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How To Inject Insulin In Arm

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Insulin is a hormone that helps manage diabetes when it is injected into the body. It can't be taken as a pill or oral medication. This is because the enzymes in the stomach will break down the insulin before it reaches the bloodstream. Insulin injections are one of many ways to treat and manage diabetes. Others include dietary and lifestyle changes, and oral medications. For people who require insulin injections, there are different types of insulin available. It is important to understand and follow the instructions that the doctor provides about how and where to inject insulin. Common injection sites Insulin is injected into the layer of fat directly under this skin, known as subcutaneous tissue. It is injected with a small needle or a device that looks like a pen. There are several different sites where insulin can be injected, including: Abdomen The abdomen is a common site for insulin injection that many people with diabetes choose to use. To give an injection into the abdomen, take a pinch of the fatty tissue from either side between the waist and the hipbones. It should be about 2 inches away from the belly button. This site is easy to access and some people report that it causes less discomfort than other sites. Upper Arms The upper arm is another site where insulin injections can be given. The needle should be placed into the back of the arm (tricep area), about halfway between the elbow and the shoulder. The main disadvantage of this site is that it is very difficult to use for self-administration and may require somebody else to do it. It may be more comfortable to inject into the non-dominant arm. This means injecting into the left arm of a right-handed person or the right arm of a left-handed person. Thighs The thigh is also a very easy area for self-injec Continue reading >>

How To Use An Insulin Pen

How To Use An Insulin Pen

Instructions Use the following instructions when injecting insulin for diabetes. Do not mix your diabetes medicine with any other medicines. Where to give shots Choose an injection area in your abdomen, upper or outer thigh, the back of your upper arms, or your buttocks. Stay two inches away from previous insulin injections or other shots. Stay two inches away from your belly button or from any scar. Do not use sites that are bruised, tender or swollen. Inject the insulin in different areas to prevent scars. The insulin will also absorb into your bloodstream better. Your insulin pen has a dial which you set to give the right amount of insulin. You can see the right amount through the dose window. 1. Collect all of your supplies. 2. Wash your hands. 3. Clean your skin with an alcohol pad. Let the area air dry. 4. Take the cover off the pen. The insulin is already in the pen. 5. If you are using cloudy insulin, gently roll the pen between your hands to mix the insulin. 6. Wipe off the end of the pen with where the needle will screw on with an alcohol pad. 7. Peel off the paper cover on the pen needle. Screw the needle onto the pen. 9. Turn the dose dial to 2 (units). 10. Hold the pen so the needle is pointing up. 11. Push in the dose button at the end of the pen to clear the air out of the pen. (See drawing, at right.) You should see a drop of insulin at the tip of the needle. You may need to repeat steps 9 through 11 until you see the drop of insulin. 12. Turn the dose dial to the number of units of insulin you will inject. 13. Lightly pinch and hold your skin at the site you will be giving your shot. Push the needle straight in. The needle should be all the way into your skin. 15. Let go of the pinch of skin. 16. Pull out the needle. 17. Unscrew the needle from the pen. Continue reading >>

