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How To Check Your Insulin Levels At Home

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

What does this test do? This is a test system for use at home to measure the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. What is glucose? Glucose is a sugar that your body uses as a source of energy. Unless you have diabetes, your body regulates the amount of glucose in your blood. People with diabetes may need special diets and medications to control blood glucose. What type of test is this? This is a quantitative test, which means that you will find out the amount of glucose present in your blood sample. Why should you take this test? You should take this test if you have diabetes and you need to monitor your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You and your doctor can use the results to: determine your daily adjustments in treatment know if you have dangerously high or low levels of glucose understand how your diet and exercise change your glucose levels The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (1993) showed that good glucose control using home monitors led to fewer disease complications. How often should you test your glucose? Follow your doctor's recommendations about how often you test your glucose. You may need to test yourself several times each day to determine adjustments in your diet or treatment. What should your glucose levels be? According to the American Diabetes Association (Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2011, Diabetes Care, January 2011, vol.34, Supplement 1, S11-S61) the blood glucose levels for an adult without diabetes are below 100 mg/dL before meals and fasting and are less than 140 mg/dL two hours after meals. People with diabetes should consult their doctor or health care provider to set appropriate blood glucose goals. You should treat your low or high blood glucose as recommended by your health care provider. How accurate is this test? The ac Continue reading >>

10 Important Tests For Diabetes

10 Important Tests For Diabetes

On the off chance that you encounter symptoms of increased thirst, frequent urination, unexplained weight reduction, increased appetite, and feel a tingling sensation in your hands or feet, chances are that you are a diabetic. The Symptoms and effects of diabetes show up all of a sudden and are frequently the explanation behind checking glucose levels. Since the symptoms of diabetes and prediabetes appear more gradually, the side effects may not be clear to us. However, The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has prescribed some particular screening rules for the accompanying individuals: Individuals aged 45 and above are encouraged to get a blood sugar screening, and if results are normal, he is to be screened in every 3 years. Any individual with a body mass index higher than 25, paying little respect to age, pertaining to extra risk components like, hypertension, an inactive way of life, someone who has been diagnosed with PCOS, having delivered an infant who measured more than 9 pounds, a crisp background marked by diabetes in pregnancy, extremely high cholesterol levels, a past filled with coronary illness, and having a relative with diabetes. HbA1C: This blood test shows your normal glucose level for as long as a few months. It quantifies the rate of glucose connected to haemoglobin and the protein that carries oxygen in red blood cells. The higher the glucose levels, the more haemoglobin one has with sugar attached to it. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests shows that you have diabetes. An A1C somewhere around 5.7 and 6.4 percent demonstrates prediabetes. Beneath 5.7 is viewed as normal. Fasting Blood Sugar Test: In this test your blood sample will be collected after you have observed an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less tha Continue reading >>

Do You Know Your Insulin Level?

Do You Know Your Insulin Level?

People often keep close watch on their glucose numbers. But how many of us know our insulin level? Dr. Joseph Mercola says fasting insulin is “the number that may best predict your sudden death.” Sounds important. But what does it mean? Our bodies need some circulating insulin at all times, even when we don’t eat. Otherwise, our livers keep making glucose and dumping it into the blood. Livers do this to prevent blood glucose from going too low. So a fasting insulin level should never be 0, which it might be in a person with untreated Type 1. It shouldn’t go below 3. But a high insulin level is just as problematic. A high insulin level is a sign of insulin resistance or prediabetes. It can also signify early-stage Type 2. According to Dr. Mercola, too much insulin promotes weight gain by storing fat. It promotes insulin resistance, lowers magnesium levels, and increases inflammation. It also tends to lower HDL (“good”) cholesterol and raise levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. All of these increase the risk of diabetes and heart disease. It may be that high insulin levels come before insulin resistance and help cause it. If you already have diabetes, why should you know your insulin level? Mainly, it helps diagnose what is happening with you. Your blood glucose may be high, but how much of the problem is too little insulin? How much is insulin resistance? A fasting insulin level test is valuable in several situations: • Diagnosing prediabetes and metabolic syndrome. “Prediabetes” is one result of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance causes high cholesterol, high glucose, and high blood pressure. A high level of fasting insulin indicates insulin resistance and can encourage a person to make changes to lower it. • Separating Type 2 from LADA (latent Continue reading >>

