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How Long Does It Take For Gestational Diabetes To Go Away?

Myth-busting Insulin For Gestational Diabetes

Myth-busting Insulin For Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is a roller coaster ride from start to finish. There is a lot of information to navigate and often at a session with your diabetes educator you don’t know what questions to ask. So we pulled together an extensive list of questions about insulin for gestational diabetes. We wanted to highlight the positives and to bust the myths. We hope that after reading this you’ll feel more informed and less anxious about insulin treatment. Written by Natasha Leader, Accredited Practising Dietitian & Credentialled Diabetes Educator Do many women with GDM have to take insulin? It tends to depend on your treatment centre and which timing and targets your health practitioners are using. For example you may be advised to check your blood glucose level at 1 hour or 2 hours after the meal. There may also be some variation in the target level of glucose that your doctor/diabetes educator uses i.e may be < 7.4 or 8.0 1hr or <6.7 or 7.0 for 2hr time point. The percentage of women who need insulin is usually between 20 and 60%. Have I failed if I end up having to take insulin? Absolutely not. The need for insulin is related to how much insulin your body is able to make and whether this is enough to process the amount of carbohydrate food you and baby need to stay well. In most cases it is not a reflection of the effort you are making with your diet. Is the insulin going to harm my baby in any way? Insulin will not harm your baby but high glucose levels may. Insulin is used because it only crosses the placenta in very small amounts (compared with oral agents) and therefore is considered the safest way to control your blood glucose levels if diet and exercise alone are not enough. Are there any long-term effects from taking insulin? No. Taking injected insulin is just in Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Common questions about type 2 diabetes: How do you treat type 2 diabetes? When you have type 2 diabetes, you first need to eat a healthy diet, stay physically active and lose any extra weight. If these lifestyle changes cannot control your blood sugar, you also may need to take pills and other injected medication, including insulin. Eating a healthy diet, being physically active, and losing any extra weight is the first line of therapy. “Diet and exercise“ is the foundation of all diabetes management because it makes your body’s cells respond better to insulin (in other words, it decreases insulin resistance) and lowers blood sugar levels. If you cannot normalize or control the blood sugars with diet, weight loss and exercise, the next treatment phase is taking medicine either orally or by injection. Diabetes pills work in different ways – some lower insulin resistance, others slow the digestion of food or increase insulin levels in the blood stream. The non-insulin injected medications for type 2 diabetes have a complicated action but basically lower blood glucose after eating. Insulin therapy simply increases insulin in the circulation. Don’t be surprised if you have to use multiple medications to control the blood sugar. Multiple medications, also known as combination therapy is common in the treatment of diabetes! If one medication is not enough, you medical provider may give you two or three or more different types of pills. Insulin or other injected medications also may be prescribed. Or, depending on your medical condition, you may be treated only with insulin or injected medication therapy. Many people with type 2 diabetes have elevated blood fats (high triglycerides and cholesterol) and blood pressure, so you may be given medications for these problem Continue reading >>

Managing Gestational Diabetes

Managing Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is diagnosed during pregnancy when your body cannot cope with the extra demand for insulin production resulting in high blood glucose levels. Gestational diabetes is managed by monitoring blood glucose levels, adopting a healthy eating plan and performing regular physical activity. Effective management of gestational diabetes will reduce the risk of complications during pregnancy and the birth of your baby. Your healthcare team including your doctor, specialist, dietician and Credential Diabetes Educator, can help you with blood glucose monitoring, healthy eating and physical activity. There are three basic components in effectively managing gestational diabetes: monitoring blood glucose levels adopting a healthy eating pattern physical activity. Gestational diabetes can often initially be managed with healthy eating and regular physical activity. However, for some women with gestational diabetes, insulin injections will be necessary for the rest of the pregnancy. Approximately 10 – 20% of women will need insulin; however, once the baby is born insulin is no longer needed. This is safe for both you and your baby. After the baby is born, gestational diabetes usually disappears. A special blood glucose test (Oral Glucose Tolerance Test) (OGTT) is performed six weeks after delivery to ensure that blood glucose levels have returned to normal. However, women who have had gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life and should be tested for diabetes at least every 2 – 3 years. If gestational diabetes is not well looked after (blood glucose levels remain high) it may result in problems such as a large baby, miscarriage and stillbirth. A large baby can create the risk of injury at delivery, caesarean delivery, Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Q And A

