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How Many Units Are In A Vial Of Lantus?

How Do I Get Lantus Insulin Less Expensively?

How Do I Get Lantus Insulin Less Expensively?

November 2, 2013-- How do I get Lantus Insulin Less Expensively? DCIN receives this question a few times a week from US caregivers of diabetic cats. I am often amazed by the question because of the “good” insulins for diabetic cats, Lantus can be the least expensive per unit. The problem often lies in knowing how to find the insulin inexpensively. (The hints I give also apply to Levemir, another human insulin often used by diabetic cats.) Your vet gave you a prescription that probably read “U100 Glargine/Lantus 10ml vial.” Lantus is the brand name for the generic insulin Glargine. Lantus is an insulin for humans and is only available from a human pharmacy (although some vets do hold some in stock). The company Sanofi makes Lantus, and no other companies currently make a generic Glargine because Sanofi still has an international patent on the insulin. That may change in 2014, and by then Sanofi may have developed a “second-generation” Lantus that is patent protected. Lantus is a U100 insulin, which describes the concentration of the insulin in the liquid suspension. A 10ml vial is the insulin’s containment device. It is a small glass bottle with a rubber stopper at the end that you pierce with a syringe. At a US retail pharmacy, a 10ml vial of Lantus can cost about $180 to $200. WOWZA! That does seem cause for sticker shock. A 10ml vial of U100 insulin holds 1000 units of insulin. At $200/vial, that is a price of $.20/unit. If your cat gets 2 units of insulin twice a day, that is $.80/day for its insulin (if you could completely use a vial of Lantus insulin). It would cost less each day to give your cat its life-saving medicine that to buy a soda from a vending machine. However, the problem with buying Lantus in a 10ml vial is that, properly handled, Lantus Continue reading >>

Lantus Optiset 100 Units/ml Solution For Injection In Apre-filled Pen

Lantus Optiset 100 Units/ml Solution For Injection In Apre-filled Pen

What is it and how is it used? Lantus is a solution for injection containing insulin glargine. Insulin glargine is a modified insulin, very similar to human insulin. Lantus is used to reduce high blood sugar in adults, adolescents and children of 6 years or above with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus is a disease where your body does not produce enough insulin to control the level of blood sugar. Insulin glargine has a long and steady blood-sugar-lowering action. Table of Contents What do you have to consider before using it? How is it used? What are possible side effects? How should it be stored? Further information What do you have to consider before using it? Do not use Lantus If you are allergic (hypersensitive) to insulin glargine or any of the other ingredients of Lantus (for a full list of ingredients, see section 6?What Lantus contains?). Take special care with Lantus Follow closely the instructions for posology, monitoring (blood and urine tests), diet and physical activity (physical work and exercise), injection technique as discussed with your doctor. If your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycaemia), follow the guidance for hypoglycaemia (see box at the end of this leaflet). Travel Before travelling consult your doctor. You may need to talk about the availability of your insulin in the country you are visiting, supplies of insulin, syringes etc., correct storage of your insulin while travelling, timing of meals and insulin administration while travelling, the possible effects of changing to different time zones, possible new health risks in the countries to be visited, what you should do in emergency situations when you feel unwell or become ill. Illnesses and injuries In the following situations, the management of your diabetes may require a lot of care (f Continue reading >>

Days Supply Question On Lantus Insulin Vials

Days Supply Question On Lantus Insulin Vials

Days Supply Question on Lantus Insulin Vials Lantus Insulin and Blood Sugar Monitoring for Diabetes What is the day supply for Lantus vials U-100? Comments for Days Supply Question on Lantus Insulin Vials Multiply 100 units by 10ml (the size of the Lantus insulin vial) and you have 1,000 total units. Next, we divide the maximum units used each day: 1,000 units divided by 20 units = 50 days per 1 x 10 ml insulin vial Back to the original question: we are dispensing 4 x 10ml vials of Lantus... so we have to multiply our days supply question by 4... 50 days supply multiplied by 4 = 200 days supply total. YES! I am entering my email below for my two FREE E-Books, and please sign me up for your FREE PTR Email Newsletter. I can unsubscribe anytime. Click Here! Subscribe me to the PTR Email Newsletter and give me my TWO FREE E-Books! I know this is a Limited-Time Offer. I'm IN! Didn't find what you were looking for? Use the box below to search this entire site. Former employee working for competitor; Enticing former customers to new pharmacy We had a pharmacy tech resign, then go to work at a grocery/pharmacy - the tech has used PHI to target our patients and entice them to transfer their prescriptions. Wondering how many Percocet I should have left in my bottle? I got my 120 Percocet Feb 18 how many should be in my bottle March 16 i take 4 a day If my pharmacist states the name of my medication very loudly at pickup, is that a Hippa violation? Is it a HIPAA violation if a pharmacist says what you are taking very loud so others can hear what you are taking? My Pharmacy told my mom that I didn't pick up my meds. Is this a Hippa Violation? Pharmacy told my mom I didn't pick up my meds. Yes I do have same last name but dif address, for all they know that wasn't my mom Is Publicl Continue reading >>

