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How Many Units Of Insulin Are In A Vial Of Novolog

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog and Novolog are two diabetes medications. Humalog is the brand-name version of insulin lispro, and Novolog is the brand-name version of insulin aspart. These drugs both help control blood glucose (sugar) in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Humalog and Novolog are both rapid acting. That means they work more quickly than other types of insulin. There are important distinctions between Humalog and Novolog, however, and the drugs are not directly interchangeable. Check out this comparison so you can work with your doctor to choose a drug that’s right for you. Insulin is injected under your skin fat. It’s the most common type of treatment for type 1 diabetes because it works quickly. It’s also the only type of diabetes medication that’s absorbed into the bloodstream. Humalog and Novolog are both equivalent to the insulin made in your body. Unlike oral diabetes drugs, insulin provides fast relief for changes in your blood sugar. The type of insulin your doctor prescribes depends on how often and how much your blood sugar fluctuates each day. The table below provides quick facts at a glance. Brand name Humalog Novolog What is the generic drug? insulin lispro insulin aspart Is a generic version available? no no What does it treat? type 1 and type 2 diabetes type 1 and type 2 diabetes What form does it come in? solution for injection solution for injection What strengths does it come in? • 3-mL cartridges • 3-mL prefilled KwikPen • 3-mL vials • 10-mL vials • 3-mL FlexPen • 3-mL FlexTouch • 3-mL PenFill cartridges • 10-mL vials What is the typical length of treatment? long-term long-term How do I store it? Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Continue reading >>

Novolog® (insulin Aspart (rdna Origin) Injection)

Novolog® (insulin Aspart (rdna Origin) Injection)

NOVOLOG - insulin aspart injection, solution Novo Nordisk Inc. HIGHLIGHTS OF PRESCRIBING INFORMATION These highlights do not include all the information needed to use NOVOLOG safely and effectively. See full prescribing information for NOVOLOG. NOVOLOG (insulin aspart) injection, solution for intravenous and subcutaneous use Initial U.S. Approval: 2000 INDICATIONS AND USAGE NovoLog is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus (1.1). DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION The dosage of NovoLog must be individualized. Subcutaneous injection: NovoLog should generally be given immediately (within 5-10 minutes) prior to the start of a meal (2.2). Use in pumps: Change the NovoLog in the reservoir, the infusion set, and the infusion set insertion site at least every 48 hours. NovoLog should not be mixed with other insulins or with a diluent when it is used in the pump (2.3). Intravenous use: NovoLog should be used at concentrations from 0.05 U/mL to 1.0 U/mL insulin aspart in infusion systems using polypropylene infusion bags. NovoLog has been shown to be stable in infusion fluids such as 0.9% sodium chloride (2.4). DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS Each presentation contains 100 Units of insulin aspart per mL (U-100) 10 mL vials (3) 3 mL PenFill® cartridges for the 3 mL PenFill cartridge device (3) 3 mL NovoLog FlexPen Prefilled syringe (3) CONTRAINDICATIONS Do not use during episodes of hypoglycemia (4). Do not use in patients with hypersensitivity to NovoLog or one of its excipients. WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin therapy. Glucose monitoring is recommended for all patients with diabetes. Any change of insulin dose should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision (5.1, 5. Continue reading >>

Insulin Delivery Options

Insulin Delivery Options

There are many ways to take NovoLog®. You and your health care provider will choose the way that works best for you. Some people take their insulin injection using a vial and syringe or an insulin pump. But many people who take NovoLog® use an insulin pen called NovoLog® FlexPen®. NovoLog® FlexPen® There are many reasons why NovoLog® FlexPen® is widely used. NovoLog® FlexPen® does not stand out the way an old-fashioned vial and syringe might. So most people who see you take out your FlexPen® probably won’t even know what it is. This may make you feel better using it in front of others in restaurants, at work, and even at home. Your FlexPen® is prefilled with NovoLog® insulin. And, it’s ready to use in just a few steps. Simply dial the exact amount of insulin you need and inject by pressing a button. View NovoLog® FlexPen® instructions online or download a printable patient brochure. NovoLog® FlexPen® fits in a pocket or purse and is: Able to deliver from 1 to 60 units of insulin Adjustable in 1-unit dosing amounts Ready to go! Once in use, it can be used for up to 28 days without refrigeration. To view full storage details, click here. NovoLog® FlexPen® lasts up to 28 days without refrigeration after first use, so it can be taken almost anywhere. Once in use, NovoLog® FlexPen® must be kept at room temperature, below 86°F. NovoLog® FlexPen® is disposable, so there is no refilling. When you run out of insulin, throw out your old FlexPen® and start fresh with a new one. Each NovoLog® FlexPen® package has 5 disposable insulin pens, for a total of 1500 units of NovoLog® insulin. Saving on NovoLog® FlexPen® NovoLog® FlexPen® is covered by most health care and Medicare prescription plans. You can get NovoLog® FlexPen® for about the same co Continue reading >>