Gestational Diabetes: Q And A

Q. What is gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy. It is different from having known diabetes before pregnancy and then getting pregnant. Gestational diabetes is generally diagnosed in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, and usually goes away after the baby is born. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for the mother and baby, but treatment and regular check-ups mean most women have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. Q. Am I at risk of gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes affects between 10 and 15 per cent of pregnancies in Australia. Women of certain ethnic backgrounds — Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, Indian, Asian, Middle Eastern, African, Maori and Pacific Islander — are more at risk of developing gestational diabetes than women of Anglo-Celtic backgrounds. Other factors can also increase your risk, including: being overweight; having a family history of diabetes; having had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy; being 40 years or older; having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS); taking medicines that can affect blood sugar levels (such as corticosteroids and antipsychotic medicines); and previously having a very large baby (more than 4.5 kg). Q. How would I know if I had gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes does not usually give rise to symptoms. For this reason it is important to be tested during pregnancy, usually between 24 and 28 weeks. Women with risk factors for diabetes may be offered testing earlier than this – sometimes at the first antenatal visit, which is often at around 10 weeks. Women who do develop symptoms may experience: extreme tiredness; being thirsty all the time; symptoms of recurrent infections (such as thrush); and needi Continue reading >>

The Ups And Downs Of Meds And Diabetes (part 1): Steroids

The Ups And Downs Of Meds And Diabetes (part 1): Steroids

If you take any kind of medication for your diabetes management, whether that be metformin, sulfonylureas, exenatide (brand name Byetta), or insulin, for example, hopefully you’re familiar with how that drug works and what the effect is on your blood glucose control. But, just like people who don’t have diabetes, you’re going to come down with a cold or the flu every now and then. You may need to take steroids for a while. Maybe you take medicine for controlling your blood pressure or your cholesterol. How familiar are you with these drugs, particularly in terms of your blood glucose levels? Most of us are prescribed medicines for various reasons at one time or another. Unfortunately, we aren’t always told by our physician or pharmacist how they work and how they might interact with other medicines. And in the case of diabetes, chances are you’re not always given information on how a drug may affect your blood glucose level or how a it may interact with your diabetes medication—and many of them do. Your pharmacist should be your number one source for any questions you have about any drug that you take. But we can scratch the surface and take a look at this important area of diabetes management. We’ll look at steroids this week. Steroids Steroids (corticosteroids, glucocorticoids) are a potent class of medications (meds for short) that are known to raise blood glucose levels, often quite significantly. Steroids are given to help reduce inflammation that may occur with arthritis or asthma. People with certain immune disorders, such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, or sarcoidosis, usually need to take steroids as well. While steroids are very effective at doing what they’re supposed to do, one of the side effects is an increase in blood glucose levels. In fa Continue reading >>