How To Find A Lantus Coupon

How To Find A Lantus Coupon

It looks like this page may be out of date. Please visit NerdWallet’s health hub for our latest content. Diabetics don’t have much of a choice when it comes to taking their insulin, and the costs can be very high, so a Lantus coupon can be invaluable. Paired with diabetic supplies like syringes and blood glucose testing equipment, diabetes is an expensive disease. But with a little bit of information and some resourcefulness, you may be able to save on your monthly prescriptions. Lantus is a long-acting insulin made by Sanofi-Aventis and prescribed to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics. Diabetics are unable to naturally produce or use insulin like most people, so they take injections of synthetic insulin to help regulate their blood sugar. Generic Lantus At this time, there is no generic form of Lantus available. However, that may soon change. The patents protecting Lantus from cheaper generic alternatives expired in February 2015, so less expensive forms of the drug may be coming. When this happens, opting for generic will likely be the best way to save on Lantus, and because of FDA requirements, you don’t have to worry about the generic version being less effective or less safe. Although some people avoid buying generics because they are afraid they won’t work as well as the name brands, those fears are largely unfounded. Lantus coupons from the manufacturer One carton of Lantus can cost close to $400 without insurance, according to GoodRx.com, though Lantus may very well be part of your insurance formulary. Currently, the maker of the drug offers a Lantus Savings Card. According to its website, the card can reduce your prescription cost to no more than $25. However, it also says there is a maximum benefit of $100 off each prescription for the duration of the pr Continue reading >>

Lantus 100 Units/ml Solution For Injection In A Cartridge

Lantus 100 Units/ml Solution For Injection In A Cartridge

Lantus 100 units/ml solution for injection in a cartridge This information is intended for use by health professionals Lantus 100 units/ml solution for injection in a vial Lantus 100 units/ml solution for injection in a cartridge Lantus SoloStar 100 units/ml solution for injection in a pre-filled pen 2. Qualitative and quantitative composition Each ml contains 100 units insulin glargine* (equivalent to 3.64 mg). Each vial contains 5 ml of solution for injection, equivalent to 500 units, or 10 ml of solution for injection, equivalent to 1000 units. Each cartridge or pen contains 3 ml of solution for injection, equivalent to 300 units. *Insulin glargine is produced by recombinant DNA technology in Escherichia coli. For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1. Treatment of diabetes mellitus in adults, adolescents and children aged 2 years and above. 4.2 Posology and method of administration Lantus contains insulin glargine, an insulin analogue, and has a prolonged duration of action. Lantus should be administered once daily at any time but at the same time each day. The dose regimen (dose and timing) should be individually adjusted. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, Lantus can also be given together with orally active antidiabetic medicinal products. The potency of this medicinal product is stated in units. These units are exclusive to Lantus and are not the same as IU or the units used to express the potency of other insulin analogues (see section 5.1). In the elderly, progressive deterioration of renal function may lead to a steady decrease in insulin requirements. In patients with renal impairment, insulin requirements may be diminished due to reduced insulin metabolism. In patients with hepatic impairment, insulin requirements may be diminished due to re Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: Improving Adherence And Reducing Costs