Determining The Accuracy Of Your Glucose Meter

Determining The Accuracy Of Your Glucose Meter

If you're like most people with diabetes, you probably assume that your glucose meter gives you accurate readings every time you check your blood. You base your insulin dose, food intake, and activity plans off that number. Fortunately, most glucose meters are well designed and give reasonably accurate test results. But there are some things you should know about your glucose meter to help you make the most educated decisions about your diabetes management. Test Results Are Not Exact Measures If you’ve ever taken your blood sugar twice or three times in a row without any delay in between tests, you’ve probably noticed that you don’t get the same exact number each time. That doesn’t mean your meter isn’t operating correctly. It does, though, reflect the variance that is built into each meter. Within the medical community, home blood glucose meters are considered clinically accurate if the result is within 20 percent of what a lab test would indicate. For example, if your glucose meter result was 100 mg/dL, it could vary on the downside to 80 mg/dL or on the upside to 120 mg/dL and still be considered clinically accurate. Your Glucose Meter Measures Blood Differently Than the Lab All blood glucose meters use whole blood to measure glucose. Whole blood is simply a blood sample that contains the red blood cells. In a lab glucose test, only the plasma portion of the blood is used to measure glucose levels; the red blood cells are removed. Whole blood glucose test results are approximately 12 percent lower than the lab plasma results. But there is a way to compare the lab result with your meter. Before you do that, first you need to learn more about your meter. Your Meter Is Calibrated to Whole Blood or Plasma Blood Though all home glucose meters measure whole blood Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Blood Glucose Results

Understanding Your Blood Glucose Results

Understanding your blood glucose level is a beneficial part of diabetes self-management and can help you and your healthcare team to decide which treatment is best for you. This can help towards reducing your risk of diabetes complications. ••••• There are 2 main ways your glucose level can be measured: The HbA1c blood test measures the amount of glucose that has stuck to a part of the red blood cells and is being carried around the body. This test is usually done on a sample of blood taken from a vein in your arm and the result shows your overall control of glucose levels over the last 2-3 months. You will have this test at least once per year. HbA1c targets are a guide and for most adults with diabetes the expected HbA1c target is 48 - 58mmol/mol. This is the target your health team will strive for since evidence shows that this success can reduce the risk of developing complications from diabetes. However, your target should be set after you have discussed this with your doctor or nurse to see what is right for you. If you have a glucose meter and test strips you will be able to self-test your glucose level. The result will be your current glucose level. If you are self-testing it is important you know what your target blood glucose levels are and what your glucose results mean. Your diabetes doctor or nurse will discuss your glucose levels with you and you can agree on your goals. There are many different opinions about the ideal range for glucose levels due to the fact that each person with diabetes is an individual with different needs and responses to therapy. This is why it is important to consider your needs before setting glucose targets and goals. The target blood glucose ranges below are indicated as a guide for adults with diabetes. – 3.5–5.5m Continue reading >>

How To Test For Insulin Resistance: Your Comprehensive Guide

How To Test For Insulin Resistance: Your Comprehensive Guide

This guide is dedicated to Dr.Joseph Kraft MD, a pioneer in the development of laboratory assays to accurately test for insulin resistance before the development of diabetes. The amazing Dr. Kraft just recently passed away in 2017 at the age of 95. His contributions to the field of metabolic and cardiovascular health were under-appreciated during his time but have vast implications today! I’ve been told that my Blood Sugar is Normal! So I’m Not Insulin Resistant, Right? In most medical practices, it is typical to test patients for blood markers of diabetes. Unfortunately, this type of thinking is rather dangerous as the vast majority of people who exhibit signs and symptoms of insulin resistance test negative for diabetes! Signs and Symptoms of Insulin Resistance Increased abdominal circumference Easy weight gain Difficult weight loss Acanthosis nigricans (dark velvety skin behind the neck or under the arms) Skin tags Fatty liver Why are so many patients with these clear signs and symptoms of insulin resistance testing negative for the most common assays for diabetes? The answer is simple! The wrong tests are being recommended. What’s the Difference Between Diabetes and Insulin Resistance? Rather than a condition that develops overnight, the onset of type two diabetes is a lengthy process that takes many, many years to manifest. It begins with insulin resistance, often starting decades before the high blood sugar levels characteristic of a diabetic emerge. Insulin resistance is characterized by hyperinsulinemia – the secretion of higher than normal amounts of insulin either after eating, or continuously even when fasting. Insulin is an important hormone – without which we would quickly die. It is released after we eat, and tells our bodies what to do with the Continue reading >>