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

This is the most comprehensive page on some of the most frequently asked questions about GD. Let us know if we missed something and we will add it in our list of questions. Note: GD means Gestational Diabetes. What is GD? What are the signs and symptoms? What kind of weight gain should I expect? Gestational vs type 2 diabetes. How does apple cider vinegar effect? What are the cut off values for GD? What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? What are the screening tests available? What should the fasting blood glucose be when pregnant? What is the correlation between GD and jaundice with the newborn? What foods should I avoid? What is the correlation with gestational hypertension and GD? When do you get tested for this issue? What causes it? Who is at risk? What is the risk of getting diabetes after being diagnosed with GD? What is the risk of my child getting diabetes after I am diagnosed? What are some healthy breakfast ideas for someone with this issue? Is there a risk if taking Zantac? Does Zofran cause it? Are Zone bars okay to eat while pregnant? Is the Zone diet okay to do while pregnant? What is the prevalence of GD in New Zealand? Is yogurt okay to eat? Is it normal to have yeast infections? Is it okay to take Xylitol during pregnancy? Is it okay to have a vbac? Does vitamin D help? What are the considerations for vegetarians? What are the risks if you don’t treat? Am I at greater risk of GD since I am carrying twins? What are the risks for the baby when mom has GD? What should I do about this issue after I deliver the baby? Is there any way to prevent it? What is the pathophysiology? PCOS and GD. What is the prevalence? Does oatmeal help? When is the usual onset? Does obesity increase the chance of getting it? When do I have to take Metformin Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Sometimes pregnancy causes the blood sugar to rise in women who do not have diabetes. This is called gestational diabetes. What is diabetes? Diabetes mellitus (just called diabetes from now on) occurs when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood becomes higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. These are called type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. For further information about diabetes, see separate leaflets called Type 1 Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. Sometimes pregnancy causes the blood sugar to rise in women who do not have diabetes. This is called gestational diabetes (see below). How does pregnancy affect diabetes? How does pregnancy affect diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Pregnancy makes the body need more insulin to control the levels of sugar (glucose) in the body. Therefore, women with diabetes usually need more treatments to control their blood sugar when t Continue reading >>

Fairly Certain My Gestational Diabetes Didn't Go Away

Fairly Certain My Gestational Diabetes Didn't Go Away

Before I lost my weight I was borderline Type II. I only had GD with dd. After I had her I had my 6 week check and I still had borderline results and my doc said he would diagnose me if I hd another test high like that. I didn't get tested again until 3 weeks ago with this pg and I am diabetic yet, but pretty sure I will get GD again this pregnancy later so it is possible to have a high blood sugar after birth but not be Type II, but it is possible you could have been before you got pg or borderline type II and not know it before, and that would be why it wouldn't go away. Momma to many precious childrenwhoarethe loves of my life! Thanks ladies I have my test tomorrow.. I still am getting the cold sweats and after I eat anything really carb packed I'm getting the weird feeling/taste in my mouth so thats kinda whats tipping me off its still the diabetes... I only gained 16lbs during my pregnancy so I don't have much to loose maybe 5 lbs to be pre pregnancy weight so i must have had it before I got preg and didn't know it cause I didn't have any symptoms but by the end of my pregnancy I could barely eat anything at all! We will just have to wait and see huh! Time will tell.. i had this test after ds and I didn't do well in it. But it didn't say I had diabetes, it said boarder line. They told me to come back in 6 months to see if my pancreas had healed from the pg (GD can damage the pancreas which leads to diabetes). But that was a year ago, I haven't had time to go back and do the 2 hour test again. I plan on doing it sometimes before summer though. But I have been tracking mysugar levelsin the morning every now and then and they have been perfect. My doc told me at the time it can take up to 6 months after having a baby for everything to be ok. 7 Sway Factors: Diet, pH, Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