Insulin Pens: Improving Adherence And Reducing Costs

The advantages offered by insulin pens may help improve patient adherence. Currently 8.3% of the United States adult population, or 25.8 million people, have diabetes. Of these cases, more than 90% are cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and at least 1 million are estimated to be cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Although a variety of oral medications are available for patients with diabetes, insulins remain an important component of treatment.1,2 Insulins are the standard therapy in patients with T1DM and are ultimately used in patients with T2DM who do not respond adequately to other treatment modalities. Although in some settings insulins may be administered intravenously (eg, with an insulin pump), the vast majority of insulin administrations are subcutaneous injections.1,2 Available Forms and Administration In the United States, 2 types of insulins are available: recombinant human insulins and insulin analogs. Recombinant human insulin is available from 2 manufacturers (Humulin by Eli Lilly and Novolin by Novo Nordisk); each of these is available in a regular form and in a longer-acting neutral protamine hagedorn (NPH) form. Unlike recombinant human insulins, insulin analogs are structurally modified forms of insulin that are designed to either lower blood sugar rapidly or maintain low blood sugar levels over time. These insulin analogs may be classified as rapid-acting and long-acting insulins. Rapid-acting insulins include insulin lispro, insulin aspart, and insulin glulisine, and long-acting insulins include insulin glargine and insulin detemir. Premixed formulations of insulin are also available.1,2 Regardless of the differences between insulin formulations, all conventional types of insulin can be administered subcutaneously. Subcutaneous injectio Continue reading >>

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir and Lantus are both long-acting injectable insulins that can be used for long-term management of diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that is naturally produced in the body by the pancreas. It helps convert the glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream into energy. This energy is then distributed to cells throughout your body. With diabetes, your pancreas produces little or no insulin or your body is unable to use the insulin correctly. Without insulin, your body can’t use the sugars in your blood and can become starved for energy. The excess sugar in your blood can also damage different parts of your body, including your blood vessels and kidneys. Everyone with type 1 diabetes and many people with type 2 diabetes must use insulin to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Levemir is a solution of insulin detemir, and Lantus is a solution of insulin glargine. Both are basal insulin formulas. That means that they work slowly to lower your blood sugar levels. They’re both absorbed into your body over a 24-hour period. They keep blood sugar levels lowered for longer than short-acting insulins do. Although the formulations are slightly different, Levemir and Lantus are very similar drugs. There are only a few differences between them. Children and adults can use both Levemir and Lantus. Specifically, Levemir can be used by people who are 2 years or older. Lantus can be used by people who are 6 years or older. Levemir or Lantus can help with daily management of diabetes. However, you may still need to use short-acting insulin to treat spikes in your blood sugar levels and diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous buildup of acids in your blood). Learn more: All about diabetic ketoacidosis » Administration Both Levemir and Lantus are given through injection in the same way. You can gi Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

What Is Lantus (Insulin Glargine)? Lantus is the brand name of insulin glargine, a long-acting insulin used to treat adults and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus to control high blood sugar. Lantus replaces the insulin that your body no longer produces. Insulin is a natural substance that allows your body to convert dietary sugar into energy and helps store energy for later use. In type 2 diabetes mellitus, your body does not produce enough insulin, or the insulin produced is not used properly, causing a rise in blood sugar. Like other types of insulin, Lantus is used to normalize blood sugar levels. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual dysfunction. Proper control of diabetes has also been shown to reduce your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Lantus is meant to be used alongside a proper diet and exercise program recommended by your doctor. Lantus is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. It was approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000 as the first long-acting human insulin administered once a day with a 24-hour sugar-lowering effect. Lantus Warnings You will be taught how to properly inject this medication since that is the only way to use it. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. Always wash your hands before measuring and injecting insulin. Lantus is always clear and colorless; look for cloudy solution or clumps in the container before injecting it. Do not use Lantus to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. A short-acting insulin is used to treat this condition. It is recommended that you take a diabetes education program to learn more about diabetes and how to manage it. Other medical problems may affect the use of this Continue reading >>

