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Travelling With An Insulin Pump

Travelling With An Insulin Pump

Travelling with an insulin pump Your insulin pump can go where you go. With the right planning and preparation, you can enjoy travel adventures around the world. When it comes to travelling with Type 1 diabetes, it’s best to be prepared. Detailed planning and preparation are the keys to an enjoyable and relaxing holiday. Preparing to travel Schedule an office visit with your healthcare provider at least 4-6 weeks prior to departure to discuss your travel itinerary and diabetes treatment plan. Animas Canada offers a free vacation loaner pump for Animas pumpers who are in-warranty. At least two weeks in advance of your departure, fax or send in a completed Vacation Loaner Request form. Become familiar with foods of your destination and their carbohydrate amount. Develop a back-up plan for time off the pump in case of a technical emergency. Bring 2-3 times as many pump supplies that you may require, along with long-acting insulin, syringes and/or insulin pens – pump supplies and related products may not be available in other countries or may require a prescription to purchase. Review your medical insurance regarding medical coverage outside of Canada. What to pack in your travel “pumpers kit”: A back-up vacation loaner pump Infusion sets and cartridges Sensors (if you use CGM) Insulin (rapid and long-acting) Syringes or insulin pens Blood glucose monitor and test strips Any other medications you require (e.g. Gravol®) Copies of all prescriptions Extra batteries for meter/pump Extra battery cap and cartridge cap for pump Extra pump clip and/or pump case A list of current pump settings Lancing device and lancets Sharps container Ketone test strips Hypoglycemia treatment (glucose tabs, Glucagon, etc.) Skin preparation dressings or adhesive Copies of physician’s ord Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

Thinking about getting an insulin pump to manage your Type 1 diabetes? As an alternative to injecting insulin with a pen, an insulin pump can help improve your diabetes control and give you more flexibility. What does an insulin pump do? An insulin pump is a battery-operated device that provides your body with regular insulin throughout the day. The insulin is provided via a tiny, flexible tube (cannula), inserted under the skin. The tube can be left in for two to three days before it needs to be replaced and moved to a different insulin injection site. When eating, you can release extra insulin using the pump. This is known as a 'bolus dose'. Your nurse and dietitian will help you to work out how much insulin you need. How can I get an insulin pump? The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) haspublished criteria for suitability to use an insulin pump. Talk to your diabetes healthcare team about whether a pump is suitable for you. You're entitled to NHS-funded insulin pump therapy if you meet the following requirements: Your diabetes consultant recommends that you use an insulin pump. You'll need to show that you're committed to good diabetes control; for example, by having at least four insulin injections a day, checking your blood sugar levels at least four times a day, counting carbohydrates and adjusting insulin doses. You meet the NICE criteria (Technology Appraisal 151 (2008)) for NHS funding. You're having frequent hypos or hypos without warning that cause anxiety and have a negative impact on your quality of life, or your HbA1c is still 69mmol/mol (8.5%) or above, despite carefully trying to manage your diabetes. What pump types are available? Pumps vary in colour, battery life, screen size and extra features, such as a remote control. Your he Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump

Insulin Pump

An insulin pump is a medical device used for the administration of insulin in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy. The device configuration may vary depending on design. A traditional pump includes: the pump (including controls, processing module, and batteries) a disposable reservoir for insulin (inside the pump) a disposable infusion set, including a cannula for subcutaneous insertion (under the skin) and a tubing system to interface the insulin reservoir to the cannula. Other configurations are possible. For instance, more recent models may include disposable or semi-disposable designs for the pumping mechanism and may eliminate tubing from the infusion set. An insulin pump is an alternative to multiple daily injections of insulin by insulin syringes or an insulin pen and allows for intensive insulin therapy when used in conjunction with blood glucose monitoring and carb counting. Medical uses[edit] Advantages[edit] Users report better quality of life (QOL) compared to using other devices for administering insulin. The improvement in QOL is reported in type 1 and insulin-requiring type 2 diabetes subjects on pumps.[1] The use of rapid-acting insulin for basal needs offers relative freedom from a structured meal and exercise regime previously needed to control blood sugar with slow-acting insulin.[citation needed] Programmable basal rates allow for scheduled insulin deliveries of varying amounts at different times of the day. This is especially useful in controlling events such as the dawn phenomenon resulting in less low blood sugar during the night.[2] Many users feel that bolusing insulin from a pump is more convenient and discreet than injection.[2][3] Insulin pumps make it possible to deliver more pre Continue reading >>

