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How Long Should I Wait To Eat After Taking My Insulin

Getting Started With Insulin

Getting Started With Insulin

If you have been talking about getting started on insulin with your doctor, or if taking insulin is new to you, you may have questions or concerns. The following guide will help you understand the types of insulin, options for taking insulin, how and where to inject insulin, and insulin care and storage. Insulin pens Your pen comes with an instruction book. Please review it to understand how your pen works, how to load the cartridge and how to prepare your pen for an insulin injection. Mixing insulin Insulin that is cloudy (NPH, premixed) needs to be mixed before using. The pen should be rolled ten times, tipped ten times and checked for a milky-white consistency. Check insulin flow (prime) Attach pen needle. Dial up two units and, with pen tip facing upwards, push the dosing button. If no stream of insulin appears, repeat with another two units. Giving your injection After you have checked the insulin flow, dial up the dose of insulin to be taken. Insert pen tip into skin at a 90º angle. Push the dosing button until you see ‘0’. Count 10 seconds before removing the needle from your skin to ensure you receive the full dose. With longer needles (≥ 8mm), you may need to gently lift the skin before injection. Insulin injection sites Site Pros Cons Abdomen (tummy) Stay 2 inches (5 cm) away from your belly button Easy to reach; insulin absorbs fast and consistently None Buttock and thigh Slower absorption rate than from abdomen and arm sites Slower absorption; absorption can be affected by exercise Outer arm After abdomen, arm provides the next fastest absorption rate Harder to reach for self-injections NOTE: It is really important to change (rotate) where you give yourself insulin to prevent fatty lumps from forming since these can affect how your body absorbs insuli Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

I’d be willing to bet that most everyone has been told—and therefore believes—that people with diabetes cannot have any sugar and are resigned to living without dessert for the rest of their lives. Well, as a Certified Diabetes Educator, I'm here to tell you that this is a myth. People with diabetes can eat sugar, desserts, and almost any food that contains caloric sweeteners (molasses, honey, maple syrup, and more). Why? Because people with diabetes can eat foods that contain carbohydrates, whether those carbohydrates come from starchy foods like potatoes or sugary foods such as candy. It’s best to save sweets and desserts for special occasions so you don’t miss out on the more nutritious foods your body needs. However, when you do decide to include a sweet treat, make sure you keep portions small and use your carbohydrate counting plan. No sugar ever again? No way! The idea that people with diabetes should avoid sugar is decades old. Logically, it makes sense. Diabetes is a condition that causes high blood sugar. Sugary foods cause blood sugar levels to increase. Therefore people with diabetes should avoid sugary foods in order to prevent hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and keep their diabetes under control. However, simply avoiding sugary foods does not go very far in terms of controlling blood sugar. Here's why. After you eat, your blood sugar level (aka postprandial blood glucose level) is largely determined by the total amount of carbohydrate you ate, not the source of the carbohydrates eaten. There are two types of carbohydrates that elevate your blood sugar levels: sugar and starch. Both will elevate your blood glucose to roughly the same level (assuming you ate the same amount of each). For example, if you were to eat a ½ cup of regular ice cream (1 Continue reading >>

Expert Advice: 18 Questions About Taking Insulin

Expert Advice: 18 Questions About Taking Insulin

Stuart Weiss, MD, is a clinical assistant professor of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism at New York University's Department of Medicine, NYU Medical Center, in New York City. Q: I have type 2 diabetes. Do I have to take insulin? A: For people with type 2 diabetes, insulin is a very nice tool that's better if used sooner rather than later. (Unlike in type 2 diabetes, in type 1 diabetes insulin is a requirement, not an option.) What happens in type 2 diabetes is that physicians may use insulin as a threat, an “if you” thingif you don't lose some weight, if you don't do some exercise, if you don't follow the diet, then you're going to wind up on insulin. That's really not how people with type 2 diabetes should view insulinas a punishment. Insulin is a very, very safe therapy, and people should not hesitate to use it if needed. The people with type 2 diabetes who must take insulin are those who are unable to control their blood sugar even while on several different oral medications. But if you start using insulin before you reach that point, you can help preserve the function of your insulin-producing pancreatic cells for a longer time. And the longer you continue to make your own natural insulin, the longer you can get by with a less complicated insulin regimen, possibly taking just one shot a day. Q: But I'm afraid of shots! A: You don't need to be, if you're talking about insulin. If you're picturing big syringes that you have to boil and sterilize, think again. Modern insulin needles are very thin and disposableno sterilizing necessary. There are also insulin pens equipped with an insulin cartridge and disposable needles that are so simple even a child can use them. Either type of delivery system makes using insulin very easy and virtually painlessreally. If Continue reading >>