How To Inject Lantus® With A Vial And Syringe

How To Inject Lantus® With A Vial And Syringe

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Supplies And Teaching

Diabetes: Supplies And Teaching

Authors: Jenny Wright, MD, Diane Britt, ARNP Last updated: Testing Supplies: who needs testing? Patients with type 2 diabetes who are well controlled on metformin or diet alone may not need to test their blood sugars daily. However, checking periodically is still useful to identify changes in glycemic control prior to the next A1c test. Testing is useful when: -the patient is taking a hypoglycemic medication (eg sulfonylureas, insulin) -titrating insulin eg titrating insulin glargine to morning blood sugars – don’t have to wait for the next A1c -the patient finds the feedback useful for diabetes control: eg patients learning how foods affect their blood sugar Testing Supplies: how to order Option #1: order individually ‘Meds & Orders’ field -> Glucometer -> select first choice, ‘Blood Glucose Monitor and Supplies’ and all the supplies are pulled in in a bundle; do not specify brand Option #2: EPIC smart set Smart Sets à UWM DIABETES à ORDERS-SUPPLIES Check the ones you want: Blood Glucose Lancets Blood Glucose Monitoring Kit (Do not specify brand) Blood Glucose test strips (On Insulin) (Never specify brand unless asked to) Blood Glucose test strips (No insulin) (Never specify brand unless asked to) Insurance issues: Medicare: Can’t be e-prescribed. Give prescription to patient or have faxed Medicare/Medicaid allowed quantity of test strips: Once a day if not on insulin, 3 a day if on insulin You will ALWAYS get a fax to fill out later, even if you put all required information on your script. Insulin: how to order Glargine: Insulin glargine 100 units / mL solution (aka Lantus) Option #1: Epic smart set: Insulin syringe, ½ cc, 31g, 8mm (5/16). Insulin, typical starting prescription: Insulin glargine 10 units subcutaneous q HS, prescribe vials. Dispense: 1 Continue reading >>

Lantus, Toujeo (insulin Glargine) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Lantus, Toujeo (insulin Glargine) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

100 units/mL (Lantus SoloSTAR; Basaglar KwikPen; 3 mL disposable prefilled pens) 300 units/mL (Toujeo; 1.5 mL SoloStar disposable prefilled pen) 300 units/mL (Toujeo Max; 3 mL SoloStar disposable prefilled pen) Note: Recent studies have suggested that glargine-300 extends blood glucose control well beyond 24 hr Long-acting basal insulin indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus Start ~1/3 of total daily insulin dose; use remaining 2/3 of daily insulin dose on short-acting, premeal insulin Usual initial dose range: 0.2-0.4 units/kg; optimal glucose lowering effect may take 5 days to fully manifest and the first insulin glargine dose may be insufficient to cover metabolic needs in the first 24 hr of use Titrate insulin glargine per instructions, and adjust coadministered glucose-lowering therapies per standard of care See Dosing Considerations and Administration Long-acting basal insulin indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus Start 0.2 units/kg qDay; if necessary, adjust dosage of other antidiabetic drugs when starting insulin glargine to minimize the risk of hypoglycemia See Dosing Considerations and Administration Dose must be individualized based on clinical response; blood glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Patients adjusting the amount or timing of dosage should do so only under medical supervision with appropriate glucose monitoring Titrate Toujeo dose no more frequently than every 3-4 days Use with caution in patients with visual impairment who may rely on audible clicks to dial their dose If changing from a treatment regimen with an intermediate- or long-acting insulin to a regimen with insulin glargine, the amount and timing of shorter-acting insulin Continue reading >>

Lantus

Lantus

Lantus is a prescription medication used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Lantus is a long-acting form of insulin and works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping the body to use sugar for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. This medication comes in an injectable form and is usually used once daily. Common side effects include low blood sugar, redness and skin thickening at the injection site, and weight gain. Lantus is a prescription medication used to treat people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. Lantus may be used along with fast-acting insulin or oral medications to control blood sugar. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Lantus can cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), hyperglycemia (high blood sugar), allergy, and skin reactions. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar): Early warning signs of hypoglycemia may be different, less noticeable or not noticeable at all in some people. That is why it is important to check your blood sugar as you have been advised by your doctor. Symptoms of hypoglycemia may include: anxiety, irritability, restlessness, trouble concentrating, personality changes, mood changes, or other abnormal behavior tingling in your hands, feet, lips, or tongue dizziness, light-headedness, or drowsiness nightmares or trouble sleeping headache blurred vision slurred speech palpitations (fast heart beat) sweating tremor (shaking) unsteady gait (walking). If you have hypoglycemia often or it is hard for you to know if you have the symptoms of hypoglycemia, talk to your doctor. Mild to moderate hypoglycemia is treated by eating or drinking carbohydrates, such as fruit juice, raisins, sugar candies, Continue reading >>

Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme

Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme

Insulin Glargine, injection, 100 units per mL, 10 mL vials and 3 mL x 5 cartridges, Lantus , July 2005 Public Summary Document for Insulin Glargine, injection, 100 units per mL, 10 mL vials and 3 mL x 5 cartridges, Lantus , July 2005. Product: Insulin Glargine, injection, 100 units per mL, 10 mL vials and 3 mL x 5 cartridges, Lantus This application sought listing of Insulin Glargine on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) as an unrestricted benefit. This is the fourth submission to the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) for Insulin Glargine. At the November 2004 meeting, the PBAC rejected the third submission. This submission sought an authority required listing restricting subsidised access through the PBS to: - the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients who have inadequate blood glucose control or recurrent unexplained severe hypoglycaemia; - the treatment of insulin dependent diabetes in children under the age of 18; and - those who are part of the current Commonwealth special access program supplying pharmaceutical benefits to remote Aboriginal Health Services. The basis for the rejection of the November 2004 re-submission was the uncertain but modest extent of clinical benefit and unfavourable, albeit uncertain, cost effectiveness. The PBAC recognised the potential importance of an insulin preparation that can reduce the incidence of hypoglycaemia, whilst maintaining good glycaemic control. However, the Committee considered that the evidence presented did not demonstrate significant differences between Insulin Glargine and insulin NPH in this regard. Thus any recommendation for listing in a broader population (the PBACs preference) could not be at the price requested. Insulin Glargine, 100 units per mL, 10 mL vials and 3 mL cartridges Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (rx)

Insulin Glargine (rx)

Dosage Forms & Strengths injectable solution 100 units/mL (Lantus; 10mL vial) 100 units/mL (Lantus SoloSTAR; Basaglar KwikPen; 3 mL disposable prefilled pens) 300 units/mL (Toujeo; 1.5 mL SolosStar disposable prefilled pen) Note: Recent studies have suggested that glargine-300 extends blood glucose control well beyond 24 hr Type 1 or 2 Diabetes Mellitus Lantus and Toujeo are recombinant human insulin analogs indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus Dosing Considerations Indicated for once-daily SC administration; exhibits relatively constant glucose-lowering profile over 24 hr May be administered at any time during the day; should be administered SC once daily at the same time every day Dose must be individualized based on clinical response; blood glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Patients adjusting the amount or timing of dosage should do so only under medical supervision with appropriate glucose monitoring In patients with type 1 diabetes, insulin glargine must be used in regimens with short-acting insulin Should not be administered IV or via an insulin pump; IV administration of the usual SC dose could result in severe hypoglycemia As with all insulins, injection sites should be rotated within the same region (abdomen, thigh, or deltoid) from one injection to the next to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy; no clinically relevant difference in insulin glargine absorption after abdominal, deltoid, or thigh SC administration As with all insulins, the rate of absorption and, consequently, the onset and duration of action may be affected by exercise and other variables (eg, stress, intercurrent illness, changes in coadministered drugs, meal patterns) Type 1 diabetes mellitus: Starting dose sho Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Cost, Dosage, Prescribing Information And Side Effects

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Cost, Dosage, Prescribing Information And Side Effects

Brand Name: Lantus Generic Name: insulin Glargine (rDNA Origin) Injection (vials and SoloStar) Medication Class: Long-Acting Insulin Manufacturer: Sanofi Aventis US FDA Approval Date: April 20, 2000 What is Lantus and its mechanism of action? Lantus (Insulin Glargine) is a long-acting type of insulin used for treating diabetes. Lantus is a biologic drug made by using recombinant DNA (rDNA) technology. Insulin is a hormone produced and released by beta cells in the pancreas. Insulin is released to help the body regulate blood glucose. Insulin release is triggered by an increase in blood glucose from food consumption. Lantus is a basal insulin analogue and it is equivalent to human insulin but it has a slower onset, no pronounced peak, and longer duration of action. Like other types of insulin Lantus regulates the use of glucose by the body. It lowers blood glucose by stimulating glucose uptake by skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, and also reducing glucose production in the liver. Insulin enhances protein production and reduces the breakdown of protein into smaller protein molecules (polypeptides) and breakdown of fats to release fatty acids. What is Lantus used for treating? Lantus is used to lower blood glucose and improve diabetes control in adult and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. How effective is Lantus? In multiple studies in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes the effect of Lantus given once daily at bedtime on reducing glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) was measured and compared against NPH once daily and twice daily. In two of the clinical studies, adult patients with type 1 diabetes were given Lantus or NPH insulin for 28 weeks. Regular insulin was administered before each meal. B Continue reading >>

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