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How Much Does One Unit Of Insulin Decrease Blood Sugar?

Your Insulin Therapy

Your Insulin Therapy

Your doctor has given you insulin to help control your diabetes. You need two kinds of insulin: basal and mealtime insulin. Sometimes insulin is premixed for you. Keep a record of your blood sugar and insulin shots every day so the amounts of insulin can be changed to fit your lifestyle. Your basal insulin type and dose are (your doctor will fill in the blanks): NPH insulin: Inject _____ units at ____ a.m. and _____ units at _____ p.m. Ultralente or glargine (Lantus): inject ____ units at _______ a.m./p.m. Basal insulin provides steady levels of insulin. NPH lasts 10 to 16 hours. Ultralente and glargine last 24 hours. Take your basal insulin at the same time every day. Do not skip your basal insulin shots, even if you are sick. Your body still needs the basal insulin. Do not mix glargine with other insulins. NPH can be mixed. Do not take glargine if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Your basal insulin dose should be increased every seven days until your fasting blood sugar level is between 90 and 130 mg per dL. Talk to your doctor about how much to increase your dose. Low blood sugar (this is called hypoglycemia) can happen if you take too much insulin. Symptoms of low blood sugar include shakiness, weakness, dizziness, confusion, and headache. Some people may not have symptoms. Check your blood sugar level if you have any of these symptoms. You also should check your blood sugar level during your insulin's peak of activity (talk to your doctor about this). If your blood sugar level is below 70 mg per dL, follow the Rule of 15: Eat or drink 15 grams of carbohydrates (e.g., one half glass of orange juice or one slice of bread). Wait 15 minutes, and test your blood sugar level again. If your blood sugar level is still below 70 mg per dL, do steps 1 and 2 ag Continue reading >>

Mysugr Bolus Calculator – Get Help With Your Insulin Dose (currently Available In Eu)

Mysugr Bolus Calculator – Get Help With Your Insulin Dose (currently Available In Eu)

back to Overview It's time for lunch. Your blood sugar is 165 mg/dl (9.2 mmol/L). You have a big slice of pizza, a bag of chips, and a cold Diet Coke waiting for you. How much insulin do you take? I can think of a few ways this goes: There’s not much to think about. You always eat the same thing and always take the same amount of insulin. You define the phrase “creature of habit.” You hate thinking about all of this stuff, so you just guess. You love doing a bunch of math before every meal, so calculating your insulin dose is fun and easy. I can relate to the first two. There’s a lot of value in routine, and I’ve also done my share of guesstimating. That last one? Enjoying all of the diabetes math? I’m sorry. That’s just weird. (I’m teasing. Kind of…) But there’s another option, and it makes thinking about your insulin doses easier and more precise. I’m talking about a bolus calculator. If you wear an insulin pump, you’re probably already using one (they’re often built in). You’re welcome to stay and read, but there’s not much new information for you here. However, if you’re using injections (syringes or pens), like most people with diabetes, then stick around. This article should be helpful. So you don’t have (or want) an insulin pump, but I bet you have a smartphone. What does that mean? It means that you should meet mySugr’s Bolus Calculator. It’s a module integrated into the mySugr app that helps with your insulin doses (note: mySugr Bolus Calculator is currently approved for use in Europe). What the heck is a “bolus,” you ask? Great question. A bolus, in our case, is a single dose of insulin given all at once. In other words, it’s your mealtime shot or a shot to fix a high blood sugar. mySugr’s Bolus Calculator examines Continue reading >>

Understand Diabetes

Understand Diabetes

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, you are certainly not alone. Diabetes affects more than 29 million people in the United States and approximately 415 million people worldwide. Although diabetes is a very common diagnosis, managing your disease is a very personal experience. Learning about your diabetes and treatment options such as insulin can help. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease where your blood sugar can be higher than normal because: Your pancreas makes little, not enough, or no insulin, or Your body prevents the insulin you do make from working correctly What does this mean? If you have diabetes, sugar can’t get into your cells and it stays in your blood. This causes your blood sugar to stay too high (also called hyperglycemia). Both high and low blood sugar can result in serious complications. Follow your health care provider's recommendation about the best time of day to check your blood sugar. Once you get a little practice checking your blood sugar, it will become part of your routine. No compatible source was found for this video. Hyperglycemia A condition that occurs when a person’s blood sugar levels are too high. Symptoms of hyperglycemia may include having to urinate often and being very thirsty. A hormone produced in the pancreas that regulates the amount of glucose in the blood. Lack of insulin production can cause diabetes. Continue reading >>