2016 Insulin Pump Comparisons

2016 Insulin Pump Comparisons

Click to go to comparison page: Tandem t-Slim/t-Flex/t-slim G4Roche Accu-Chek Combo Insulet Insulet OmniPod Medtronic 530G With Enlite Animas Vibe Pump System Features in Common: 24-hour toll-free helpline Internal safety checks Child button lock-out Full Training Included Simplified programming Extended bolus options Temporary basal rate options Programmable reminders Downloadable Low battery warning Low insulin warning User-set active insulin time Tandem t:slim, t:slim G4 & t:flex Unique Advantages Potential Drawbacks Bright, full-color touch screen Modern, high-tech appearance Compact, thin dimensions Rapid numeric entry, fastest bolus entry Cartridges hold 300u (t:slim); 480u (t:flex) Can calculate boluses up to 50 units (60 on t:flex) Site-change reminder w/customizable day & time Graphic on-screen history display Carb counting calculator Temp basal up to 250%, 72 hrs Can set duration of insulin action in 1-minute increments IOB & time remaining displayed on home screen Missed bolus reminders customizable by day of week Alert for high temperatures which may spoil insulin Secondary basal programs linked with secondary bolus calculation parameters Web-based download software Compatible w/leur-lock infusion sets Minimal insulin movement with changes in altitude Small buttons can be difficult to activate; screen goes blank if buttons missed 3x Unlock procedure required to perform any programming No integrated clip (must put in a case that has a clip) Tubing connector looks “medical,” can snag on clothing Basal & bolus settings in same time slots; may take several steps to edit Extra confirmation steps with all programming Weak vibrate mechanism No meter link Manufacturer relatively new in pump industry Requires charging 1-2x/week No formal in-warranty upgrade polic Continue reading >>

Accessing Insulin Pumps And Cgm’s

Accessing Insulin Pumps And Cgm’s

The buzzword in diabetes care these days seems to be “Insulin Pump”. And there is a lot of frustration in the diabetes community about the lack of availability of them. NOTE: If you have a child with type 1 diabetes age 6 years or younger; you should have access to an insulin pump almost immediately as per the HSE’s “ Model of Care for the Provision of Insulin Pumps for the treatment of Type 1 Diabetes in the Under Five Age Group” see here. So, I thought I would pull together some of the information I have into a post to help people increase their odds of getting any piece of diabetes tech. Plus, dispel some myths around insulin pump therapy and accessibility. Thank you to Davina Lyon from Diabetes T One for the suggestion for this post. It might seem like some people have unlimited access to all of this technology but most people with type 1 diabetes in Ireland do not! Mostly people gain access to this tech by being knowledgeable, persistent and not being deterred. Oh, yes, and they also attend a diabetes clinic that offers all of this. Firstly, The FreeStyle Libre is available to buy in Ireland since November 2016. So there is only one significant block to accessing this technology – affordability. The application process to have this device included on the Long Term Illness Scheme is ongoing and we will keep you informed. This website; is where you can buy the Libre. Whether it’s an Insulin Pump or a Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) that you’re after, or just curious about, here is my advice to you on finding out more; Do your homework! Find out as much as you can from different manufacturers websites, from reputable diabetes websites and from online support groups. And not just in Ireland-go beyond. Start with this really good website; InPut Diabetes Continue reading >>

Getting An Insulin Pump

Getting An Insulin Pump

Tweet There is a high level of demand for insulin pumps but currently the UK lags behind other European countries in its provision of insulin pumps. Insulin pumps allow greater opportunity to take control of diabetes but, because they are a more expensive option than injections, eligibility criteria exists to ensure the most suitable candidates have access to insulin pump therapy. Funding options There are two main options for getting an insulin pump: Self funding –whereby you buy the pump and consumables NHS funded –the pump is paid for by the NHS for those meeting eligibility criteria The most common option for getting an insulin pump in the UK is to have one funded by the NHS. Getting an insulin pump privately If you buy the pump privately, you will need to consider the total cost, including the consumables, and ensure you have a health team with a specialism in insulin pumps. You will need to arrange whether you will be able to receive care on the NHS or privately before going ahead with buying an insulin pump privately. Insulin pumps tend to cost between £2,000 and £3,000 and the consumables for an insulin pump, including infusion sets, reservoirs and batteries, can cost around £1,000 to £2,000 a year. The NHS does not operate a scheme in which it funds pumps which have been bought privately. Getting a pump on the NHS The process of getting an insulin pump can vary across different parts of the UK as budgets, the level of demand for pumps and the number of healthcare professionals with experience of insulin pumps can all play a part. The advantage of applying for an insulin pump through the NHS is that you have the chance of getting the pump for free. This for most people outweighs the disadvantages of not knowing whether or when they may qualify for a pump Continue reading >>