Measuring Blood Sugar And Insulin Levels

Measuring Blood Sugar And Insulin Levels

There are many ways for doctors to assess your blood sugar (glucose) and insulin levels and determine insulin resistance. One of the most common methods involves taking an oral "glucose tolerance test." After fasting, a patient drinks a solution containing 75 grams of sugar glucose. Blood is periodically drawn over a two- to five-hour period to determine how high the glucose levels rise and how quickly they fall. Doctors directly measure changes in glucose and infer insulin function from this data. A glucose response more typical of a diabetic or prediabetic suggests insulin resistance. Some physicians, especially those who specialize in the treatment of Syndrome X, also draw blood to specifically measure insulin levels, but this is not common in general practice. A normal fasting glucose range, taken before breakfast, is 65120 mg/dL (ideal range: 80100 mg/dL). A normal fasting insulin range is 635 micro-international units per milliliter (mcIU/mL). A normal two-hour postprandial (postmeal) glucose range is generally 65139 mg/dL. A normal two-hour postprandial insulin range is 635 micro-international units per milliliter (mcIU/mL). Continue reading >>

How To Help Your Body Reverse Diabetes

How To Help Your Body Reverse Diabetes

Diabetes rates are rising, in fact it is now considered an “epidemic” in the medical community. The American Diabetes Association reports that: 23.6 million Americans have diabetes 57 million Americans are pre-diabetic 1.6 new cases of diabetes are reported each year For those over age 60, almost 1 in 4 have diabetes Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death Diabetes increases heart attack risk and 68% of diabetes related death certificates report heart related problems 75% of adults with diabetes will develop high blood pressure Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness, kidney failure and nervous system disorders Diabetes costs $174 billion annually Diabetes is a well-established problem and a multi-billion dollar industry. It is medically characterized by Fasting Blood Glucose higher than 126 mg/dL , which ranges between 100-125 mg/dL are considered pre-diabetic and ranges below 99 mg/dL are considered normal. Studies are finding that a fasting blood glucose below 83 mg/dL is actually a better benchmark, as risk of heart disease begins to increase at anything above that. IMPORTANT: There is a difference between Type 1 diabetes (an autoimmune condition) and Type 2 diabetes (lifestyle related). This article refers specifically to Type 2 diabetes. Some medical professionals use an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) to test for diabetes. If you’ve ever been pregnant and had to drink the sickeningly sweet sugar cocktail and then have blood drawn, you are familiar with this one. Basically, a patient is given 50-75 grams of glucose in concentrated solution and his blood sugar response is measured. I’m not a fan of this test because no one should be ingesting that much concentrated glucose, and the test is not a completely accurate measure. (Just a side note: if yo Continue reading >>

My Results – Kraft Glucose Insulin Test

My Results – Kraft Glucose Insulin Test

This post is to report my results from taking the “Kraft Prediabetes Bloodspot Profile Test” from Meridian Valley Lab. I took the 4 hour test at home on October 13th, 2015 and sent in the blood spot test cards to the lab in a pre-paid UPS mailer the lab provides as a part of the cost of the test. The test requires 6, yes SIX, tests in which you have to poke your finger, or fingers and squeeze out FIVE large drops of blood on a card. The lab sent me back the results on Monday, November 2nd. Be forewarned, this test takes a long time and you have to get a LOT of Blood spots, 5 large blood spots per test! This is an information page that helps you understand the numbers, from Meridian Valley Lab. The first thing I want to make clear is this – I purposely did not Carb Load for two weeks before taking the test, as a person is recommended to do. Why? Because I want to know where I’m really at, with my real life habits. How do carbs effect me now, not after changing my diet for an extended time. Yes, I know this is not the correct way to get the test done, but believe me, I consulted with several doctor friends I have for an opinion about this before taking the test with this method. First, I’m very pleased with my fasting insulin level, which was 3, anything below 10 is normal, but I’ve found below 5 is better. I’ve also found in my not so scientific research (my own personal study of many studies), that fasting insulin seems to track with BMI, or waist circumference, see my graph about this below. This seems to be true in my case as well. I’m normal weight and my fasting insulin is certainly in the normal low range. – link from a Facebook post I did a while back. My fasting sugar is also very good, 67 was that number. I expected to see a low number and I’ Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults: Diagnosis And Management

