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How Many Insulin Units Per Mg

Selected Important Safety Information

Selected Important Safety Information

Tresiba® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients with hypersensitivity to Tresiba® or one of its excipients Never Share a Tresiba® FlexTouch® Pen Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Changes in insulin may affect glycemic control. These changes should be made cautiously and under medical supervision. Adjustments in concomitant oral anti-diabetic treatment may be needed Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin, including Tresiba®, and may be life-threatening Tresiba® (insulin degludec injection) is indicated to improve glycemic control in patients 1 year of age and older with diabetes mellitus. Tresiba® is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis or for pediatric patients requiring less than 5 units of Tresiba®. Tresiba® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients with hypersensitivity to Tresiba® or one of its excipients Never Share a Tresiba® FlexTouch® Pen Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Changes in insulin may affect glycemic control. These changes should be made cautiously and under medical supervision. Adjustments in concomitant oral anti-diabetic treatment may be needed Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin, including Tresiba®, and may be life-threatening. Increase monitoring with changes to: insulin dose, co-administered glucose lowering medications, meal pattern, physical activity; and in patients with hypoglycemia unawareness or renal or hepatic impairment Accidental mix-ups betwe Continue reading >>

Calculating Insulin Dose

Calculating Insulin Dose

You'll need to calculate some of your insulin doses. You'll also need to know some basic things about insulin. For example, 40-50% of the total daily insulin dose is to replace insulin overnight. Your provider will prescribe an insulin dose regimen for you; however, you still need to calculate some of your insulin doses. Your insulin dose regimen provides formulas that allow you to calculate how much bolus insulin to take at meals and snacks, or to correct high blood sugars. In this section, you will find: First, some basic things to know about insulin: Approximately 40-50% of the total daily insulin dose is to replace insulin overnight, when you are fasting and between meals. This is called background or basal insulin replacement. The basal or background insulin dose usually is constant from day to day. The other 50-60% of the total daily insulin dose is for carbohydrate coverage (food) and high blood sugar correction. This is called the bolus insulin replacement. Bolus – Carbohydrate coverage The bolus dose for food coverage is prescribed as an insulin to carbohydrate ratio. The insulin to carbohydrate ratio represents how many grams of carbohydrate are covered or disposed of by 1 unit of insulin. Generally, one unit of rapid-acting insulin will dispose of 12-15 grams of carbohydrate. This range can vary from 6-30 grams or more of carbohydrate depending on an individual’s sensitivity to insulin. Insulin sensitivity can vary according to the time of day, from person to person, and is affected by physical activity and stress. Bolus – High blood sugar correction (also known as insulin sensitivity factor) The bolus dose for high blood sugar correction is defined as how much one unit of rapid-acting insulin will drop the blood sugar. Generally, to correct a high bloo Continue reading >>

Reader Input Needed For Community High-alert Drug Survey

Reader Input Needed For Community High-alert Drug Survey

Insulin dosed in mg? A set up for errors! In September, a new form of inhaled insulin, EXUBERA (insulin human [rDNA origin]) will become available. The drug has an onset of action similar to rapid-acting insulin analogs and must be inhaled about 10 minutes before a meal. It also has a duration of glucose-lowering activity comparable to subcutaneously administered regular human insulin. The drug will be available in 1 mg and 3 mg blisters of insulin powder, which are administered using the Exubera Inhaler. We have already received a report from a pharmacist who alerted us to the risk of serious medication errors with this high-alert drug. Exubera is dosed in mg (as during clinical trials), with a weight-based dosing chart for initial mg doses, and a conversion chart for equivalent doses in units (see table 1), the long-standing, usual way insulin is prescribed. Dose(mg) Approximate Regular Insulin SC Dose in IU Number of 1 mg EXUBERA Blisters per Dose Number of 3 mg EXUBERA Blisters per Dose 1 mg 3 1 - 2 mg 6 2 - 3 mg 8 - 1 4 mg 11 1 1 5 mg 14 2 1 6 mg 16 - 2 Table 1: Approximate Equivalent IU Dose of Regular Human Subcutaneous Insulin for EXUBERA Inhaled Insulin Doses Ranging from 1 mg to 6 mg (from: www.pfizer.com/pfizer/download/uspi_exubera.pdf) Confusion between mg and units seems inevitable, especially given the following: The 1 mg blister is equivalent to 3 units of insulin, thus the risk of confusion between the 3 mg blister and 3 units is heightened. Another potential source of error is that the equivalency of mg to units is not exactly incremental. For example, although 1 mg of the drug is equal to 3 units of insulin, a 3 mg dose is equal to 8 units, not 9 units, as may be expected. Likewise, consecutive inhalation of three 1 mg blisters results in significantl Continue reading >>