PDF Format Gestational Diabetes What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes mellitus that develops in women for the first time during pregnancy. Some women found to have gestational diabetes actually may have had mild diabetes before pregnancy that was not diagnosed. What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus (also called "diabetes") is a condition that causes high levels of glucose in the blood (see the FAQ Diabetes and Women). Glucose is a sugar that is the body’s main source of energy. Health problems can occur when glucose levels are too high. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is caused by a change in the way a woman’s body responds to insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is a hormone. It moves glucose out of the blood and into the body’s cells where it can be turned into energy. During pregnancy, a woman’s cells naturally become slightly more resistant to insulin’s effects. This change is designed to increase the mother’s blood glucose level to make more nutrients available to the baby. The mother’s body makes more insulin to keep the blood glucose level normal. In a small number of women, even this increase is not enough to keep their blood glucose levels in the normal range. As a result, they develop gestational diabetes. Will I be tested for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women are screened for gestational diabetes. You may be asked about your medical history and risk factors or you may have a blood test to measure the level of glucose in your blood. This test usually is done between 24 weeks and 28 weeks of pregnancy. It may be done earlier if you have risk factors. If I develop gestational diabetes, will I always have diabetes mellitus? For most women, gestational diabetes goes away after childbirth. How Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes develops in women during pregnancy because the mother’s body is not able to produce enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone that enables the body to break down sugar (glucose) to be used as energy. Without sufficient insulin the amount of sugar in the blood rises. High blood sugar levels in the mother’s body are passed through the placenta to the developing baby. This can cause health problems. Gestational diabetes usually begins in the second half of pregnancy, and goes away after the baby is born. This makes it different to the more common forms of diabetes which, once they occur, are permanent. What causes gestational diabetes? The hormones produced during pregnancy work against the action of insulin. Gestational diabetes can happen if the mother’s body can’t produce enough extra insulin to counteract this blocking effect. Who is more likely to get gestational diabetes? Women are more at risk if they: • have a family history of type 2 diabetes • are over the age of 35 • are obese • have previously given birth to a large baby • have previously given birth to a baby born with an abnormality • have previously had a stillbirth late in pregnancy How would I know if I had gestational diabetes and how is it is it diagnosed? The symptoms of gestational diabetes are tiredness and excessive urination. Both of these symptoms are experienced by most pregnant ladies and therefore gestational diabetes may go unnoticed. It is normal to be tested for gestational diabetes in the latter part of the second trimester of pregnancy (24 to 28 weeks). Urine is routinely tested for sugar throughout pregnancy, and high blood sugar, if present, is usually detected between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. The only way to confirm gestational diabetes is with a Continue reading >>

What Is Gestational Diabetes And Its Link To Pre-diabetes?

What Is Gestational Diabetes And Its Link To Pre-diabetes?

Insulin Resistance and obesity-associated Gestational Diabetes are conditions that develop in the third trimester of pregnancy and affect 4-5% of all pregnant women in the U.S. - around 135,000 cases each year. With Gestational Diabetes, the pancreas produces insulin but it doesn't lower the mother's blood sugar levels. The symptoms are only detectable by laboratory testing. Pregnant women get a urine dip stick test with each pre-natal visit. This test may show glucose in the urine, which will prompt a health care provider to carry out further examinations for the presence of Gestational Diabetes, also known as Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM). To determine if a woman has this condition, she should be tested between 24 and 28 weeks if she is at average risk i.e. has no history of prior Gestational Diabetes and is of regular weight. Women at higher risk should be tested earlier. A patient is considered high risk if she is obese, has glycosuria (glucose in the urine) or has a personal or family history of Gestational Diabetes. Laboratory diagnosis of the condition includes a fasting blood glucose measurement of greater than 126 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) or a random blood glucose of 200 mg/dl. An Oral Glucose Tolerance Test should also be carried out. If the glucose level exceeds what is considered normal, this could result in a diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes. Pregnancy and Obesity Women who are overweight before they become pregnant are most at risk from this disorder. The best way to avoid it is to lose weight before becoming pregnant via a low insulin, low Glycemic Index (GI) diet and regular exercise. Gestational Diabetes usually disappears after pregnancy, but it can lead to the development of Pre- and Type 2 Diabetes years later. As a baby grows, it is s Continue reading >>