Do I Take Insulin Before Or After A Meal?

Do I Take Insulin Before Or After A Meal?

Question Originally asked by Community Member elainenakamura Do I Take Insulin Before Or After A Meal? How soon after a meal should I take insulin? I don’t know whether I should take it before or after, actually. Can anyone help? Answer Elaine- Hello! What kind of insulin are you taking? You should find out from your physician when the best time for you to take your insulin would be. When I was taking shots (insulin) I would give myself a shot before breakfast, before lunch, before dinner and I would give myself lantus before bed. We all have different requirements. Your physician would be able to answer this questions a lot better than I could. You can read more about how insulin works, and other useful information at this link. Cherise Community Moderator You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Answered By: Cherise Nicole Continue reading >>

Should You Skip A Meal If Your Blood Glucose Is High?

Should You Skip A Meal If Your Blood Glucose Is High?

High blood glucose levels can damage the small arteries and nerves in your eyes, kidneys, heart, brain and feet over time. If you have diabetes, high blood sugar is defined as higher than 130 mg/dL when fasting and above 180 mg/dL two hours after eating, unless your doctor has specified a different target for you. Managing your blood glucose levels closely is the key to healthy living with diabetes. If your blood glucose levels are high, don't skip a meal; rather, try to understand the causes behind your high reading and do some damage control by eating healthy and exercising. The Cause If your blood glucose levels are higher than they should be, start by determining what caused the rise. Did you eat more carbohydrates than usual? Carbohydrates found in grains, potatoes and sugar increase your blood sugar levels the most, and eating too much can result in high glucose levels. Are you more stressed than usual or are you feeling sick? Stress and illness also increase your blood sugar levels. Did you skip your usual walk or did your forget to take your medications? Both exercise and prescribed medications decrease your blood sugar levels. Keeping a journal of what you eat, how you feel, how much you exercise and the medications and supplements you take can help you figure out the cause of your high blood sugar. Skipping Meals Skipping meals can actually increase your blood glucose levels. If your body doesn't get a regular supply of energy from food, your liver may panic and start releasing glucose into your bloodstream. This glucose can come from stored liver glycogen or can be newly synthesized from protein. Skipping a meal can cause you to have high blood glucose levels, so don't skip a meal in an attempt to lower high blood sugar. Healthy Meal Instead of skipping a mea Continue reading >>

Fast-acting Insulin

Fast-acting Insulin

Even when you think you’re doing everything right with your diabetes care regimen, it can sometimes seem like your blood glucose levels are hard to control. One potential source of difficulty that you may not have thought of is how you time your injections or boluses of rapid-acting insulin with respect to meals. Since the first rapid-acting insulin, insulin lispro (brand name Humalog), came on the market in 1996, most diabetes experts have recommended taking it within 15 minutes of starting a meal (any time between 15 minutes before starting to eat to 15 minutes after starting to eat). This advice is based on the belief that rapid-acting insulin is absorbed quickly and begins lowering blood glucose quickly. However, several years of experience and observation suggest that this advice may not be ideal for everyone who uses rapid-acting insulin. As a result, the advice on when to take it needs updating. Insulin basics The goal of insulin therapy is to match the way that insulin is normally secreted in people without diabetes. Basal insulin. Small amounts of insulin are released by the pancreas 24 hours a day. On average, adults secrete about one unit of insulin per hour regardless of food intake. Bolus insulin. In response to food, larger amounts of insulin are secreted and released in two-phase boluses. The first phase starts within minutes of the first bite of food and lasts about 15 minutes. The second phase of insulin release is more gradual and occurs over the next hour and a half to three hours. The amount of insulin that is released matches the rise in blood glucose from the food that is eaten. In people with normal insulin secretion, insulin production and release is a finely tuned feedback system that maintains blood glucose between about 70 mg/dl and 140 mg/d Continue reading >>