Dosage & Calc

Dosage & Calc

Sort An adult has a prescription for: Epogen (epoetin alfa) 15,000 units subcut q day. The vial strength is: Epogen 10,000 units/mL. Which is the best method to teach him to administer these injections to himself? 1. Use two syringes, draw up 0.75 mL in each syringe, and administer in two different abdominal sites. 2. Draw up 15 mL of the medication and administer it through his intravenous site. 3. Draw up 1.5 mL of the medication in a syringe and administer it into the upper arm adipose tissue. 4. Draw up 1.5 mL of the medication in one syringe and administer it in one vastus lateralis site. 1. Use two syringes, draw up 0.75 mL in each syringe, and administer in two different abdominal sites. The nurse wants to select the most potent solution available to clean a wound. Which of the following solutions is the most potent? 1. 5:100 millitlers 2. 1:20 millitlers 3. 1:100 millitlers 4. 1:10 millitlers 1 : 10 mL The student nurse is learning how to write decimals to prevent medication errors. According to national health care standards, which of the following examples is expressed correctly? 1. 00.0125 milligrams 2. .0125 milligrams 3. 0.01250 milligrams 4. 0.0125 milligrams 4. 0.0125 milligrams The nurse is comparing a medication that is available in different amounts. Which of the following medications has the most medication? 1. 0.08 milligrams 2. 0.206 milligrams 3. 0.5 milligrams 4. 0.35 milligrams 3. 0.5 milligrams There are 4 patients receiving dextrose in their intravenous fluids. Which patient is receiving the most dextrose? 1. 10% dextrose solution 2. 1% dextrose solution 3. 5% dextrose solution 4. 50% dextrose solution 4. 50% dextrose solution The nursing student is reviewing rules of the metric system. Which of the following notations is acceptable? 1. 400 cc Continue reading >>

Interactive Dosing Calculator

Interactive Dosing Calculator

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

9.6 Ml

9.6 Ml

Liquid Dosage Calculations The concentration of medication in a liquid solution or suspension is expressed in mass/volume (such as milligrams per milliliter) . Orders for liquid medication, however, are expressed in mass (milligrams, for example). Suppose the dosage ordered is 500 mg and the available concentration is 2.50 mg/ml. Our usual set-up for dosage calculations would be: The problem that the dosage on hand is expressed as a concentration — mg/ml. But we need to flip over the expression. That is why the boxes above show instead of . So the procedure is correctly expressed with the Dosage on Hand term flipped over. And now the mg labels cancel out perfectly: 200 ml is required. Note The previous example shows how proper dimension-analysis procedures can tell you when you are making a set-up error. This feature helps prevent math errors. It can save your reputation ... and even a life. Example Complete the math: Result: 21.4 ml Cancel the labels: Complete the math: Result: 0.08 ml or 80 mcg Here is how you would actually work such problems for exams or on the job. Dosage Ordered: 400 mg Stock Available: 500 mg/L Answer: 0.8 L or 800 ml Liquid Dosage Drill Work with this drill routine until you can consistently answer the questions correctly. You should have no need for a calculator. [ ** Interactive 020301 here **] Real-World Examples 1. You are to give the patient Ampicillin 250 mg PO q 6h. The suspension on hand contains 125 mg per 5 ml. How many ml will the patient receive per dose? ______ Ans: 10 ml 2. The order is to give Dilantin 100 mg PO t.i.d. The available suspension contains 30 mg per 5 ml. How many ml. will you give? ______ Ans: 16.7 ml 3. The physician has ordered Tetracycline syrup 500 mg q 6h PO The available medication contains 125 mg per 5 ml. H Continue reading >>