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How much insulin does it take to lower blood sugar? A patient with newly diagnosed diabetes has a hemoglobin (Hb) A1c of 12.2% and glucose 350 mg/dL, despite increasing insulin (glargine [Lantus]) to 25 units. What else can be done to lower blood sugar? ClinicalAdvisor.com is for nurse practitioners and physician assistants, offering the latest information on diagnosing, treating, managing, and preventing medical conditions typically seen in the office-based primary-care setting. Find all of the news and departments you love from the print issue archived for easy online access, along with special Web-only content. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

Getting Started When most people find out they have Type 2 diabetes, they are first instructed to make changes in their diet and lifestyle. These changes, which are likely to include routine exercise, more nutritious food choices, and often a lower calorie intake, are crucial to managing diabetes and may successfully lower blood glucose levels to an acceptable level. If they do not, a drug such as glyburide, glipizide, or metformin is often prescribed. But lifestyle changes and oral drugs for Type 2 diabetes are unlikely to be permanent solutions. This is because over time, the pancreas tends to produce less and less insulin until eventually it cannot meet the body’s needs. Ultimately, insulin (injected or infused) is the most effective treatment for Type 2 diabetes. There are many barriers to starting insulin therapy: Often they are psychological; sometimes they are physical or financial. But if insulin is begun early enough and is used appropriately, people who use it have a marked decrease in complications related to diabetes such as retinopathy (a diabetic eye disease), nephropathy (diabetic kidney disease), and neuropathy (nerve damage). The need for insulin should not be viewed as a personal failure, but rather as a largely inevitable part of the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. This article offers some practical guidance on starting insulin for people with Type 2 diabetes. When to start insulin Insulin is usually started when oral medicines (usually no more than two) and lifestyle changes (which should be maintained for life even if oral pills or insulin are later prescribed) have failed to lower a person’s HbA1c level to less than 7%. (HbA1c stands for glycosylated hemoglobin and is a measure of blood glucose control.) However, a recent consensus statement from Continue reading >>

How Much Does 1 Unit Of Insulin Bring Your Sugar Down

How Much Does 1 Unit Of Insulin Bring Your Sugar Down

Question Originally asked by Community Member karen How Much Does 1 Unit Of Insulin Bring Your Sugar Down Using a chart to give my mother her insulin, sometimes it just seams its not bringing her sugar down to a lower level. Answer The “correction factor” is the term used for the amount of insulin a person needs in order to bring their blood sugar down to 120. It is different for everyone! Your mother’s endocrinologist should have a note of what this dose has been in the past, but you can also figure this out purely by conducting SAFE trial and error. If her blood sugar is at 200, try giving her one unit of insulin and test her blood sugar a half hour later, and then an hour later. If it’s still high, give another. For example, in MY body, if my blood sugar is at 200, I take two units of insulin to bring it down to 100 to 120. If I was going to be doing any exercise also at this time, i would only take one unit as my “correction factor” because the exercise would help bring the blood sugar down, too. Ginger You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Continue reading >>

1 Unit Insulin Lowers Glucose By How Much? Calculating Insulin/carb Ratio

1 Unit Insulin Lowers Glucose By How Much? Calculating Insulin/carb Ratio

Remember High School algebra? Problem after problem wondering, when am I EVER going to use this? I sure remember thinking that on more than one occasion. Well, it turns out math does have more practical application than balancing your checkbook, keeping a budget, and calculating tips for servers. If you have type 2 diabetes, simple math may be crucial to keeping blood glucose under control. Why? As it turns out, the total amount of carbohydrates is the single most significant factor in maintaining blood glucose control. While many other factors play a role – such as meal timing, quality of food choices, balance of food groups etc – consistently maintaining the proper number of carbohydrates at meal times is most significant. Foods Really Matter This means it is not only key to choose complex carbohydrate (not simple sugars) whole foods sources, but also to be conscientious of the amount of carbohydrates you regularly consume. The amount of carbohydrates to eat per day is a hot issue of debate, with recommendations ranging from 20 to 200+ grams per day! In most cases 200 grams is way too much for a diabetic, research indicating that a lower carb diet is best for glucose control. Still, what is best for you will depend on many factors including your height, weight, age, physical activity level, and how your body responds to carbs. Some people are much more sensitive than others. For example, some people can eat brown rice and oatmeal, while in many cases people find it difficult to control their blood glucose while still eating these high carb foods. It will take working with a team of trusted professionals and probably some trial and error to find out what works best for you as an individual. In theory, the more consistent your carbohydrate consumption is (all other Continue reading >>

What’s A Correction Factor? An Insulin Sensitivity? A Ratio?