The Best Time To Check Blood Glucose After A Meal

The Best Time To Check Blood Glucose After A Meal

Q: I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Should I check my blood glucose two hours from when I start eating or after I finish eating my meal? A: Most of the food you consume will be digested and raises blood glucose in one to two hours. To capture the peak level of your blood glucose, it is best to test one to two hours after you start eating. The American Diabetes Association recommends a target of below 180 mg/dl two hours after a meal. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists recommends a lower target: below 140 mg/dl two hours after a meal. Ask your doctor which target is right for you. Postmeal blood glucose monitoring (and record-keeping) is important because it helps you see how your body responds to carbohydrates in general and particular foods. Managing postmeal blood glucose can help reduce your risk of developing heart and circulation problems. Virginia Zamudio Lange, a member of Diabetic Living's editorial advisory board, is a founding partner of Alamo Diabetes Team, LLP in San Antonio. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Common questions about type 2 diabetes: How do you treat type 2 diabetes? When you have type 2 diabetes, you first need to eat a healthy diet, stay physically active and lose any extra weight. If these lifestyle changes cannot control your blood sugar, you also may need to take pills and other injected medication, including insulin. Eating a healthy diet, being physically active, and losing any extra weight is the first line of therapy. “Diet and exercise“ is the foundation of all diabetes management because it makes your body’s cells respond better to insulin (in other words, it decreases insulin resistance) and lowers blood sugar levels. If you cannot normalize or control the blood sugars with diet, weight loss and exercise, the next treatment phase is taking medicine either orally or by injection. Diabetes pills work in different ways – some lower insulin resistance, others slow the digestion of food or increase insulin levels in the blood stream. The non-insulin injected medications for type 2 diabetes have a complicated action but basically lower blood glucose after eating. Insulin therapy simply increases insulin in the circulation. Don’t be surprised if you have to use multiple medications to control the blood sugar. Multiple medications, also known as combination therapy is common in the treatment of diabetes! If one medication is not enough, you medical provider may give you two or three or more different types of pills. Insulin or other injected medications also may be prescribed. Or, depending on your medical condition, you may be treated only with insulin or injected medication therapy. Many people with type 2 diabetes have elevated blood fats (high triglycerides and cholesterol) and blood pressure, so you may be given medications for these problem Continue reading >>

Selected Important Safety Information

Selected Important Safety Information

Tresiba® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients with hypersensitivity to Tresiba® or one of its excipients Never Share a Tresiba® FlexTouch® Pen Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Changes in insulin may affect glycemic control. These changes should be made cautiously and under medical supervision. Adjustments in concomitant oral anti-diabetic treatment may be needed Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin, including Tresiba®, and may be life-threatening Tresiba® (insulin degludec injection) is indicated to improve glycemic control in patients 1 year of age and older with diabetes mellitus. Tresiba® is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis or for pediatric patients requiring less than 5 units of Tresiba®. Tresiba® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients with hypersensitivity to Tresiba® or one of its excipients Never Share a Tresiba® FlexTouch® Pen Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Changes in insulin may affect glycemic control. These changes should be made cautiously and under medical supervision. Adjustments in concomitant oral anti-diabetic treatment may be needed Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin, including Tresiba®, and may be life-threatening. Increase monitoring with changes to: insulin dose, co-administered glucose lowering medications, meal pattern, physical activity; and in patients with hypoglycemia unawareness or renal or hepatic impairment Accidental mix-ups betwe Continue reading >>

What Is Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection)?