Diabetes Assistance Programs

Diabetes Assistance Programs

Diabetes can be expensive and many people with it need help paying some of the bills. Having an insurance plan in place would be ideal but is not the case for everyone. If you lack health care coverage, many drug companies provide healthcare assistance if you meet specific requirements. Below is a list of sites that can help you get specific assistance. For the pharmaceutical sites, determine who manufactures the drug you need and contact them to see what assistance they can provide. Other Helpful Sites: The Partnership for Prescription Assistance helps qualifying patients without prescription drug coverage get the medicines they need for free or nearly free. RXassist offers a comprehensive database of patient assistance programs, as well as practical tools, news, and articles so that health care professionals and patients can find the information they need. CR3 Diabetes mission is to make a difference in the lives of people living with diabetes all over the world by providing equipment and encouragement to those in need. Insulin Pumpers Foundation is pleased to offer a program that helps bring insulin pump technology to those in our society who do not have the financial resources to purchase an insulin pump on their own. Medtronic Diabetes has a financial assistance program for current users of their pumps. Drug Company sites and programs Company Program Phone Number AztraZeneca Pharm. AstraZeneca Foundation Patient Assistance 800-424-3727 Bristol-Myers Squibb Company Bristol-Myers Squibb Patient Assistance Foundation 800-736-0003 Eli Lilly and Company Lilly Cares 800-545-6962 GlaxoSmithKline Bridges to Access 866-728-4368 Novartis Pharm. Corp. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. Patient Assistance 800-277-2254 Pfizer Inc. Pfizer Helpful Answers Pfizer Bridge Program (Endoc Continue reading >>

Getting An Insulin Pump

Getting An Insulin Pump

I went to the diabetes clinic last week for what I thought would be the first step in a hellish process of getting an insulin pump. I had been to this clinic once before (four years ago) at the suggestion of my then new family doctor. I remember that during that visit, I felt a little out of place. Most t of the people in the waiting room were over 60 and looked very unhealthy. I imagined they were newly diagnosed type 2’s or that they just hadn’t taken care of themselves. The visit was composed of three parts; a consultation with a nutritionist, then a visit with a diabetes nurse, and then with the doctor. The nutritionist tried to explain to me all about carbohydrate counting which I knew about already (I had been a diabetic for 5 years). She gave me a whole pile of food tables and charts. The nurse was nice, asked me a few questions and checked my feet – they were fine. Then the doctor… I walked in, she looked at my blood test results from the last year or so, with HbA1c levels ranging between 6.8 and 7.2 and asked “so what are you doing here what do you want?” “I’m a type 1 diabetic and this is a diabetes clinic so my doctor sent me here. I don’t ‘want’ anything” I said. And that was the end of my visit to the diabetes clinic. I never went back and I never thought I would need to. I wasn’t angry or insulted, but I didn’t see any reason for me to go back there. The truth is that from the look of the people in the waiting room that day I can understand why the doctor may have felt I was wasting her time. (Although there may have been a better way of expressing it) So when I learned that I had to go back to this same clinic again in order to get an insulin pump, I was a little put off and a little nervous. And that was on top of my already n Continue reading >>

Is My Test, Item, Or Service Covered?

Is My Test, Item, Or Service Covered?

How often is it covered? Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) doesn’t cover insulin (unless use of an insulin pump is medically necessary), insulin pens, syringes, needles, alcohol swabs, or gauze. Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D) may cover insulin and certain medical supplies used to inject insulin, like syringes, gauze, and alcohol swabs. If you use an external insulin pump, insulin and the pump may be covered as durable medical equipment (DME). However, suppliers of insulin pumps may not necessarily provide insulin. For more information, see durable medical equipment. Your costs in Original Medicare You pay 100% for insulin (unless used with an insulin pump, then you pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount, and the Part B deductible applies). You pay 100% for syringes and needles, unless you have Part D. To find out how much your specific test, item, or service will cost, talk to your doctor or other health care provider. The specific amount you’ll owe may depend on several things, like: Other insurance you may have How much your doctor charges Whether your doctor accepts assignment The type of facility The location where you get your test, item, or service Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Uk: Free Care, But Behind The Times?

Diabetes In The Uk: Free Care, But Behind The Times?

