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How Much Insulin Is Too Much

Insulin Overdose

Insulin Overdose

Tweet Taking too much insulin can lead to hypoglycemia. This can become particularly serious if your insulin dose was significantly more than it should have been. If you are worried that you have overdosed on insulin, take ample fast-acting carbohydrate immediately and seek advice from your health team, or the out-of-hours service at your local hospital, if applicable. Symptoms of an insulin overdose The list of symptoms below are symptoms of hypoglycemia which can result from an insulin overdose: Depressed mood Drowsiness Headache Hunger Inability to concentrate Irritability Disorientation Nausea Nervousness Personality changes Rapid heartbeat Restlessness Sleep disturbances Slurred speech Pale skin Sweating Tingling Tremor Unsteady movements Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 Continue reading >>

Calculating Insulin Dose

Calculating Insulin Dose

You'll need to calculate some of your insulin doses. You'll also need to know some basic things about insulin. For example, 40-50% of the total daily insulin dose is to replace insulin overnight. Your provider will prescribe an insulin dose regimen for you; however, you still need to calculate some of your insulin doses. Your insulin dose regimen provides formulas that allow you to calculate how much bolus insulin to take at meals and snacks, or to correct high blood sugars. In this section, you will find: First, some basic things to know about insulin: Approximately 40-50% of the total daily insulin dose is to replace insulin overnight, when you are fasting and between meals. This is called background or basal insulin replacement. The basal or background insulin dose usually is constant from day to day. The other 50-60% of the total daily insulin dose is for carbohydrate coverage (food) and high blood sugar correction. This is called the bolus insulin replacement. Bolus – Carbohydrate coverage The bolus dose for food coverage is prescribed as an insulin to carbohydrate ratio. The insulin to carbohydrate ratio represents how many grams of carbohydrate are covered or disposed of by 1 unit of insulin. Generally, one unit of rapid-acting insulin will dispose of 12-15 grams of carbohydrate. This range can vary from 6-30 grams or more of carbohydrate depending on an individual’s sensitivity to insulin. Insulin sensitivity can vary according to the time of day, from person to person, and is affected by physical activity and stress. Bolus – High blood sugar correction (also known as insulin sensitivity factor) The bolus dose for high blood sugar correction is defined as how much one unit of rapid-acting insulin will drop the blood sugar. Generally, to correct a high bloo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prescription Insulin Medications (cont.)

Diabetes Prescription Insulin Medications (cont.)

font size A A A Previous 1 2 3 4 5 Next What are the side effects of the diabetes drug insulin? The main side effects of insulin have to do with taking too little or too much of the drug. The former can result in high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia. A person with diabetes who has hyperglycemia frequently or for long periods of time may suffer damage to the blood vessels, nerves, and organs. In a worst-case scenario, hyperglycemia can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, a potentially life-threatening condition. Loss of appetite, thirst, flushing, drowsiness, and a fruity odor on the breath are the first signs of diabetic ketoacidosis. Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia can result from taking too much insulin, although missing meals and exercising excessively can also bring it on. This, too, can be a life-threatening. Initial signs of hypoglycemia include dizziness, sweating, tremor, confusion, and hunger. It's important to intervene before symptoms progress. High doses of insulin can lower levels of potassium. If potassium gets too low, it can cause muscle aches or weakness, abnormal heart rhythms and even death. Other side effects of insulin include break down of fat at the injection site, the injection site might be depressed or raised, and allergic reactions, which can be local or involve the entire body. The latter may be life-threatening. lower your blood sugar Amputations. INVOKANA® may increase your risk of lower-limb amputations. Amputations mainly involve removal of the toe or part of the foot; however, amputations involving the leg, below and above the knee, have also occurred. Some people had more than one amputation, some on both sides of the body. You may be at a higher risk of lower-limb amputation if you: have a history of amputation, have heart disease or are at Continue reading >>

