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How Long Will A Water Pump Last After It Starts Leaking

How To Tell If A Car's Water Pump Needs Replacement

How To Tell If A Car's Water Pump Needs Replacement

How to Tell if a Car's Water Pump Needs Replacement Your car's water pump is an important part of your vehicle. It is the part that continually pumps coolant to your vehicle's engine so that it doesn't overheat. A leak or a faulty bearing can cause serious damage to your car's engine. Puddles of coolant underneath your vehicle or high temperature readings may be signs that your water pump needs replacing. Let your car sit overnight, parked in a garage with a clean concrete floor. If it's not possible to park it inside on a clean concrete surface, place a piece of light-colored cardboard underneath your car directly under the motor. Be mindful that water pumps are more likely to leak while the vehicle engine is running, so this is a poor reference for finding a leak. Examine the cardboard the next morning. If it appears to be wet from coolant, you have a leak somewhere, possibly in your water pump, but other sources of leaking coolant could be radiator hoses, heater hoses, freeze plugs, gaskets, or the radiator itself. To narrow the search down, try to place the cardboard directly underneath the water pump itself. If you notice green liquid on the cardboard, it's antifreeze. This means you have a coolant leak somewhere. Check the water pump pulley. Find the round part at the front of your water pump that the belt is around. Attempt to rock the pulley back and forth. If it seems to be loose, it may be time to replace it, because the bearing is going bad. Listen to your car. Start your car's engine with the hood up. If you hear a low-pitched grinding noise, it may indicate that your water pump bearing is going bad. You can often hear it plainly if it's gone bad. You also have similar bearings in your AC compressor, power steering pump, and alternator, so you need to be ab Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of A Bad Or Failing Water Pump

Symptoms Of A Bad Or Failing Water Pump

Common signs include coolant leaks at the front-center of the car, loose water pump pulley, overheating engine, and steam coming from the radiator. by a top-rated mechanic at your home or office In order to run cool on those hot summer days, your engine needs to have a consistent flow of coolant supplied from the radiator throughout the engine. The water pump is the primary component responsible for maintaining this flow. When it works properly, your car will maintain a consistent operating temperature, run smoothly, and take you anywhere you need to travel. When the water pump fails or is beginning to wear out, it can lead to complete engine failure. When the water cooled (as opposed to air cooled) engine was introduced, many automotive experts believed that the water pump circulating coolant through the engine block was just as critical to engine protection as oil. This philosophy holds true even as technology has improved over the years to create more efficient cooling systems in today's modern cars. Your cars water pump is the key to making the entire system work. It is an impeller pump and is usually buried under the timing belt cover on the side of the engine. The pump is operated by the engines drive belt as the belt turns, the pump turns. Blades on the pump force coolant to flow through the engine and back to the radiator to be cooled by a forced air cooling fan. Although the water pumps in most modern cars, trucks, and SUVs will last a long time, they are by no means indestructible. Like any other mechanical device, they will produce a few warning signs that they are wearing out , so that car owners can contact a local ASE certified mechanic to replace the water pump before additional engine components are damaged. Here are some common symptoms that hint towar Continue reading >>