Diabetes is certainly not created equal, and it's even more varied when you take into account the various ways countries manage their health care system. Over the past few months, in our new international series, we've peeked into the lives of PWDs in Spain, Germany, Canada and Australia, and this month we're taking a hop across the pond to visit Becky Thomson, a resident of the United Kingdom (which of course encompasses England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland). Becky is a 26-year-old administrative assistant at a theater in York, England, where she's lived with type 1 diabetes for about two years. She writes the blog Instructions Not Included and tweets away at @instructionsni. She currently uses an Animas insulin pump, but as she tells us, that's not exactly common in the UK... A Guest Post by Becky Thompson So the UK — land of hope and glory, right? — we've spell with more U's than you can shake a stick at, and a whole other system of blood glucose measurement. But apart from that, how different is life over here in terms of diabetes? Speaking from this side of the 'pond,' so much of what I hear about from the other side is like a labyrinthine mystery. And when I was diagnosed two years ago, at the age of 24, having had relatively little interaction with the world of doctors, prescriptions and juggling appointments, I was completely lost. So, since you probably know about as much about dealing with all this in the UK as I did, let me give you a whistlestop tour of our system. The UK is (in my opinion) extremely fortunate in that we have access to the NHS (National Health Service). Scotland and Wales have their own branches of the NHS — oh-so-creatively named NHS Scotland and NHS Wales. Northern Ireland has a similar institution to the NHS, called HSC (He Continue reading >>

Fda Clears Finger-prick Free Insulin Pump-cgm Combo

Fda Clears Finger-prick Free Insulin Pump-cgm Combo

The FDA has approved the first insulin pump – glucose monitor combination of devices which can recommend treatment decisions without the need for a finger-prick blood test. Tandem Diabetes’ t:slim X2 Insulin Pump has received FDA approval for use alongside Dexcom’s G5 Mobile continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology. The approval is part of a rapid evolution in insulin management, with digitisation and automation gathering pace. On its own, the t:slim X2 Insulin Pump is one of the smallest insulin pumps on the market and features the firm’s proprietary Micro-Delivery Technology – a method of minuscule insulin delivery claimed to be safer than traditional insulin pumps. Its touchscreen display shows live blood glucose readings and can alert users when blood glucose rises higher or drops lower than their target range. A trend arrow also gives users an idea of their future blood glucose levels. Meanwhile, the Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM, which uses a small, under-the-skin sensor that measures glucose levels in interstitial fluid, is the only CGM approved for therapeutic use by the FDA, meaning it can be used to inform treatment decisions. The fact that it doesn’t need a finger-prick test once it has been inserted under the skin sets it apart from other CGMs on the market. The newly-approved device will now give both diabetes patients access to insulin pump and Dexcom G5 CGM data in one device. Existing t:slim X2 Pump users will also be given the software upgrade for free, giving them the ability to integrate CGM data. “We are setting a new standard in our industry by simultaneously offering our existing and future customers the benefits of best-in-class CGM integration on our simple-to-use touchscreen insulin pump,” said Kim Blickenstaff, president and CEO of Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy Is Key To Tight Control.

Insulin Pump Therapy Is Key To Tight Control.

Insulin pump therapy is key to tight control. But the cost! What can you do about the high price? Below is a chapter from Insulin Pump Therapy Demystified: An Essential Guide for Everyone Pumping Insulin by Gabrielle Kaplan-Mayer, Money Makes the World Go Round . . . AH, MONEY, SOMETHING that can be even scarier than sex! You may have heard about how expensive the insulin pump is (roughly $5000 for the pump and up to $150 to 300 per month for pump supplies). When I realized I was walking around with something on my belt worth more money than my used Honda, I was shocked! Fortunately, my insurance company paid the entire cost of the pump and for my needed supplies. People who feel a bit anxious about using such an expensive piece of medical equipment, take note: Your insulin pump can be covered by a renter's or homeowner's insurance policy. Insurance companies will issue a special floater, as they would for an expensive piece of jewelry. It seems like all I do is fight with my insurance company over how many blood sugar test strips I can get a month. I don't know if I have the energy to take on another battle with pump supplies. Again: Knowledge is power. The bureaucracy of managed health care can be mind-boggling; still with a little effort, you should be able to break through the red tape and reach a real live person. Ask to speak with a manager or head of department; find out exactly what your insurance will cover. More and more, many American states are mandating coverage for diabetes supplies and this will cover the insulin pump and pump supplies. Fortunately, Medicare now covers the cost of the insulin pump for people with type 1 diabetes. What is even better is that the major pump manufacturers-Animas, Disetronic, Medtronic MiniMed, and Sooil-all have trained prof Continue reading >>

