diabetestalk.net

How Many Units Of Insulin Are In A Novolog Pen?

Novolog Flexpen U-100 Insulin Aspart Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Novolog Flexpen U-100 Insulin Aspart Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Insulin aspart is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes . Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke . Insulin aspart is a man-made product that is similar to human insulin . It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. Insulin aspart starts working faster and lasts for a shorter time than regular insulin. It works by helping blood sugar ( glucose ) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. This medication is usually used with a medium- or long-acting insulin product. Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist. Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin . Insulin aspart should be clear and colorless. Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the skin and to avoid developing problems under the skin ( lipodystrophy ). Insulin aspart may be injected in the stomach area, the thigh, or the back of the upper arm. Do not inject into skin that is red, swollen, or itchy. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. The insulin container you are currently using can be kept at room temperature. Inject this medication under the skin as directed by your doctor. Some brands should be injecte Continue reading >>

Starting With Novolog® Mix 70/30

Starting With Novolog® Mix 70/30

Do not share your NovoLog® Mix 70/30 FlexPen® with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take NovoLog® Mix 70/30? Do not take NovoLog® Mix 70/30 if: your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Before taking NovoLog® Mix 70/30, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blood sugar. How should I take NovoLog® Mix 70/30? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. NovoLog® Mix 70/30 starts acting fast. If you have type 1 diabetes, inject within 15 minutes before you eat a meal. If you have type 2 diabetes, inject within 15 minutes before or after starting your meal. Do not mix NovoLog® Mix 70/30 with other insulin products or use in an insulin pump. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles or syringes with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. What should I avoid while taking NovoLog® Mix 70/30? Do not drive or operate heavy machinery, until you know how NovoLog® Mix 70/30 affects you. Do not drink alcohol or use medicines that contain alcohol. What are the possible side effects of NovoLog® Mix 70/30? Serious side effects can lead to death, includin Continue reading >>

Selected Important Safety Information

Selected Important Safety Information

NovoLog® Mix 70/30 is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® Mix 70/30 or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® Mix 70/30 FlexPen® Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® Mix 70/30 vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. NovoLog® Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart injectable suspension) 100 U/mL Indications and Usage NovoLog® Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart injectable suspension) 100 U/mL is a mixture of insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart indicated to improve glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus. NovoLog® Mix 70/30 is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. The proportions of rapid-acting and long-acting insulins are fixed and do not allow for basal versus prandial dose adjustments. NovoLog® Mix 70/30 is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® Mix 70/30 or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® Mix 70/30 FlexPen® Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® Mix 70/30 vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen With Half-unit Dosing Now Available In U.s. For Children And Young Adults.

Insulin Pen With Half-unit Dosing Now Available In U.s. For Children And Young Adults.

NovoPen Junior is a line extension of the company's NovoPen®, the most widely used insulin pen in the world. "NovoPen Junior fills an important need among children and young adults because it allows half-unit dosing," said Harold Starkman, MD, at the Pediatric Diabetes Center, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, NJ. He explained that, because of their small body size, many children with diabetes require only small amounts of insulin to maintain proper control — with some requiring very finely tuned doses. "NovoPen Junior allows people with diabetes, particularly children and young adults, to administer insulin more accurately to meet their needs," he said. Dr. Starkman said that the incidence of diabetes is increasing dramatically in children. "It's more important than ever before to make insulin therapy as easy and as accurate as possible for those who need it," he said. He added that the bright and colorful look of NovoPen Junior may encourage children to more easily accept and incorporate a daily insulin regimen into their lives. NovoPen Junior is available in two fun colors, to help patients tell their different insulin types apart. Insulin therapy is administered with NovoPen Junior by dialing the dose, inserting the needle, and pushing the injection button. The dosage dial is graduated in half-unit markings and can administer from one to 35 units. NovoPen Junior is designed for use with Novo Nordisk's range of PenFill® 3 mL cartridges, which contain 300 units of insulin. It is used with NovoFine® disposable needles, including NovoFine 31-gauge (6 mm) needles, whose design may help make insulin injections more comfortable. NovoPen Junior is available as part of a complete diabetes management system. The NovoPen® Junior Diabetes Management System include Continue reading >>