Math Calculations With Novolog Insulin

Math Calculations With Novolog Insulin

www.TakeRx.com Calculate the total quantity and the total days supply for the following Rx: novolog 70/30 15 units bid disp: 6 bottles ------------------------------------------------------------ The doctor has prescribed 6 bottles of NovoLog Mix 70/30 Each vial of NovoLog Mix has 10 mL of insulin. 1 vial = 10 mL and then 6 vials = 60 mL So, the total quantity to be dispensed is 60 mL The sig says: inject 15 units subcutaneously twice daily In other words, the patient will inject 30 units per day. Now, we need to convert 30 units into mL We know that the ratio is 1mL/100U x / 30U = 1mL / 100U x = (30 * 1) / 100 x = 0.3 mL So, the patient will inject 0.3 mL per day. Now, the total days supply will be 60mL divided by 0.3mL which is 200 days. On the other hand, most insurance companies will not pay for 6 vials of NovoLog all at once. So, the patient will very likely be forced by the insurance company to get one vial at a time. We know that the patient needs to inject 0.3 mL of insulin per day. How much insulin does the patient need in one month? The patient will inject 0.3 mL * 30 days which means the patient will inject 9mL per month. In this case, the pharmacist will dispense one vial every mouth. So, the patient will pick up at the pharmacy one vial every month during a period of six months. In this case, the total quantity prescribed will be 60mL, but the total quantity dispensed will be 10mL and the total days supply will be 30 days. The bottom line is that insurance companies often impose restrictions and limitations on patients. Calculate the total quantity and the total days supply for the following Rx: Novolog mix 70/30 flexpen susp sig: 35U in am and 25U in pm disp: 18 ------------------------------------------------------------ The doctor has prescribed NovoLog Continue reading >>

Pharm Ch 15

Pharm Ch 15

Routine Adminsitration Intermediate and long-acting insulin (including mixtures) are usually given this way. Patient will receive insulin injections at specific times during the day. This regimen provides a slow release of insulin over a relatively long period (called basal level), which mimics the body's own natural release of insulin throughout the day. Ex: Lantus 20 units, subcut, every evening NPH insulin 14 units, subcut before breakfast NovoLog Mix 70/30, 18 U, subcut before breakfast and dinner Sliding-Scale Insulin Administration Fallen out of favor with providers. A patient is administered a rapid or short acting insulin based upon the blood glucose level drawn prior to meals. The sliding scale reacts to hyperglycemia after it has occurred rather than preventing it from occurring, and it does not account for carbs that will be consumed in the upcoming meal. Ex: Administer insulin aspart (Humalog), subcut before meals, based on BG levels: less than 110 mg/dL=0 units 110-130=3 units 131-150=4 units 151-200=6 units over 200=call provider Guidelines for Removing Insulin from a Vial: 1) Carefully select the correct vial of Insulin. 2) Inspect the insulin for appearance 3) Check the expiration date. Do not use if passed expiration date 4) Select the appropriate syringe size 5) Clean the vials' rubber stopper using aseptic technique. 6) Carefully uncap the insulin syringe, being careful to keep the cap clean and the needle shaft and plunger sterile. 7) Draw back air into the syringe the same amoung of the insulin that will be injected 8) Insert the needle into the center of the rubber stopper in the vial and inject the air 9) Turn the vial upside down and draw back the necessary dosage of insulin, being careful to remove any bubbles that have collected inside the syri Continue reading >>

Novolog

Novolog

Novolog is a prescription medication used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Novolog is a fast-acting form of insulin. It is usually given with a long-acting insulin to provide a steady amount of insulin to control blood glucose (sugar) levels. This medication comes in an injectable form available in vials and prefilled pens. Novolog should be injected just under the skin 5 to 10 minutes before meals. It may also be injected directly into a vein (IV) by a healthcare provider or by an insulin pump. Common side effects of Novolog include low blood sugar, reaction at the injection site, and weight gain. Novolog is a prescription medication used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Serious side effects may occur. See "Novolog Precautions" section. Common side effects of Novolog include weight gain, reaction at the injection site, and low blood sugar. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is the most common side effect seen with Novolog use. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include: sweating dizziness or lightheadedness shakiness hunger fast heart beat tingling of lips and tongue trouble concentrating or confusion blurred vision slurred speech anxiety, irritability or mood changes headache Severe low blood sugar can cause unconsciousness (passing out), seizures, and death. Know your symptoms of low blood sugar. Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions for treating low blood sugar. Talk to your healthcare provider if low blood sugar is a problem for you. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you tak Continue reading >>