Water Pump Replacement: The Dos And Donts

Water Pump Replacement: The Dos And Donts

Water pump replacement: the dos and donts Water pump replacement: the dos and donts Replacing a water pump requires a fair amount of technical expertise. Are you planning on installing a new water pump? These dos and donts will help you avoid 9 common mistakes. 1. Dont worry if the new water pump looks a little different from the old one It is possible that theres a visual difference between the new water pump youre about to install and the old pump you have just removed. Perhaps the new one has a metal paddle wheel while the old one had a plastic paddle wheel, or perhaps its shape is somewhat different. Dont worry about these minor differences; all that matters is the position of the water pump pulley. It should be at the same height as in the old pump because if the belt starts rubbing against the pulley it will become frayed. To check if youre good to go, simply put both water pumps on your workbench, face down (i.e. with the side that touches the engine), and compare the position of the pulley. Not flushing the cooling systemis a common mistake that could cost you dearly. After all, the old coolant is likely to be contaminated, and its impurities could settle where the dynamic seal is supposed to form. As a result, these impurities will cause scratches on the dynamic seal surface, which could, in turn, lead to premature pump failure.To remove all the debris from the cooling system, flushing is key. A hose and a standard cleansing agent might do, but using a flush tool like the Gates Power Clean Flush tool will help you to do the job properly. Tip: if you flush the cooling system with a water pump attached, use the old water pump and not the new one, to prevent impurities from contaminating the new pump. 3. Dont apply sealant to an O-ring or a dry seal When changing Continue reading >>

Small Leak At Water Pump, I Assume The Weep Hole...how Long Do I Have? - Pennock's Fiero Forum

Small Leak At Water Pump, I Assume The Weep Hole...how Long Do I Have? - Pennock's Fiero Forum

Technical Discussion & Questions - Archive Small leak at water pump, I assume the weep hole...how long do I have? (Page 1) T H I SI SA NA R C H I V E DT O P I C Small leak at water pump, I assume the weep hole...how long do I have? by Bigfieroman From: Pleasant Hills, PA, near Pittsburgh As the title states, I noticed a coolant leak coming from the WP area. I think it is from the weep hole when the WP is wearing out. If that is the case, how many miles, roughly, do I have to change it before it needs replaced? I realize noone can tell me for sure, I just want to know if I should expect 100 miles or 10000 miles. I would replace ASAP, the coolant can leak on the belts causing slippage, and possibly get in the alternator. If it gets near the exhaust it can cause a fire or at least a lot of smoke...............Paul Most water pumps I have dealt with that start to leak get worse in short order. "What is hateful to you do not to your fellow man. That is the entire Law: all the rest is commentary." Talmud, Shabbat 31a From: Pleasant Hills, PA, near Pittsburgh I forgot to mention, it is a very slow leak currently, about 1 drop every 30 seconds. When you see the puddles start to get bigger, then usually when your at the most inconvient place & time, you come out and theres a large stream coming from under your car and people standing around in awe, wondering whats going on--it (for the most part) it will happen when the engine is sitting and cooling off--good news is usually you can top it off and make it home--then time for the new pump. Strange over the years --they don`t leak like the above when driving it---its when you park it and the engine cools. Got a good couple of months out of a 69 chevy snub nose van I used to drive, before it went for good... The leak means that th Continue reading >>

How Long Does A Water Pump Last?

How Long Does A Water Pump Last?

The engine in your car produces a lot of heat, which means that the cooling system in your car will need to do its job to keep it from overheating. There are a variety of different key components in your cooling system and each of them plays a vital role in keeping the vehicle at a manageable temperature. The water pump helps to circulate the coolant throughout the engine keeping the internal temperature at the right levels. The water pump contains a propeller that is ran by the drive belt. This propeller is what helps to push the coolant through the engine. Every time that your car is ran, the water pump will have to do its job and keep the internal temperature of the engine down. For the most part, the water pump on your vehicle should last the life of the vehicle. Due to mechanical issues with this part, the water pump will need to be replaced over time. Noticing the warning signs that the car gives when there is an issue with the water pump can help to save you a lot of time and trouble. Neglecting to act when these warning signs surface can lead to the engine overheating and in a lot of damage to the engine. Running a car too hot can lead to damage to the cylinder heads, which can be very expensive to fix. Because of its location and the complexity involved in removing it, you may have to find a professional to handle the repairs for you. If you do not have experience with this type of work, you may do more harm than good. The water pump will have to be installed properly in order for your engine to get the cooling that it needs. If there is an issue with your cars water pump, here are a few of the things that you will probably notice: There is coolant leaking from around where the water pump is mounted When the water pump is replaced, you will need to make conces Continue reading >>