Drug Calculation For Patient

Drug Calculation For Patient

1. Dosage Calculations 2. Dosage Calculations • Measurement systems – Metric – Apothecaries – Household • Most doctors use the metric system 3. Three Systems of Weight andMeasure • Metric (simple system based on units of 10). • Apothecary (based on the weight of one grain of wheat). • Household (drops, teaspoons, tablespoons, etc.). 4. Metric System • Meter is used for linear measure, Meter for length, gram for weight and liter for volume 5. Metric System • The metric, or decimal, system is a simple system of measurement based on units of 10. The basic units can be multiplied or divided by 10 to form secondary units. • The decimal point is moved to the right for calculating multiples, and the decimal point is moved to the left for division. • The basic units of measurement in the metric system are the meter (linear), the liter (volume), and the gram (mass). • When the metric system is used, a zero is always placed in front of the decimal for values less than 1 (e.g., 0.5) to prevent error. 6. Apothecary System • Grains, minims, drams, ounces, pounds, pints, and quarts 7. • The apothecary system, is based on the weight of one grain of wheat. Therefore, the basic unit of weight is the grain (gr), and the basic unit of volume is the minim (the approximate volume of water that weighs a grain). • The grain is expressed in fractions such as morphine gr 1/4. • The minim (m) is the smallest unit of volume, followed in ascending order by the fluid dram (D), fluid ounce (Z), pint (pt), quart (qt), and gallon (gal). Apothecary System 8. Household Measures • Drops, teaspoons (tsp), tablespoons (tbsp) , ounce (oz)and cups • Important since this is often how people take medications • 60 drops (gtts) = 1 teaspoon (tsp) • 3 tsp = 1 tablespoon ( Continue reading >>

Insulin Therapy In Type 1

Insulin Therapy In Type 1

This slide summarizes the information in the new guidelines. Note that information is provided for each drug option regarding efficacy, risk of hypoglycemia, effect on weight, major adverse effects, and relative cost. [Participants have a copy of this algorithm in their printed seminar materials.] Review algorithm options with participants and respond to any questions. 38 Initiating Insulin Therapy Add single dose of basal insulin Glargine, detemir, or NPH Usually administered at bedtime Use conservative starting dose 10 units (empiric) 0.1 to 0.2 units/kg 0.3 to 0.4 units/kg if severe hyperglycemia 41 41 Review concepts in initiating basal insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes. (Points continue on next slide.) Initiating Insulin Therapy Adjust dose according to fasting SMBG Typical titration 1–2 units every few days Treat to target range for fasting glucose ADA: 70–130 mg/dL AACE: <110 mg/dL May use product-specific titration instructions Continue oral agent(s) at same dosage (eventually reduce) 42 American Diabetes Association Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes—2012 AACE Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice for Developing a Diabetes Mellitus Comprehensive Care Plan (2011) 42 Continue reviewing concepts in initiating basal insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes. (Points continue on next slide.) Intensifying Insulin Therapy A1C ≥7% after 2–3 months with fasting blood glucose in target range Perform SMBG before meals, bedtime Add prandial (bolus) insulin based on time of out-of-range result Before lunch: add breakfast dose Before dinner: add lunch dose Before bedtime: add dinner dose 43 43 Review concepts in intensifying insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes. (Points continue on next slide.) Intensifying Insulin Th Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