Optimizing Insulin Absorption And Insulin Injection Technique In Older Adults

Optimizing Insulin Absorption And Insulin Injection Technique In Older Adults

The objective of our study was to determine the impact of anatomic site and injection technique on insulin absorption in the elderly. Twenty elderly insulin-naïve subjects (age 80 ± 1 years; sex 7 female, 13 male; BMI 29 ± 1 kg/m2; diabetes duration 11 ± 2 years; A1C 7.1 ± 0.2% [54 ± 2 mmol/mol]) were studied (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01213901). All subjects provided informed written consent (Declaration of Helsinki). Subjects underwent three 360-min euglycemic glucose clamp studies in random order. In each, 0.1 units/kg of insulin lispro (Humalog; Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN) was administered subcutaneously using a 5-mm needle. The investigator conducting the clamp and the technician collecting samples were blind to treatment. In two studies, insulin was given 6.0 cm from the umbilicus using either a skin lift or no skin lift (1). In the third, insulin was injected into the upper arm without skin lift. Pain of injection was evaluated using a visual analog scale. Samples were taken regularly to measure glucose and insulin. Differences among studies were evaluated with repeated measures ANOVA. P < 0.05 was considered significant. There was no significant difference in glucose values or infusion rates (data not shown). There was a significant study/time interaction among studies in insulin values (Fig. 1) (F = 2.5, P < 0.05), implying that injection into the abdominal site resulted in higher peak insulin values, but the difference was not clinically significant. Pain was minimal with injection and did not differ among sites. It was difficult to maintain the skin lift in many elderly subjects because the subcutaneous tissue collapsed before injection could be completed. In younger subjects, insulin is absorbed more quickly from the abdomen than peripheral sites (2–7). Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Giving Yourself An Insulin Shot

Diabetes: Giving Yourself An Insulin Shot

Introduction Insulin is used for people who have type 1 diabetes. It's also used if you have type 2 diabetes and other medicines are not controlling your blood sugar. If you have gestational diabetes, you may need to take insulin if diet and exercise have not helped to keep your blood sugar levels within your target range. With little or no insulin, sugar (glucose) in the blood can't enter your cells to be used for energy. This causes the sugar in your blood to rise to a level that's not safe. When your blood sugar rises past about 180 mg/dL, your kidneys start to release sugar into the urine. This can make you dehydrated. If that happens, your kidneys make less urine, which means your body can't get rid of extra sugar. This is when blood sugar levels rise. Taking insulin can prevent symptoms of high blood sugar. It can also help to prevent emergencies such as diabetic ketoacidosis (in type 1 diabetes) and hyperosmolar coma (in type 2 diabetes). Insulin can help lower blood sugar too. This can prevent serious and permanent health problems from long-term high blood sugar. Remember these key tips for giving insulin shots: Make sure you have the right dose of insulin, especially if you are giving two types of insulin in the same syringe. Practice how to give your shot. Store the insulin properly so that each dose will work the way it should. Continue reading >>

Can The Upper Inner Side Of The Thigh Become A New Option For Insulin Injection?

Can The Upper Inner Side Of The Thigh Become A New Option For Insulin Injection?

Abstract OBJECTIVE: Sites for subcutaneous insulin injections include the upper arms, abdomen, buttocks and outer sides of the thigh. No similar study has explored the feasibility of using the inner side of the thigh for insulin injection, since the 4 mm pen needles were introduced for clinical use. This study aimed to determine whether the inner side of the thigh is suitable for insulin injection. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Seventy-five patients with diabetes under insulin therapy from the Inpatient Department of Endocrinology were recruited for this non-blinded, non-randomized observational study. Subcutaneous adipose layer thicknesses of the upper, middle and lower area of the inner and outer thighs of 35 patients were measured by ultrasound, distance from the skin surface to the femoral deep vessels in 20 patients was measured, and insulin was injected at the upper inner and outer sides of the thigh in 20 patients. Pain perception, bleeding or bruising, leakage at the injection sites, blood glucose changes after insulin injection, and preferred ratings of the patients were measured. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02307968. RESULTS: Subcutaneous adipose layer thicknesses at both the upper inner and outer thighs were more than 4 mm and the minimum distance was 10 mm. Among the 100 injections at the upper inner thigh, only three incidents of perceived pain occurred. No bleeding or bruising and leakage were observed from the inner or outer sides. Furthermore, the difference in blood glucose control between insulin injections at the inner side and outer sides was not statistically significant. Patient ratings for injections at the inner side were similar to injections at the outer side. The key limitation of this study was the small sample size of a Continue reading >>