How Long Can I Drive With A Leaking Water Pump? | Yahoo Answers

How Long Can I Drive With A Leaking Water Pump? | Yahoo Answers

How long can i drive with a leaking water pump? I noticed it was leaking 2 days ago, and I don't have the money to get it worked on now. It's leaking but the engine is not getting hot or over heating. Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Long enough to get it to a repair shop. Once the pump starts leaking the bearings in the pump failing isn't too far behind and depending on the vehicle when the pump freezes up it can do allot of damage. Such as throwing the fan into the radiator. You can drive it as long as you monitor the coolant level. Add water as needed. Don't let it run low or you'll be faced with a potential overheat. Carry some with you. If you're in a cold climate you cannot use plain water. You must use at least 50% anti-freeze (or the pre-mixed stuff) or you risk a freeze and possibly destroy the engine. Now then, if the pump is leaking around the pulley shaft there's a seal in there that's failing. It will only get worse. Likely after a while the bearing in there will fail too. The pump will start screaming at you. This is bad and needs to be replaced quickly before it seizes up. If it is leaking at a gasket on the engine block the gasket can be replaced. Assuming the pump is still in good order it won't have to be replaced. This leak will likely get worse too. Another concern is where the leaking water goes. If it's just dripping down it probably isn't a big deal. But if it sprays around the engine onto other things there could be some serious consequences. Well the leak will only get worse and eventually the coolant will get into the bearings of the water pump and then it will lock up or fly apart. Not a good deal on a rear wheel drive car because the fan that is attached to the water pump will hit the radiator then you need a belt, w Continue reading >>

How Long Will A Bad Water Pump Last?

How Long Will A Bad Water Pump Last?

I guess I'm just looking for some peace of mind here. I've got a bum water pump. It's been noisy for a bit over a month (like a griding sound noticible from outside the truck). I suspected it was the water pump, and the Toyota dealer confirmed this last week when I took the runner in for the lower ball joint recall. I know once in dealing with the water pump you're right by the timing belt, and I'm coming up soon on my 90K service, so I'm gonna wait to get everything done at once. Only thing is, I'm not gonna have a chance to do that for a couple more weeks or so. So what I'm looking for is either "Yeah, I ran with a bad water pump for a million miles" or "Get it fixed now or else" replies. It's already been like this for a few weeks, so that leads me to believe a couple more shouldn't be too catastropic. Also, say it does die on me while out on the road...what happens? The engine will just overheat real quick, but I'd still be able to drive a few miles till it does, or what? Educate me. I guess I'm just looking for some peace of mind here. I've got a bum water pump. It's been noisy for a bit over a month (like a griding sound noticible from outside the truck). I suspected it was the water pump, and the Toyota dealer confirmed this last week when I took the runner in for the lower ball joint recall. I know once in dealing with the water pump you're right by the timing belt, and I'm coming up soon on my 90K service, so I'm gonna wait to get everything done at once. Only thing is, I'm not gonna have a chance to do that for a couple more weeks or so. So what I'm looking for is either "Yeah, I ran with a bad water pump for a million miles" or "Get it fixed now or else" replies. It's already been like this for a few weeks, so that leads me to believe a couple more shouldn't Continue reading >>