Handling A Diabetes Emergency

Handling A Diabetes Emergency

Emergencies can happen at any time, so it's best to be prepared and know what to do if an emergency occurs. Talking with your veterinarian is a crucial part of being informed and prepared to handle emergencies. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) The most common side effect experienced with insulin therapy is hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia can be caused by: Missing or delaying food. Change in food, diet, or amount fed. Infection or illness. Change in the body's need for insulin. Diseases of the adrenal, pituitary, or thyroid glands, or progression of liver or kidney disease. Interaction with other drugs (such as steroids). Change (increase) in exercise. Signs of hypoglycemia may occur suddenly and can include: Weakness Depression Behavioral changes Muscle twitching Anxiety Seizures Coma Death See below for a list of other side effects. What to do If your pet is conscious, rub a tablespoon of corn syrup on his or her gums. When your pet is able to swallow, feed him or her a usual meal and contact your veterinarian. If your pet is unconscious or having a seizure, this is a medical emergency. CONTACT YOUR VETERINARIAN. In the meantime, you should immediately treat your pet rather than delaying management. Pour a small amount of a sugar solution (eg, corn syrup) onto your finger and then rub the sugar solution onto your pet's gums. The sugar is absorbed very quickly and your pet should respond in 1 to 2 minutes. The sugar solution should never be poured directly into your pet's mouth since there is a risk that the solution will be inhaled into the lungs. Once your pet has responded to the sugar administration and is sitting up, it can be fed a small amount of its regular food. Once the pet has stabilized, it should be transported to your veterinarian for evaluation. Your pet's diet Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: A Killing Dose Of Insulin

Ask D'mine: A Killing Dose Of Insulin

Hey, All: if you've got questions about life with diabetes, then you've come to the right place! That would be our weekly diabetes advice column, Ask D'Mine, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and clinical specialist Wil Dubois. Today, Wil tackles a very serious question that we hope is just one of genuine curiosity. It's about suicide, a sensitive topic to be approached with the utmost caution. Read on to see how Wil responds... {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Anonymous, type 1 from California, asks: How much insulin would you need to take to kill yourself? [email protected] D’Mine answers: First off, don’t kill yourself. Second off, if you are determined to do it, don’t use insulin. It’s slow and unreliable, with a distinct risk that the attempt will leave you permanently damaged, rather than dead. More on that in a bit. But first, let’s start the day by talking about the different ways to end your day. The Wikipedia entry on suicide methods lists the following ways to usher yourself out of this world: Bleeding, drowning, suffocation, hypothermia, electrocution, jumping from height, using a firearm, hanging, ligature compression, vehicular impact from trains or cars, taking poison, not treating a disease, immolation (including throwing oneself into a volcano), starvation, dehydration, and suicide attack—sometimes called Suicide by Cop. The entry even includes a discussion on the use of homemade guillotines as a way of suicide. But no mention of insulin. That’s odd. Or maybe not, because, as I mentioned, insulin is a crappy tool to try to use to kill yourself. Not surprisingly, studies of insulin suicides are somewhat scarce, but one looked at 160 insulin suicide attempts and found that 94.7% of the PWDs fully recovered, 2.7% Continue reading >>

Mother Accused Of Giving A Child With Type 1 Too Much Insulin

Mother Accused Of Giving A Child With Type 1 Too Much Insulin

Most parents of children with Type 1 diabetes display quiet heroism as they take on the 24/7 task of blood sugar management for their little ones. Their selflessness makes news of a parent who stands accused of trying to poison her child with insulin all the more abhorrent. sponsor Deva Young has been arrested in Cleveland for felonious assault and third-degree felony child endangerment, according to a Cleveland.com report. Ms. Young was taken into custody after social workers told Cleveland police that they suspected she had intentionally given her daughter with Type 1 diabetes an extremely high amount of insulin. Read: Parents Who Withheld Insulin Guilty of First-Degree Murder. Her ex-husband has sworn in a court affidavit that this was not the first time the mother has done this; the six-year-old girl had been hospitalized from insulin overdoses in the past, he attested. A judge has granted the father custody of the girl and a pair of three-year-old siblings. No information was given in the report about the girl’s health after her hospitalization. Ms. Young is being held in a Cleveland jail on a $150,000 bond. The initial report on Ms. Young’s arrest leaves some questions unanswered. For one, the social workers told police that the six-year-old had between 12 times and 77 times the amount of synthetic insulin that should have been in her system. That’s a large range, although it may reflect the difficulty of measuring insulin in the blood after the fact. Although Ms. Young stands accused of these crimes, the state would have to prove she had the intention of making her daughter overdose, as well as the opportunity. The enormous amount of insulin in the girl’s system and the father’s affidavit seem to cast doubt on a possible defense that the overdose was ac Continue reading >>

