plan you have for rotating the injection sites. For instance, if you use the thigh for your morning Humalog before breakfast, then you may want to use the back of the arm for your lunchtime dose and your abdomen for your evening dose. Some people adjust their injection sites based upon how high their blood glucose level is, using the abdomen for quickest absorption and the buttock for slowest. However, with the newer insulins, injection site choice has less effect on absorption than was the case with NPH and regular insulin. Levemir is not approved for use in the buttock area, so this site should be avoided for your Levemir dose. Concerning how far apart to give Humalog and Levemir, we recommend injecting Humalog and Levemir at least 3 inches apart. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Insulin

Type 1 Diabetes And Insulin

It’s necessary to take insulin when you have type 1 diabetes. Your body doesn’t produce the hormone insulin, and without that, your body can’t properly get the energy and fuel it needs from glucose. Because people with type 1 diabetes rely on insulin, it was formerly called insulin-dependent diabetes. To learn about how the hormone insulin works, we have an article that explains the role of insulin. As soon as you are (or your child is) diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you will be immersed in the world of insulin, and it may feel overwhelming at first. There are doses to calculate, different types of insulin to consider, and the pressure of needing to keep blood glucose in a normal range to prevent short- and long-term complications. Your diabetes treatment team is there to help you. They can walk you through the basics of insulin dosing, answer any questions, and help you figure out how to balance food, exercise, and insulin. You will learn to take care of your diabetes with your diabetes team. If you are a parent of a child with type 1 diabetes, we also encourage you to visit our Patients' Guide to Managing Your Child's Type 1 Diabetes. It's often comforting to hear stories about others who are also going through the same things you are. Jay Cutler, quarterback for the Chicago Bears, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2008, and he is still getting used to regular blood sugar testing and insulin injections. To learn more about his journey with type 1 diabetes, read Jay Cutler's interview with EndocrineWeb. This article will provide basic details on insulin treatment. You can also visit our Patients' Guide to Insulin for more details. Types of Insulin With type 1 diabetes, you will need to take insulin on a daily basis, and there are several types of insulin you Continue reading >>

How To Inject Insulin

How To Inject Insulin

Tweet When you are injecting insulin, you should aim to inject into the fatty tissue just underneath the skin. If you think you are injecting into the muscle, you may want to change your technique or ask your GP to prescribe shorter needles. The steps below are a broad guide to injecting insulin. If you plan to change your technique, check with your healthcare team, diabetic nurse or consultant for their advice. How to perform an insulin injection Firstly, prepare your kit. You will need: An insulin pen Enough insulin inside to give the required dose A new pen needle Cotton wool or a tissue Make sure you have your kit available at all times and if possible, inform your family as to its location. If you suffer from a hypo, this will allow your family to act quickly. Injecting your insulin shot To perform your insulin injection: Wherever possible, wash your hands with soap and water before injecting Put a new needle onto your pen Perform an ‘air shot’ of at least 2 units to clear any bubbles out of the needle – if you do not get a steady stream, repeat the air shot until you do get a steady stream Dial up your dose – how you do this exactly may depend on which pen you have Pick a soft fatty area to inject – tops of thighs, belly, bum and triceps (not always recommended for children or thinner people) Raise a fold of fatty flesh slightly between your thumb and fingers - leaving plenty of space between to put the needle in Put the needle in – if you are particularly slim, you may need to put the needle in at a 45 degree angle to avoid injecting into the muscle Push the plunger, to inject the dose, relatively slowly After the dose has been injected, hold the needle in for a good 10 seconds to prevent too much insulin from escaping out If any blood or insulin esca Continue reading >>

Injections

Injections

Doing an injection Because my body doesn't make insulin anymore, I have to give it to myself instead. I use a pen injector to do this. Here's how injections work. Most people will use a pen injector when they are first told they need to give themselves insulin. A pen injector looks like this. Your nurse will show you how and when to inject insulin. Your mum and dad or someone else might give you your injection, or you might do it yourself. There are lots of places on our body where we can inject insulin: tummy thighs bottom arms (only if your nurse says it's OK and there is someone to help you). It's important not to inject in the same part of your body each time. Using a different place helps the injection to work better. Why can't I swallow insulin like a medicine instead of having to have an injection? Because if you swallow insulin it gets all broken up in your stomach, and can't get into you blood where it can do it's job peoperly. How can I make my injections hurt less? Injections can be scary, and this might make you want to do it slowly. But it will hurt less if you do it quickly. Try to relax and think about something else while you are having your injection. Perhaps put your favourite TV programme on or look at a special book. Some children find it helps to hold a piece of ice against their skin where they're just about to be injected. The ice makes the skin go very cold and numb so you can't feel the injection so much. Ask your mum or dad to see if your nurse has any tips to help make injections hurt less. I'm scared of doing my injection. Will I have to do it myself? It's OK for someone else to do your injection. Your nurse will show your mum and dad how to do it and nobody should force you to do it yourself until you're ready. There's no set age when you sh Continue reading >>