The Cure For Type 2 Diabetes Is Known, But Few Are Aware

The Cure For Type 2 Diabetes Is Known, But Few Are Aware

The cure for type 2 diabetes is known, but few are aware I recently posted to Facebook about a cure for diabetes and suggested someone try it. Just six days later, I received the following message from a friend: I just wanted to drop you a line and thank you for that post… My lab results at the beginning of the month were 230. After just this last week it’s down to 155. I think I’ll be in normal range within a month. Really miraculous… It’s really been a game changer for me already and I wanted you to know how much I appreciated the info and how much of a difference I think it will make in my life. Four months later, the friend posted this to Facebook: I started on this regiment when Nathan posted about it [four months ago]. My blood glucose level at that time, while taking two daily glucose meds, was 235. Two weeks ago, my [fasting] glucose level, WITHOUT the meds, was 68. If you google “diabetes cure” you are directed to websites like WebMD and the Mayo Clinic where you find information on diet, exercise, medication, and insulin therapy, but nothing about the cure. This lack of information may have to do with the fact that Americans spend $322 billion a year to treat diabetes, $60 billion a year on weight-loss programs, and $124 billion a year on snack foods. This is about 3% of the US economy! Because so many peoples’ livelihoods are supported by diabetes and its main cause, obesity, the viral effect of people getting cured and telling others is greatly diminished. Because of this understandable stifling of the message, if you are like my Facebook friend and have already experienced the type 2 diabetes cure for yourself — there are thousands of you out there — it is important for you to share your success stories as far and wide as possible. You c Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Medical experts haven't agreed on a single set of screening guidelines for gestational diabetes. Some question whether gestational diabetes screening is needed if you're younger than 25 and have no risk factors. Others say that screening all pregnant women is the best way to identify all cases of gestational diabetes. When to screen Your doctor will likely evaluate your risk factors for gestational diabetes early in your pregnancy. If you're at high risk of gestational diabetes — for example, your body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy was 30 or higher or you have a mother, father, sibling or child with diabetes — your doctor may test for diabetes at your first prenatal visit. If you're at average risk of gestational diabetes, you'll likely have a screening test during your second trimester — between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Routine screening for gestational diabetes Initial glucose challenge test. You'll drink a syrupy glucose solution. One hour later, you'll have a blood test to measure your blood sugar level. A blood sugar level below 130 to 140 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 7.2 to 7.8 millimoles per liter (mmol/L), is usually considered normal on a glucose challenge test, although this may vary by clinic or lab. If your blood sugar level is higher than normal, it only means you have a higher risk of gestational diabetes. You'll need a glucose tolerance test to determine if you have the condition. Follow-up glucose tolerance testing. You'll fast overnight, then have your blood sugar level measured. Then you'll drink another sweet solution — this one containing a higher concentration of glucose — and your blood sugar level will be checked every hour for three hours. If at least two of the blood sugar readings are higher than normal, you'll Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Gestational Diabetes

What You Need To Know About Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes means diabetes that develops for the first time during pregnancy. According to the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada gestational diabetes affects between 3.7 and 18 per cent of Canadian pregnancies. Diabetes happens when your body can't produce enough of a hormone called insulin. Insulin is made by your pancreas, and it does two jobs: regulating the amount of sugar available in your blood for energy enabling any sugar that isn't needed to be stored During pregnancy your body has to produce extra insulin to meet your baby's needs, especially from mid-pregnancy onwards. If your body can't manage this, you will have too much sugar in your blood. It's then that you may develop gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after your baby is born. It's unlike other types of diabetes, which are lifelong conditions. How will I know if I have gestational diabetes? You will be offered a routine glucose tolerance test between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Or you may be offered one earlier or at the end of pregnancy, if sugar is found in your urine during a prenatal appointment. If you are considered low risk for gestational diabetes you may not be offered the glucose tolerance test at all. Factors that make you low risk include: Being under the age of 25 If you are Caucasian or a member of another ethnic group with a low prevalence of diabetes You have a body mass index (BMI) of 27 or less You have no previous history of gestational diabetes, glucose intolerance, or adverse pregnancy outcomes related to gestational diabetes You have no family history of diabetes What are the symptoms of gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes often doesn't have any symptoms, but you may experience the followi Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

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