Too Much Insulin? How To Reset Your Metabolism

Too Much Insulin? How To Reset Your Metabolism

By: Mark Hyman, M.D. Are your hormones out of balance? Does your life feel like a song played badly out of tune? If so, the problem may have to do with imbalances in your hormones, which are wreaking havoc on your body and mind. Today I want to focus on the most common — and therefore the most problematic — of hormonal problems in Americans today: too much insulin. When you eat too much sugar, flour and white rice, your insulin levels spike. When this happens, your cells become resistant to its effects. So you pump out more and more insulin, become even more resistant to its effects, and end up in the vicious cycle of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance can cause energy and mood swings — and it can take you down the slippery road toward high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, cancer, brain aging, dementia, and more. Between 80 and 100 million Americans suffer from insulin resistance. It is not exactly the same in everyone, but the ultimate consequences can be similar. How do you know if you suffer from insulin resistance? Most people with insulin resistance have extra fat around the middle. (Quick Tip: Check your waist-to-hip ratio — the measurement around your belly button divided by the measurement around your hips. If it is greater than 0.8, you likely have insulin resistance.) You may be tall, thin, short, fat, or any combination of these and still have insulin resistance. The only way to know for sure is to take an insulin response test, which measures blood sugar and insulin while you are fasting and one and two hours after you consume a 75-gram sugar drink. Just measuring blood sugar alone isn’t enough. You have to measure insulin — this is something that many doctors miss. Fortunately, balancing blood sugar and correcting insulin resistance a Continue reading >>

You And Your Hormones

You And Your Hormones

What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ located behind the stomach called the pancreas. Here, insulin is released into the bloodstream by specialised cells called beta cells found in areas of the pancreas called islets of langerhans (the term insulin comes from the Latin insula meaning island). Insulin can also be given as a medicine for patients with diabetes because they do not make enough of their own. It is usually given in the form of an injection. Insulin is released from the pancreas into the bloodstream. It is a hormone essential for us to live and has many effects on the whole body, mainly in controlling how the body uses carbohydrate and fat found in food. Insulin allows cells in the muscles, liver and fat (adipose tissue) to take up sugar (glucose) that has been absorbed into the bloodstream from food. This provides energy to the cells. This glucose can also be converted into fat to provide energy when glucose levels are too low. In addition, insulin has several other metabolic effects (such as stopping the breakdown of protein and fat). How is insulin controlled? When we eat food, glucose is absorbed from our gut into the bloodstream. This rise in blood glucose causes insulin to be released from the pancreas. Proteins in food and other hormones produced by the gut in response to food also stimulate insulin release. However, once the blood glucose levels return to normal, insulin release slows down. In addition, hormones released in times of acute stress, such as adrenaline, stop the release of insulin, leading to higher blood glucose levels. The release of insulin is tightly regulated in healthy people in order to balance food intake and the metabolic needs of the body. Insulin works in tandem with glucagon, another hormone produced by the pan Continue reading >>

Too Much Insulin Causes Insulin Resistance

Too Much Insulin Causes Insulin Resistance

POST SUMMARY: What this means for you… Be sure to get your insulin checked on your next wellness visit or check-up. If it’s above ~6-7 IU/ml, make the necessary dietary changes to lower your insulin. As always, remember that dietary fat is the one nutrient that does not increase insulin production in your body. Let natural fats become an increasingly prominent part of your diet, whether it’s from meat or fruit sources. Of the various factors that can cause insulin resistance (and we’ll discuss them all in future posts), insulin is the most relevant. To be precise about it, for every 1 µU change in blood insulin level, a person may experience an approximately 20% increase in insulin resistance [1]. This might seem like a strange cause and effect, but it represents a fundamental feature of how the body works; when a process is excessively activated, the body will often dampen its response to the excess stimulus in order to reduce the activation. This is similar to how bacteria become resistant to antibiotics. With insulin resistance, if a cell, such as muscle or liver, is inundated with insulin, it can do nothing to directly reduce the insulin being produced, which is happening at the pancreas, but it can alter itself to ensure that insulin has a smaller effect; it becomes resistant to insulin. As this occurs in countless cells in several tissues, the body as a whole becomes insulin resistant. Convincing and Distinct Studies The studies that have highlighted this phenomenon of hyperinsulinemia cause insulin resistance are few, but very convincing and distinct from one another. For example, certain pancreas tumors consist of overactive beta cells, the cells that create insulin. This beta cell-loaded tumor is often referred to as an insulinoma because of the high a Continue reading >>

Can You Produce Too Much Insulin?

Can You Produce Too Much Insulin?