Water Pump Leaking: What Do I Risk Driving Like That? - Mercedes-benz Forum

Water Pump Leaking: What Do I Risk Driving Like That? - Mercedes-benz Forum

Vintage Mercedes-Benz > Water pump leaking: what do I risk driving like that? yesterday the water pump on my 3.5 M116 engine started leaking quite badly. it seams to come from a hole at the bottom of the water pump housing. By looking at the schemes on the Workshop manual it looks like the sliding ring seal behind the propeller has failed. I have a spare water pump but I have no clue whether it is better than the one I have in place now and I don't want to do all the work of replacing the pump only to discover it is also faulty. I'm still to decide if I order a gasket kit and renew them on my spare water pump before fitting it or if I order a new water pump. But this will take some days anyway. My problem is this is the only car I have and I had planned a 800 miles round trip early next week and the thing won't be repaired by then. So far it takes two hours of driving before the temp needle starts going up and I need to refill the radiator. When the engine is stopped it does not leak, unless I take the radiator cap out and then it starts dripping from the water pump. I would like to tempt the trip anyway by stopping and refilling from time to time. - do I risk some water pump complete failure such as bearings seizing etc? - will a stop leak of any sort help at least reduce the leak? - anybody drove a car with a similar problem? It's a kind of risky but you know already that you are loosing coolant ,so the worst is you get stranded,if it get too hot you need to shut the engine of before it overheats. For sure I would put a stop leak in ,it swells up the seals so it can't get worst. I once took a cab in Thailand he had no radiator cap so he filled every 50 Miles water in,as long as there is water in the radiator you can drive 1000 of miles. - do I risk some water pump co Continue reading >>

How Long Does A Water Pump Last?

How Long Does A Water Pump Last?

NEXT Small parts on a car's engine are often easy to overlook, but those components are often some of the most important to keep everything running properly. In the case of keeping your engine cool, the water pump is an effective and integral part of the process. But how long can you expect it to last? The water pump endures constant use inside an engine and allows the engine to endure the intense heat that internal combustion produces. When your engine is on, the water pump circulates coolant, or antifreeze, in the cylinder head and the engine block to cool the engine down. After the coolant passes through the engine it's sent back into the radiator to be cooled before entering the engine again. When it comes to water pump longevity, they actually tend to last a long time. It's recommended that your engine's water pump be replaced when the timing belt is serviced. Water pumps are driven by the timing belt, or an accessory drive belt that spins a pulley outside of the pump which turns the internal impeller. On different makes and models of cars, these belts can last anywhere between 60,000 and 90,000 miles (96,561 to 144,841 kilometers), so you can expect your water pump to last about that long, too. Of course, some water pumps may not last quite that long, but manufacturers make efforts to ensure water pumps last a long time due to negative effects on the engine if they fail. To avoid running into the problem of a failed water pump, there are a couple warning signs that you can look for. The first is if coolant is leaking around the water pump. Weep holes located on the casing of the water pump will leak coolant when the pump is failing. The second red flag is if the water pump is making more noise than usual. This may be from a defective impeller or an impeller that's Continue reading >>

Water Pump Diagnosis & Replacement

Water Pump Diagnosis & Replacement

The water pump is the heart of the cooling system. The pump circulates coolant between the engine and radiator to keep the engine from overheating. Inside the pump is a metal or plastic impeller with blades that push the water through the pump. The impeller is mounted on a shaft that is supported by the pump housing with a bearing and seal assembly. The water pump is usually belt driven and is mounted on the front of the engine. Water pumps typically fail one of two ways: the shaft seal starts to leak, or the impeller inside breaks, comes loose or the blades erode and wear down (which is more of a problem with pumps that have plastic impellers). When a water pump starts to leak, the cooling system will lose coolant. If the leak is not discovered, the loss of coolant will eventually cause the engine to overheat. The drive may not realize anything is wrong until the temperature warning light comes on. If this happens to you, shut the engine off immediately. Severe engine damage can result if an overheating engine is driven too far. If the engine has overheated, the entire cooling system (radiator, hoses, water pump and engine) must all be inspected to see if there are any coolant leaks. If coolant is leaking out of the water pump shaft or vent hole, the water pump needs to be replaced. Cooling system sealer cannot stop this kind of leak. A seal on the water pump shaft prevents coolant from leaking past the bearing. Seal wear can be caused by rust, sediment or other contaminants that are circulating with the coolant inside the cooling system. The pump shaft and bearings are also under constant load not only from the drive belt or timing belt but also the fan on vehicles with pump-mounted mechanical cooling fans. Eventually the water pump shaft seal and/or bearing wears ou Continue reading >>