What’s A Correction Factor? An Insulin Sensitivity? A Ratio?

Share: A Correction Factor (sometimes called insulin sensitivity), is how much 1 unit of rapid acting insulin will generally lower your blood glucose over 2 to 4 hours when you are in a fasting or pre-meal state. However, you should keep in mind: this is an estimate it may need to change as your baseline dose changes expect variations - sometimes 1 unit will lower it by more, and other times 1unit will lower it by less! calculating how much 1 unit of insulin will drop your blood sugar is a trial and error process, and sensitivity to insulin varies with the individual To get your total daily dose, add up all your usual meal time insulin and basal insulin. For example, Tom wants to calculate his correction factor: daily insulin dose: 8 units at breakfast, 6 units at lunch,10 at dinner and N/NPH 8 units at breakfast and 18 units at 10 pm Total Daily Dose (TDD) = 8 + 8 + 6+ 10 + 18 = 50 Correction Factor (CF) = 100/50 = 2 Therefore, one unit of rapid acting insulin would lower Tom’s blood sugar by 2 mmol/L over the next 2 to 4 hours. The average adult needs approximately 1 unit of insulin for every 2 mmol increase in blood sugar, but this can vary a lot between individuals: some people need 1 unit of insulin for every 1 mmol/L increase in blood sugar others need 1 unit of insulin for every 3 -5 mmol/L increase in blood sugar Using your CF before meal doses Before meal means there has been about 4 hours or more since you last ate or took an insulin dose for carbohydrate containing food or beverage. The correction factor or insulin sensitivity can be used to make a scale for pre meal insulin doses. BG Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bed Basal < 3.9 -2 -2 -2 Snack 4.0 - 5.9 Baseline Baseline Baseline Baseline Baseline 6.0 - 7.9 Baseline Baseline Baseline Baseline Baseline 8.0 – 9.9 Continue reading >>

How Much Does One Unit Of Humalog Reduce Bs Levels?

How Much Does One Unit Of Humalog Reduce Bs Levels?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community How much does one unit of Humalog reduce BS levels? How much does one unit of Humalog reduce BS levels? There's no one answer to that. It depends on your personal correction amount. It'll vary from person to person. TorqPenderloin Type 1 Well-Known Member Your doctor should start you on a set ratio and adjust it from there. There are way too many factors to give you a responsible answer that includes a number. 1 unit in the morning does very little to my levels whereas 1 unit in the evening might drop them significantly. I take 1/2 unit with each meal but each meal gets bigger as the day goes on. As Tork said it does very little in the morning but does a lot at night. Most people are most insulin resistant in the morning therefore potentially requiring more insulin to cover the same foods later in the day 1/2 unit without food generally lowers me about 25. Your size, muscle, weight, insulin resistance, activity, what you ate at he last meal etc etc all play a roll There is the 100 rule - But this has never worked reliably for me because my insulin sensitivity changes throughout the day/month and also depending on how high my blood sugar is eg if it's over 12 1u will do absolutely nothing for me. How much does one unit of Humalog reduce BS levels? With sincere respect. You are asking "how long is a piece of string." With sincere respect. You are asking "how long is a piece of string." Thank you everyone for your comments. I was considering using a bolus calculator - this would appear to be a waste of time. Thank you everyone for your comments. I was considering using a bolus calculator - this would appear to be a waste of time. Have a go at using the R Continue reading >>

Insulin Dosage Calculations

Insulin Dosage Calculations

When your doctor prescribes insulin to treat your diabetes, you need to understand how to calculate your dosage requirements to properly manage the carbohydrates in your diet, your natural blood sugar fluctuations and a pump, if necessary. Mistakes in insulin dosage calculations can have dangerous medical side effects, so it is important to work with your doctor and establish a solid dosage plan for your insulin therapy. Video of the Day If you are a newly diagnosed diabetic and obtaining a pump, you need to identify the total daily insulin dose as a starting point to measure your basal dose. A general guideline from which to start one-quarter of your weight. For example, if you weigh 280 pounds, your entire daily dose of insulin will be close to 70 units between your long-acting insulin and your mealtime rapid-acting dose. This provides a starting point to calculate a basal rate for an insulin pump. Insulin Pump Dosage Calculation Log your insulin doses over the course of a week. Track every insulin dose, both fast-acting and long-acting. For example, if you take 20 units of long-acting insulin twice daily, and then an average of 4 units per meal, you take 52 units of insulin daily. Divide that total in half. Your basal insulin, or the amount of insulin your pump distributes throughout the day, is 26 units. The remaining 26 units are dosed in even bolus amounts, or additional doses before each meal, based on how many carbohydrates you eat. Carbohydrate Insulin Dose Cover your carbohydrate intake by calculating the insulin dose that your body needs to manage the carbohydrates you are eating. Start with the insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio recommended by your doctor or diabetic educator. Determine how many grams of carbohydrates you are eating by reading the nutrition label Continue reading >>

How Much Insulin Do You Need?