What Is Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection)?

Do not share your Levemir® FlexTouch® with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take Levemir®? Do not take Levemir® if: you have an allergy to Levemir® or any of the ingredients in Levemir®. How should I take Levemir®? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Never inject Levemir® into a vein or muscle. Do not share your Levemir FlexTouch with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take Levemir®? Do not take Levemir® if: you have an allergy to Levemir® or any of the ingredients in Levemir®. Before taking Levemir®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blood sugar. How should I take Levemir®? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should ch Continue reading >>

5 Things Everyone Taking Diabetes Medications Should Do

5 Things Everyone Taking Diabetes Medications Should Do

Diabetes can definitely be a challenging condition to manage, especially when it comes to medications. If you are diabetic, there are five key things you need to do to get the most health benefits from your prescriptions. Guest post by: Mike Shelley Fourth Year Pharmacy Student Northeast Ohio Medical University As I approach the start of my career as a pharmacist at a community pharmacy, I look forward to the opportunity to help people understand and use their medications as wisely as possible. If you or someone you love is diabetic, I’d like to offer these tips, guidelines and recommendations for managing this condition. #1 — Keep a list of your medications with you. Keeping track of your medications can be a difficult task. Making a list is a great way to help you remember which medications you are taking and how you take them. Here are some things you should include for each medication on your list: Medication name (brand and/or generic) Medication strength Directions Prescriber For example, you might write down: Metformin (Glucophage) 500 mg, 1 tablet twice a day, Dr. Smith; or Lantus insulin, inject 30 units daily at bedtime, Dr. Wheeler. You may also want to add your emergency contact information, as well as the pharmacies you go to in case of an emergency. Also, make sure you update your list as changes are made to your medications! #2 — Be familiar with the medications you take. There are many medication options available to help lower your blood sugar; your doctor decides which medications are best for you based on your lifestyle, physical condition, how you respond to medications, and insurance coverage. Below are examples of each class of oral anti-diabetes medications and generic and brand names of each. Medication Class Medications Sulfonylureas Chlor Continue reading >>

Insulin Treatment

Insulin Treatment

Insulin is a hormone made in your pancreas, which lies just behind your stomach. It helps our bodies use glucose for energy. Everyone with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes need to take insulin – either by injection or a pump – to control their blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels). Injecting insulin Insulin is injected using a syringe and needle, or an insulin pen or needle. The needles used are very small as the insulin only needs to be injected under the skin (subcutaneously) – not into a muscle or vein. Once it's been injected, it soaks into small blood vessels and is taken into the bloodstream. As your confidence grows and you become more relaxed, injections will get easier and soon become second nature. The most frequently used injection sites are the thighs, buttocks and abdomen. You may be able to inject into your upper arms, but check with your diabetes team first as this isn't always suitable. As all these areas cover a wide skin area, you should inject at different sites within each of them. It is important to rotate injection sites, as injecting into the same place can cause a build up of lumps under the skin (also known as lipohypertrophy), which make it harder for your body to absorb and use the insulin properly. The three groups of insulin There are three groups of insulin – animal, human (not from humans but produced synthetically to match human insulin) and analogues (the insulin molecule is like a string of beads; scientists have managed to alter the position of some of these beads to create 'analogues' of insulin). Nowadays, most people use human insulin and insulin analogues, although a small number of people still use animal insulin because they have some evidence that they otherwise lose their awareness of Continue reading >>