Getting Started When most people find out they have Type 2 diabetes, they are first instructed to make changes in their diet and lifestyle. These changes, which are likely to include routine exercise, more nutritious food choices, and often a lower calorie intake, are crucial to managing diabetes and may successfully lower blood glucose levels to an acceptable level. If they do not, a drug such as glyburide, glipizide, or metformin is often prescribed. But lifestyle changes and oral drugs for Type 2 diabetes are unlikely to be permanent solutions. This is because over time, the pancreas tends to produce less and less insulin until eventually it cannot meet the body’s needs. Ultimately, insulin (injected or infused) is the most effective treatment for Type 2 diabetes. There are many barriers to starting insulin therapy: Often they are psychological; sometimes they are physical or financial. But if insulin is begun early enough and is used appropriately, people who use it have a marked decrease in complications related to diabetes such as retinopathy (a diabetic eye disease), nephropathy (diabetic kidney disease), and neuropathy (nerve damage). The need for insulin should not be viewed as a personal failure, but rather as a largely inevitable part of the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. This article offers some practical guidance on starting insulin for people with Type 2 diabetes. When to start insulin Insulin is usually started when oral medicines (usually no more than two) and lifestyle changes (which should be maintained for life even if oral pills or insulin are later prescribed) have failed to lower a person’s HbA1c level to less than 7%. (HbA1c stands for glycosylated hemoglobin and is a measure of blood glucose control.) However, a recent consensus statement from Continue reading >>

Xultophy 100 Units/ml Insulin Degludec + 3.6 Mg/ml Liraglutide Solution For Injection In A Pre-filled Pen

Xultophy 100 Units/ml Insulin Degludec + 3.6 Mg/ml Liraglutide Solution For Injection In A Pre-filled Pen

Package leaflet: Information for the patient Xultophy® 100 units/mL + 3.6 mg/mL insulin degludec + liraglutide ▼This medicine is subject to additional monitoring. This will allow quick identification of new safety information. You can help by reporting any side effects you may get. See the end of section 4 for how to report side effects. Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start using this medicine because it contains important information for you. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This medicine has been prescribed for you only. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their signs of illness are the same as yours. If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. See section 4. 1. What Xultophy® is and what it is used for 2. What you need to know before you use Xultophy® 3. How to use Xultophy® 4. Possible side effects 5. How to store Xultophy® 6. Contents of the pack and other information Xultophy® contains two active substances that help your body control your blood sugar: insulin degludec – a long-acting basal insulin which lowers your blood sugar levels. liraglutide – a ‘GLP-1 analogue’ that helps your body make more insulin during meals and lowers the amount of sugar made by your body. 2. What you need to know before you use Xultophy® Warnings and precautions Talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse before using Xultophy®. If you are also taking a sulfonylurea (such as glimepiride or glibenclamide), your doctor may tell you to lower your sulfonylurea dose depending on your blood sugar levels. Do not use Xultophy® if you have type 1 diabetes mellitu Continue reading >>