How To Give Yourself An Insulin Injection

How To Give Yourself An Insulin Injection

We all grew up with some dread about those occasional visits to the doctor — and usually it was that fear of getting a shot. Sure it was nice to get a lollipop (or a maybe a sticker, if your parents were lame like that), but it probably didn’t seem like a fair deal, right? And now that you’re faced with giving yourself an insulin injection, don’t think that you’re unusual or especially cowardly if this appears to be *the worst* element of having diabetes. One (very minor) consolation, however, is that insulin injections are subcutaneous, meaning the area between the skin and the muscle, so the needles are usually smaller and shorter than you’re imagining. Actually, after the novelty (or “terror”, as it may be) wears off and you have some practice, you’ll find that it can be a simple and pain-free process. One key to minimizing discomfort is to be quick and confident with your movements, and you will absolutely get better with practice … but that’s not much consolation when you’re first starting out, so let’s walk through it step by step, with some helpful tips along the way. Note: This information is for educational purposes only and is not medical advice. For specific guidance on giving an insulin injection, please talk with your doctor. CHECK YOUR INSULIN Insulin has an expiration date, so be mindful of this and don’t use expired insulin. Seriously — just toss it. Insulin also can’t be stored in the freezer, or left in direct sunlight. If you were keeping it cool in a bag or the refrigerator, give it time (30 minutes) to warm up to room temperature. Once you open a vial you can keep it room temperature for around 28 days. There are several different brands of insulin, so know which you use and check that you know your dosage. You’ll w Continue reading >>

Administration Of Insulin

Administration Of Insulin

Are all insulins the same? No. You may be prescribed 1 or more types of Insulin. Normally your body makes insulin all day, but increases production at meal times. Therefore, you may need a long-acting insulin and a short- or rapid-acting insulin. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist to determine what type you need to use. Why is insulin injection only? Insulin cannot be taken in a tablet form. If we swallowed insulin the digestive enzymes in our stomach would break it down before reaching our bloodstream. Therefore, all insulin must be injected into our body. It is most commonly given as an injection directly under the skin. Certain types of insulin are injected in the vein but this must be done by a doctor or nurse. Insulin can be supplied in different ways. These options include an insulin PUMP, an insulin PEN, or an insulin VIAL. Recently, a patch/pen device has been approved, but is not available yet. This device is a pump-patch-pen combo and does not require batteries to release the insulin. Types of devices used for administering insulin: VERY IMPORTANT POINTS Use same area for injections. If you inject into thigh, always use thigh. OK to inject into right or left thigh. If you inject into arm, always use arm. OK to inject into right or left arm. If you inject into belly, always use belly. Inject at least 2 inches away from belly button. Rotate sites Rotating sites is very important. Why? It can be painful to inject in the same site frequently. Injecting in the same site can cause the skin tissue to become very hard. Injecting in the same site can cause increase in fat tissue at that site. The fat tissue alters the body's ability to absorb the insulin. How much insulin do I inject? The decision about what dose you need and the way in which it will be delivered to yo Continue reading >>

Optimizing Insulin Absorption And Insulin Injection Technique In Older Adults

Optimizing Insulin Absorption And Insulin Injection Technique In Older Adults

The objective of our study was to determine the impact of anatomic site and injection technique on insulin absorption in the elderly. Twenty elderly insulin-naïve subjects (age 80 ± 1 years; sex 7 female, 13 male; BMI 29 ± 1 kg/m2; diabetes duration 11 ± 2 years; A1C 7.1 ± 0.2% [54 ± 2 mmol/mol]) were studied (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01213901). All subjects provided informed written consent (Declaration of Helsinki). Subjects underwent three 360-min euglycemic glucose clamp studies in random order. In each, 0.1 units/kg of insulin lispro (Humalog; Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN) was administered subcutaneously using a 5-mm needle. The investigator conducting the clamp and the technician collecting samples were blind to treatment. In two studies, insulin was given 6.0 cm from the umbilicus using either a skin lift or no skin lift (1). In the third, insulin was injected into the upper arm without skin lift. Pain of injection was evaluated using a visual analog scale. Samples were taken regularly to measure glucose and insulin. Differences among studies were evaluated with repeated measures ANOVA. P < 0.05 was considered significant. There was no significant difference in glucose values or infusion rates (data not shown). There was a significant study/time interaction among studies in insulin values (Fig. 1) (F = 2.5, P < 0.05), implying that injection into the abdominal site resulted in higher peak insulin values, but the difference was not clinically significant. Pain was minimal with injection and did not differ among sites. It was difficult to maintain the skin lift in many elderly subjects because the subcutaneous tissue collapsed before injection could be completed. In younger subjects, insulin is absorbed more quickly from the abdomen than peripheral sites (2–7). Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin is a hormone that helps cells use glucose (sugar) for energy. It works as a “key,” allowing the sugar to go from the blood and into the cell. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t make insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin correctly, which can lead to the pancreas not being able to produce enough — or any, depending on the progression of the disease —insulin to meet your body’s needs. Diabetes is normally managed with diet and exercise, with medications, including insulin, added as needed. If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin is required for life. This may seem difficult at first, but you can learn to successfully administer insulin with the support of your healthcare team, determination, and a little practice. There are different ways to take insulin, including syringes, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and jet injectors. Your doctor will help you decide which technique is best for you. Syringes remain a common method of insulin delivery. They’re the least expensive option, and most insurance companies cover them. Syringes Syringes vary by the amount of insulin they hold and the size of the needle. They’re made of plastic and should be discarded after one use. Traditionally, needles used in insulin therapy were 12.7 millimeters (mm) in length. Recent research shows that smaller 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm needles are just as effective, regardless of body mass. This means insulin injection is less painful than it was in the past. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, which means into the fat layer under the skin. In this type of injection, a short needle is used to inject insulin into the fatty layer between the skin and the muscle. Insulin should be injected into the fatty tissue just below your skin. If you inject the insulin deeper int Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites

Insulin Injection Sites

If you use insulin, you will have various injection sites for use in injecting exogenous insulin. The most common site for injecting insulin is the stomach or abdomen. Other common areas include the upper part of the arms, the upper aspect of the hips or buttocks, and the outer aspect of the thighs. These are the best places to inject insulin because: These are parts of the body that have the most fatty tissue beneath the skin. Insulin needs to be injected into fatty tissue and in areas of the body that don’t have that many nerves. Injecting insulin in areas of the body that don’t have many nerves means that you will have less pain during the injection. These are areas of the body that have the most subcutaneous tissue. Insulin is usually injected into the subcutaneous tissue located in the above-mentioned areas. The best areas to inject insulin are dependent upon your body type. Some people find that putting insulin into the abdomen is preferable because it seems to absorb better in that area. For those who cannot pinch up at least a half-inch of fat on their abdomen need to look elsewhere for areas to inject insulin. Your doctor can help you decide which areas of the body are best for injecting insulin. Both the degree of insulin absorption and the places you rotate for the injections will be considered. Rotating Insulin Injection Sites If you have type 1 diabetes and inject insulin at least three times daily, you will need to consider rotating injection sites as it is not a good idea to inject insulin into the same site every time. Doing so can cause lumps of hard tissue or extra fatty deposits to occur within the tissues. The lumps will look bad and will absorb insulin at a different rate when compared to normal fatty tissue so it will be harder to keep your blo Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Giving Yourself An Insulin Shot

Diabetes: Giving Yourself An Insulin Shot

Introduction Insulin is used for people who have type 1 diabetes. It's also used if you have type 2 diabetes and other medicines are not controlling your blood sugar. If you have gestational diabetes, you may need to take insulin if diet and exercise have not helped to keep your blood sugar levels within your target range. With little or no insulin, sugar (glucose) in the blood can't enter your cells to be used for energy. This causes the sugar in your blood to rise to a level that's not safe. When your blood sugar rises past about 10.0 mmol/L, your kidneys start to release sugar into the urine. This can make you dehydrated. If that happens, your kidneys make less urine, which means your body can't get rid of extra sugar. This is when blood sugar levels rise. Taking insulin can prevent symptoms of high blood sugar. It can also help to prevent emergencies such as diabetic ketoacidosis (in type 1 diabetes) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (in type 2 diabetes). Insulin can help lower blood sugar too. This can prevent serious and permanent health problems from long-term high blood sugar. Remember these key tips for giving insulin shots: Make sure you have the right dose of insulin, especially if you are giving two types of insulin in the same syringe. Practice how to give your shot. Store the insulin properly so that each dose will work the way it should. How to prepare and give an insulin injection Your health professional or certified diabetes educator (CDE) will help you learn to prepare and give your insulin dose. Here are some simple steps that can help. To get ready to give an insulin shot, follow these steps. Wash your hands with soap and running water. Dry them well. Gather your supplies. Most people keep their supplies in a bag or kit so they can take them wher Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Giving Yourself An Insulin Shot

Diabetes: Giving Yourself An Insulin Shot

Introduction Insulin is used for people who have type 1 diabetes. It's also used if you have type 2 diabetes and other medicines are not controlling your blood sugar. If you have gestational diabetes, you may need to take insulin if diet and exercise have not helped to keep your blood sugar levels within your target range. With little or no insulin, sugar (glucose) in the blood can't enter your cells to be used for energy. This causes the sugar in your blood to rise to a level that's not safe. When your blood sugar rises past about 180 mg/dL, your kidneys start to release sugar into the urine. This can make you dehydrated. If that happens, your kidneys make less urine, which means your body can't get rid of extra sugar. This is when blood sugar levels rise. Taking insulin can prevent symptoms of high blood sugar. It can also help to prevent emergencies such as diabetic ketoacidosis (in type 1 diabetes) and hyperosmolar coma (in type 2 diabetes). Insulin can help lower blood sugar too. This can prevent serious and permanent health problems from long-term high blood sugar. Remember these key tips for giving insulin shots: Make sure you have the right dose of insulin, especially if you are giving two types of insulin in the same syringe. Practice how to give your shot. Store the insulin properly so that each dose will work the way it should. Continue reading >>

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