How Long Will The Water Pump Last When Leaking? - Diesel Forum - Thedieselstop.com

How Long Will The Water Pump Last When Leaking? - Diesel Forum - Thedieselstop.com

1994 F-350 7.3 IDI Turbo, crew cab, E4OD,4:10 L/S, LB, Dually To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts. ATS Turbo upgrades: 3" DP with 3" exhaust Magnaflow XL muffler: To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts. 2012 Copper Canyon 273 FWRET w/2 slides, Air Lift 5000 bags Pillar pod: Autometer C2 Series gauges: pyro,trans, boost, water, oil pressure To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts. Hypermax Cowl induction, K&N air filter, flex-a-lite 26K trans cooler with fan,Tekonsha prodigy To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts. 1994 F-350 7.3 IDI Turbo, crew cab, E4OD,4:10 L/S, LB, Dually To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts. ATS Turbo upgrades: 3" DP with 3" exhaust Magnaflow XL muffler: To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts. 2012 Copper Canyon 273 FWRET w/2 slides, Air Lift 5000 bags Pillar pod: Autometer C2 Series gauges: pyro,trans, boost, water, oil pressure To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts. Hypermax Cowl induction, K&N air filter, flex-a-lite 26K trans cooler with fan,Tekonsha prodigy To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts. 1996 F-250 extended cab long box five speed. Home made Tymar, 203 Stat, 60 gal in bed fuel cell, 315/75's, no muffler, ebpv welded open 3" to 3" DP, Babies. 290K, still chugging, and still smoking when cold. UPDATED 1/1/09 Replace so far Continue reading >>

Automotive Engine Water Pump: How Many Miles Should Pumps Last?

Automotive Engine Water Pump: How Many Miles Should Pumps Last?

With Drivers Racking Up More Miles, Brakes Shouldn't Be Ignored The service life of most original equipment water pumps should be 100,000 miles or longer. Some cheap replacement water pumps, however, may not last 30,000 miles before they start to leak. Thats why you should recommend a top-quality replacement water pump if a customers old water pump has called it quits. Several factors can shorten the life of any water pump. These include internal corrosion in the cooling system (old neglected coolant that is worn out and should have been changed), as well as cavitation wear (which can be a problem with some water pumps that have plastic impellers). The pump shaft is supported by bearings, and there is usually a ceramic seal around the shaft. Antifreeze contains lubricants for the shaft bearing, as well as corrosion inhibitors to prevent internal rust and corrosion. But these additives eventually wear out over time. If the coolant is worn out or dirty, it will shorten the life of the water pumps bearings and seals, as well as other cooling system components. A water pump with bad bearings may make noise and/or wobble as it turns. There should be no play or movement in the pump shaft if the pump pulley is wiggled sideways by hand when the engine is off. Coolant leaking out of the vent hole on the housing means the shaft seal has failed and the pump needs to be replaced. If an engine has been overheating, but the coolant level is full and there are no signs of coolant leaks externally or internally (such as a bad head gasket), the problem may be the water pump impeller. Steel impellers can rust or even separate from the shaft. Plastic impellers can erode and wear down, reducing the pumps ability to circulate coolant. Either way, a pump that isnt pumping very well needs to Continue reading >>