Is There A Guideline Or Formula For Calculating The Number…

Is There A Guideline Or Formula For Calculating The Number…

A: There are several ways to determine how much mealtime insulin to take to “cover” carbs. One method is to use what is known as the “1500” or “1800 Rule.” One needs to calculate the entire daily dose of insulin (both mealtime, such as NovoLog, Humalog or Apidra and basal insulin, such as Lantus or Levemir) and divide that amount into 1500 or 1800. (Whether to use 1500 or 1800 depends on the type of insulin that is used and you should ask your healthcare provider which to use.) The resulting number is a starting point for determining and fine-tuning the insulin-to-carb ratio. Another way to figure out insulin coverage for carbohydrate is to keep food records for several days, add up the carbohydrate at a particular meal, say, breakfast, and note how much mealtime insulin you took to cover those carbs (this, however, assumes that your pre- and post-meal glucose levels were within your target range). Sometimes healthcare providers will start a person off with a “1:15 ratio,” which assumes 1 unit of insulin covers 15 grams of carb. Of course, this approach can be way off for people who usually require much more or less insulin. It’s important to keep in mind that one may have a different “ratio” for each meal. If you’re interested in trying what is often called “advanced carb counting,” I’d strongly encourage you to meet with a dietitian who is well-versed in diabetes, because this level of carb counting is more of an art than a science. It requires careful and accurate carb counting (weighing/measuring foods, label reading, using carb-count books or a database), logging of both food and blood glucose, and frequent blood glucose monitoring (before and after meals) to evaluate the ratio and then fine-tune it if it’s not correct. Also, in addi Continue reading >>

Selected Important Safety Information

Selected Important Safety Information

NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. NovoLog® (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin therapy. The timing of hypoglycemia may reflect the time-action profile of the insulin formulation. Glucose monitoring is re Continue reading >>

Using Novolog® Flexpen®

Using Novolog® Flexpen®

Here is a quick guide to NovoLog® dosing using NovoLog® FlexPen®. Please read the full Instructions For Use that came with your FlexPen® carefully before using it. To see FlexPen® in action, watch the video below. FlexPen® Demo Video (7:05 min) This video shows you how to use your NovoLog® FlexPen®. NovoLog® FlexPen® should not be used by people who are blind or have severe visual problems without the help of a person who has good eyesight and who is trained to use NovoLog® FlexPen® the right way. Wash your hands. Check the label to make sure that you are using the right type of insulin. This is especially important if you take more than 1 type of insulin Pull off the pen cap. Wipe the rubber stopper with an alcohol swab Remove the protective tab from the needle and screw it onto your FlexPen® tightly. It is important that the needle is placed on straight Never place a disposable needle on your FlexPen® until you are ready to take your injection Pull off the big outer needle cap and then pull off the inner needle cap. Throw away the inner needle cap right away Always use a new needle for each injection Be careful not to bend or damage the needle before use To reduce the risk of needle stick, never put the inner needle cap back on the needle Small amounts of air may collect in the cartridge during normal use. To avoid injecting air and ensure proper dosing: Turn the dose selector to 2 units Hold your FlexPen® with the needle pointing up, and tap the cartridge gently a few times, which moves the air bubbles to the top Press the push-button all the way in until the dose selector is back to 0. A drop of insulin should appear at the tip of the needle If no drop appears, change the needle and repeat. If you still do not see a drop of insulin after 6 tries, do n Continue reading >>