Insulin 101

Insulin 101

1. KNOW THE TYPE OF INSULIN & HAVE THE RIGHT SYRINGE First of all, you need to know what type of insulin your cat is receiving. Lantus (glargine) and Levemir (detemir) are increasingly common insulins prescribed by veterinarians with current knowledge of feline diabetes. Some vets will still try to prescribe Humulin N. Do NOT use this type of insulin as it has unpredicatable results in cats. PZI is still used some although it is being phased out. Vetsulin is not the best choice for your cat. You need to be aware of the type of insulin you are using and you need to know its concentration, listed in units (U). The concentration, in the United States, is most often U-40 but some insulins are manufactured in U-100 concentration. To give the proper dose, the syringes you use must match the concentration of the insulin. To be sure you get the right syringe, take your insulin (or the insulin box) into your pharmacist when you go to buy syringes and the pharmacist will make sure you get the right syringes. When you buy the next batch of syringes, take the syringe packaging with you to make sure you buy the right type. If for some reason you must use a U-40 syringe for a U-100 insulin, or vice versa, use our conversion chart. 2. FOOD Always make sure your cat eats around the time (up to one hour before injection) of the insulin administration. This will insure that the cat has food in her stomach (and rising blood glucose levels as a result) to counteract the action of the insulin. Also, it is often easier to give the injection while your cat is eating. If your cat is having trouble with vomiting, be very careful and watch for possible hypoglycemic episodes. If your cat is not eating, consider skipping the insulin. Remember, if your cat does not eat for 24 hours, you should take Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus - Insulin Treatment In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus - Insulin Treatment In Dogs

By Ernest Ward, DVM & Robin Downing, DVM, DAAPM, DACVSMR, CVPP Emergency Situations, Medical Conditions This handout provides detailed information on insulin administration. For more information about diabetes mellitus, see the fact sheets "Diabetes Mellitus - General Information", and "Diabetes Mellitus - Principles of Treatment". What is diabetes mellitus? In dogs, diabetes mellitus is caused by the failure of the pancreas to produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar. This is Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (also called Type 1 Diabetes). This type of diabetes usually results from destruction of most or all of the beta-cells that produce insulin in the pancreas. As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilize blood sugar levels. What do I need to know about insulin treatment for diabetes mellitus? In diabetic dogs, the main treatment for regulating blood glucose is giving insulin by injection. Dogs with diabetes mellitus typically require two daily insulin injections as well as a dietary change. Although the dog can go a day or so without insulin and not have a crisis, this should not be a regular occurrence; treatment should be looked upon as part of the dog's daily routine. This means that you, as the dog's owner, must make both a financial commitment and a personal commitment to treat your dog. If are out of town or go on vacation, your dog must receive proper treatment in your absence. Initially, your dog may be hospitalized for a few days to deal with any immediate crisis and to begin the insulin regulation process. For instance, if your dog is so sick that he has quit eating and drinking for several days, he may be experiencing “diabetic ketoacidosis,” which may require a several days of intensive care. On Continue reading >>

What You Should Avoid When Taking Hgh Supplements

What You Should Avoid When Taking Hgh Supplements

When taking HGH supplementation there’s plenty of stuff you should do, such as get lots of sleep, exercise and eat well, but what about the things you shouldn’t do? There are a couple of habits that should be avoided while taking HGH supplementation that you may not be aware of. The reason you need to avoid these two habits is that they can ultimately stop the natural production of HGH in your body, which will in turn have you taking steps backwards. Habit #1 To Avoid During HGH Supplementation The first habit you need to curb has to do with the time of day you consume carbohydrates. It is advised you don’t consume them 90 minutes before you go to bed for the evening. What most people don’t realize is that HGH depends on sleep, especially REM sleep. This means that during the first 30-70 minutes of sleep is the most important for the flow of the growth hormone. Anytime your sleep becomes interrupted or you just don’t sleep period, the creation of the hormone will either decrease or stop all together. So where does the consumption of carbohydrates play into this? They are known to interrupt your sleep and force your body to create insulin. The more carbohydrates you consume, the higher your blood sugar will rise, which then sets off insulin production. Insulin and HGH production are not a good mix, as the insulin can stop the production from happening. Instead what you want to do is find a way to increase the hormone production during sleep and this can be done by fasting before bedtime. Even if you’re not taking HGH supplementation, going to bed with a belly full of carbohydrates is never advised. This is a good habit to get into no matter what your personal health is or what supplements you might be taking. Habit #2 To Avoid During HGH Supplementation This Continue reading >>

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