Buy Novolog/novorapid (insulin Aspart) Vials Online

Buy Novolog/novorapid (insulin Aspart) Vials Online

NovoLog/NovoRapid (Insulin Aspart) Vials 10 mL QTY TYPE PRICE COST PER UNIT 1 10 mL Vial $80.91 $80.91 2 10 mL Vial $125.80 $62.90 3 10 mL Vial $170.67 $56.89 4 10 mL Vial $215.56 $53.89 5 10 mL Vial $260.45 $52.09 6 10 mL Vial $305.34 $50.89 7 10 mL Vial $350.21 $50.03 8 10 mL Vial $395.12 $49.39 9 10 mL Vial $442.53 $49.17 10 10 mL Vial $484.90 $48.49 VIEW ALL INSULIN PRODUCTS PLACE A NEW INSULIN ORDER What is NovoLog Vial? NovoLog, known as NovoRapid in Canada, contains insulin aspart, which is a fast-acting mealtime insulin. Insulin aspart is a man-made insulin that is similar to naturally occurring human insulin. Only a single amino acid has been modified, compared to the structure of human insulin (which consists of 51 amino acids in total). This small change allows this medication to be absorbed quickly. It starts to work in minutes, which lets you eat soon after its administration. What is it used for? NovoLog is used for the control of blood sugar levels in adults and children with diabetes. It has a relatively low likelihood of causing hypoglycemia, which is low blood sugar, the most common side effect of insulin therapy. How does it work? NovoLog is a type of mealtime or bolus insulin, which works quickly to regulate blood sugar levels during and after eating. You can start to eat within 5 to 10 minutes after taking it, with its peak action taking effect between 45 to 90 minutes, while lasting approximately 3 to 5 hours. These times are based on averages and can vary due to which injection site you use, the temperature of the medication, your blood flow and exercise. NovoLog is similar in structure to naturally occurring insulin and works similarly, too. Naturally occurring insulin is a hormone produced in a large organ near the stomach called the pancreas. I Continue reading >>

My Insulin Overdose

My Insulin Overdose

When the sun rose that morning, I was in the kitchen as usual with my daughter, preparing to take my insulin. I usually don’t take it in front of her, but we were engaged in one of those frustrating conversations that were so common now that she was a teenager. As I listened, growing more aggravated by the moment, I thought I had my Lantus bottle in my hand, ready to draw up my usual dose of forty units. So I loaded up the syringe with insulin, trying to push her words aside for just a minute, nodding to satisfy her that I was listening. Then I rushed to the injection of short-acting insulin, anxious to return my attention to the conversation. But as I pulled the Novolog needle from my stomach I glanced up…and saw the cap still on my Lantus! How could that be? Anyone who takes insulin from the vial knows that once the cap is removed, it can’t be put back on. I looked at the counter: Two syringes used… only one vial open. It took just a few seconds for it to click in my head. I had taken both injections from the Novolog vial! My heart began to race, and sweat started down my neck as the realization of what I had done began to sink in. As my daughter glanced at my flushed face, she knew something was very wrong. All I could think was “I have to do something! Am I going to pass out? I’m going to die!” I turned toward the basement, calling to my husband “Eric…Eric!” As he came running, I looked up and said, “I took 45 units of my fast acting stuff!” His expression was frantic, but his actions remained calm. He grabbed my shoulder and said, “It’s going to be okay. Sit down on the couch.” He went to the kitchen, and I saw his eyes glance around the fridge door every few seconds. “You okay in there?” he asked repeatedly. I didn’t reply much, Continue reading >>