How Long Will A Leaking Water Pump Last

How Long Will A Leaking Water Pump Last

Ok, after some thought I decided rather than jump headfirst into a water pump job, I should make sure I'm prepared. I'm getting the 60k video for reference and wanna get some belts replaced at the same time. My question is how long will the water pump hold up. I'm planning on doing it next month as opposed to this one. Should I do the timing belt? It has ~28,000 miles on it. The coolant leak is noticeable but not too bad. I topped off the overflow a week ago and the low coolant light hasn't come back yet. A leaking water pump means the shaft seals gone bad, shaft seals start going out you'll start getting "wobble" on the pump empeller, which could in-turn, worse case, start gouging/ scrapping into the engine. I've seen that on other vehicles, still have my original on my '89 SHO. Take Care, Your crankshaft position sensor will fail before your water pump lets you down. That's I would worry about. The pump leaks directly on top of the CPS. Your pump will probably last as long as your CPS holds out with the water leaking on it. Nice safety system when you think about it...I know its a PITA to have the CPS go, but it certainly keeps you from driving a car that no longer has the ability to cool itself. squint The leaking seal should be able to make it until you can schedule the complete front end job. I have my doubts that leaking water pumps guarantee the demise of the CPS. I have had the CPS fail without a leak from the pump. I have also destructively disassembled that and other failed CPSs to determine why they may have quit. I found no evidence of water intrusion or even a possible path for the coolant to enter. The only penetration into the sensor body is the electrical conductors and those are epoxy sealed along with the entire electronics package. If you are concern Continue reading >>

When To Replace Your Car's Water Pump

When To Replace Your Car's Water Pump

It's a good idea to change your car's water pump at the same time as the timing belt. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Angie's List magazine) Your car's water pump is out of sight, but don't keep it out of mind. The water pump receives little attention tucked away out of sight under your cars timing belt cover. But without a water pump, your car would overheat and you'd be left shopping around for a new engine. The water pump plays an important role in your cars cooling system and continually pumps coolant and water into the engine. Operated by the drive belt, blades on the pump allow coolant to flow into the engine. Although water pumps are built to last, they sometimes break down and require replacement. "Sadly, there are times that water pumps fail without any notice, says Lynn Beckwith, owner of Beckwiths Car Care in Humble, Texas. However, a small bit of attention can help you spot a possible problem. Water pumps can fail in several ways. They can leak and lose precious coolant, as well as fail internally with bearing and shaft issues, or have impellers fail." The electrical fuel pump transfers fuel from the fuel tank to the engine. It can last the life of your vehicle, but only if it's properly cared for. How to know when to replace the water pump A coolant leak near the timing belt often signals an issue with the water pump. "A coolant leak of any kind should never be ignored, and, when it's coming from under the timing belt cover, it's probably going to be from the water pump, Beckwith says. Overheating or a sudden change in the temperature gauge can also signal a problem. You can also check by pulling back and forth on the water pump pulley. Beckwith says if theres any play or you can move the water pump back and forth it could mean the shaft and bearings are loose. "W Continue reading >>

When Can You Be Sure When A Water Pump Is Going Bad?

When Can You Be Sure When A Water Pump Is Going Bad?

When can you be sure when a water pump is going bad? The car: 2007 Honda Civic 1.8L with 37K miles The backstage story: Found one drop of coolant on garage floor about 3 years ago. Found another drop in November. The Civic 1.8L is under voluntary recall for lower block cracking, causing coolant loss which requires engine replacement. Took car to dealer last week. Asked service advisor to check two things: recall on airbags and for possible engine cracking. Advisor came back 45 minutes later and informed me that the airbags are not covered by recal, that the block is fine but that the coolant came from the water pump weep hole and it needs replacement. The cost? About $600. Question: I've owned the car for over 7 years and noticed two drops of coolant loss. I have filled the overflow tank once with a cup of water. I have an OEM electronic service manual which states that if (during diagnosis) you turn the water pump pulley counter-clockwise you may see a drop of coolant at the weep hole ... this is normal. The pump makes no adverse noises whatsoever. I'm looking for opinions here. From what you know is this water pump going bad? What would you do? Yeah but that is extremely rare and you would usually have a ton of warning before it got to that point. I'm not saying to keep driving a car with badly leaking pump for a year lol. I'm saying if it starts leaking badly you can make it home without calling a tow truck. If the pump totally fails and maybe takes out the power steering, a/c, or even the alternator you still can probably make it home. Won't be fast since you would have to pull over and cool the engine a lot but you can make it. You could look at it from another perspective. It's a small leak, it's probably leaking a little worse than an occasional drop because eng Continue reading >>

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