~12 Units Of Novolog Remaining

~12 Units Of Novolog Remaining

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Up til today, whenever my Novolog flexpen got down to near the bottom, I would discard it and grab another one. But by coincidence today I happened to need a 3 unit correction for my post lunch blood sugar and after that was done, I went to check to see how much the pen had left to give me by way of dialing up the dose. Nothing. Yep, the 3 unit correction had maxed out the dosage clicker. But I'm looking at the end of this pen, and have a syringe with me, so I get curious and decide to see how much Novolog I could draw out of the flexpen's remaining reservoir. 12 units. There was 12 units of insulin left. Sometimes I ponder about these things and I ponder how precious all of us here must consider insulin, needing to supply ourselves with these exogenous supplies every day of our lives to remain part of the living. And here I see the makers of the flexpen have constructed a device to deliver this precious liquid into us, constructed it such that at the very least, 12 units of insulin go into the trash. Of course, how insulin is precious to us, those in need of it, is much different from how the pharmaceutical companies consider insulin precious. 12 units. There was 12 units of insulin left. Sometimes I ponder about these things and I ponder how precious all of us here must consider insulin, needing to supply ourselves with these exogenous supplies every day of our lives to remain part of the living. And here I see the makers of the flexpen have constructed a device to deliver this precious liquid into us, constructed it such that at the very least, 12 units of insulin go into the trash. Of cou Continue reading >>

Math Calculations With Novolog Insulin

Math Calculations With Novolog Insulin

www.TakeRx.com Calculate the total quantity and the total days supply for the following Rx: novolog 70/30 15 units bid disp: 6 bottles ------------------------------------------------------------ The doctor has prescribed 6 bottles of NovoLog Mix 70/30 Each vial of NovoLog Mix has 10 mL of insulin. 1 vial = 10 mL and then 6 vials = 60 mL So, the total quantity to be dispensed is 60 mL The sig says: inject 15 units subcutaneously twice daily In other words, the patient will inject 30 units per day. Now, we need to convert 30 units into mL We know that the ratio is 1mL/100U x / 30U = 1mL / 100U x = (30 * 1) / 100 x = 0.3 mL So, the patient will inject 0.3 mL per day. Now, the total days supply will be 60mL divided by 0.3mL which is 200 days. On the other hand, most insurance companies will not pay for 6 vials of NovoLog all at once. So, the patient will very likely be forced by the insurance company to get one vial at a time. We know that the patient needs to inject 0.3 mL of insulin per day. How much insulin does the patient need in one month? The patient will inject 0.3 mL * 30 days which means the patient will inject 9mL per month. In this case, the pharmacist will dispense one vial every mouth. So, the patient will pick up at the pharmacy one vial every month during a period of six months. In this case, the total quantity prescribed will be 60mL, but the total quantity dispensed will be 10mL and the total days supply will be 30 days. The bottom line is that insurance companies often impose restrictions and limitations on patients. Calculate the total quantity and the total days supply for the following Rx: Novolog mix 70/30 flexpen susp sig: 35U in am and 25U in pm disp: 18 ------------------------------------------------------------ The doctor has prescribed NovoLog Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Insulin Pen - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Sujoy Ghosh MD(General Medicine) DM(Endocrinology) MRCP(UK) MRCPS(Glasgow), Andrew Collier BSc MD FRCP(Glasgow & Edinburgh), in Churchill's Pocketbook of Diabetes (Second Edition) , 2012 There are four main devices for insulin injection: needle and syringe; insulin pens (now most commonly used); jet injection devices; and external pumps. This is the traditional method of delivery. The following steps are recommended: Clean the rubber stopper of the bottle with alcohol. If intermediate-acting or long-acting insulin is being used (cloudy insulins), mix by rolling or rotating the bottle. Open the syringe to the number of units that is needed so that there is air to this point in the syringe. Turn the insulin bottle upside down and inject the stopper with the needle. Push the air inside and withdraw the insulin dose required. Give the syringe a few taps with your finger to get the bubbles to the top, and push the bubbles back into the bottle. Pinch up the area of skin to be injected. Insert the needle at a right angle to the skin and push it in; then push down the plunger to administer the insulin. There are now several aids to needle and syringe delivery: spring-loaded syringe holders; syringe magnifiers to help the visually impaired; syringe-filling devices that click when the insulin has been taken up; and needle guides for when a person cannot see the rubber stop on the bottle where the needle is inserted to take up insulin. These pens come with a cartridge already inserted that contains 3.0 mL of the specific insulin and the patient can dial the amount of insulin to be taken. Each unit (or 2 units) is accompanied by a click so that people with visual impairment can hear the number of units; the number will also appear in a window on the pen. The pens allow delivery Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: How To Give A Shot