Novolog Mix 70-30

Novolog Mix 70-30

NovoLog® Mix 70/30 (70% insulin aspart protamine suspension and 30% insulin aspart) Injection, [rDNA origin]) Suspension for Subcutaneous Injection DESCRIPTION NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart rdna origin) (70% insulin aspart protamine suspension and 30% insulin aspart injection, [rDNA origin]) is a human insulin analog suspension containing 70% insulin aspart protamine crystals and 30% soluble insulin aspart. NovoLog Mix 70/30 is a blood glucoselowering agent with an earlier onset and an intermediate duration of action. Insulin aspart is homologous with regular human insulin with the exception of a single substitution of the amino acid proline by aspartic acid in position B28, and is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's part (NovoLog) has the empirical formula C256H381N65O79S6 and a molecular weight of 5825.8 Da. Figure 1: Structural formula of insulin aspart NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart rdna origin) is a uniform, white, sterile suspension that contains insulin aspart 100 Units/mL. Inactive ingredients for the 10 mL vial are mannitol 36.4 mg/mL, phenol 1.50 mg/mL, metacresol 1.72 mg/mL, zinc 19.6 μg/mL, disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate 1.25 mg/mL, sodium chloride 0.58 mg/mL, and protamine sulfate 0.32 mg/mL. Inactive ingredients for the NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart rdna origin) FlexPen are glycerol 16.0 mg/mL, phenol 1.50 mg/mL, metacresol 1.72 mg/mL, zinc 19.6 μg/mL, disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate 1.25 mg/mL, sodium chloride 0.877 mg/mL, and protamine sulfate 0.32 mg/mL. NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart rdna origin) has a pH of 7.20 - 7.44. Hydrochloric acid or sodium hydroxide may Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: Improving Adherence And Reducing Costs

Insulin Pens: Improving Adherence And Reducing Costs

The advantages offered by insulin pens may help improve patient adherence. Currently 8.3% of the United States adult population, or 25.8 million people, have diabetes. Of these cases, more than 90% are cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and at least 1 million are estimated to be cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Although a variety of oral medications are available for patients with diabetes, insulins remain an important component of treatment.1,2 Insulins are the standard therapy in patients with T1DM and are ultimately used in patients with T2DM who do not respond adequately to other treatment modalities. Although in some settings insulins may be administered intravenously (eg, with an insulin pump), the vast majority of insulin administrations are subcutaneous injections.1,2 Available Forms and Administration In the United States, 2 types of insulins are available: recombinant human insulins and insulin analogs. Recombinant human insulin is available from 2 manufacturers (Humulin by Eli Lilly and Novolin by Novo Nordisk); each of these is available in a regular form and in a longer-acting neutral protamine hagedorn (NPH) form. Unlike recombinant human insulins, insulin analogs are structurally modified forms of insulin that are designed to either lower blood sugar rapidly or maintain low blood sugar levels over time. These insulin analogs may be classified as rapid-acting and long-acting insulins. Rapid-acting insulins include insulin lispro, insulin aspart, and insulin glulisine, and long-acting insulins include insulin glargine and insulin detemir. Premixed formulations of insulin are also available.1,2 Regardless of the differences between insulin formulations, all conventional types of insulin can be administered subcutaneously. Subcutaneous injectio Continue reading >>

What Is Novolog 70/30?

What Is Novolog 70/30?

QUICK LINKS Insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart is a combination of a fast-acting insulin and an intermediate-acting type of human insulin. Insulin is used by people with diabetes to help keep blood sugar levels under control. When you have diabetes mellitus, your body cannot make enough or does not use insulin properly. So, you must take additional insulin to regulate your blood sugar and keep your body healthy. This is very important as too much sugar in your blood can be harmful to your health. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription. Find big savings at pharmacies near you with GoodRx discount coupons Lowest GoodRx Price $526.00 View All Prices A nurse or other trained health professional may give you this medicine. You may also be taught how to give your medicine at home. This medicine is given as a shot under your skin. Always double-check both the concentration (strength) of your insulin and your dose. Concentration and dose are not the same. The dose is how many units of insulin you will use. The concentration tells how many units of insulin are in each milliliter (mL), such as 100 units/mL (U-100), but this does not mean you will use 100 units at a time. Each package of insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart combination contains a patient information sheet. Read this sheet carefully before beginning your treatment and each time you refill the medicine for any new information, and make sure you understand: How to prepare the medicine. How to inject the medicine. How to use disposable insulin delivery device. How to dispose of syringes, needles, and injection devices. It is best to use a different place on the body for each injection (eg, under the skin of your abdomen or stomach, thigh, buttocks, or upper arm). If you have qu Continue reading >>