How To Give A Painless Injection

How To Give A Painless Injection

If you have Type 2 diabetes, sooner or later you may require insulin injections, either temporarily (as during infections) or permanently. This is nothing to be afraid of, even though many people with long-standing Type 2 diabetes literally spend years worrying about it. I usually teach all my patients how to inject themselves at our first or second meeting, before there’s any urgency. Once they give themselves a sample injection of sterile saline (salt water), they find out how easy and painless it can be, and they are spared years of anxiety. If you’re anxious about injections, after you read this section, please ask your physician or diabetes educator to allow you to try a self-administered injection. Insulin is usually injected subcutaneously This means Into a layer of fat under the skin The regions of the body that usually contain appropriate deposits of fat are illustrated in Figure 1 Examine your body to see if you have enough fat at the illustrated sites to comfortably grab a big hunk between your thumb and first finger. Fig 1 Potential sites for subcutaneous injections. To show you how painless a shot can be, your teacher should give himself or herself a shot and leave the syringe dangling in place, illustrating that no pain is felt Your teacher should next give you a shot of saline to prove the point. Now it’s time for you to give yourself an injection, using a syringe that’s been partly filled for you with about 5 “units” of saline. 1. With your “nonshooting” hand, grab as big a chunk of skin plus underlying fat as you can hold comfortably. If you have a nice roll of fat around your waist, use this site. If not, select another site from those illustrated in Figure 1 Nearly everyone has enough subcutaneous buttocks fat to inject there without g Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Insulin

Type 1 Diabetes And Insulin

It’s necessary to take insulin when you have type 1 diabetes. Your body doesn’t produce the hormone insulin, and without that, your body can’t properly get the energy and fuel it needs from glucose. Because people with type 1 diabetes rely on insulin, it was formerly called insulin-dependent diabetes. To learn about how the hormone insulin works, we have an article that explains the role of insulin. As soon as you are (or your child is) diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you will be immersed in the world of insulin, and it may feel overwhelming at first. There are doses to calculate, different types of insulin to consider, and the pressure of needing to keep blood glucose in a normal range to prevent short- and long-term complications. Your diabetes treatment team is there to help you. They can walk you through the basics of insulin dosing, answer any questions, and help you figure out how to balance food, exercise, and insulin. You will learn to take care of your diabetes with your diabetes team. If you are a parent of a child with type 1 diabetes, we also encourage you to visit our Patients' Guide to Managing Your Child's Type 1 Diabetes. It's often comforting to hear stories about others who are also going through the same things you are. Jay Cutler, quarterback for the Chicago Bears, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2008, and he is still getting used to regular blood sugar testing and insulin injections. To learn more about his journey with type 1 diabetes, read Jay Cutler's interview with EndocrineWeb. This article will provide basic details on insulin treatment. You can also visit our Patients' Guide to Insulin for more details. Types of Insulin With type 1 diabetes, you will need to take insulin on a daily basis, and there are several types of insulin you Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection

Insulin Injection

Insulin injection is used to control blood sugar in people who have type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not make insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or in people who have type 2 diabetes (condition in which the blood sugar is too high because the body does not produce or use insulin normally) that cannot be controlled with oral medications alone. Insulin injection is in a class of medications called hormones. Insulin injection is used to take the place of insulin that is normally produced by the body. It works by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. All of the types of insulin that are available work in this way. The types of insulin differ only in how quickly they begin to work and how long they continue to control blood sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to be injected subcutaneousl Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Giving Yourself An Insulin Shot