Actrapid 100 International Units/ml, Solution For Injection In A Vial

Actrapid 100 International Units/ml, Solution For Injection In A Vial

1 vial contains 10 ml equivalent to 1,000 international units. 1 ml solution contains 100 international units insulin human* (equivalent to 3.5 mg). *Human insulin is produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by recombinant DNA technology. Excipient with known effect: Actrapid contains less than 1 mmol sodium (23 mg) per dose, i.e. Actrapid is essentially 'sodium-free'. For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1. Posology The potency of human insulin is expressed in international units. Actrapid dosing is individual and determined in accordance with the needs of the patient. It can be used alone or in combination with intermediate-acting or long-acting insulin before a meal or a snack. The individual insulin requirement is usually between 0.3 and 1.0 international unit/kg/day. Adjustment of dose may be necessary if patients undertake increased physical activity, change their usual diet or during concomitant illness. Special populations Elderly (≥ 65 years old) Actrapid can be used in elderly patients. In elderly patients, glucose monitoring should be intensified and the insulin dose adjusted on an individual basis. Renal and hepatic impairment Renal or hepatic impairment may reduce the patient's insulin requirements. In patients with renal or hepatic impairment, glucose monitoring should be intensified and the human insulin dose adjusted on an individual basis. Paediatric population Actrapid can be used in children and adolescents. Transfer from other insulin medicinal products When transferring from other insulin medicinal products, adjustment of the Actrapid dose and the dose of the basal insulin may be necessary. Close glucose monitoring is recommended during the transfer and in the initial weeks thereafter (see section 4.4). Method of administration Actrapid is a Continue reading >>

Peptide Calculator - Reconstituting Bodybuilding Peptides

Peptide Calculator - Reconstituting Bodybuilding Peptides

The Peptide Calculator measures reconstitution and peptide dosage for research. Double check peptide calculator math with 1/3ml, 50cc and 100 unit syringes. Microgram (mcg) peptide measurements are used to find dosage in each unit and tick mark on an insulin syringe. How to Measure bodybuilding Peptides ml = milliliter. This is a VOLUME measurement. it is 1/1000 of a liter. When talking about water or similar liquids, it is equivalent to one cubic centimeter. cc = cubic centimeter.This is also a VOLUME measurement. Most syringes measure their capacity in cc's. If you have a 1cc syringe, it will hold 1ml of liquid. iu = international unit. This is a unit used to measure the activity (that is, the effect) of many vitamins and drugs. For each substance to which this unit applies, there is an international agreement specifying the biological effect expected with a dose of 1 IU. Other quantities of the substance are then expressed as multiples of this standard. This also means that this measurement is not based on sheer volume or weight of the substance, but rather the effect. mg = milligram. This is a WEIGHT measurement. It is 1/1000 of a gram. the amount of chemical substance is often measured in milligrams. For injectable solutions, this will be reported as a concentration of weight to volume, such as mg/ml (milligrams per milliliter). In the case of orally administered substances, the weight of chemical is labeled, although the actual weight of the pill/capsule may be much higher, because of the use of filler substances. This means that a small pill may be much more potent than a large pill, so don't judge a pill based on its size, but the actual amount of substance for which it is labeled as. Typical to buy melanotan peptides in 5 and 10 milligram vials. mcg = microgram Continue reading >>

1 Unit Insulin Lowers Glucose By How Much? Calculating Insulin/carb Ratio

1 Unit Insulin Lowers Glucose By How Much? Calculating Insulin/carb Ratio

Remember High School algebra? Problem after problem wondering, when am I EVER going to use this? I sure remember thinking that on more than one occasion. Well, it turns out math does have more practical application than balancing your checkbook, keeping a budget, and calculating tips for servers. If you have type 2 diabetes, simple math may be crucial to keeping blood glucose under control. Why? As it turns out, the total amount of carbohydrates is the single most significant factor in maintaining blood glucose control. While many other factors play a role – such as meal timing, quality of food choices, balance of food groups etc – consistently maintaining the proper number of carbohydrates at meal times is most significant. Foods Really Matter This means it is not only key to choose complex carbohydrate (not simple sugars) whole foods sources, but also to be conscientious of the amount of carbohydrates you regularly consume. The amount of carbohydrates to eat per day is a hot issue of debate, with recommendations ranging from 20 to 200+ grams per day! In most cases 200 grams is way too much for a diabetic, research indicating that a lower carb diet is best for glucose control. Still, what is best for you will depend on many factors including your height, weight, age, physical activity level, and how your body responds to carbs. Some people are much more sensitive than others. For example, some people can eat brown rice and oatmeal, while in many cases people find it difficult to control their blood glucose while still eating these high carb foods. It will take working with a team of trusted professionals and probably some trial and error to find out what works best for you as an individual. In theory, the more consistent your carbohydrate consumption is (all other Continue reading >>