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap "old-school" Insulin

Note: BootCamp for Betics is not a medical center. Anything you read on this site should not be considered medical advice, and is for educational purposes only. Always consult with a physician or a diabetes nurse educator before starting or changing insulin doses. Did you know that all type 1 diabetics and some type 2 diabetics need injectable insulin in order to live? Put another way, if a diabetic needs insulin in order to live, and the diabetic does not get insulin, the diabetic will die. Diabetic death from Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a grisly process, during which acid starts running through your bloodstream, searing your vessels and organs while your body shrivels up in dehydration as it tries to push the acid out of your body through your urine and lungs, and, left untreated, the condition shuts down your organs one by one until you are dead. If you're lucky, your brain will be the first thing to swell itself into a coma and you'll be unconscious for the remainder of the organ failures. In some cases, this grisly diabetic death can take a few days or weeks to complete its process. Or, if you're one of the luckier less-resistant insulin-dependent type 2 diabetics, you may actually get away with staying alive for quite a few years and suffer only some heart disease, stroke, kidney damage/failure, neuropathy, limb amputations and blindness. (my intent in describing how lack of insulin leads to death is not to cause fear in people with diabetes or their loved ones; rather, my intent is to make clear the reality that injectable insulin is absolutely vital to diabetics who depend on injectable insulin to live) While I'd love to go off on a political rant about how insulin should be a basic human right for all insulin-dependent diabetics (and why the hell isn't it?), that' Continue reading >>

Insulin (medication)

Insulin (medication)

"Insulin therapy" redirects here. For the psychiatric treatment, see Insulin shock therapy. Insulin is used as a medication to treat high blood sugar.[3] This includes in diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2, gestational diabetes, and complications of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states.[3] It is also used along with glucose to treat high blood potassium levels.[4] Typically it is given by injection under the skin, but some forms may also be used by injection into a vein or muscle.[3] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] Insulin can be made from the pancreas of pigs or cows.[5] Human versions can be made either by modifying pig versions or recombinant technology.[5] It comes in three main types short–acting (such as regular insulin), intermediate–acting (such as NPH insulin), and longer-acting (such as insulin glargine).[5] Insulin was first used as a medication in Canada by Charles Best and Frederick Banting in 1922.[6] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[7] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$2.39 to $10.61 per 1,000 iu of regular insulin and $2.23 to $10.35 per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[8][9] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of regular or NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds, while this amount of insulin glargine costs 30.68 pounds.[5] Medical uses[edit] Giving insulin with an insulin pen. Insulin is used to treat a number of diseases including diabetes and its acute complications such as diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

Insulin Aspart (rx)

Insulin Aspart (rx)

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Improvement of glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus May administer 0.2-0.6 unit/kg/day in divided doses; conservative doses of 0.2-0.4 unit/kg/day often recommended to reduce risk of hypoglycemia Total maintenance daily insulin requirement may vary; it is usually between 0.5 and 1 unit/kg/day; nonobese may require 0.4-0.6 unit/kg/day; obese may require 0.6-1.2 units/kg/day Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes inadequately controlled by diet, weight reduction, exercise, or oral medication 10 units/day SC (or 0.1-0.2 units/kg/day) in evening or divided q12hr of an intermediate (eg, NPH) or long-acting insulin at bedtime recommended; conversely, regular insulin or rapid-acting insulin (aspart insulin) before meals also recommended Dosing Considerations When used in a meal-related SC injection treatment regimen, 50-75% of total insulin requirements may be provided by an intermediate-acting or long-acting insulin; the remainder is divided and provided before or at mealtimes as a rapid-acting insulin, such as insulin aspart Because of insulin aspart’s comparatively rapid onset and short duration of glucose-lowering activity, some patients may require more basal insulin and more total insulin to prevent premeal hyperglycemia than they would need when using human regular insulin Dosage must be individualized; blood and urine glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Insulin requirements may be altered during stress or major illness or with changes in exercise, meal patterns, or coadministered drugs Dosage Modifications Patients with hepatic and renal impairment may be at increased risk of hypoglycemia and may require more frequent dose adjustment and more frequent blood glucose monitoring Continue reading >>

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful because the needles are short and thin and the insulin shots are placed into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. In some cases, the doctor prescribes a mixed dose of insulin. This means taking more than one type of insulin at the same time. A mixed dose allows you to have the benefits of both short-acting insulin along with a longer acting insulin — without having to give 2 separate shots. Usually, one of the insulins will be cloudy and the other clear. Some insulins cannot be mixed in the same syringe. For instance, never mix Lantus or Levemir with any other solution. Be sure to check with your doctor, pharmacist, or diabetes educator before mixing. These instructions explain how to mix two different types of insulin into one shot. If you are giving or getting just one type of insulin, refer to the patient education sheet Insulin: How to Give a Shot. What You Will Need Bottles of insulin Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Syringe with needle (You will need a prescription to buy syringes from a pharmacy. Check with your pharmacist to be sure the syringe size you are using is correct for your total dose of insulin.) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of a Syringe and Needle You will use a syringe and needle to give the shot. The parts are labeled below. Wash the work area (where you will set the insulin and syringe) well with soap and water. Wash your hands. Check the drug labels to be sure they are what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date o Continue reading >>

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