Sugar, in the form of glucose, is your body’s primary fuel source. However, having high glucose levels in your blood is damaging to your organs and nerves. To solve this problem, your body produces a hormone called insulin to help keep blood glucose levels within a normal range. Unfortunately, it’s possible to produce too much of this necessary hormone, which increases your risk for chronic diseases. Blood Glucose Regulation Blood sugar control is a carefully-orchestrated process involving your pancreas and liver. Your body breaks down food that contains carbohydrates into glucose, which your cells need for energy. The glucose can’t get into cells on its own, so your pancreas secretes the hormone insulin to signal your cells to let glucose in. Any extra glucose that your cells can’t use right away is sent to the liver where it’s converted to a storage form of glucose called glycogen. The liver converts glycogen back to glucose and releases into the blood stream when glucose levels decline between meals. These actions keep blood sugar levels within normal range. Producing Too Much Insulin Excess insulin production occurs when your cells become insensitive to insulin. Think of it this way: insulin knocks on the door of your cells to tell them to let glucose in, but the cells don’t answer the door in a timely manner. The pancreas releases more insulin in an effort to get glucose into cells and out of the bloodstream, where too much sugar floating around can damage nerves. A vicious cycle ensues where the pancreas produces more insulin to keep blood sugar balanced. After a while the pancreas can have trouble keeping up with the extra insulin production. Then blood sugar levels rise, increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes. Weight Loss Improves Insulin Sensitivity Continue reading >>

Is Obesity Caused By Too Much Insulin?

Is Obesity Caused By Too Much Insulin?

8,106 views Is obesity mainly caused by the fat storing hormone insulin? And if so, why do many people still not agree at all? As the dogma of Calories In, Calories Out is becoming more and more outdated, people like Dr. Ted Naiman sees tremendous results doing the opposite: stop counting calories. Finally, what should you be doing if you want to lose weight by lowering your insulin? Dr. Naiman shares the most effective ways to do this (low carb is just one of four important things). Watch a segment from it above (transcript). The full 25-minute interview – one of our most popular and controversial videos this year – is available on our member site: Is Obesity Caused by Too Much Insulin? – Interview with Dr. Ted Naiman Start your free membership trial to watch it instantly – as well as over 140 video courses, movies, presentations, other interviews, Q&A with experts, etc. Feedback Here’s what our members have said about the interview: Thanks for the interview, it was very informative and helpful. Especially helpful was Dr. Naiman’s explanation that once a person is fat adapted, they need to lower fat intake if they still have some excess weight to lose. Exactly my situation, and the extra advice about increasing exercise was also helpful. I’ll shoot for correct amount of fat and protein, continue to not eat processed carbs, and increase my exercise. Thanks to Dr. Andreas, Dr. Naiman and all the crew at Diet Doctor. – Hal This video is so confusing. Do we eat high fat to loose weight or not. If not its just like any other diet, maybe even harder, low carbs, moderate protein and low fat too. Have listened to lots of your videos where we are told “don’t be afraid of fat” then now we are told to watch our fat intake?? – Geraldine I will go by my pers Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment: How Much Insulin Do You Need?

Diabetes Treatment: How Much Insulin Do You Need?

If you have type 2 diabetes and your doctor thinks it might be a good time to start insulin therapy, there are two important factors to consider: How much insulin do you need to take? When do you need to take it? And both are very personal. “You can’t paint everyone with type 2 diabetes with the same brush,” says Mark Feinglos, M.D., division chief of endocrinology, metabolism,\ and nutrition at the Duke University School of Medicine, in Durham, N.C. “You need to tailor the regimen to an individual’s needs.” A person with type 2 diabetes might start off on half a unit of insulin per kilogram of body weight per day, especially if there is not much known about the nature of his or her diabetes. Still, it is not unusual to need more like one unit, says Dr. Feinglos. (One unit per kilogram would be 68 units per day for someone who weighs 150 pounds, which is about 68 kilograms.) A lot depends on your specific health situation. People with type 2 diabetes suffer from insulin resistance, a situation in which the body loses its ability to use the hormone properly. Early in the course of the disease, the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas respond to insulin resistance by churning out even more of the hormone. Overtime, though, insulin production declines. Taking insulin can help you overcome the body’s insulin resistance, though many factors can affect your dosage. If your body is still sensitive to insulin but the pancreas is no longer making much insulin, for example, Dr. Feinglos says that you would require less insulin than someone who is really resistant to insulin. “But the most important issue is not necessarily how much you need to take,” he adds. “Rather, it’s the timing of what you to take. Timing is everything.” One Shot A Day Or More? If Continue reading >>

> Diabetes: What's True And False?

> Diabetes: What's True And False?