Insulin Pens: How To Give A Shot

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful as people imagine because the needles are short and thin. Insulin shots are given into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. The following instructions are for using most disposable insulin pens. If you are using a refillable pen, check with your doctor, diabetes educator or pharmacist on how to use. If you prefer to use a vial and syringe, refer to UPMC patient education page Insulin: How to Give a Shot. ADVANTAGES of insulin pens: Easy to use and carry Looks like a pen for writing (discreet/not easily noticed) No need to draw the insulin dose from a vial/bottle Can be used for most insulin types Doses can be easily dialed Less waste of expired insulin if not much insulin is used within time period designated (300 units in each pen)…see table end of this document To some people it may be less scary than a syringe DISADVANTAGES: Cannot mix different kinds of insulin together in a prescribed dose. Before you give the shot, you will need the following: Insulin pen Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Pen needle (be sure your doctor writes your prescription for the pen needles as well as the specific type of insulin pen) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of an Insulin Pen Wash your hands. Check the drug label to be sure it is what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date on the pen. Do not use a drug that is past the expiration date. Also do not use if beyond number of days listed in table at end of this document once opened and in use. Remove pen cap Continue reading >>

Insulin Aspart (rx)

Insulin Aspart (rx)

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Improvement of glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus May administer 0.2-0.6 unit/kg/day in divided doses; conservative doses of 0.2-0.4 unit/kg/day often recommended to reduce risk of hypoglycemia Total maintenance daily insulin requirement may vary; it is usually between 0.5 and 1 unit/kg/day; nonobese may require 0.4-0.6 unit/kg/day; obese may require 0.6-1.2 units/kg/day Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes inadequately controlled by diet, weight reduction, exercise, or oral medication 10 units/day SC (or 0.1-0.2 units/kg/day) in evening or divided q12hr of an intermediate (eg, NPH) or long-acting insulin at bedtime recommended; conversely, regular insulin or rapid-acting insulin (aspart insulin) before meals also recommended Dosing Considerations When used in a meal-related SC injection treatment regimen, 50-75% of total insulin requirements may be provided by an intermediate-acting or long-acting insulin; the remainder is divided and provided before or at mealtimes as a rapid-acting insulin, such as insulin aspart Because of insulin aspart’s comparatively rapid onset and short duration of glucose-lowering activity, some patients may require more basal insulin and more total insulin to prevent premeal hyperglycemia than they would need when using human regular insulin Dosage must be individualized; blood and urine glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Insulin requirements may be altered during stress or major illness or with changes in exercise, meal patterns, or coadministered drugs Dosage Modifications Patients with hepatic and renal impairment may be at increased risk of hypoglycemia and may require more frequent dose adjustment and more frequent blood glucose monitoring Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Aspart (novolog, Novolog Flexpen, Novolog Penfill)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Aspart (novolog, Novolog Flexpen, Novolog Penfill)?