Medication Dosage Exam €“ Answer Sheet

Medication Dosage Exam €“ Answer Sheet

The following exam is required to advance to the next clinical rotation, where you may be passing medications for the first time. You MUST pass this exam with a minimum score of 86% in order to begin the next clinical rotation. Round as needed, unless otherwise stated. 1 Order Lasix 20mg IV Stat Available furosemide 100mg / 10mL How many mL will you give? 2 mL 2 Order Ativan 1 mg IV Available lorazepam 2mg / ml How many mL will you give? 0.5 mL 3 Order Gentamycin 500mg IV Available Gentamycin 1gm powder to be mixed with 10ml NSS NSS 10ml syringe How many mL will you give? 5 mL 4 Order Tylenol 15mg / kg PO PO Available 125mg /5ml Elixer Weight 24 pounds How many mg will you give? How many mL will you give? 163.5 MG 6.5 mL* 5 Order Ibuprofen 10mg / kg Available 100mg / 5mL Elixer Weight 10 pounds, 8 ounces How many mg will you give? How many mL will you give? 48 MG 2.5 mL* 6 Order 1L NSS over four hours How many ml/Hr will you set the IV Pump? 250mL/Hr 7 Order 500mL LR IV over two hours. Drip Factor 10 gtt/ml How many gtt/min are needed? 42 gtt/min* 8 Order 250ml NSS IV over 30 minutes How many mL per hour is the IV Pump to be set? 500mL/Hr 9 Order 2L LR over six hours Drip Factor 15gtt/mL How many gtt/min are needed? 83gtt/min* 10 Order Amitriptyline 25 mg PO Available Amitriptyline 12.5mg How many tablets will you give? 2 Tabs 11 Order Warfarin 2.5 mg PO Available Warfarin 5mg How many tablets will you give? 0.5 Tabs 12 Order Heparin 3000 units SQ Loading Dose Available Heparin 5000 units/mL How many mL will you give (Do not round) 0.6 mL 13 Order FSBS – 110 / 30 = # Units Humalog FSBS 130 How many units of Humalog will you give? 0 Units 14 Order FSBS – 110 / 30 = # Units Novolog FSBS 200 How many units of Novolog will you give? 3 Units 15 Order FSBS †Continue reading >>

How Much Insulin Do You Need?

How Much Insulin Do You Need?

Getty ImagesIf you have type 2 diabetes and your doctor thinks it might be a good time to start insulin therapy, there are two important factors to consider: How much insulin do you need to take? When do you need to take it? And both are very personal. "You can't paint everyone with type 2 diabetes with the same brush," says Mark Feinglos, MD, division chief of endocrinology, metabolism, and nutrition at the Duke University School of Medicine, in Durham, N.C. "You need to tailor the regimen to an individual's needs." A person with type 2 diabetes might start off on half a unit of insulin per kilogram of body weight per day, especially if there is not much known about the nature of his or her diabetes. Still, it is not unusual to need more like 1 unit, says Dr. Feinglos. (One unit per kilogram would be 68 units per day for someone who weighs 150 pounds, which is about 68 kilograms.) Testing Each DayI test morning, evening, and before meals Watch videoMore about blood sugar monitoring A lot depends on your specific health situation. People with type 2 diabetes suffer from insulin resistance, a situation in which the body loses its ability to use the hormone properly. Early in the course of the disease, the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas respond to insulin resistance by churning out even more of the hormone. Over time, though, insulin production declines. Taking insulin can help you overcome the body's insulin resistance, though many factors can affect your dosage. If your body is still sensitive to insulin but the pancreas is no longer making much insulin, for example, Dr. Feinglos says that you would require less insulin than someone who is really resistant to insulin. "But the most important issue is not necessarily how much you need to take," he adds. "Rather, Continue reading >>

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