If you're like most people with diabetes, you'll get all kinds of advice about it from friends and family or online. Some of this information is wrong. Here's the truth about some of the common things you might hear. No, it doesn't. Type 1 diabetes happens when cells in the pancreas that make insulin are destroyed. This happens because something goes wrong with the body's immune system. It has nothing to do with how much sugar a person eats. Sugar doesn't cause diabetes. But there is one way that sugar can influence whether a person gets type 2 diabetes. Consuming too much sugar (or sugary foods and drinks) can make people put on weight. Gaining weight leads to type 2 diabetes in some people. Of course, eating too much sugar isn't the only reason why people gain weight. Weight gain from eating too much of any food can make a person's chance of getting diabetes greater. Can people with diabetes eat sweets? Yes! You can have your cake and eat it too, just not the whole cake! Like everyone, people with diabetes should put the brakes on eating too many sweets. But you can still enjoy sweets sometimes. Do people "grow out of" diabetes? People with type 1 diabetes don't grow out of it. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops making insulin and won't make it again. People with type 1 diabetes will always need to take insulin, at least until scientists find a cure for diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes will always have a tendency to get high blood sugar levels. But if they take steps to live a healthier life, it can sometimes lower their blood sugar. If people eat healthy foods and exercise enough to get their blood sugar levels back on track, doctors might say they can stop taking insulin or other medicines. Can you catch diabetes from a person who has it? No. Diabetes is Continue reading >>

“i Just Injected 46 Units Of The Wrong Insulin!”

“i Just Injected 46 Units Of The Wrong Insulin!”

I have lived with type 2 diabetes for thirteen years, and I know very well howto take care of myself. In fact, I have it down to a routine. The flaw of aroutine activity, however, is that it is so very routine: you go through themotions without thinking. And that, as I learned to my deep chagrin, can bedangerous. On a recent speaking trip, I was just about to step into the shower when Iremembered that it was time for my Lantus injection. No problem-I stepped awayfrom the shower, prepared the dose, and injected the insulin. As soon as thedeed was done, however, dismay overwhelmed me. I had grabbed the wrong insulinand had just injected 46 units of rapid-acting Apidra instead of slow-releaseLantus. And I was alone in my hotel room, stark naked. My experience as a diabetes trainer kicked into overdrive as I yanked everythingout of the mini-fridge, desperately counting the carbohydrates available tocounter the quick-acting Apidra. The procedure I teach to treat hypoglycemia(low blood sugar) is to eat fifteen grams of fast-acting carbohydrates, waitfifteen minutes, and then check your blood sugar level. This process shouldcontinue until your blood sugar is over 70 mg/dl. But because I did not knowhow low my blood sugar would plummet on 46 units of Apidra, my overridingthought was to stuff down as many simple carbohydrates as I could, as fast as Icould. That night, thankfully, the mini-fridge was uncharacteristically full. I sweptup two pieces of leftover bread, two small bunches of grapes, crackers, and areal Coke, in addition to my usual glucose tablets and orange juice. One part ofmy brain began methodically counting the carbohydrates that I was ingesting: thirty-three grams from the orange juice, twenty from the bread, twelve from theglucose tablets. The other part of my Continue reading >>

Insulin Overdose: Dosage, Symptoms, And Treatment

Insulin Overdose: Dosage, Symptoms, And Treatment

Insulin is an important hormone used in medical treatments for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It helps the body's cells to properly absorb sugar. Insulin is a lifesaving medication when taken correctly, but an insulin overdose can have some serious side effects. This article explores signs of insulin overdose to look out for, as well as steps to take to avoid insulin overdoses. Contents of this article: Safe vs. unsafe insulin doses There are a few things to consider to ensure a correct insulin dose. Insulin doses can vary greatly from person to person. The normal dose for one person may be considered an overdose for another. Basal insulin The insulin needed to keep the blood sugar steady throughout the day is called basal insulin. The amount of insulin needed changes from person to person based on what time of day they take it, and whether their body is resistant to insulin or not. It is best to consult a doctor to figure out the appropriate basal insulin dosage. Mealtime insulin Mealtime insulin is insulin that is taken after a meal. Glucose (sugar) is released into the bloodstream as the body breaks down food, which raises the blood sugar levels. In people with diabetes, this extra sugar must be met with extra insulin so the body can use it properly. There are a few different factors to be considered in terms of the mealtime insulin levels. People with diabetes have to consider: their pre-meal blood sugar how many carbs are in the food they are eating if they plan to do anything active after the meal Then they must factor in their own level of insulin sensitivity and the blood sugar target they want to hit after the insulin is taken. The process can be complicated and, as such, there is room for error. Other variables There are also a few different types of Continue reading >>

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