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults: Diagnosis And Management

Having high blood glucose makes you more likely to get other health problems, so keeping your glucose levels as close to normal as possible is very important. Your diabetes care team will help you with this. You will need to test your blood glucose several times a day, to make sure it doesn't get too high or too low – this is called self‑monitoring. It is done using a simple finger prick test with a home‑testing kit. Your care team should make sure you have all the equipment you need, as well as teaching you how to use the kit and act on the results. You should test your blood glucose at least 4 times a day – before each meal and before you go to bed. You might need to test more often, such as before and during driving, when you exercise, if you start to feel unwell, during illness (as part of sick-day rules) or if you have problems with hypos. Target blood glucose levels Blood glucose levels are given in a unit of measurement that is written as 'mmol/litre' or 'mmol/l'. To minimise your risk of long‑term problems caused by blood glucose levels that are higher than normal, you should aim for the following target levels: If you have to test after a meal, the target level at least 90 minutes after eating is between 5 and 9 mmol/litre. Your diabetes care team should talk with you about your blood glucose targets. This includes what level to aim for before you go to bed, which will depend on when you last ate and your insulin dose. Most adults with type 1 diabetes don't need continuous glucose monitoring. But you may be offered this if you have problems with hypos. Questions to ask about testing your blood glucose Why do I need to test my blood glucose? When should I test? Is it OK to test after a meal rather than before? When might I have to test more often? What Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Monitoring Blood-glucose Levels

The Importance Of Monitoring Blood-glucose Levels

Since your doctor told you that you have diabetes, you’ve had to make a few changes to your habits. Among other things, you probably now have to use a small device called blood glucose meter. Are you aware of the importance of monitoring your blood-glucose levels regularly? Essential facts about diabetes Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects the way the body treats glucose (sugar) in the blood. In the case of type 1 diabetes, the pancreas cannot produce insulin, a hormone that allows the body’s cells to use glucose and produce energy. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is a two-part affliction: first, the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, and second, insulin can no longer play its role properly because the body’s cells are unaffected by it (insulin resistance). People suffering from diabetes, no matter what type, have to be followed by a doctor for life. Type 2 diabetes can, in some cases, initially be controlled by healthy eating habits, weight loss and increased physical activity. Many people with type 2 diabetes, however, will eventually have to take medication; it is most often taken orally, but sometimes it is administered by injection, such as insulin. For its part, treating type 1 diabetes is essentially based on daily insulin injections. Oral medication is not effective for this type of diabetes. Why is it important to control blood-glucose levels? Many people who live with diabetes don’t feel any particular symptoms, unless they are experiencing hyperglycemia (glucose level is too high) or hypoglycemia (glucose level is too low). Hyperglycemia can cause significant damage to some organs, which then leads to complications of diabetes. These include: cardiac or vascular event, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack) or stroke; kidney pr Continue reading >>

Easy At Home Homa-ir Tests

Easy At Home Homa-ir Tests

a simple (at home) diagnosis of prediabetes I wish you would have come to me two years agoeven five years ago, when this was still prediabetes. You could have reversed this with diet and exercise. Im sorry to say this, but you now have type II diabetes. Its hard to know whats harder to hear. That you have diabetes or that it could have been prevented. But although doctors often give us these I wish you would have come to me sooner kind of explanations for their own failings, the truth of the matter is that even if you had shown up five years earlier, your doctor likely would not have tested you for prediabetic insulin resistance ( except if you presented with obvious symptoms). Frustrated with a broken medical model, individuals everywhere are taking the prevention of diabetes into their own hands and putting the health back in healthcare. Today there is a growing number of at home lab tests that are available for undoctored, self-managed healthcare consumers and quantified selfies like us to track and monitor insulin resistance and prediabetic blood levels. The HOMA test is the most accurate gauge of insulin resistance and the best test to gauge ones likelihood of developing diabetes that your doctor is not doing. But you easily can, at home, without a doctors prescription. The HOMA-IR is a diagnostic tool called the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance or the blood code calculation, and it is a highly accurate formula proven to accurately detect insulin resistance before prediabetes or diabetes occurs. Its a simple calculation and multiple diabetes websites have handy calculators online to calculate the HOMA-IR score. You need only plug in the results of two simple, affordable blood tests, a fasting insulin test and a fasting glucose test, and you can c Continue reading >>