How Much Insulin Do You Need?

Getty ImagesIf you have type 2 diabetes and your doctor thinks it might be a good time to start insulin therapy, there are two important factors to consider: How much insulin do you need to take? When do you need to take it? And both are very personal. "You can't paint everyone with type 2 diabetes with the same brush," says Mark Feinglos, MD, division chief of endocrinology, metabolism, and nutrition at the Duke University School of Medicine, in Durham, N.C. "You need to tailor the regimen to an individual's needs." A person with type 2 diabetes might start off on half a unit of insulin per kilogram of body weight per day, especially if there is not much known about the nature of his or her diabetes. Still, it is not unusual to need more like 1 unit, says Dr. Feinglos. (One unit per kilogram would be 68 units per day for someone who weighs 150 pounds, which is about 68 kilograms.) Testing Each DayI test morning, evening, and before meals Watch videoMore about blood sugar monitoring A lot depends on your specific health situation. People with type 2 diabetes suffer from insulin resistance, a situation in which the body loses its ability to use the hormone properly. Early in the course of the disease, the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas respond to insulin resistance by churning out even more of the hormone. Over time, though, insulin production declines. Taking insulin can help you overcome the body's insulin resistance, though many factors can affect your dosage. If your body is still sensitive to insulin but the pancreas is no longer making much insulin, for example, Dr. Feinglos says that you would require less insulin than someone who is really resistant to insulin. "But the most important issue is not necessarily how much you need to take," he adds. "Rather, Continue reading >>

Is One Unit Of Insulin Equal?

Is One Unit Of Insulin Equal?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. "The more you weigh and the more insulin you take, the less every unit will lower your blood sugars." Pg 128 Sensitivity to Insulin based on Daily Insulin Useage - How much 1 unit lowers Blood Sugar The result is an approximate range of how much one unit of insulin will lower your blood sugar. This means that every unit of insulin should lower BS approximately 54 – 64. (To simplify round off to 60.) Is this "formula" the same for all types of insulin? Whether you take only rapid? Whether you take in longer acting? Whether you use a 70/30 Mix? Is ONE Unit of INSULIN Equal? *regardless of which type of insulin? The 1500 rule applies to using fast acting insulin (Humalog, Novolog or Apidra) to do corrections. The 1800 rule applied to doing this with Regular. Basal insulin is not intended to bring blood sugar down and we need to use dosages that keep BG at a constant level. These rules also can't be applied to the use of mixed insulin because it contains both fast acting and basal. I don't find the 1500 rule that useful. I find the amount of insulin required to correct a high depends a lot on the the level of the high, and a linear formula just doesn't work. I have the same experience as Blue Sky. It proportionally takes more insulin for me to lower a 300 to 100 than it does to lower a 150 to 100. My correction factor is about 50 (changes during the day) so it takes one unit to go from 150 to 100. It would take me 3.75 units to go from 300 to 100 if all other things are the same. Each person is different and my own experience is that the same person can be different under different circumst Continue reading >>