Visiting / Moving To The Uk With A Pump

Visiting / Moving To The Uk With A Pump

INPUT receives several enquiries every year from people with diabetes who are coming to the UK from overseas. Melissa, INPUT Chief Adviser, initially came to the UK as a foreign student some years ago so she knows what it’s like to have to get your head around a new health system in addition to everything else that comes with moving countries! With immigration policy changes that took effect in April 2015, there are essentially 2 categories of migrants to the UK: People from the EU who do not require a visa, who are automatically eligible for free NHS treatment People from outside the EU who require a visa, most of whom must pay the new Immigration Health Surcharge (IHS) This page lists who is exempt from paying the IHS, and who needs an IHS reference number even if they are exempt from paying. To find out if you need to pay the IHS, and to obtain your IHS reference number if required (even if you’re exempt from paying), check out this page. To find out how much the Immigration Health Surcharge should cost you if you have to pay it, try this calculator. For people who must pay it, payment of the immigration health surcharge means you can access NHS hospital services free-of-charge. Everyone who is eligible for NHS treatment (whether they have to pay IHS or not) needs to be registered with a local general practitioner (GP), a primary care doctor. If you are a student, your educational institution should help you with the process of registering with a GP. GPs can issue prescriptions for blood glucose test strips, insulin, glucagon and ketone test strips. A GP can also refer you to an NHS diabetes specialist service (considered a hospital/secondary care service). GPs cannot coordinate funding for insulin pumps or insulin pump supplies – these must be handled at the s Continue reading >>

Diabetes Pumps In Ireland

Diabetes Pumps In Ireland

Before you start pumping read on…. An Insulin Pump is another way of delivering insulin rather than using a syringe or pen. It is a small programmable battery-powered device that is worn externally on the body. An insulin pump contains a syringe of insulin which is changed by the user every 2-3 days. The syringe of insulin is placed into the pump and it is attached to the body via a narrow tube (infusion set) and a small plastic cannuale that is placed under the skin. Insulin injections are not required by the pump user except for a situation where the pump is not working. The pump weights approx 3 ozs and measures 7 cms X 5 cms and is usually worn on a belt or carried in a pocket. It is the same size as a pager and is worn in a similar manner. Who uses a Pump? Insulin pump therapy has become popular as part of diabetes management in recent years and there are advantages and disadvantages to it. If you would like more information on insulin pumps speak to your diabetes team. In general, the pump is recommended as an option for people with Type 1 diabetes who, despite multiple daily injection therapy have not been able to maintain a A1c level without experiencing repeated and unpredictable episodes of hypoglycaemia. The sensors would only be sanctioned based on clinical need e.g repeated and unpredictable episodes of hypoglycaemia. How the pump works The pump delivers fast acting insulin at a pre-determined, pre-set hourly rate (called a basal rate) and insulin can also be delivered by the user when eating or to correct a high blood sugar (bolus of insulin). The basal rate of insulin can be set at several different rates over a 24 hour period, depending on the person’s insulin requirements. There is a temporary basal rate function which can be set at a reduced or an Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy In Australia

Insulin Pump Therapy In Australia

The Case for Action Insulin pump therapy can be life-changing and together with new technologies such as continuous glucose monitors, potentially life-saving for people with type 1 diabetes. Insulin pump therapy can reduce the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia1 (low blood sugar), enable better blood glucose management to reduce risk of complications, and reduce costs associated with ambulance use, emergency department presentations and hospital admissions. Insulin pump therapy can reduce fear of hypoglycaemia1, diabetes-related distress and depressive symptoms and can improve health status and quality of life. Australia has one of the highest rates of type 1 diabetes in the world. In the past year alone over 3021 new cases of type 1 diabetes were registered (8 new cases every day). There are over 25,000 young people with type 1 diabetes under age 30 and there are 118,000 Australians with type 1 diabetes. Due to cost and poor access only 14,990 (12%) Australians with type 1 diabetes have accessed insulin pump therapy, comparing poorly to the USA which has twice the level of access, estimated at 25%. Australia has an unfair funding model for insulin pumps with around 80% of all pumps in Australia provided to people with private health insurance. Australians without private insurance do not have affordable access to insulin pumps. The Insulin Pump Program introduced by the Australian Government in 2008 to improve access has to date only provided 611 pumps and has not been available to high-needs groups including young adults over age 18 years. High and/or urgent clinical needs, people over 18 years, and women planning for and during pregnancy should be eligible for access to the Insulin Pump Program. Currently, some people with type 1 diabetes with a clear clinical need ar Continue reading >>

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