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Blood glucose (sugar) is the amount of glucose in your blood at a given time. It is important to check your blood glucose (sugar) levels, because it will: Provide a quick measurement of your blood glucose (sugar) level at a given time; Determine if you have a high or low blood glucose (sugar) level at a given time; Show you how your lifestyle and medication affect your blood glucose (sugar) levels; and Help you and your diabetes health-care team to make lifestyle and medication changes that will improve your blood glucose (sugar) levels. How often should you check your blood glucose (sugar) levels? How frequently you check your blood glucose (sugar) levels should be decided according to your own treatment plan. You and your health-care provider can discuss when and how often you should check your blood glucose (sugar) levels. Checking your blood glucose (sugar) levels is also called Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG). How do you test your blood glucose levels? A blood glucose (sugar) meter is used to check your blood glucose (sugar) at home. You can get these meters at most pharmacies or from your diabetes educator. Talk with your diabetes educator or pharmacist about which one is right for you. Once you receive a meter, ensure you receive the proper training before you begin to use it. Ask your health-care provider about: How and where to draw blood How to use and dispose of lancets (the device that punctures your skin) The size of the drop of blood needed The type of blood glucose (sugar) strips to use How to clean the meter How to check if the meter is accurate How to code your meter (if needed) Note: Your province or territory may subsidize the cost of blood glucose (sugar) monitoring supplies. Contact your local Diabetes Canada branch to find out if this appli Continue reading >>

Home Blood Glucose Test: How To Test For Diabetes At Home

Home Blood Glucose Test: How To Test For Diabetes At Home

Home blood glucose testing is a safe and affordable way to detect diabetes before it becomes a health issue. Diabetes, especially in the early stages, does not always cause symptoms. Almost half of people with the disease don't know they have it. For people already diagnosed with diabetes, a simple diabetes home test is vital in the management of blood sugar levels. It could even be lifesaving. How to test for diabetes at home Home blood glucose monitoring is designed to offer a picture of how the body is processing glucose. A doctor might recommend testing at three different times, and often over the course of several days: Morning fasting reading: This provides information about blood glucose levels before eating or drinking anything. Morning blood glucose readings give a baseline number that offers clues about how the body processes glucose during the day. Before a meal: Blood glucose before a meal tends to be low, so high blood glucose readings suggest difficulties managing blood sugar. After a meal: Post meal testing gives a good idea about how your body reacts to food, and if sugar is able to efficiently get into the cells for use. Blood glucose readings after a meal can help diagnose gestational diabetes, which happens during pregnancy. Most doctors recommend testing about 2 hours after a meal. For the most accurate testing, people should log the food they eat, and notice trends in their blood glucose readings. Whether you consume a high or low carbohydrate meal, if your blood sugar reading is higher than normal afterwards, this suggests the body is having difficulty managing meals and lowering blood glucose. After consulting a doctor about the right testing schedule and frequency, people should take the following steps: Read the manual for the blood glucose moni Continue reading >>

Testing

Testing

There are a range of tests which will need to be done to monitor your health and your diabetes. Some of these, such as your blood glucose levels, you will be able to do yourself. Others will be done by healthcare professionals. Self-monitoring of blood glucose can be a beneficial part of diabetes management. As part of the day-to-day routine it can help with necessary lifestyle and treatment choices as well as help to monitor for symptoms of hypo- or hyperglycaemia. Monitoring can also help you and your healthcare team to alter treatment which in turn can help prevent any long-term complications from developing. Some people with diabetes (but not all) will test their blood glucose levels at home. Home blood glucose testing gives an accurate picture of your blood glucose level at the time of the test. It involves pricking the side of your finger (as opposed to the pad) with a finger-pricking device and putting a drop of blood on a testing strip. Some people can't see the point of testing as they think they know by the way they feel, but the way you feel is not always a good or accurate guide to what is happening. Blood glucose targets It is important that the blood glucose levels being aimed for are as near normal as possible (that is in the range of those of a person who does not have diabetes). These are: 3.5–5.5mmol/l* before meals less than 8mmol/l, two hours after meals. There are many different opinions about the ideal range to aim for. As this is so individual to each person, the target levels must be agreed between the person and their diabetes team. The target blood glucose ranges below are indicated as a guide. Children with Type 1 diabetes (NICE 2015) on waking and before meals: 4–7mmol/l after meals: 5–9mmol/l.after meals: 5–9mmol/l. Adults with Type Continue reading >>

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