Diabetes: Giving Yourself An Insulin Shot

Introduction Insulin is used for people who have type 1 diabetes. It's also used if you have type 2 diabetes and other medicines are not controlling your blood sugar. If you have gestational diabetes, you may need to take insulin if diet and exercise have not helped to keep your blood sugar levels within your target range. With little or no insulin, sugar (glucose) in the blood can't enter your cells to be used for energy. This causes the sugar in your blood to rise to a level that's not safe. When your blood sugar rises past about 10.0 mmol/L, your kidneys start to release sugar into the urine. This can make you dehydrated. If that happens, your kidneys make less urine, which means your body can't get rid of extra sugar. This is when blood sugar levels rise. Taking insulin can prevent symptoms of high blood sugar. It can also help to prevent emergencies such as diabetic ketoacidosis (in type 1 diabetes) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (in type 2 diabetes). Insulin can help lower blood sugar too. This can prevent serious and permanent health problems from long-term high blood sugar. Remember these key tips for giving insulin shots: Make sure you have the right dose of insulin, especially if you are giving two types of insulin in the same syringe. Practice how to give your shot. Store the insulin properly so that each dose will work the way it should. How to prepare and give an insulin injection Your health professional or certified diabetes educator (CDE) will help you learn to prepare and give your insulin dose. Here are some simple steps that can help. To get ready to give an insulin shot, follow these steps. Wash your hands with soap and running water. Dry them well. Gather your supplies. Most people keep their supplies in a bag or kit so they can take them wher Continue reading >>

Giving An Insulin Injection Into The Arm

Giving An Insulin Injection Into The Arm

Giving an Insulin Injection Into the Arm Clean Clean the area of skin where you will give the injection. If you use alcohol to clean the skin, let it dry. Remove the cap from the syringe. Pinch up Using your knee, push up the back of your arm to create a "pinched-up" area. Stick it Push the needle all the way into the pinched-up area. Relax Lower your knee slightly so that the back of your arm is no longer pinched up. Inject and wait Push the plunger of the syringe all the way in. Count to five before taking the needle out. Needle safety Throw away the needle in a sharps container or other solid plastic container. You can get a sharps container at your pharmacy. This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.© 1995-2015 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated. Continue reading >>

Special Article New Insulin Delivery Recommendations

Special Article New Insulin Delivery Recommendations

Correct technique in insulin delivery is critical for optimal control of diabetes. This article reviews the most recent studies in the field and then offers new injection and infusion recommendations for insulin users. It is meant to complement and extend the injection recommendations published in 2010.1 These latest recommendations were based on the results of the fourth Injection Technique Questionnaire (ITQ) survey (published elsewhere in this issue). From February 2014 through June 2015, 13,289 insulin-injecting patients with diabetes from 42 countries participated in the ITQ survey, one of the largest multinational studies of its kind. A smaller Infusion Technique Questionnaire survey was undertaken concurrently with the ITQ in 356 patients using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in four countries and informed the drafting of the new infusion recommendations. The ITQ survey results (fo Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites

Insulin Injection Sites

If you use insulin, you will have various injection sites for use in injecting exogenous insulin. The most common site for injecting insulin is the stomach or abdomen. Other common areas include the upper part of the arms, the upper aspect of the hips or buttocks, and the outer aspect of the thighs. These are the best places to inject insulin because: These are parts of the body that have the most fatty tissue beneath the skin. Insulin needs to be injected into fatty tissue and in areas of the body that don’t have that many nerves. Injecting insulin in areas of the body that don’t have many nerves means that you will have less pain during the injection. These are areas of the body that have the most subcutaneous tissue. Insulin is usually injected into the subcutaneous tissue located in the above-mentioned areas. The best areas to inject insulin are dependent upon your body type. Some people find that putting insulin into the abdomen is preferable because it seems to absorb better in that area. For those who cannot pinch up at least a half-inch of fat on their abdomen need to look elsewhere for areas to inject insulin. Your doctor can help you decide which areas of the body are best for injecting insulin. Both the degree of insulin absorption and the places you rotate for the injections will be considered. Rotating Insulin Injection Sites If you have type 1 diabetes and inject insulin at least three times daily, you will need to consider rotating injection sites as it is not a good idea to inject insulin into the same site every time. Doing so can cause lumps of hard tissue or extra fatty deposits to occur within the tissues. The lumps will look bad and will absorb insulin at a different rate when compared to normal fatty tissue so it will be harder to keep your blo Continue reading >>