NOVOLOG (insulin aspart) Injection DESCRIPTION NOVOLOG (insulin aspart injection) is a rapid-acting human insulin analog used to lower blood glucose. NOVOLOG is homologous with regular human insulin with the exception of a single substitution of the amino acid proline by aspartic acid in position B28, and is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast). Insulin aspart has the empirical formula C256H381N65O79S6 and a molecular weight of 5825.8. Figure 1: Structural formula of insulin aspart NOVOLOG is a sterile, aqueous, clear, and colorless solution, that contains insulin aspart 100 Units/mL, glycerin 16 mg/mL, phenol 1.50 mg/mL, metacresol 1.72 mg/mL, zinc 19.6 mcg/mL, disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate 1.25 mg/mL, sodium chloride 0.58 mg/mL and water for injection. NOVOLOG has a pH of 7.2-7.6. Hydrochloric acid 10% and/or sodium hydroxide 10% may be added to adjust pH. font size A A A 1 2 3 4 5 Next What is Type 2 Diabetes? The most common form of diabetes is type 2 diabetes, formerly called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or "adult onset" diabetes, so-called because it typically develops in adults over age 35, though it can develop at any age. Type 2 diabetes is diagnosed more often in people who are overweight or obese, and who are not physically active. Type 2 diabetes is an illness in which the body does not process ingested sugars (glucose) properly. In type 2, the body usually produces some insulin, but not enough to allow the glucose into the cells for the body to use as energy. In addition, there can be insulin resistance, where it becomes difficult for the body to use the insulin produced. Type 2 diabetes is seen both in men and in women, though men have a slightly higher incidence of developing the dise Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog and Novolog are two diabetes medications. Humalog is the brand-name version of insulin lispro, and Novolog is the brand-name version of insulin aspart. These drugs both help control blood glucose (sugar) in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Humalog and Novolog are both rapid acting. That means they work more quickly than other types of insulin. There are important distinctions between Humalog and Novolog, however, and the drugs are not directly interchangeable. Check out this comparison so you can work with your doctor to choose a drug that’s right for you. Insulin is injected under your skin fat. It’s the most common type of treatment for type 1 diabetes because it works quickly. It’s also the only type of diabetes medication that’s absorbed into the bloodstream. Humalog and Novolog are both equivalent to the insulin made in your body. Unlike oral diabetes drugs, insulin provides fast relief for changes in your blood sugar. The type of insulin your doctor prescribes depends on how often and how much your blood sugar fluctuates each day. The table below provides quick facts at a glance. Brand name Humalog Novolog What is the generic drug? insulin lispro insulin aspart Is a generic version available? no no What does it treat? type 1 and type 2 diabetes type 1 and type 2 diabetes What form does it come in? solution for injection solution for injection What strengths does it come in? • 3-mL cartridges • 3-mL prefilled KwikPen • 3-mL vials • 10-mL vials • 3-mL FlexPen • 3-mL FlexTouch • 3-mL PenFill cartridges • 10-mL vials What is the typical length of treatment? long-term long-term How do I store it? Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Continue reading >>

Insulin Delivery Options

Insulin Delivery Options

There are many ways to take NovoLog®. You and your health care provider will choose the way that works best for you. Some people take their insulin injection using a vial and syringe or an insulin pump. But many people who take NovoLog® use an insulin pen called NovoLog® FlexPen®. NovoLog® FlexPen® There are many reasons why NovoLog® FlexPen® is widely used. NovoLog® FlexPen® does not stand out the way an old-fashioned vial and syringe might. So most people who see you take out your FlexPen® probably won’t even know what it is. This may make you feel better using it in front of others in restaurants, at work, and even at home. Your FlexPen® is prefilled with NovoLog® insulin. And, it’s ready to use in just a few steps. Simply dial the exact amount of insulin you need and inject by pressing a button. View NovoLog® FlexPen® instructions online or download a printable patient brochure. NovoLog® FlexPen® fits in a pocket or purse and is: Able to deliver from 1 to 60 units of insulin Adjustable in 1-unit dosing amounts Ready to go! Once in use, it can be used for up to 28 days without refrigeration. To view full storage details, click here. NovoLog® FlexPen® lasts up to 28 days without refrigeration after first use, so it can be taken almost anywhere. Once in use, NovoLog® FlexPen® must be kept at room temperature, below 86°F. NovoLog® FlexPen® is disposable, so there is no refilling. When you run out of insulin, throw out your old FlexPen® and start fresh with a new one. Each NovoLog® FlexPen® package has 5 disposable insulin pens, for a total of 1500 units of NovoLog® insulin. Saving on NovoLog® FlexPen® NovoLog® FlexPen® is covered by most health care and Medicare prescription plans. You can get NovoLog® FlexPen® for about the same co Continue reading >>

More in insulin