Insulin Correction Dose Calculator -beta

Insulin Correction Dose Calculator -beta

perinatology.com Please enable JavaScript to view all features on this site. Insulin Correction Dose Calculator Select the type of insulin, enter the total daily dose of insulin used, the carbohydrate content of the meal, and press 'calculate' button to estimate the amount of insulin needed to cover the carbohydrate content of the meal. All calculations must be confirmed before use. The suggested results are not a substitute for clinical judgment. Neither Perinatology.com nor any other party involved in the preparation or publication of this site shall be liable for any special, consequential, or exemplary Insulin Type Rapid acting Insulin (Humalog, Novolog) Short acting (Regular) Total Daily Dose of Insulin (TDD) units Carbohydrate Content of meal : grams Current Blood Glucose mg/dL Target Pre-Meal Blood Glucose mg/dL Carbohydrate Ratio = One unit of insulin covers grams of carbohydrate Insulin Sensitivity Factor (ISF) = One unit insulin decreases blood glucose by mg/dL Insulin required to cover carbohydrate in meal units Correction to Dose Of Insulin units Dose Of Insulin for meal units Meal related insulin boluses are calculated according to the carbohydrate content of the meal using the carbohydrate-to-insulin ratio (CIR) The carbohydrate-to-insulin ratio (CIR) is the number of grams of carbohydrate that are covered by 1 unit of insulin. The CIR is calculated by dividing the constant 450 by the Total Daily Dose (TDD). The CIR may be different for different meals of the day. CIR-= 450 / TDD Example: TDD= 50 units insulin CIR= 450 /50 = 9 grams/unit The meal has 90 grams of carbohydrate Meal insulin bolus = carbohydrates/carbohydrate to insulin ratio CIR =90/9= 10 units If the post meal blood sugar is above the targeted blood sugar range for 2 to 3 days then consider Continue reading >>

Insulin Dose Calculation Definitions Ï‚§carbohydrate Ratio

Insulin Dose Calculation Definitions Ï‚§carbohydrate Ratio

Information Needed to Get Started How many grams of carbs the child is eating Blood glucose (BG) taken before eating Important numbers from primary caregiver: – Carbohydrate Ratio – Correction Target – Correction Factor How many grams of carbohydrates will be covered by one unit of insulin Correction Target Target blood glucose value used for insulin dose calculations when the blood glucose is high Correction Factor How many points (mg/dL) one unit of insulin will lower the blood glucose over several hours Bolus Insulin Calculation Worksheet Insulin for carbs Insulin for high blood glucose Add insulin for carbs to insulin for high blood glucose Bolus Insulin Calculation Worksheet Place the example numbers on the worksheet. Carbohydrate Ratio: 15 Correction Target: 120 Correction Factor: 30 15 30120 Bolus Insulin Calculation Worksheet Place the example numbers on the worksheet. Carbohydrate Ratio: 15 Correction Target: 120 Correction Factor: 30 15 30120 Bolus Insulin Calculation Worksheet Place total carbs and blood glucose on the worksheet. Carb Grams: 68 Blood Glucose: 214 15 30120 68 214 Bolus Insulin Calculation Worksheet Calculate carb bolus: 68 ÷ 15 = 4.533 Round answer to nearest tenths 15 30120 68 214 For example: 4.533 rounds to 4.5 4.555 rounds to 4.6 Bolus Insulin Calculation Worksheet Calculate Correction Bolus: 214–120 = 94 ÷ 30 = 3.133 Round answer to nearest tenths 15 30120 68 214 4.5 94 3.1 For example: 3.133 rounds to 3.1 3.155 rounds to 3.2 Bolus Insulin Calculation Worksheet Add the carb bolus to the correction bolus: 4.5 + 3.1 = 7.6 15 30120 68 214 4.5 94 3.1 4.5 3.1 7.6 Bolus Insulin Calculation Worksheet The final Rounded Total Insulin Bolus depends if the child uses half units or Continue reading >>

How To Determine Your Insulin Sensitivity Factor

How To Determine Your Insulin Sensitivity Factor

For many people with diabetes, insulin injections are the key to keeping their blood sugar at normal levels. Getting the right amount of insulin can seem a bit tricky at first. This is where you’ll need to do some math to get the dose just right. The pancreas makes the hormone insulin. Insulin helps the body use sugar as an energy source. It also helps balance your blood glucose levels. People with type 1 diabetes don’t make enough insulin. People with type 2 diabetes don’t properly use the insulin their bodies make. Taking insulin is necessary for people with type 1 diabetes, but it can also be important for people who have type 2 diabetes. An insulin dose that’s too high could lower your blood sugar too much. This can cause hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia occurs when your blood sugar falls below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hypoglycemia can lead to a loss of consciousness and seizures. Learn more: Humalog vs. NovoLog: Important differences and more » An insulin dose that’s too low may not bring your blood sugar to the target level. The resulting high blood sugar is called hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia can lead to serious complications over time that can affect your: heart kidneys eyes nerves other organs You’ll need to know how sensitive you are to insulin to know the right dose of insulin to take. In other words, you’ll need to know how much insulin you need to lower your blood sugar by a certain amount. Insulin sensitivity isn’t the same for everyone. Some people with diabetes are more sensitive to insulin that others. In general, people with type 1 diabetes are more sensitive to insulin than people with type 2 diabetes. Your sensitivity to insulin can vary during the day based on your level of activity and your body’s rhythm of daily hormone se Continue reading >>

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