How To Give Yourself Insulin

How To Give Yourself Insulin

Expert Reviewed Six Methods:Monitoring Your Blood Glucose LevelsGiving Yourself Insulin Using a SyringeUsing a Pen Device to Inject InsulinRotating Your Injection SitesUsing Other Methods to Administer InsulinFollowing Recommended Safety PrecautionsCommunity Q&A Nearly three million people in the United States use insulin to treat either type 1 or type 2 diabetes.[1]. In people with diabetes, the pancreas does not produce enough insulin to manage the carbohydrates, sugars, fats, and proteins in your diet. The use of insulin in people that suffer from type 1 diabetes is an absolute necessity in order to sustain life. Many people with type 2 diabetes often reach a point where medication, diet, and exercise, are not enough to control blood sugar levels, and begin a regimen that includes insulin administration. The correct administration of insulin takes a solid understanding of the type of insulin you are using, your method of administration, and a commitment to follow recommended safety precautions to prevent harm or injury. Consult with your doctor for a thorough demonstration before attempting to administer insulin. Continue reading >>

25 September 12 Tips For Reducing Pain With Insulin Injections

25 September 12 Tips For Reducing Pain With Insulin Injections

For those of you with diabetes who take insulin, take heart! While insulin injections can sometimes cause pain or discomfort, there are tips for reducing or eliminating pain. Most of the tips reported here are taken from a presentation given by Stacey Seggelke, MS, RN, CNS, CDE, BC-ADM at the Rocky Mountain Metabolic Syndrome Symposium on May 14, 2010. Alcohol After swabbing your injection site with alcohol, wait for it to DRY before injecting insulin. Alcohol can feel like a burning sensation if it gets pushed in along with the insulin. Temperature Injecting insulin that is cold will hurt more than if it is at room temperature. Remove your unopened insulin from the refrigerator long enough in advance before use so that it is at room temperature when you need to use it. Once your vial or pen is in use, you can store it at room temperature (59F – 86F). Insulin vials can be stored at room temperature for up to 1 month. Most rapid-acting or long acting insulin pens can be stored for up to 28 days at room temperature. However, premixed insulin or intermediate N or NPH pens should be stored for up to only 10 – 14 days. Never guess at your insulin's room temperature storage guidelines - always check the information provided with your insulin for number of days it can be used at room temperature. Unopened insulin can be stored in the refrigerator (36F-46F) up until the expiration date. However, once the expiration date is reached, do not use the insulin – discard it. Dose Higher doses can hurt more than lower doses of insulin. For those of you with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight and regular exercise could improve your insulin sensitivity enough so that less insulin is needed to control your diabetes. And for folks with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, good carb counting skills Continue reading >>

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

But Didn’t Know to Ask Just take your shot. What could be easier, right? Well, you’d be surprised how many errors are made by “veteran” insulin users. It turns out there’s nothing basic about the basics of insulin injections. However, you can improve your technique. This article takes a look at the nitty-gritty details behind successful insulin delivery, why they matter, and how to avoid common pitfalls. The gear Realistically, there are two delivery systems when it comes to injecting insulin: syringes and pens. Yes, there are pumps, but that’s a whole other subject. And yes, there are jet injectors, but they are not widely used. Syringes. The first-ever human insulin shot was delivered by syringe in 1922, and here in the United States, more than half of all insulin is still delivered via syringe. Syringes used to be made of glass, had to be sterilized between uses, and had long, thick, steel surgical needles that could be resharpened on a kitchen whetstone. (No kidding.) But syringes have come a long way since then. Syringes are now disposable, the barrels are made of plastic, and the needles are thin, high-tech, multi-beveled, and coated with lubricants to make them enter the skin smoothly. (Bevels are the slanted surfaces on a needle that create a sharp point.) In the old days, the needle and the syringe were separate components. Nowadays most insulin syringes come with the needle attached. People who use syringes almost always purchase insulin in vials. Vials are glass bottles that generally hold 1,000 units of insulin. Pens. Insulin pens date from the mid-1980s, and while syringes still predominate in the United States, much of the rest of the world has traded in syringes for insulin pens. Pens currently come in two varieties: disposable, prefilled pens Continue reading >>

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